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Keyword: antibiotics

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  • UEA researchers discover Achilles’ heel in antibiotic-resistant bacteria

    06/18/2014 6:27:26 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 27 replies
    University of East Anglia ^ | June 18, 2014 | Press Release
    Scientists at the University of East Anglia have made a breakthrough in the race to solve antibiotic resistance. New research published today in the journal Nature reveals an Achilles’ heel in the defensive barrier which surrounds drug-resistant bacterial cells. The findings pave the way for a new wave of drugs that kill superbugs by bringing down their defensive walls rather than attacking the bacteria itself. It means that in future, bacteria may not develop drug-resistance at all. The discovery doesn’t come a moment too soon. The World Health Organization has warned that antibiotic-resistance in bacteria is spreading globally, causing severe...
  • FEDERAL POLICY ENABLING 'DEADLY SUPERBUGS'

    05/12/2014 5:58:23 PM PDT · by DannyTN · 2 replies
    WND ^ | 5/11/2014 | GREG COROMBOS
    ... The good news, according to Goldberg, is that this isn’t a hard threat to combat, but he said there are unnecessary hurdles blocking an effective response and putting lives in danger. “We need to take the chains off companies that would otherwise develop antibiotics but aren’t because it’s too expensive or too complicated to do so,” said Goldberg, who then elaborated on the federally imposed hurdles facing drug makers. ... So what needs to happen to relax federal restraints on drug makers? ...
  • 'The world is headed for a post-antibiotic era,' WHO official warns

    05/02/2014 2:50:11 PM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 20 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | May 2, 2014 | by Karen Kaplan
    Officials from the World Health Organization warned this week that the workhorse medications we rely on to keep viruses, bacteria and other pathogens in check are in real danger of becoming obsolete. In every region of the globe, health officials have witnessed “very high rates of resistance” to antimicrobial drugs designed to fight bugs like Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae, according to a new report. These bugs cause pneumonia and infections in the bloodstream, open wounds and the urinary tract.
  • We Kill Germs at Our Peril - ‘Missing Microbes’: How Antibiotics Can Do Harm

    04/30/2014 9:41:21 PM PDT · by neverdem · 30 replies
    NY Times ^ | April 28, 2014 | Abigail Zuger M.D.
    You never get something for nothing, especially not in health care. Every test, every incision, every little pill brings benefits and risks. Nowhere is that balance tilting more ominously in the wrong direction than in the once halcyon realm of infectious diseases, that big success story of the 20th century. We have had antibiotics since the mid-1940s — just about as long as we have had the atomic bomb, as Dr. Martin J. Blaser points out — and our big mistake was failing long ago to appreciate the parallels between the two. Antibiotics have cowed many of our old bacterial...
  • Superbug: An Epidemic Begins

    04/23/2014 11:22:23 AM PDT · by posterchild · 24 replies
    Harvard Magazine ^ | May-June, 2014 | Katherine Xue
    LESS THAN A CENTURY AGO, the age-old evolutionary relationship between humans and microbes was transformed not by a gene, but by an idea. The antibiotic revolution inaugurated the era of modern medicine, trivializing once-deadly infections and paving the way for medical breakthroughs: organ transplants and chemotherapy would be impossible without the ability to eliminate harmful bacteria seemingly at will. But perhaps every revolution contains the seeds for its own undoing, and antibiotics are no exception: antibiotic resistance—the rise of bacteria impervious to the new “cure”—has followed hard on the heels of each miracle drug. Recently, signs have arisen that the...
  • Potential for human superbugs in cow manure: study

    04/22/2014 5:37:04 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 31 replies
    Yahoo! News ^ | 4/22/14 | AFP
    Washington (AFP) - Cow manure, commonly used to fertilize vegetable crops, contains a high number of genes that can fuel resistance to antibiotics, a US study out Tuesday found. These genes come from the cows' gut bacteria, and while none have yet been found in superbugs that are infecting humans, researchers said the potential is real. The research was done by scientists at Yale University, who sampled manure from a handful of dairy cows at a farm in Connecticut. In those samples, they found 80 unique antibiotic resistance genes. About three quarters were unfamiliar. Genetic sequencing showed they were only...
  • Are Antibiotics Making You and Your Child Fat?

