Keyword: antarctic

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  • Polar explorers brought to life in colour

    12/13/2017 3:23:36 PM PST · by mairdie · 14 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 13 December 2017 | Chris Pleasance
    They were among the bravest and hardiest men of their time, the first to explore the world's polar regions alongside men like Captain Scott and Ernest Shackleton. While these men might not have received the same recognition as Scott and Shackleton, they were still worthy of being immortalised in photographs that have now been brought to life in colour for the first time. Among the men pictured here is Tom Crean, and Irishman who served with both Scott and Shackleton including on the ill-fated Terra Nova Expedition to the South Pole, which he survived. Also pictured is Lawrence Oats, who...
  • Penguins die in 'catastrophic' Antarctic breeding season

    10/13/2017 6:17:59 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 31 replies
    BBC News ^ | October 13, 2017
    All but two Adelie penguin chicks have starved to death in their east Antarctic colony, in a breeding season described as "catastrophic" by experts. It was caused by unusually high amounts of ice late in the season, meaning adults had to travel further for food. It is the second bad season in five years after no chicks survived in 2015.
  • 106-year-old Antarctic fruitcake found, might be edible

    08/12/2017 7:32:21 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 47 replies
    S F Gate ^ | Friday, August 11, 2017 | Mike Moffitt,
    The Antarctic dessert was found wrapped in paper in a decrepit tin. But despite its rotting container, the cake was said to be in "excellent condition." "There was a very, very slight rancid butter smell to it, but other than that, the cake looked and smelled edible," trust program manager Lizzie Meeks said. Conservators believe British explorer Capt. Robert Falcon Scott probably brought the cake, made by the British biscuit company Huntley & Palmers, to Antarctica during their ill-fated 1910-1913 Terra Nova expedition. The expedition's Northern Party took shelter in the Cape Adare hut, which had been built by Norwegian...
  • ICYMI: NASA Found Out That A Key Antarctic Glacier Isn’t Melting As Fast

    06/17/2017 6:50:48 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 14 replies
    Hotair ^ | 06/17/2017 | Matt Vespa
    Al Gore thinks the weather has been out of the Book of Revelation, while Time and ABC News have reported that Antarctica is melting very quickly. Now, it’s not (via NASA): The melt rate of West Antarctica’s Thwaites Glacier is an important concern, because this glacier alone is currently responsible for about 1 percent of global sea level rise. A new NASA study finds that Thwaites’#8217; ice loss will continue, but not quite as rapidly as previous studies have estimated. The new study, published in the journal Geophysical Research Letters, finds that numerical models used in previous studies have...
  • Massive ‘anomaly’ lurks beneath ice in Antarctica

    12/29/2016 2:12:09 PM PST · by heterosupremacist · 64 replies
    http://nypost.com ^ | 12/29/2016 | Jasper hamill
    Scientists believe a massive object that could change our understanding of history is hidden beneath the Antarctic ice. The huge and mysterious “anomaly” is thought to be lurking beneath the frozen wastes of an area called Wilkes Land. The area is 151 miles across and has a minimum depth of about 2,700 feet. Some researchers believe it is the remains of a truly massive asteroid more than twice the size of the Chicxulub space rock that wiped out the dinosaurs. If this explanation is true, it could mean this killer asteroid caused the Permian-Triassic extinction event, which killed 96 percent...
  • Sea Shepherd Embarks on Latest Whale Defense Campaign Against Japanese Whalers

    12/06/2016 6:09:55 AM PST · by artichokegrower · 16 replies
    gCaptain ^ | December 5, 2016 | Mike Schuler
    The controversial Sea Shepherd Conservation Society has kicked off its 11th Antarctic whale defense campaign with two Sea Shepherd vessels now on their way to the Southern Ocean to intercept the Japanese whaling fleet. The two vessels, the Steve Irwin and the new Ocean Warrior, departed over the weekend from Melbourne and Hobart, respectively. The vessels are headed for the Southern Ocean to confront the Japanese whaling fleet, which departed last month.
  • A lengthening crack is threatening to cause an Antarctic ice shelf to collapse (Larsen C Ice Shelf)

    08/22/2016 6:20:34 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 43 replies
    Yahoo ^ | 8/22/16 | Andrew Freedman - Mashable
    A large rift is widening across an increasingly fragile Antarctic ice shelf, scientists found. The crack is spreading across the Larsen C Ice Shelf at an increased rate, threatening to carve out an iceberg the size of Delaware while destabilizing a larger area of ice roughly the size of Scotland. When this iceberg calving event happens — no one knows exactly when it will occur, except that it's getting closer — it will be the largest calving event in Antarctica since 2000, the third-biggest ever recorded and the largest from this particular ice shelf, scientists say. About 10 to 12...
  • Plane lands at South Pole in rare, risky effort to rescue sick worker

