Keyword: antarctic

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  • A lengthening crack is threatening to cause an Antarctic ice shelf to collapse (Larsen C Ice Shelf)

    08/22/2016 6:20:34 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 43 replies
    Yahoo ^ | 8/22/16 | Andrew Freedman - Mashable
    A large rift is widening across an increasingly fragile Antarctic ice shelf, scientists found. The crack is spreading across the Larsen C Ice Shelf at an increased rate, threatening to carve out an iceberg the size of Delaware while destabilizing a larger area of ice roughly the size of Scotland. When this iceberg calving event happens — no one knows exactly when it will occur, except that it's getting closer — it will be the largest calving event in Antarctica since 2000, the third-biggest ever recorded and the largest from this particular ice shelf, scientists say. About 10 to 12...
  • Plane lands at South Pole in rare, risky effort to rescue sick worker

    06/21/2016 8:05:48 PM PDT · by DUMBGRUNT · 32 replies
    nola.com ^ | 21 June 2016 | Sarah Kaplan
    Twin Otters are certified to fly at temperatures as low as minus-103 degrees... during the mission to evacuate Shemenski in 2001... But as they started up the engines, the crew realized they couldn't take off. The Twin Otter's skis had stuck to the ice beneath them, and the grease on the wing flaps had frozen them in the fully extended position. While the station workers hacked at the ice on the skis, the plane's mechanic jury-rigged the controls to allow it to take off. It was one of the longest, slowest take-offs any of them had ever attempted, but eventually,...
  • 'Sleeping giant' glacier may lift seas two metres: study

    05/18/2016 5:31:55 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 137 replies
    AFP on Yahoo ^ | 5/18/16 | Marlowe Hood
    Paris (AFP) - A rapidly melting glacier atop East Antarctica is on track to lift oceans at least two metres, and could soon pass a "tipping point" of no return, researchers said Wednesday. To date, scientists have mostly worried about the Greenland and West Antarctic ice sheets as dangerous drivers of sea level rise. But the new study, following up on earlier work by the same team, has identified a third major threat to hundreds of millions of people living in coastal areas around the world. "I predict that before the end of the century the great global cities of...
  • New Ice Age knowledge

    05/13/2016 12:27:40 PM PDT · by sparklite2 · 22 replies
    Science Daily ^ | May 13, 2016
    In fact, deep ocean circulation slowed down to such an extent that the heavy, saline water mass below a depth of 2000 metres was not in contact with the surface for almost 3000 years. "During this time, so much bound carbon in the form of animal and algae remains trickled down from the more intermixed sea surface into the deep water layer that we were able to identify it as the major carbon reservoir that we have looked for so intensively," says Thomas Ronge. The data also showed that the already old age of the water masses was artificially increased...
  • Why Modern Meteorologists Use a 19th-Century Crystal Ball

    04/22/2016 12:04:14 PM PDT · by NYer · 3 replies
    Atlas Obscura ^ | April 19, 2016 | Ella Morton
    Crystal balls at the South Pole. (Photo: Eli Duke/CC BY-SA 2.0)It sounds like the premise for a riddle: At the South Pole are two crystal balls that provides unfailingly accurate information—not about the future, but about the past. This is no trick. It's just meteorology. The dual glass spheres at the South Pole are Campbell-Stokes sunshine recorders, orbs that capture the number of hours of direct sunlight each day, as well as its intensity.Sunshine recorders first came about in the 1850s, thanks to John Francis Campbell—the Campbell in Campbell-Stokes. Around 1853, Campbell, a Scottish author who focused on Celtic folklore, developed a desire to quantify...
  • Ancient Vegetation, Insect Fossils Found in Antarctica

    08/05/2008 9:56:54 AM PDT · by Scythian · 45 replies · 151+ views
    Fourteen million years ago the now lifeless valleys were tundra, similar to parts of Alaska, Canada and Siberia — cold but able to support life, researchers report. The moss was essentially freeze dried, he said. Unlike fossils, where minerals replace soft materials, the moss tissues were still there, he said. "The really cool thing is that all the details are still there," even though the plant has been dead for 14 million years. "These are actually the plant tissues themselves." ==================================================== And they redicule me for believing in the bible ... 14 million years, ya right
  • Moss Landing researchers reveal iron as key to climate change