    04/11/2014 2:07:27 PM PDT · by Armen Hareyan · 9 replies
    EmaxHealth ^ | 2014-04-09 | Tim Boyer, Ph.D.
    Farmers intentionally feed chicken and other livestock antibiotics to increase their size. But antibiotics may be doing the same thing to you posits Dr. Oz in a new episode of The Dr. Oz Show that takes a look at why antibiotics may be making you fat and could be the cause of your obesity. “Today I’ve got breaking news. Experts are uncovering the hidden reason behind America’s obesity problem: Could you be gaining weight because of antibiotics that you take every day for problems like sore throats and earaches? Or from antibiotics found in our food? It’s an alarming finding,...
  • 25 pharmaceutical companies will phase out animal antibiotics

    03/27/2014 6:42:36 PM PDT · by neverdem · 29 replies
    Associated Press ^ | March 26, 2014 | MARY CLARE JALONICK
    WASHINGTON — The Food and Drug Administration says 25 pharmaceutical companies are voluntarily phasing out the use of antibiotics for growth promotion in animals processed for meat. Citing a potential threat to public health, the agency in December asked 26 companies to voluntarily stop labeling drugs important for treating human infection as acceptable for use in animal production. The FDA did not name the one company that has not agreed to withdraw or revise its drugs...
  • ON PNEUMONIA

    03/06/2014 3:56:31 PM PST · by Lazamataz · 185 replies
    Original Content | 3/6/2014 | By Laz A. Mataz
    I had a bacterial pneumonia over this last week. It manifested as flu-like symptoms, at first: Low-grade fever, dizziness, chills, then sweats, and a constant fatigue. I thought nothing of it for the first day, having been the self-administered victim of minor food-poisoning before. However, this illness didn't seem to want to pass. By the second day, Sunday, I became more anxious as to the true cause of the malady. It was less likely to be a true influenza, because I had received a flu vaccine shot this year. So what was it? I almost thought to get to the...
  • How to Surivive in a World Without Antibiotics - Free download

    01/10/2014 2:37:22 PM PST · by null and void · 76 replies
    The Alternative Doctor ^ | 12/10/14 | Keith Scott-Mumby
    The Golden Age of Antibiotics is Over!! Exclusive: Limited Time Coast to Coast Listeners... Sign Up Below to Get One of My Best Selling eBooks for FREE! Secure & Confidential WE GURANTEE YOUR PRIVACY. We hate spam as much as you do. For 60 years we have lived protected by these CURE ALL drugs. Lives have been saved… Billions of lives. True, there have been complications, but that's because of abuse, not because of the wonderful life-saving properties of antibiotics. But NOW it's over: Antibiotic resistant strains of bacteria are spreading like wildfire. There are dozens of deadly antibiotic resistant...
  • Imagining the Post-Antibiotics Future

    12/01/2013 8:22:41 PM PST · by JerseyanExile · 54 replies
    After 85 years, antibiotics are growing impotent. So what will medicine, agriculture and everyday life look like if we lose these drugs entirely? A few years ago, I started looking online to fill in chapters of my family history that no one had ever spoken of. I registered on Ancestry.com, plugged in the little I knew, and soon was found by a cousin whom I had not known existed, the granddaughter of my grandfather’s older sister. We started exchanging documents. After a few months, she sent me something disturbing. It was a black-and-white scan of an article clipped from the...
  • Cranberries Stop Bacteria In Their Tracks

    11/27/2013 1:13:29 PM PST · by Dysart · 83 replies
    Real Clear Science ^ | 11-27-13 | Sara Suchy
    For over a century cranberries have been more than a Thanksgiving staple; they've also been heralded for their reported ability to prevent and even treat urinary tract infections.But clinical research attempting to link cranberry consumption to a reduction in urinary tract infections remains somewhat inconsistent. A 2012 study by a team from Taiwan and the U.S., published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, found that consuming cranberries did seem to prevent urinary tract infections in certain populations, but qualified the findings with a strong word of caution against using the "folk remedy" as a treatment. Most research on the cranberry's...
  • What If There Simply Aren’t More Antibiotics to be Discovered?

