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Keyword: animalhusbandry

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  • NEW RESEARCH ON HOW DOGS AND CATS BECAME MAN'S BEST FRIENDS

    06/07/2009 2:50:13 AM PDT · by Scanian · 46 replies · 1,397+ views
    NY Post ^ | June 6, 2009 | Maureen Callahan
    They have lived in our homes, been members of the family, slept on our laps for over 10,000 years. Yet it is only recently that science has begun to answer how it is that cats and dogs came to be our most prized companion animals - discovering, along the way, how the domestication of cats and dogs actively helped change the course of human history. "Domestication," says scientist Carlos Driscoll, "is evolution that we can see." Driscoll is a researcher at Oxford University and the National Cancer Institute in Maryland, where much of the world's leading work on cats has...
  • Man's best friend for 30,000 years: Canine skulls discovered in two separate digs reveals...

    01/24/2012 7:04:21 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | Wednesday, January 25th, 2012 | Rob Waugh
    Scientists believe that two 33,000-year-old skulls unearthed in digs in Siberia and Belgium show dogs were domesticated long before any other animal, such as sheep, cows or goats. Researchers from the University of Arizona said the skulls had shorter snouts and wider jaws than undomesticated animals such as wolves, which use their longer snouts and narrower jaws to help them hunt. That suggested the dogs had been kept for protection and companionship by our ancient ancestors -- just as they are today. The researchers think dogs could have been the first species of animals to be domesticated by humans, long...
  • How Did Dogs Acquire a "Guilty Look?"

    09/18/2009 3:06:19 PM PDT · by PJ-Comix · 174 replies · 3,640+ views
    Self | September 18, 2009 | PJ-Comix
    A little while ago I made my wife laugh by doing an impression of a dog acting guilty. After the laughter subsided I started thinking: How does a dog even know how to act guilty? Guilt is not an emotion in any part of the rest animal kingdom except perhaps to a much lesser extent in cats and maybe chimpanzees although I am not sure about the latter due to little contact with chimps. Cats have such a superiority complex that they really don't show much guilt about anything. But dogs go completely overboard in the guilt department. You come...
  • World's Dogs Are Descended From Asian Wolves

    11/21/2002 4:27:05 PM PST · by blam · 78 replies · 1,771+ views
    Ananova ^ | 11-21-2002
    World's dogs are descended from Asian wolves Scientists have found that almost all dogs share a common gene pool after analysing the DNA of hundreds of dogs from Europe, Asia, Africa and North America. They have concluded domesticated dogs originated from wolves in East Asia nearly 15,000 years ago. The animals travelled with humans through Europe and Asia and across the Bering Strait with the first settlers in America. Swedish and Chinese scientists studied the genes of 654 dogs and found a higher genetic diversity among East Asian dogs suggested that people there were the first to domesticate dogs from...
  • Ancient dog skull unearthed in Siberia

    08/03/2011 9:53:08 AM PDT · by decimon · 29 replies
    BBC ^ | August 3, 2011 | Hamish Pritchard
    A very well-preserved 33,000 year old canine skull from a cave in the Siberian Altai mountains shows some of the earliest evidence of dog domestication ever found. But the specimen raises doubts about early man's loyalty to his new best friend as times got tough. The findings come from a Russian-led international team of archaeologists. The skull, from shortly before the peak of the last ice age, is unlike those of modern dogs or wolves. The study is published in the open access journal Plos One. Although the snout is similar in size to early, fully domesticated Greenland dogs from...
  • Best friend, indeed: Dogs take human cues better than chimps

    11/22/2002 10:34:10 AM PST · by afraidfortherepublic · 63 replies · 926+ views
    Washington - Research has long indicated that all dogs, from prissy Pekingese to slobbering St. Bernards, are the domesticated descendants of wolves. But scientists have tussled like puppies over the question of when and where the transition from wild carnivore to newspaper-toting pet began - and why, exactly, dogs and humans have gotten along so well. Now, a new analysis of dog DNA pegs East Asia as the place where wolves and people began their dance of co-domestication - not Europe or the Middle East, as some experts have contended. The work also suggests that domestication began about 15,000 years...
  • The Forever Dog -- Dog breeds were created by human beings. The village dog created itself

    01/30/2012 7:20:14 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 56 replies · 1+ views
    National Geographic ^ | February 2012 | Evan Ratliff
    While a postdoc at Cornell University a few years ago, Adam Boyko became curious about the little-studied village vagrants. Though dogs were first domesticated 20,000 to 15,000 years ago, most breeds go back only a few hundred years. Perhaps village dog DNA might shed light on the long, early history of domestication, when canines were hanging around humans yet not under our domain. But how to get samples? As it happened, around the same time Boyko's brother Ryan had married, and he and wife Corin were looking for a cheap honeymoon off the beaten track. The three Boykos decided to...
  • How Dogs Became Man's Best Friend Video