    04/16/2004 5:29:53 AM PDT · by ckilmer · 29 replies · 347+ views
    Moss Landing Marine Laboratories (MLML) ^ | APRIL 15, 2004 | PRESS RELEASE
    Moss Landing researchers reveal iron as key to climate change -------------------------------------------------------------------------------- PRESS RELEASE APRIL 15, 2004 EMBARGOED: Not for release until Thursday, 15 April 2004 at 14:00 Eastern Time MOSS LANDING RESEARCHERS REVEAL IRON AS KEY TO CLIMATE CHANGE MOSS LANDING, California - A remarkable expedition to the waters of Antarctica reveals that iron supply to the Southern Ocean may have controlled Earth's climate during past ice ages. A multi-institutional group of scientists, led by Dr. Kenneth Coale of Moss Landing Marine Laboratories (MLML) and Dr. Ken Johnson of the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI), fertilized two key areas...
  • West Antartic Ice Sheet began melting away 10,000 years ago: study

    01/06/2003 8:04:04 AM PST · by boris · 27 replies · 407+ views
    www.spacedaily.com ^ | 01-06-2003 | not given
    LINK West Antartic Ice Sheet began melting away 10,000 years ago: study WASHINGTON (AFP) Jan 04, 2003 The West Antartic Ice Sheet began melting away some 10,000 years ago and should continue to shrink, according to a study released Friday. A team of researchers at the University of Washington in Seattle found that rock fragments were left behind by glaciers that disappeared over 10,000 years ago, according to the study out Friday in the latest issue of Science. "This work establishes a background pattern of steady decline in the West Antarctic ice sheet," said John Stone, an associate professor of...
  • Meet the 'water bear,' the world’s toughest animal

    11/28/2015 7:54:46 AM PST · by rickmichaels · 29 replies
    Maclean's ^ | Nov. 26, 2015 | Cathy Gulli
    Everything about tardigrades sounds like a riddle: What creature can survive both freezing and boiling temperatures; you can't see it, but it's everywhere; it can survive outer space; and after being dried up for years, it can reanimate in water within a few minutes? The answer is just as puzzling: tardigrades, which are also called "water bears" or "moss piglets," are aquatic, microscopic invertebrates that have recently captivated evolutionary biologists and science enthusiasts alike for their unique ability to withstand extreme conditions. There is photographic evidence too that tardigrades are adorable. Now, researchers at the University of North Carolina at...
  • "Water Bears" First Animals to Survive Trip Into Space Naked (Where's PETA?)

    09/09/2008 7:12:32 PM PDT · by Clint Williams · 9 replies · 130+ views
    Slashdot ^ | 9/9/8 | timothy
    Adam Korbitz writes "New Scientist and Science Daily are reporting the results of an intriguing experiment in which scientists launched tardigrades or 'water bears' — tiny invertebrates about one millimeter long — into space onboard the European Space Agency's FOTON-M3 spacecraft. After 10 days in the vacuum of space, the satellite returned to Earth and the tardigrades were recovered. The tardigrades survived the vacuum just fine, but exposure to the Sun's ultraviolet radiation proved deadly for most of the water bears. However, some did survive. The tardigrades are the first animals to have survived such an experiment, a feat previously...
  • Moss Frozen for 1500 Years. . . It’s Alive!

    04/18/2016 10:08:04 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    Mysterious Universe ^ | March 19, 2014 | Paul Seaburn
    We’ve all found wrapped-but-unlabeled steaks that have been buried in a deep, dark crevice of a freezer for an unknown number of years and have attempted to revive them to a state where they can be grilled and served with copious amounts of steak sauce. Scientists with the British Antarctic Survey and the University of Reading would scoff at this trivial effort. They dug into the Antarctic permafrost and extracted frozen moss that they determined, using carbon dating, to have been frozen for over 1500 years. The icy moss was placed in an incubator, given an ideal environment and, within...
  • West Antarctic ice sheet could collapse, causing significant sea level rise, experts warn

    03/31/2016 8:51:14 AM PDT · by rktman · 122 replies
    foxnews.com ^ | 3/31/2016 | unknown
    Scientists are warning that the West Antarctic ice sheet could collapse, potentially causing sea levels to rise more than 49 feet by 2500. The study published in the journal Nature this week, cites the impact of greenhouse gas emissions over the coming decades. Collapsing Antarctic ice could cause sea levels to rise more than 3 feet by 2100, say co-authors Rob DeConto, a geoscientist at the University of Massachusetts Amherst and David Pollard, a palaeoclimatologist at Pennsylvania State University in University Park. If emissions continue unabated, the scientists warn, atmospheric warming will soon become a “dominant driver” of ice loss,...
  • Ancient Cataclysm Rearranged Pacific Map, Study Says