    11/26/2013 6:45:55 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 51 replies
    The Washington Monthly's Political Animal ^ | November 25, 2013 | Ryan Cooper, web editor
    Antibiotic resistance, like climate change, is one of those issues that has been blinking red on the world’s dashboard for decades. Everyone agrees it’s potentially disastrous—in fact, has already reached crisis stage in some areas—but interest group politics and crippling political dysfunction combine to make sure nothing is done about it. The issue got another boomlet of attention over the weekend when the CDC launched a new campaign to limit overuse of antibiotics, and Maryn McKenna published an excellent longform piece about it on Medium. The problem: evolution. A new antibiotic works like magic for awhile. But as it is...
  • Germs Carried by Wounded Syrians ‘Endangering Israelis’

    11/26/2013 5:47:20 AM PST · by Olog-hai · 13 replies
    INN ^ | 11/26/2013, 11:03 AM | Gil Ronen
    About one third of the wounded Syrians who received treatment in recent months in hospitals in northern Israel carry an abnormally high number of bacteria, some of which are either uncommon or unknown in Israel. Some of these bacteria are resistant to all effective antibiotic treatments, reports Israel Hayom, based on statements by senior medical sources in the Health Ministry Directorate and internal documents. The Syrians are being treated for injuries suffered in the civil war that has been raging in their country for the past three years. …
  • A New Weapon in the Fight against Superbugs

    11/05/2013 7:26:41 AM PST · by null and void · 2 replies
    Scientific Computing ^ | Fri, 11/01/2013 - 9:14am | American Institute of Physics
    The ever-increasing threat from "superbugs" — strains of pathogenic bacteria that are impervious to the antibiotics that subdued their predecessor generations — has forced the medical community to look for bactericidal weapons outside the realm of traditional drugs. One promising candidate is the antimicrobial peptide (AMP), one of Mother Nature's lesser-known defenses against infections, that kills a pathogen by creating, then expanding, nanometer-sized pores in the cell membrane until it bursts. However, before this phenomenon can be exploited as a medical therapy, researchers need a better understanding of how AMPs and membranes interact at the molecular level. Using a novel...
  • 'We've reached the end of antibiotics': Top CDC expert declares

    10/26/2013 10:13:54 AM PDT · by MinorityRepublican · 133 replies
    The Daily Mail ^ | 26 October 2013 | SNEJANA FARBEROV
    A high-ranking official with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has declared in an interview with PBS that the age of antibiotics has come to an end. 'For a long time, there have been newspaper stories and covers of magazines that talked about "The end of antibiotics, question mark?"' said Dr Arjun Srinivasan. 'Well, now I would say you can change the title to "The end of antibiotics, period.”' The associate director of the CDC sat down with Frontline over the summer for a lengthy interview about the growing problem of antibacterial resistance. Srinivasan, who is also featured in...
  • Atomic-Scale Structure of Ribosome Could Lead to Better Antibiotics

    06/30/2013 9:56:45 PM PDT · by neverdem · 8 replies
    SciTech Daily ^ | June 28, 2013 | Staff
    Researchers at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have imaged the atom-by-atom structure of the ribosome attached to a molecule that controls its motion for the first time, providing a step forward for the development of better antibiotics.The above image may look like a tangle of squiggly lines, but youÂ’re actually looking at a molecular machine called a ribosome. Its job is to translate DNA sequences into proteins, the workhorse compounds that sustain you and all living things.The image is also a milestone. ItÂ’s the first time the atom-by-atom structure of the ribosome has been seen as itÂ’s attached to a...
  • Antibiotic killing mechanism debate continues

    06/29/2013 3:50:38 PM PDT · by neverdem · 4 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 28 June 2013 | Emma Stoye
    Antibiotics can kill bacteria without the need for reactive oxygen species (ROS). That's the claim of new research, which has added new evidence into the emerging debate over how antibiotics exert their lethal effects.A study in 2007 suggested that all antibiotics kill by triggering the production of ROS, which interfere with bacterial cell processes.1 This hypothesis gained widespread support, but there is a growing body of evidence that this is wrong. This latest study, led by Frederic Barras from Aix-Marseille University in France2, showed that Escherichia coli strains that were hypersensitive to ROS, such as superoxide or hydrogen peroxide, were...
  • Silver makes antibiotics thousands of times more effective

    06/21/2013 9:02:11 PM PDT · by neverdem · 43 replies
    Nature News ^ | June 19, 2013 | Brian Owens
    Ancient antimicrobial treatment could help to solve modern bacterial resistance. Like werewolves and vampires, bacteria have a weakness: silver. The precious metal has been used to fight infection for thousands of years — Hippocrates first described its antimicrobial properties in 400 bc — but how it works has been a mystery. Now, a team led by James Collins, a biomedical engineer at Boston University in Massachusetts, has described how silver can disrupt bacteria, and shown that the ancient treatment could help to deal with the thoroughly modern scourge of antibiotic resistance. The work is published today in Science Translational Medicine1....
  • Antibiotics could cure 40pc of chronic back pain patients