    01/26/2007 2:44:05 PM PST · by afraidfortherepublic · 53 replies · 1,927+ views
    http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2007/01/070125-dogs-video.htmlRELATED Video: Working Dogs Go Beyond "Man's Best Friend" Video: Dog Whisperer Tackles Pit Bull Terror Dogs: Photos, Video, Audio, and More January 25, 2007—Though they come in many different sizes and temperaments, all domesticated dogs living today are descended from just a few wild wolves that roamed Asia some 15,000 years ago. But why, out of all of the animals that humans have domesticated, have dogs become so close to their owners? Join an anthropologist as he conducts experiments on both wild dogs and down-home pups to figure out why dogs are so good at communicating with humans. Video...
  • Dog: Man's Best Friend for Over 33,000 Years (Oldest Known Evidence of Dog Domestication)

    02/05/2012 8:24:42 AM PST · by DogByte6RER · 33 replies
    FoxNews.com ^ | January 24, 2012 | FoxNews.com
    Dog: man's best friend for over 33,000 years He's been man's best friend for generations. An ancient dog skull found in Siberia and dating back 33,000 years presents some of the oldest known evidence of dog domestication. When combined with a similar find in Belgium, the two skulls indicate that the domestication of dogs by humans occurred repeatedly throughout early human history at different geographic locations -- rather than at a single domestication event, as previously believed. "Both the Belgian find and the Siberian find are domesticated species based on morphological characteristics," said Greg Hodgins, a researcher at the University...
  • Dog domestication likely started in N. Africa

    08/03/2009 6:19:19 PM PDT · by decimon · 15 replies · 944+ views
    Discovery ^ | Aug 3, 2009 | Jennifer Viegas
    A Basenji is a dog breed indigenous to sub-Saharan Africa. Humans might have first domesticated dogs from wolves in Africa, with Egypt being one possibility, since wolves are native to that region. Modern humans originated in Africa, and now it looks like man's best friend first emerged there too. An extensive genetic study on the ancestry of African village dogs points to a Eurasian — possibly North African — origin for the domestication of dogs. Prior research concluded that dogs likely originated in East Asia. However, this latest study, the most thorough investigation ever on the ancestry of African village...
  • Earliest Domesticated Dog Uncovered

    05/08/2003 5:55:22 PM PDT · by blam · 31 replies · 471+ views
    Discovery News ^ | 5-7-2003 | Jennifer Viegas
    Earliest Domesticated Dogs Uncovered By Jennifer Viegas, Discovery News Skull of a Stone Age Dog April 7, 2003 — The skulls of two Stone Age dogs believed to be the earliest known canines on record have been found, according to a team of Russian scientists. The dog duo, which lived approximately 14,000 years ago, appear to represent the first step of domestication from their wild wolf ancestors. Mikhail Sablin, a scientist at the Zoological Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences in St. Petersburg, along with his colleague Gennady Khlopachev, analyzed the dog remains, which were found at the Eliseevichi...
  • Wolves make dog's dinner out of domestication theory

    09/26/2008 5:15:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 551+ views
    New Scientist ^ | September 24, 2008 | Ewen Callaway
    Dogs are no better than wolves at picking up on human cues... When tasked with choosing between two paint cans based on a trainer's hand signal, tamed wolves actually proved more adept at picking the right can. This casts doubt on the idea that domestication some 15,000 years ago imbued dogs with a window into the human mind, says Clive Wynne, an animal psychologist at the University of Florida in Gainesville. Rather, dogs -- and tamed wolves -- probably learn to associate human arm movements with treats, play and affection. Researchers who argue for a dog "theory of mind" are...
  • The Cat in Ancient Egypt

    01/31/2003 2:29:42 PM PST · by vannrox · 181 replies · 65,620+ views
    Tour Egypt ^ | FR Posts 1-30-2003 (April 1st, 2001) | By Ilene Springer
    The Cat in Ancient EgyptBy Ilene SpringerAfter the pyramids and the kohl painted eyes, almost nothing evokes more awe and mystery than the fascination ancient Egyptians had with cats.They were not only the most popular pet in the house, but their status rose to that of the sacred animals and then on to the most esteemed deities like no other creature before them.Cats domesticate the ancient EgyptiansAlthough no one can pinpoint the time exactly, we know that the cat was domesticated in Egypt, probably around 2000 B.C., and that most modern cats are descendants of the cats of ancient...
  • Dogs Make Us Human