    10/24/2007 2:48:01 PM PDT · by blam · 22 replies · 1,449+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | 10-24-2007 | Julian Ryall
    Ancient Cataclysm Rearranged Pacific Map, Study Says Julian Ryall for National Geographic NewsOctober 24, 2007 A cataclysm 50 million years ago changed the face of the planet from the Hawaiian Islands to Antarctica, according to new research. The collapse of an underwater mountain range in the Pacific Ocean turned Australia into a warm and sunny continent instead of a snowbound wasteland and created some of the islands that dot the South Pacific today. "We have found that the destruction of an entire mid-ocean ridge, known as the Izanagi Ridge, initiated a chain reaction of geological events," said Joanne Whittaker, a...
  • Ancient Jigsaw Puzzle of Past Supercontinent Revealed

    07/09/2013 2:11:45 PM PDT · by null and void · 45 replies
    Scientific Computing ^ | Fri, 07/05/2013 - 3:28am | Royal Holloway, University of London
    Colored polygons represent different geological units that have been mapped (and inferred) by geologists over many years. These geological units formed before the continents broke apart, so we can use their position to put the "jigsaw pieces" back together again. Many other reconstructions do not use the geological boundaries to match the continental "jigsaw pieces" back together - so they don't align properly. Courtesy of University of Royal Holloway London A new study published in the journal Gondwana Research, has revealed the past position of the Australian, Antarctic and Indian tectonic plates, demonstrating how they formed the supercontinent Gondwana 165...
  • Palm trees 'grew on Antarctica' (in the early Eocene period, about 53 million years ago.)

    08/02/2012 1:05:45 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 24 replies
    BBC News ^ | 8/2/12 | Jason Palmer
    Scientists drilling deep into the edge of modern Antarctica have pulled up proof that palm trees once grew there. Analyses of pollen and spores and the remains of tiny creatures have given a climatic picture of the early Eocene period, about 53 million years ago. The study in Nature suggests Antarctic winter temperatures exceeded 10C, while summers may have reached 25C. Better knowledge of past "greenhouse" conditions will enhance guesses about the effects of increasing CO2 today. The early Eocene - often referred to as the Eocene greenhouse - has been a subject of increasing interest in recent years as...
  • Snapshot Of Past Climate Reveals No Ice In Antarctica Millions Of Years Ago

    03/06/2009 1:04:30 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies · 1,583+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | July 29, 2008 | Natural Environment Research Council and Cardiff University
    A snapshot of New Zealand's climate 40 million years ago reveals a greenhouse Earth, with warmer seas and little or no ice in Antarctica, according to research recently published in the journal Geology. The study suggests that Antarctica at that time was yet to develop extensive ice sheets. Back then, New Zealand was about 1100 km further south, at the same latitude as the southern tip of South America -- so was closer to Antarctica -- but the researchers found that the water temperature was 23-25°C at the sea surface and 11-13°C at the bottom. "This is too warm to...
  • One of the World's Biggest Telescopes Is Buried Beneath the South Pole

    12/17/2010 4:04:40 PM PST · by ColdOne · 40 replies · 1+ views
    FoxNews.com ^ | December 17, 2010 | Blake Snow
    Like exploding stars, black holes, dark matter? How about cosmic intrigue, deep space astronomy , or origins of the universe? Then you’re gonna love this. Researchers at the University of Wisconsin are putting the finishing touches on a giant underground telescope buried beneath the South Pole to help understand said phenomenon.
  • 'Telescope' buried a mile under the Antarctic ice to find source of cosmic rays

    10/18/2010 6:44:01 AM PDT · by LucyT · 18 replies
    Telegraph.co.uk ^ | 18 Oct 2010 | Richard Gray, Science Correspondent
    A "telescope" buried deep under Antarctic ice has detected the first signals that scientists hope will allow them to identify the source of mysterious particles that bombard Earth from outer space. For the past ten years scientists have been planning and building an ambitious experiment to explain the mystery of what produces the cosmic rays and elusive particles known as neutrinos, which constantly pepper our planet. more at Telegraph.co.UK
  • Earth's Clearest Skies Revealed [Ideal Telescope Site In Antarctica - Graphic On Comments Page]