    05/08/2013 5:59:24 PM PDT · by djf · 52 replies
    The radical findings follow years of debate about the cause of such discomfort and the best way to treat it. One leading neurosurgeon said the finding was a “turning point” so important that the researchers behind it deserved a Nobel prize. But infection experts cautioned against widespread long-term prescribing of antibiotics, which could increase drug resistance across the population, triggering a rise in superbugs. Around five million people in Britain will suffer chronic back pain at some point in their lives, and the cause is often not clear.
  • Survival Antibiotics

    04/09/2013 3:34:10 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 94 replies
    doomandbloom.net ^ | 4/8/13 | Dr. Bones and Nurse Amy
    · Amoxicillin 250mg AND 500mg (FISH-MOX, FISH-MOX FORTE) · Ciprofloxacin 250mg and 500mg(FISH-FLOX, FISH-FLOX FORTE) · Cephalexin 250mg and 500mg (FISH-FLEX, FISH-FLEX FORTE) · Metronidazole 250mg (FISH-ZOLE) · Doxycycline 100mg (BIRD-BIOTIC) · Ampicillin 250mg and 500mg (FISH-CILLIN, FISH-CILLIN FORTE) Clindamycin 300mg (FISH-CIN) · Sulfamethoxazole 400mg/Trimethoprin 80mg (BIRD-SULFA)
  • Resurrection of 3-billion-year-old antibiotic-resistance proteins

    03/19/2013 9:47:51 PM PDT · by neverdem · 9 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | February 27, 2013 | NA
    Scientists are reporting "laboratory resurrections" of several 2-3-billion-year-old proteins that are ancient ancestors of the enzymes that enable today's antibiotic-resistant bacteria to shrug off huge doses of penicillins, cephalosporins and other modern drugs. The achievement, reported in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, opens the door to a scientific "replay" of the evolution of antibiotic resistance with an eye to finding new ways to cope with the problem. Jose M. Sanchez-Ruiz, Eric A. Gaucher, Valeria A. Risso and colleagues explain that antibiotic resistance existed long before Alexander Fleming discovered the first antibiotic in 1928. Genes that contain instructions for...
  • New antibiotics: what's the hold up?

    03/19/2013 9:19:09 PM PDT · by neverdem · 2 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 6 March 2013 | Derek Lowe
    If you’re an editor in need of a medical headline to fill out some column space, I can recommend ‘New antibiotics needed, experts warn’. Don’t worry if you don’t have all the details: experts are always warning about that, and unfortunately, they’re always right. That headline’s been valid for years now, and it looks like it will be good for quite a few more.Now, why should that be? Here’s a large market, with a substantial unmet need that’s doing nothing but growing over time. Why aren’t the pharma research labs stepping up to fill it? You can get several answers...
  • Battleground develops over antibiotic killing mechanism

    03/17/2013 10:58:55 AM PDT · by neverdem · 3 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 8 March 2013 | Simon Hadlington
    Some researchers propose that all antibiotics kill cells using reactive oxygen species, whereas others favour individual paths © ShutterstockThe esoteric yet deadly serious world of antibiotic chemistry looks set for something of a showdown. Two new pieces of research appear to flatly contradict a new school of thought about how antibiotics kill bacteria, which has been gaining traction in recent years. The topic is important because a detailed understanding of the mechanism of action of antibiotics is key to the development of new and more efficient antibiotics in the face of mounting resistance to antibiotics by pathogenic microbes.In 2007, a...
  • Rare Superbug Spreads in US

    02/27/2013 4:58:19 PM PST · by Doogle · 37 replies
    FOX NEWS ^ | 02/27/13 | FOX
    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is alerting clinicians of an emerging untreatable multidrug-resistant organism in the United States. There are many forms of Carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE), but of the 37 forms reported in the U.S., 15 have been reported in less than a year. The CDC said the increase in CRE means health care providers need to “act aggressively to prevent the emergence and spread of these unusual CRE organisms.” Enterobacteriaceae lives in water, soil and the human gut. These “surperbugs” have developed high levels of resistance to antibiotics – even carbapanems. Individuals who usually develop CRE infections...
  • Sweat protects us from dangerous bugs