    03/26/2002 10:29:27 AM PST · by blam · 124 replies · 747+ views
    Australian Museum ^ | 3-25-2002 | Heidi De Wald
    Dogs make us human By Heidi De Wald Monday, 25 Mar, 2002 About 48% of Australian households own dogs. But can you imagine a world without dogs. And would we be the same if they were not here? Would human beings have developed in very different ways had our best friends not been by our sides? A recent study suggests that the domestication of dogs mutually led to profound changes in the biological and behavioural evolution of both species. It has long been known that the first species domesticated by humans was the wolf. In essence, we made wolves into...
  • Experts: Dogs originated in ancient Asia

    02/17/2004 2:20:26 PM PST · by presidio9 · 38 replies · 410+ views
    AP ^ | Tuesday, February 17, 2004
    <p>From Yorkshire terriers the size of a teacup to Irish wolfhounds near the size of a small pony, all dogs originated from a single species, probably an East Asian wolf seeking the warmth of the human hearth and an easy meal.</p>
  • Opinion: We Didn’t Domesticate Dogs. They Domesticated Us.

    03/03/2013 4:02:35 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 47 replies
    National Geographic News ^ | March 3, 2013 | Brian Hare and Vanessa Woods
    Scientists argue that friendly wolves sought out humans.In the story of how the dog came in from the cold and onto our sofas, we tend to give ourselves a little too much credit. The most common assumption is that some hunter-gatherer with a soft spot for cuteness found some wolf puppies and adopted them. Over time, these tamed wolves would have shown their prowess at hunting, so humans kept them around the campfire until they evolved into dogs. (See "How to Build a Dog.") But when we look back at our relationship with wolves throughout history, this doesn't really make...
  • Sorcery, Sex and the Sheep Census: Reconstructing the socio-economic patterns of Bronze Age Mesop...

    03/03/2013 8:45:23 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Collegiate Journal of Anthropology ^ | Wednesday, February 29, 2012 | Alexandre Loktionov
    AbstractThe textual corpus of Bronze Age Mesopotamia is unique in its richness; containing works which appear purely administrative, entirely fictional, or anywhere along a vast spectrum between the two extremes. The present discussion evaluates the major textual genres in terms of their possible uses in reconstructing wider socio-economic dynamics across Mesopotamia: this includes both practical aspects of the agricultural and commercial economies, but also points of ideology centred on complementary themes of fatalistic transience, rejuvenation, and the sensuality of mortals. The two are then linked together by an analysis of legal and haruspical texts, which were written for practical purposes...
  • Turns Out Cats Have Been Walking on Important Stuff for Basically Forever

    02/28/2013 7:35:28 AM PST · by Squawk 8888 · 50 replies
    Check out this 15th Century manuscript. Notice anything familiar? In totally-non-shocking-news-of-the-day, it turns out cats have been walking on whatever you're writing since the dawn of time. Emir O. Filipovic of the University of Sarajevo's History Department discovered the medieval kitty prints. We can only assume that somewhere, beyond the reach of time, in a small ancient monastery in the mountains, the muffled sounds of "SNOWBALL, OFF. OFF. DOWN. GET DOWN, SNOWBALL. BAD KITTY. DAMNIT, SNOWBALL GO SOMEWHERE ELSE," carry across the medieval vales and valleys.
  • Ancient burial ground discovered during duck hunt[Oklahoma]

    01/10/2007 11:02:36 PM PST · by FLOutdoorsman · 27 replies · 1,192+ views
    Benton County Daily Record ^ | 09 Jan 2007 | Jeff Della Rosa
    SILOAM SPRINGS — Bryan Austin of Siloam Springs thought he’d found a crime scene when he spotted a human skull under a pile of rocks while he was duck hunting in northeast Oklahoma. Looking for a good place to set up a camouflage hunting screen Nov. 19 on a mud flat in the Spavinaw Creek drainage area, Austin found what turned out to be an ancient skull. He later learned that the site is an ancient Indian burial ground. “ It’s absolutely amazing, ” Austin said. “ I’m incredibly interested in this kind of stuff. It’s in my line of...
  • Cattle's Call Of The Wild: Domestication May Hold Complex Genetic Tale

    05/16/2006 1:02:49 PM PDT · by blam · 25 replies · 688+ views
    Science News ^ | 5-16-2006 | Bruce Bower
    Cattle's Call of the Wild: Domestication may hold complex genetic tale Bruce Bower A new investigation of DNA that was obtained from modern cattle and from fossils of their ancient, wild ancestors puts scientists on the horns of a domestication dilemma. The new data challenge the mainstream idea, based on earlier genetic and archaeological evidence, that herding and farming groups in southeastern Turkey or adjacent Near Eastern regions domesticated cattle perhaps 11,000 years ago. According to that view, these groups then introduced the animals throughout Europe, so current European cattle breeds would trace their ancestry directly back to early Near...