    06/08/2009 11:59:30 PM PDT · by zeestephen · 10 replies · 961+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 06 June 2009 | Anil Ananthaswamy
    POSSIBLY the clearest skies on Earth have been found - but to exploit them, astronomers will have to set up a telescope in one of the planet's harshest climates...[Scientists] evaluated different factors that affect telescope vision, such as the amount of water vapour, wind speeds and atmospheric turbulence...The team found that the Antarctic plateau offers world-beating atmospheric conditions - as long as telescopes are raised 20 meters above its frozen surface...[The Antarctic air is] drier than the Atacama desert in Chile [where some of the best telescopes in the world are currently located].
  • Cosmologists Probe Mystery Of Dark Energy With South Pole Telescope

    04/05/2008 11:43:32 AM PDT · by RightWhale · 5 replies · 221+ views
    sciencedaily ^ | 3 Apr 08 | staff
    Cosmologists Probe Mystery Of Dark Energy With South Pole Telescope ScienceDaily (Apr. 3, 2008) — Something is pulling the universe apart. What is it, and where will it take us from here? Scientists at the Kavli Institute for Cosmological Physics, University of Chicago, seek answers to those questions with the newly-commissioned South Pole Telescope. Frigid and bone-dry, with six straight months of night each year, the South Pole is a forbidding place to live or work. But for largely the same reasons, it’s one of the best spots on the planet for surveying the faint cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation...
  • South Pole Detector Could Yield Signs of Extra Dimensions

    02/15/2006 9:30:32 PM PST · by Marius3188 · 67 replies · 1,527+ views
    Northeastern University ^ | 26 Jan 2006 | Newswise
    Newswise — Researchers at Northeastern University and the University of California, Irvine say that scientists might soon have evidence for extra dimensions and other exotic predictions of string theory. Early results from a neutrino detector at the South Pole, called AMANDA, show that ghostlike particles from space could serve as probes to a world beyond our familiar three dimensions, the research team says. No more than a dozen high-energy neutrinos have been detected so far. However, the current detection rate and energy range indicate that AMANDA's larger successor, called IceCube, now under construction, could provide the first evidence for string...
  • Antarctic telescope delivers first neutrino sky map

    07/30/2003 10:36:25 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 1 replies · 163+ views
    Antarctic telescope delivers first neutrino sky map UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-MADISON NEWS RELEASE Posted: July 30, 2003 A novel telescope that uses the Antarctic ice sheet as its window to the cosmos has produced the first map of the high-energy neutrino sky. The map, unveiled for astronomers at a meeting of the International Astronomical Union, provides astronomers with their first tantalizing glimpse of very high-energy neutrinos, ghostly particles that are believed to emanate from some of the most violent events in the universe -- crashing black holes, gamma ray bursts, and the violent cores of distant galaxies. The first map of...
  • Meteor mega-hit spawned Australian continent: researchers

    06/03/2006 3:23:27 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 25 replies · 774+ views
    AFP on Yahoo ^ | 6/2/06 | AFP
    WASHINGTON (AFP) - A meteor's roaring crash into Antarctica -- larger and earlier than the impact that killed the dinosaurs -- caused the biggest mass extinction in Earth's history and likely spawned the Australian continent, scientists said. Ohio State University scientists said the 483-kilometer-wide (300-mile-wide) crater is now hidden more than 1.6 kilometers (one mile) beneath the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. "Gravity measurements that reveal its existence suggest that it could date back about 250 million years -- the time of the Permian-Triassic extinction, when almost all animal life on Earth died out," the university said in a statement Thursday....
  • Does a giant crater lie beneath the Antarctic ice?

    06/05/2006 9:07:10 AM PDT · by S0122017 · 29 replies · 1,455+ views
    nature news ^ | 2 06 | Mark Peplow
    Does a giant crater lie beneath the Antarctic ice? Signs of an ancient impact could help to explain a mass extinction. Mark Peplow A dense bit of rock in the Antarctic (orange circle) seems to be circled by a crater. © Ohio State University Evidence of a cataclysmic meteorite impact has been unearthed in Antarctica, according to researchers who say the collision could possibly explain the greatest mass extinction ever seen on our planet. But scientists contacted by news@nature.com say they are sceptical, as no signs of such an enormous impact have been found in other, well-studied areas of Antarctica....
  • Cold And Deep: Antarctica's Lake Vostok Has Two Big Neighbors