    02/24/2013 10:54:27 PM PST · by neverdem · 11 replies
    The Times of India ^ | Feb 22, 2013 | NA
    Scientists has discovered how an important natural antibiotic called dermcidin, produced by our skin when we sweat, is a highly efficient tool to fight tuberculosis germs and other dangerous bugs. Their results could contribute to the development of new antibiotics that control multi-resistant bacteria. Scientists from the University of Edinburgh and from Goettingen, Tuebingen and Strasbourg have uncovered the atomic structure of the compound, enabling them to pinpoint for the first time what makes dermcidin such an efficient weapon in the battle against dangerous bugs. Although about 1700 types of these natural antibiotics are known to exist, scientists did not...
  • Diagnosing bacterial growth

    02/07/2013 4:34:32 PM PST · by neverdem · 16 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 6 February 2013 | Harriet Brewerton
    Antibiotics are used regularly for treating bacterial infections, but there is currently no quick and simple test to determine the most effective type or dose of antibiotic for a specific patient infection. As a result, it’s estimated that around 30% of all antibiotic prescriptions are not the optimum choice. This can lead to the formation of drug-resistant bacteria, delayed recovery, and in some cases death from an infection.Tests for the most appropriate antibiotic choice are performed for life-threatening patient infections. However, microbes have to be grown on agar plates from a very small patient sample which delays results for a...
  • Antibiotic-resistant diseases pose 'apocalyptic' threat, top expert says

    01/24/2013 6:17:45 AM PST · by cartan · 17 replies
    The Guardian ^ | 2013-01-23 | Ian Sample
    Britain's most senior medical adviser has warned MPs that the rise in drug-resistant diseases could trigger a national emergency comparable to a catastrophic terrorist attack, pandemic flu or major coastal flooding. Dame Sally Davies, the chief medical officer, said the threat from infections that are resistant to frontline antibiotics was so serious that the issue should be added to the government's national risk register of civil emergencies. She described what she called an "apocalyptic scenario" where people going for simple operations in 20 years' time die of routine infections "because we have run out of antibiotics".
  • Study: Feces Transplant More Effective For Diarrhea Than Antibiotics

    01/17/2013 12:52:05 PM PST · by knife6375 · 47 replies
    CBS CONNECTICUT ^ | January 17, 2013 12:24 PM | CBS CONNECTICUT
    A procedure that inserts fecal matter from a healthy person into the intestines of someone with diarrhea has been found to be a better treatment than antibiotics.
  • Panda Blood Compound 6x More Powerful Than Current Antibiotics

    01/01/2013 1:54:41 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 31 replies
    DVICE ^ | Jan 1, 2013 | Evan Ackerman
    Panda blood compound 6x more powerful than current antibiotics In what could be either very good news or very bad news for our fluffy black and white friends, it's been discovered that panda blood contains an antibiotic compound that's vastly more powerful than anything we've got right now. Researchers at the Life Sciences College of Nanjing Agricultural University in China have extracted a compound called cathelicidin-AM from the blood of giant pandas. Cathelicidin-AM is what's called a gene-encoded antimicrobial peptide, a natural antibiotic that's produced by a panda's immune cells. Testing has shown that cathelicidin-AM can kill even drug resistant...
  • KFC faces food-safety investigation in China

    01/01/2013 9:11:37 AM PST · by Olog-hai · 17 replies
    Daily Telegraph (UK) ^ | 2:52PM GMT 01 Jan 2013 | Malcolm Moore
    Kentucky Fried Chicken, which has become a staple food for young Chinese, is under investigation in Shanghai for containing high levels of antibiotics. The Shanghai Food and Drug Administration told the Oriental Daily newspaper that it has launched a formal investigation and would shortly publish its findings. …
  • How to Stockpile Antibiotics for Long Term Survival

    10/19/2012 6:34:47 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 94 replies
    Daily Survival ^ | 10/19/12 | The Survival Woman
    A month or so ago, I happened to mention that I had purchased some antibiotics to stockpile for long term survival purposes. It’s not, you know, that I believe in popping antibiotics every time I get a sniffle. Nothing could be further from the truth. But a recent situation where I had a very bad tooth abscess that had to go untreated for almost a week convinced me that antibiotics for use in a collapse situation were an important part of my preps. Let me say this: I am not a health care professional nor am I especially qualified on...
  • Vitamin B3 May Help Kill Superbugs