    06/21/2016 8:05:48 PM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 32 replies
    nola.com ^ | 21 June 2016 | Sarah Kaplan
    Twin Otters are certified to fly at temperatures as low as minus-103 degrees... during the mission to evacuate Shemenski in 2001... But as they started up the engines, the crew realized they couldn't take off. The Twin Otter's skis had stuck to the ice beneath them, and the grease on the wing flaps had frozen them in the fully extended position. While the station workers hacked at the ice on the skis, the plane's mechanic jury-rigged the controls to allow it to take off. It was one of the longest, slowest take-offs any of them had ever attempted, but eventually,...
  • 'Sleeping giant' glacier may lift seas two metres: study

    05/18/2016 5:31:55 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 137 replies
    AFP on Yahoo ^ | 5/18/16 | Marlowe Hood
    Paris (AFP) - A rapidly melting glacier atop East Antarctica is on track to lift oceans at least two metres, and could soon pass a "tipping point" of no return, researchers said Wednesday. To date, scientists have mostly worried about the Greenland and West Antarctic ice sheets as dangerous drivers of sea level rise. But the new study, following up on earlier work by the same team, has identified a third major threat to hundreds of millions of people living in coastal areas around the world. "I predict that before the end of the century the great global cities of...
  • New Ice Age knowledge

    05/13/2016 12:27:40 PM PDT · by sparklite2 · 22 replies
    Science Daily ^ | May 13, 2016
    In fact, deep ocean circulation slowed down to such an extent that the heavy, saline water mass below a depth of 2000 metres was not in contact with the surface for almost 3000 years. "During this time, so much bound carbon in the form of animal and algae remains trickled down from the more intermixed sea surface into the deep water layer that we were able to identify it as the major carbon reservoir that we have looked for so intensively," says Thomas Ronge. The data also showed that the already old age of the water masses was artificially increased...
  • Why Modern Meteorologists Use a 19th-Century Crystal Ball

    04/22/2016 12:04:14 PM PDT · by NYer · 3 replies
    Atlas Obscura ^ | April 19, 2016 | Ella Morton
    Crystal balls at the South Pole. (Photo: Eli Duke/CC BY-SA 2.0)It sounds like the premise for a riddle: At the South Pole are two crystal balls that provides unfailingly accurate information—not about the future, but about the past. This is no trick. It's just meteorology. The dual glass spheres at the South Pole are Campbell-Stokes sunshine recorders, orbs that capture the number of hours of direct sunlight each day, as well as its intensity.Sunshine recorders first came about in the 1850s, thanks to John Francis Campbell—the Campbell in Campbell-Stokes. Around 1853, Campbell, a Scottish author who focused on Celtic folklore, developed a desire to quantify...
  • Ancient Vegetation, Insect Fossils Found in Antarctica

    08/05/2008 9:56:54 AM PDT · by Scythian · 45 replies · 151+ views
    Fourteen million years ago the now lifeless valleys were tundra, similar to parts of Alaska, Canada and Siberia — cold but able to support life, researchers report. The moss was essentially freeze dried, he said. Unlike fossils, where minerals replace soft materials, the moss tissues were still there, he said. "The really cool thing is that all the details are still there," even though the plant has been dead for 14 million years. "These are actually the plant tissues themselves." ==================================================== And they redicule me for believing in the bible ... 14 million years, ya right
  • Moss Landing researchers reveal iron as key to climate change

    04/16/2004 5:29:53 AM PDT · by ckilmer · 29 replies · 347+ views
    Moss Landing Marine Laboratories (MLML) ^ | APRIL 15, 2004 | PRESS RELEASE
    Moss Landing researchers reveal iron as key to climate change -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- PRESS RELEASE APRIL 15, 2004 EMBARGOED: Not for release until Thursday, 15 April 2004 at 14:00 Eastern Time MOSS LANDING RESEARCHERS REVEAL IRON AS KEY TO CLIMATE CHANGE MOSS LANDING, California - A remarkable expedition to the waters of Antarctica reveals that iron supply to the Southern Ocean may have controlled Earth's climate during past ice ages. A multi-institutional group of scientists, led by Dr. Kenneth Coale of Moss Landing Marine Laboratories (MLML) and Dr. Ken Johnson of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), fertilized two key areas...
  • West Antartic Ice Sheet began melting away 10,000 years ago: study

    01/06/2003 8:04:04 AM PST · by boris · 27 replies · 407+ views
    www.spacedaily.com ^ | 01-06-2003 | not given
    LINK West Antartic Ice Sheet began melting away 10,000 years ago: study WASHINGTON (AFP) Jan 04, 2003 The West Antartic Ice Sheet began melting away some 10,000 years ago and should continue to shrink, according to a study released Friday. A team of researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle found that rock fragments were left behind by glaciers that disappeared over 10,000 years ago, according to the study out Friday in the latest issue of Science. "This work establishes a background pattern of steady decline in the West Antarctic ice sheet," said John Stone, an associate professor of...
  • Meet the 'water bear,' the world’s toughest animal