    02/08/2006 3:52:36 PM PST · by blam · 57 replies · 1,414+ views
    Science News Online ^ | 2-8-2006 | Sid Perkins
    Cold and Deep: Antarctica's Lake Vostok has two big neighbors Sid Perkins GREAT LAKES. Lake Vostok and the newly described 90°E and Sovetskaya Lakes lie beneath a kilometers-thick blanket of ice. The black square in the inset shows the outline of this satellite image on a map of Antarctica; the cross indicates the South Pole. R.E. Bell, et al. Trapped beneath Antarctica's kilometers-thick ice sheet are two bodies of water that rival North America's Great Lakes, new analyses suggest. The geological setting of these huge, unfrozen lakes hints that they may harbor ecosystems that have been isolated for millions of...
  • Antarctica 'Lost World' Found

    08/15/2005 1:01:20 PM PDT · by TerP26 · 118 replies · 4,251+ views
    CNN ^ | 08/14/2005
    Two teams of researchers, working separately thousands of miles from each other but both defeating incredible odds, have made stunning finds in frozen Antarctica -- so stunning that the National Science Foundation calls their discoveries evidence of a lost world. The researchers found what they believe to be the fossilized remains of two species of dinosaurs previously unknown to science. One is a 70-million-year old quick-moving meat-eater found on the bottom of an Antarctic sea, while and the other is a 200-million-year-old giant plant-eater that was found on the top of a mountain, reports Reuters. The lost world in which...
  • Global warming, not asteroid, cause of extinction?

    01/21/2005 7:09:59 AM PST · by Zon · 45 replies · 1,455+ views
    c|net news.com ^ | 1/20/2005 | Michael Kanellos
    Two hundred and fifty million years ago, the majority of life on earth may have suffocated. The "Great Dying," a catastrophic event that killed 90 percent of Earth's marine life and 75 percent of the life on land, was caused by a combination of warmer temperatures and lower oxygen levels, according to a recent study by researchers at the University of Washington. In other words, the extinction was precipitated by global warming, rather than an asteroid collision, the reigning theory. The findings, to be published in the magazine Science, are largely based on comparisons of fossils found in South Africa's...
  • Oldest ever ice core promises climate revelations

    09/08/2003 7:22:36 AM PDT · by forsnax5 · 32 replies · 277+ views
    newscientist.com ^ | September 8, 2003 | Magdeline Pokar, Milan
    Oldest ever ice core promises climate revelations An ice core recently shipped from Antarctica has yielded its first, eagerly awaited results. The tests confirm that the 3200-metre core dates back at least 750,000 years, making the ice the oldest continuous core ever retrieved.Gases and particles trapped in the layers of an ice core provide information about the Earth's climate and atmosphere. Oxygen and hydrogen isotopes reveal the temperature when the ice formed, for example, while high carbon dioxide and methane levels indicate periods of global warming.A group of research teams called the European Project for Ice Coring in Antarctica (EPICA)...
  • Warning: Well in Antarctica may pop like a can of Coke

    08/14/2003 8:46:58 AM PDT · by Dog Gone · 64 replies · 328+ views
    Knight-Ridder Tribune News ^ | August 14, 2003 | JOSHUA L. KWAN
    SAN JOSE, Calif. -- If Russian researchers in Antarctica succeed in drilling through the final 396 feet of nearly 2-1/2 miles of ice to reach an ancient, unexplored lake underneath, scientists at NASA warn the hole could cause an eruption that spews water thousands of feet into the air. The American scientists speculate that the water in pristine Lake Vostok, filled with gases and pressurized under tons and tons of ice, would act like a carbonated drink in a can that's shaken and then popped open. Their concern is that the lake water, which has not been exposed to Earth's...
  • Japan Scientists Find Million-Year-Old Ice (in Antarctica)

    03/27/2006 1:26:18 AM PST · by S0122017 · 7 replies · 338+ views
    abcnews.go.com ^ | 1/24/2006 | AP
    Japan Scientists Find Million-Year-Old Ice Japanese Scientists Recover Million-Year-Old Ice From Antarctica, May Be Oldest Ever TOKYO Jan 25, 2006 (AP)— A team of Japanese researchers drilling on Antarctica has recovered what is believed to be the oldest sample of ice ever possibly dating back 1 million years, officials said Tuesday. The ice sample was taken from a depth of 9,994 feet into the Antarctic ice sheet near the Japanese camp at Fuji Dome, according to Yuji Umezaki, an official with the education and science ministry. He said although exact dating will be conducted after the sample is returned to...
  • Memo to Global Warming Expeditions: Stay Away From Antarctica