    10/07/2012 11:17:41 AM PDT · by CutePuppy · 43 replies
    Medical News Today (MNT) ^ | August 25, 2012 | Catharine Paddock, PhD
    Nicotinamide, commonly known as vitamin B3, may help the innate immune system kill antibiotic-resistant staph bacteria, the so-called "superbugs". In lab work done with mice and human blood, researchers found high doses of the vitamin increased the ability of immune cells to kill the bacteria by 1,000 times.The discovery opens the door to a new arsenal of tools for dealing with antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections, such as those caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus or MRSA, that have killed thousands of people around the world. They are increasing in hospitals and nursing homes, and also rising in prisons, among athletes, people in...
  • A Doctor's Thoughts on Antibiotics, Expiration Dates

    09/14/2012 4:31:38 PM PDT · by Kartographer · 142 replies
    Survival Blog ^ | 7/26/10 | Dr. Bones
    As a recently-retired physician who is married to a nurse-midwife, my preparedness group looks to us as the post-TEOTWAWKI hospital and medical staff. Medical progress has been exponential and even just the last decade of scientific breakthroughs can equal a century of improvement in medical treatments, surgical techniques and pharmaceuticals. However, in the years (months?) ahead, the crumbling of the infrastructure and devolution of society in general will very likely throw us back to a medical system that existed in the 19th Century. Let’s take an example: When the U.S. was a young nation, the average woman could expect to...
  • Listed Chinese pharma used gutter oil to make antibiotics

    09/03/2012 6:10:33 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 29 replies
    WantChinaTimes.com ^ | 9/1/12 | Staff Reporter
    A company in Shanghai which collects "gutter" oil. (Photo/Xinhua) Joincare Pharmaceutical Group, which is listed on the Shanghai Stock Exchange, has been accused of using recycled waste cooking oil as an ingredient in antibiotics, reports the Shanghai Securities News. Citing the indictment filed by prosecutors with the Ningbo Intermediate People's Court in Zhejiang province, the newspaper said Joincare was the largest user of the "gutter" oil produced by Gelin Biology Company in Jinan, Shandong province. Gutter oil refers to waste oil collected from restaurants and illegally reused. The prosecutors said Gelin sold its gutter oil to a company called...
  • NIH superbug outbreak highlights lack of new antibiotics

    08/25/2012 10:31:56 PM PDT · by null and void · 38 replies
    Washington Post ^ | August 24 | Brian Vastag
    As doctors battled a deadly, drug-resistant superbug at the National Institutes of Health’s Clinical Center last year, they turned to an antibiotic of last resort. But colistin, is not a fancy new creation of modern biotechnology. It was discovered in a beaker of fermenting bacteria in Japan — in 1949. That doctors have resorted to such an old, dangerous drug — colistin causes kidney damage — highlights the lack of new antibiotics coming out of the pharmaceutical pipeline ... Experts point to three reasons pharmaceutical companies have pulled back from antibiotics ... There is not much money in it; inventing...
  • Gonorrhea Evades Antibiotics, Leaving Only One Drug To Treat Disease

    08/14/2012 12:22:17 PM PDT · by Mrs. Don-o · 43 replies
    All Things Considered - NPR ^ | August 9, 2012 | Rob Stein
    Pictures, If You Can Stand It. Health officials say they're worried that one day there will be no more antibiotics left to treat gonorrhea. There's some disturbing news out today about a disease we don't hear about much these days: gonorrhea. Federal health officials announced that the sexually transmitted infection is getting dangerously close to being untreatable. As a result, the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention issued new guidelines for how doctors should treat gonorrhea. The guidelines are designed to keep one of the remaining effective antibiotics useful for as long as possible by restricting the use of...
  • Gonorrhea growing resistant to drugs, WHO warns

    06/06/2012 11:13:25 AM PDT · by C19fan · 18 replies
    AP ^ | June 6, 2012 | Frank Jordans
    A sexually transmitted disease that infects millions of people each year is growing resistant to drugs and could soon become untreatable, the World Health Organization said Wednesday. The U.N. health agency is urging governments and doctors to step up surveillance of antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea, a bacterial infection that can cause inflammation, infertility, pregnancy complications and, in extreme cases, lead to maternal death. Babies born to mothers with gonorrhea have a 50 percent chance of developing eye infections that can result in blindness.
  • Garlic 100 Times Better Than Antibiotics For Food Poisoning