    11/28/2015 7:54:46 AM PST · by rickmichaels · 29 replies
    Maclean's ^ | Nov. 26, 2015 | Cathy Gulli
    Everything about tardigrades sounds like a riddle: What creature can survive both freezing and boiling temperatures; you can't see it, but it's everywhere; it can survive outer space; and after being dried up for years, it can reanimate in water within a few minutes? The answer is just as puzzling: tardigrades, which are also called "water bears" or "moss piglets," are aquatic, microscopic invertebrates that have recently captivated evolutionary biologists and science enthusiasts alike for their unique ability to withstand extreme conditions. There is photographic evidence too that tardigrades are adorable. Now, researchers at the University of North Carolina at...
  • "Water Bears" First Animals to Survive Trip Into Space Naked (Where's PETA?)

    09/09/2008 7:12:32 PM PDT · by Clint Williams · 9 replies · 130+ views
    Slashdot ^ | 9/9/8 | timothy
    Adam Korbitz writes "New Scientist and Science Daily are reporting the results of an intriguing experiment in which scientists launched tardigrades or 'water bears' — tiny invertebrates about one millimeter long — into space onboard the European Space Agency's FOTON-M3 spacecraft. After 10 days in the vacuum of space, the satellite returned to Earth and the tardigrades were recovered. The tardigrades survived the vacuum just fine, but exposure to the Sun's ultraviolet radiation proved deadly for most of the water bears. However, some did survive. The tardigrades are the first animals to have survived such an experiment, a feat previously...
  • Moss Frozen for 1500 Years. . . It’s Alive!

    04/18/2016 10:08:04 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    Mysterious Universe ^ | March 19, 2014 | Paul Seaburn
    We’ve all found wrapped-but-unlabeled steaks that have been buried in a deep, dark crevice of a freezer for an unknown number of years and have attempted to revive them to a state where they can be grilled and served with copious amounts of steak sauce. Scientists with the British Antarctic Survey and the University of Reading would scoff at this trivial effort. They dug into the Antarctic permafrost and extracted frozen moss that they determined, using carbon dating, to have been frozen for over 1500 years. The icy moss was placed in an incubator, given an ideal environment and, within...
  • West Antarctic ice sheet could collapse, causing significant sea level rise, experts warn

    03/31/2016 8:51:14 AM PDT · by rktman · 122 replies
    foxnews.com ^ | 3/31/2016 | unknown
    Scientists are warning that the West Antarctic ice sheet could collapse, potentially causing sea levels to rise more than 49 feet by 2500. The study published in the journal Nature this week, cites the impact of greenhouse gas emissions over the coming decades. Collapsing Antarctic ice could cause sea levels to rise more than 3 feet by 2100, say co-authors Rob DeConto, a geoscientist at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and David Pollard, a palaeoclimatologist at Pennsylvania State University in University Park. If emissions continue unabated, the scientists warn, atmospheric warming will soon become a “dominant driver” of ice loss,...
  • Ancient Cataclysm Rearranged Pacific Map, Study Says

    10/24/2007 2:48:01 PM PDT · by blam · 22 replies · 1,449+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | 10-24-2007 | Julian Ryall
    Ancient Cataclysm Rearranged Pacific Map, Study Says Julian Ryall for National Geographic NewsOctober 24, 2007 A cataclysm 50 million years ago changed the face of the planet from the Hawaiian Islands to Antarctica, according to new research. The collapse of an underwater mountain range in the Pacific Ocean turned Australia into a warm and sunny continent instead of a snowbound wasteland and created some of the islands that dot the South Pacific today. "We have found that the destruction of an entire mid-ocean ridge, known as the Izanagi Ridge, initiated a chain reaction of geological events," said Joanne Whittaker, a...
  • Ancient Jigsaw Puzzle of Past Supercontinent Revealed

    07/09/2013 2:11:45 PM PDT · by null and void · 45 replies
    Scientific Computing ^ | Fri, 07/05/2013 - 3:28am | Royal Holloway, University of London
    Colored polygons represent different geological units that have been mapped (and inferred) by geologists over many years. These geological units formed before the continents broke apart, so we can use their position to put the "jigsaw pieces" back together again. Many other reconstructions do not use the geological boundaries to match the continental "jigsaw pieces" back together - so they don't align properly. Courtesy of University of Royal Holloway London A new study published in the journal Gondwana Research, has revealed the past position of the Australian, Antarctic and Indian tectonic plates, demonstrating how they formed the supercontinent Gondwana 165...