    03/09/2016 3:27:45 PM PST · by Sean_Anthony · 13 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 03/09/16 | Jack Dini
    A highly publicized folly attracting much worldwide ridicule It should be clear to global warming polar researchers that sea ice at the South Pole is not melting, but in fact has been growing for 37 years, reports Pierre Gosselin. (1) Yet, recently another ship got caught in the Antarctic ice. The Antarctic ‘Aurora Australis’ with 68 people on board became stranded in sea ice in the West Arm in Horsehoe Harbor the last week in February, and rescue efforts were prevented by a snowstorm. They were eventually rescued. The problem: Too much ice! The Aurora Australis may ring a bell....
  • Iron meteorites 'buried in Antarctica' by the Sun

    02/22/2016 9:23:26 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 22 replies
    BBC ^ | 02/17/2016 | Jonathan Webb
    Antarctica is known by meteorite specialists as a fruitful hunting ground, because the rocks are collected from their landing sites by glacial flows and transported to concentrated dumping-grounds. ... Among this Antarctic haul, however, researchers have noticed that iron-rich meteorites - whether partly or wholly made of the metal - are surprisingly scarce, compared to the percentage collected in other places around the world. Dr Joy and her colleagues think they may have discovered why. They froze two small meteorites of similar size and shape, one made of iron and the other rocky and non-metallic, inside blocks of ice. A...
  • Seas Are Rising at Fastest Rate in Last 28 Centuries

    02/22/2016 12:56:48 PM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 154 replies
    New York Times ^ | February 22, 2016 | By JUSTIN GILLIS
    The oceans are rising faster than at any point in the last 28 centuries, and human emissions of greenhouse gases are primarily responsible, scientists reported Monday. They added that the flooding that is starting to make life miserable in many coastal towns - like Miami Beach; Norfolk, Va.; and Charleston, S.C. - was largely a consequence of those emissions, and that it is likely to grow worse in coming years. The ocean could rise as much as three or four feet by 2100, as ocean water expands and the great ice sheets in Greenland and Antarctica begin to collapse. Experts...
  • ...Antarctic fungi survives Martian conditions...strapped outside the space station for 18 months

    01/28/2016 6:28:56 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 9 replies
    daily mail uk ^ | 01/25/2016 | cheyenne macdonald
    After a year-and-a-half long voyage aboard the International Space Station, a group of fungi collected from Antarctica has proven its ability to withstand harsh, Mars-like conditions. More than half of the cells remained intact over the course of the 18-month study, providing new insight for the possibility of life on Mars. These fungal samples, along with lichens from Spain and Austria, have allowed European researchers to assess the survivability and stability of microscopic lifeforms on the red planet. The tiny fungi taken from Antarctica are typically found in the cracks of rocks in this dry, hostile region. Scientists took samples...
  • Prince William's friend Henry Worsley dies trying to recreate Shackleton's Antarctic crossing

    01/25/2016 8:01:01 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 20 replies
    telegraph.co.uk ^ | gordan raynor
    A friend of the Duke of Cambridge has died attempting to make a solo crossing of Antarctica to raise money for one of the Duke's charities. Kensington Palace announced that Henry Worsley, 55, died in hospital in Chile, where he had undergone surgery after falling ill with bacterial peritonitis just 30 miles short of his goal. The Duke, who was Patron of the expedition, said he was "incredibly proud" of the former SAS officer's effort, which raised more than £100,000 for the Endeavour Fund, part of the Duke's Royal Foundation charity. Mr Worsley was trying to complete the journey that...
  • World's largest canyon discovered beneath Antarctica

    01/13/2016 11:24:39 PM PST · by Fred Nerks · 27 replies
    ninemsn ^ | January 14, 2016 | James Gorman
    The worlds largest canyon may lie deep beneath the ice sheets on Antarctica, according to a new discovery by UK scientists. While the depth of the discovery is comparative to the Grand Canyon it dwarfs the US landmark by 555km in length. Satellite data recovered by a team of scientists led by Durham University revealed the previously unknown canyon system which is thought to be more than 1000km long and 1km deep buried under several kilometres of ice. While the discovery is yet to be confirmed by direct measurements, researchers believe the canyon beneath the ice sheet may be so...
  • Breaking Icebergs Unexpectedly Slow Global Warming

    01/11/2016 10:42:43 AM PST · by Citizen Zed · 15 replies
    Al Jazeera America ^ | 1-11-2016 | Reuters
    The biggest icebergs breaking off Antarctica unexpectedly help to slow global warming as they melt away into the chill Southern Ocean, scientists said Monday. The rare Manhattan-sized icebergs, which may become more frequent in coming decades because of climate change, release a vast trail of iron and other nutrients that act as fertilizers for algae and other tiny plant-like organisms in the ocean. These extract carbon dioxide from the atmosphere as they grow, a natural ally for human efforts to limit the pace of climate change blamed on manmade greenhouse gas emissions. Ocean blooms in the wake of giant icebergs...
  • Massive Eltanin Meteor 2.5 million years ago set off mass tsunami, changed the climate?