    05/02/2012 8:22:54 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 46 replies
    International Business Times ^ | Wednesday, May 2, 2012 | Amir Khan
    Garlic may be the best weapon against a type of bacteria responsible for millions of cases of food poisoning in the United States every year, according to a new study. Researchers from Washington State University discovered that a compound found in garlic was 100 times more effective than antibiotics at killing Campylobacter, most common cause of food-borne bacterial illness in the United States. The compound, diallyl sulphide, which is responsible for the garlic smell that sticks to your hands when you cook, worked better and faster than the common antibiotic treatments for Campylobacter, erythromycin and ciprofloxacin. Eating massive quantities of...
  • Finally, a smoking gun connecting livestock antibiotics and superbugs

    02/25/2012 9:48:16 AM PST · by JerseyHighlander · 19 replies
    Grist ^ | 24 Feb 2012 7:41 AM | Tom Laskawy
    How does the livestock industry talk about antibiotics? Well, it depends on who’s doing the talking, but they all say some version of the same thing. Take the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association; they say there is “no conclusive scientific evidence indicating the judicious use of antibiotics in cattle herds leads to antimicrobial resistance in humans [MRSA].” Or Ron Phillips of the Animal Health Institute (a drug-industry front group). In an interview on Grist last year, he said that before you can draw any conclusions: … You have to look at specific bug/drug combinations and figure out what are the potential...
  • Antibiotics no help against most sinus infections: study

    02/15/2012 2:16:21 AM PST · by iowamark · 35 replies
    Reuters ^ | Feb. 14, 2012 | Frederik Joelving
    Antibiotics don't help fight most sinus infections, although doctors routinely prescribe them for that purpose, according to a U.S. study. Researchers whose work was published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that antibiotics didn't ease patients' symptoms or get them back to work any sooner than an inactive placebo pill. Antibiotics are known to fuel the evolution of drug-resistant bacteria and experts have grown increasingly worried about overuse. This is a particular concern with sinus infections, because doctors can't tell if the disease is caused by bacteria or by a virus, in which case antibiotics are useless....
  • Antibiotics And Their Use in Collapse Medicine(tm), Part 1

    01/24/2012 9:55:20 AM PST · by Kartographer · 73 replies
    Doom and Bloom.net ^ | 11/28/11 | Dr. Bones
    One of the most common questions that I am asked from prospective survival medics is “What antibiotics should I stockpile and how do I use them?” There isn’t a 60 second answer to this. Actually, there isn’t a 60 MINUTE answer to this, but anyone that is interested in preserving the health of their loved ones in a collapse will have to learn what antibiotics will work in a particular situation. It’s important to start off by saying that you will not want to indiscriminately use antibiotics for every minor ailment that comes along. In a collapse, the medic is...
  • Drugs used to overcome cancer may also combat antibiotic resistance: McMaster researchers

    12/23/2011 8:00:10 AM PST · by decimon · 3 replies
    McMaster University ^ | December 22, 2011
    Hamilton, ON (Dec. 22, 2011) - Drugs used to overcome cancer may also combat antibiotic resistance, finds a new study led by Gerry Wright, scientific director of the Michael G. DeGroote Institute for Infectious Disease Research at McMaster University. "Our study found that certain proteins, called kinases, that confer antibiotic resistance are structurally related to proteins important in cancer," says Wright about the study published in Chemistry & Biology. "The pharmaceutical sector has made a big investment in targeting these proteins, so there are a lot of compounds and drugs out there that, although they were designed to overcome cancer,...
  • Tennessee ranks 3rd in antibiotic use Bacteria can outsmart drugs when overused

    11/18/2011 5:19:09 PM PST · by TennesseeGirl · 13 replies
    ETNWeb ^ | 11/18/2011 | WBIR
    Too many people in Tennessee are asking for antibiotics and too many doctors are prescribing them — a practice that renders once-powerful drugs ineffective against infections, according to a recently released study......“Unless we do something really radical and different, we’re going to lose these drugs,” said Dr. Ramanan Laxminarayan, an epidemiologist and economist in Washington, D.C., who was a co-author of the study. “It’s not like we’re going to. We already have in many instances and things are just getting worse...” (Excerpted) http://www.tennessean.com/article/20111118/NEWS07/311180046/Tenn-ranks-3rd-antibiotic-use
  • When ticks transmit dangerous pathogens (Local antibiotic therapy stops Lyme disease)