    09/28/2012 11:55:36 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 13 replies
    JoNova ^ | September 21st, 2012 | Joanne
    From the file of “Things that would really be catastrophic”. Did a meteor have a role in a major shift in Earth’s Climate?The start of the Quaternary period (2.588 million years ago, where the Pliocene became Pleistocene) coincides with evidence of a mega tsunami in the South Pacific.The Eltanin Meteor fell into the South Pacific 2.5 million years ago setting off a (likely) tsunami that was hundreds of meters high and theoretically pushed mass material into the atmosphere which may have contributed to the cooling the globe had already started on. This meteor was hard to detect because it hit...
  • The Eltanin Impact Crater

    10/17/2004 9:46:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies · 1,736+ views
    Geological Society of America ^ | October 27-30, 2002 | Christy A. Glatz, Dallas H. Abbott, and Alice A. Nunes
    An impact event occurred at 2.15±0.5 Ma in the Bellingshausen Sea. It littered the oceanic floor with asteroidal debris. This debris is found within the Eltanin Impact Layer. Although the impact layer was known, the crater had yet to be discovered. We have found a possible source crater at 53.7S,90.1W under 5000 meters of water. The crater is 132±5km in diameter, much larger than the previously proposed size of 24 to 80 km.
  • Giant asteroid rocked Antarctica

    10/17/2004 9:26:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies · 1,011+ views
    The collision happened around 870 000 years ago, a time when Homo erectus, man’s early ancestor, was still roaming the planet. Molten asteroid slabs melted through more than 1.5 kilometres of ice and snow to reach the underlying bedrock... Billions of tons of ice, snow and rock would have been vaporised and thrown into the atmosphere. Rock particles that fell to the ground have been located more that 5 000 kilometres away in Australia. The impact was so immense that it is being considered as the cause of a reversal of the Earth’s magnetic polarity around this time. One...
  • How Scottish Scientists Re-Created a Hundred-Year-Old Whisky (Shackleton's Antartica Scotch)

    01/22/2012 4:18:28 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 52 replies
    PopSci ^ | 01.04.2012 | Paul Adams
    How Scottish Scientists Re-Created a Hundred-Year-Old Whisky Preserved in Antarctica since 1907, the Scotch that Ernest Shackleton drank is now available in stores In 1907, Ernest Shackleton and crew set out on the ship Nimrod to visit Antarctica and, they hoped, the South Pole. The good news was, the entire party survived the trip, thanks in part to the Rare Old Highland Whisky they brought to the frozen continent. But the expedition was forced to evacuate in 1909, some 100 miles short of the Pole they sought. And, as winter ice encroached and the men hurried home, they left behind...
  • Explorer's rare Scotch returned to Antarctic stash

    01/19/2013 12:25:10 PM PST · by Kaslin · 69 replies
    Yahoo!News ^ | January 19, 2013 | ROD McGUIRK
    SCOTTBASE, Antarctica (AP) — Talk about whisky on ice: Three bottles of rare, 19th century Scotch found beneath the floor boards of Antarctic explorer Ernest Shackelton's abandoned expedition base were returned to the polar continent Saturday after a distiller flew them to Scotland to recreate the long-lost recipe. But not even New Zealand Prime Minister John Key, who personally returned the stash, got a taste of the contents of the bottles of Mackinlay's whisky, which were rediscovered 102 years after the explorer was forced to leave them behind. "I think we're all tempted to crack it open and have a...
  • New Zealand museum thaws 100-year-old whisky

    07/24/2010 5:20:35 PM PDT · by bruinbirdman · 71 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 7/22/2010
    A crate of Scotch whisky that has been frozen in Antarctic ice for more than a century is being slowly thawed by New Zealand museum officials. The crate of whisky was recovered earlier this year - along with four other crates containing whisky and brandy - beneath the floor of a hut built by British explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton during his 1908 Antarctic expedition. Four of the crates were left in the ice, but one labelled Mackinlay's whisky was brought to the Canterbury Museum in Christchurch on New Zealand's South Island, where officials said it was being thawed in a...
  • World's oldest malt whisky ($15,000 a bottle) goes on sale

    03/12/2010 7:10:30 AM PST · by envisio · 74 replies · 1,308+ views
    DAILYMAIL ^ | 12th March 2010 | By Daily Mail Reporter
    The world's oldest malt whisky - costing up to £10,000 a bottle - went on sale today. The Mortlach 70-year-old Speyside was sampled by a select group of tasters at a ceremony in Edinburgh Castle. Bottles of the rare piece of Scotland's 'liquid history' have now hit the market. Only 54 full-size bottles, costing £10,000 each, and 162 smaller bottles at £2,500 have been made available. The whisky has been released under Gordon and MacPhail's Generations brand. It was filled into its cask on October 15 1938 on the order of John Urquhart, the grandfather of the firm's joint managing...
  • Shackleton's whisky recovered

    02/05/2010 7:52:41 PM PST · by Pan_Yan · 20 replies · 815+ views
    Guardian.co.uk ^ | February 2010 12.20 GMT | Rick Peters
    That's the spirit! Cases of Mackinlay's 'Rare Old' scotch whisky have been recovered from the ice outside Shackleton's Antarctic hut. What will it taste like? After some hype and anticipation news has emerged that the crates of whisky long suspected to have been entombed by ice outside Sir Ernest Shackleton's Antarctic hut have finally been recovered. A team from the New Zealand Antarctic Heritage Trust have managed to extract five cases, three of Chas Mackinlay & Co's whisky and two containing brandy made by the Hunter Valley Distillery Limited, Allandale (Australia), which were abandoned by the expedition in 1909 as...
  • Explorers' century-old whisky found in Antarctic

    02/05/2010 5:57:24 PM PST · by Redcitizen · 32 replies · 994+ views
    Associated Press ^ | Fri Feb 5, 4:49 am ET | unknown
    WELLINGTON, New Zealand – This Scotch has been on the rocks for a century. Five crates of Scotch whisky and two of brandy have been recovered by a team restoring an Antarctic hut used more than 100 years ago by famed polar explorer Ernest Shackleton. Ice cracked some of the bottles that had been left there in 1909, but the restorers said Friday they are confident the five crates contain intact bottles "given liquid can be heard when the crates are moved."
  • Team drills for century-old Scotch whiskey in Antarctica

    11/16/2009 8:36:45 AM PST · by buccaneer81 · 22 replies · 1,703+ views
    The Columbus Dispatch ^ | November 16, 2009 | NA
    <p>WELLINGTON, New Zealand (AP) -- A beverage company has asked a team to drill through Antarctica's ice for a lost cache of some vintage Scotch whiskey that has been on the rocks since a century ago.</p> <p>The drillers will be trying to reach two crates of McKinlay and Co. whiskey that were shipped to the Antarctic by British polar explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton as part of his abandoned 1909 expedition.</p>
  • Preserved in ice for 100 years, the whisky Shackleton used to keep out the cold.

    11/04/2009 6:03:37 PM PST · by GSP.FAN · 41 replies · 1,672+ views
    MailOnline ^ | 03 March 2007 | Peter Gillman
    They say whisky matures with age...but leaving it embedded in the Antarctic ice for almost 100 years may be going a bit far.
  • Now That’s What I Call On The Rocks! 107-Y/O Crates Of Whisky Found Frozen In Antarctica

    11/27/2015 3:31:17 PM PST · by NYer · 32 replies
    Dusty Old Things ^ | November 26, 2015
    In 2010, researchers and conservators from the Antarctic Heritage Trust of New Zealand made quite the interesting discovery. Hidden beneath the hut legendary explorer Sir Ernest Shackleton used during his 1908 Antarctica expedition (known as the Nimrod) were five crates covered in ice: three containing whisky and two containing scotch! This wasn’t the only discovery made by the Trust either; they also found a notebook and photos from similar expeditions on the continent.From: Youtube / Shackleton Whisky After the whisky was discovered, one crate was sent to New Zealand where it was thawed and displayed for the public at Canterbury Museum. Three of the bottles...
  • Ross Sea Party Lost Photos (Amazing Century-Old Photos Found Preserved in Antarctic Ice Slideshow)

    09/01/2015 8:40:28 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 42 replies
    A team of conservationists were working on restoring an old hut that served as an Antarctic exploration outpost when they discovered a box full of undeveloped negatives, frozen in a solid block of ice.