    09/15/2011 9:00:47 AM PDT · by decimon · 11 replies
    LMU Munich ^ | September 15, 2011 | Unknown
    > Although the early symptoms of the illness are quite mild, if left untreated, it can result in serious damage to the skin, the joints, the heart and the nervous system, and effective therapy becomes very difficult. A team of researchers led by the veterinary bacteriologist Professor Reinhard Straubinger at Ludwig-Maximilians Universität (LMU) München has now shown, in an animal model, that application of a gel containing the antibiotic azithromycin to the site of the bite rapidly terminates the infection. The efficacy of this local antibiotic therapy for the treatment of borreliosis in humans is now being tested in a...
  • Gonorrhoea strain found to be 'resistant to antibiotics'

    07/11/2011 4:13:09 PM PDT · by decimon · 18 replies
    BBC ^ | July 11, 2011 | Unknown
    A new strain of the sexually transmitted disease gonorrhoea has become resistant to antibiotics, international research shows. Analysis of the bacterium that causes gonorrhoea found a new variant which is very effective at mutating. Scientists from the Swedish Reference Laboratory warn that the infection could now become a global threat to public health. New drugs to delay the spread of the infection are needed, experts say. The first case of antibiotic-resistant gonorrhoea was found in Japan. By analysing this new strain of neisseria gonorrhoea, called H041, researchers identified the genetic mutations responsible for the new strain's extreme resistance to all...
  • The Emergence, in Homosexual and Bi-Sexual Men, of Decreased Sensitivity of Gonorrhea to Antibiotics

    07/12/2011 3:15:18 PM PDT · by NYer · 26 replies
    GerardNadal ^ | July 12, 2011 | Dr. Gerard M. Nadal, Ph.D.
    Guess that it was bound to happen. Was just a matter of time. But now I’ve come to my decision, And it’s one of the painful kind. ‘Cause now it seems that you wanted a martyr. Just a regular guy wouldn’t do. But baby I can’t hang upon no lover’s cross for you. ~ Jim CroceThis sweet, sad lyric by Jim Croce may well be the new anthem in the sexual revolution, as word comes recently from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention that strains of Gonorhhea that are resistant to all antibiotics have now emerged. Get all of...
  • Spoonful of Sugar Helps the Persistent Bacteria Go Down [good news!]

    05/16/2011 6:21:17 PM PDT · by Clint Williams · 46 replies
    Slashdot ^ | 5/16/11 | samzenpus
    Doctors have discovered that adding sugar to antibiotics increases their ability to knock out persistent staph infections (abstract). Certain types of bacteria called persisters shut down their metabolic processes when exposed to antibiotics. Adding sugar keeps the bacteria feeding, making them more susceptible to drugs. From the article: "Adding such a simple and widely available compound to existing antibiotics enhances their effectiveness against persisters, and fast. One test showed that a sugared up antibiotic could eliminate 99.9 percent of persisters in two hours, while a regular antibiotic did nothing. Doctors believe that this discovery will help treat urinary tract infections,...
  • Degradable Nanoparticles Search, Intercept and Destroy Antibiotic-Resistant Bacteria

    04/05/2011 11:17:20 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 5 replies
    Popular Science ^ | 04.04.2011 at 9:17 am | By Rebecca Boyle
    A new breed of biodegradable nanoparticles can glom on to drug-resistant bacteria, breaching their cell walls and leaking out their contents, selectively killing them. The polymer particles could someday be used in anything from injectable treatments for drug-resistant bacteria, to new antibacterial soaps and deodorants, according to inventors at IBM. After their work is done, the particles break apart, flushing away with the invaders they destroyed. The nanoparticles, which IBM says are relatively inexpensive, were effective against bugs that have been evolving to resist antibiotics, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Preliminary results suggest the particles could also be effective against...
  • The spread of superbugs - What can be done about the rising risk of antibiotic resistance?

    04/05/2011 11:05:59 AM PDT · by neverdem · 45 replies
    The Economist ^ | Mar 31st 2011 | Masthead Editorial
    ON DECEMBER 11th 1945, at the end of his Nobel lecture, Alexander Fleming sounded a warning. Fleming’s chance observation of the antibiotic effects of a mould called Penicillium on one of his bacterial cultures had inspired his co-laureates, Howard Florey and Ernst Chain, two researchers based in Oxford, to extract the mould’s active principal and turn it into the miracle cure now known as penicillin. But Fleming could already see the future of antibiotic misuse. “There is the danger”, he said, “that the ignorant man may easily underdose himself and by exposing his microbes to non-lethal quantities of the drug...