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Keyword: antibiotics

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  • Saudi Youth’s Initiative to Stop Overuse of Antibiotics

    04/22/2017 7:58:47 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 5 replies
    Saudi Gazette ^ | April 21, 2017
    THE Saudi Antibiotics Integrated Regulatory Program (SAIR) is an initiative launched by Mohammed Alaqil concerning the misuse and abuse of antibiotics and the issue of superbugs in Saudi Arabia. It is the first initiative and program where the idea is educational and supported by several international and national organizations. SAIR program has been working with several universities in the United States including Portland State University & Georgetown University. As a first plan, symposiums, seminars, and campaigns will be held and then it would be transmitted to the MENA region within the extended plan of SAIR for Middle East & North...
  • Israelis fight antibiotic resistant bacteria

    03/06/2017 4:23:32 PM PST · by Eleutheria5 · 13 replies
    What happens when bacteria evolves to the point where antibiotics are no longer effective? One Israeli company is working hard... Embedded video. No You Tube link at present
  • 'Brute force' can overcome antibiotic resistance

    02/06/2017 4:23:08 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 11 replies
    University College London ^ | February 3, 2017
    Antibiotics can still kill drug-resistant bacteria if they 'push' hard enough into bacterial cells, finds new UCL-led research funded by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council. The study, published in Nature Scientific Reports, opens up a promising new way of overcoming antibiotic resistance and could help scientists to design even more effective drugs. "Antibiotics work in different ways, but they all need to bind to bacterial cells in order to kill them," explains lead author Dr Joseph Ndieyira (UCL Medicine). "Antibiotics have 'keys' that fit 'locks' on bacterial cell surfaces, allowing them to latch on. When a bacterium becomes...
  • US woman dies of infection resistant to all 26 available antibiotics

    01/16/2017 3:21:22 PM PST · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 67 replies
    Agence France Presse via Yahoo ^ | January 13, 20171/13/17 | Agence France Presse (AFP)
    <p>The specific strain of CRE, known as Klebsiella pneumoniae, was isolated from one of her wounds in August.</p> <p>Tests were negative for the mcr-1 gene—a great concern to health experts because it makes bacteria resistant to the antibiotic of last resort, colistin.</p>
  • Evolutionists Couldn’t Have Been More Wrong About Antibiotic Resistance

    12/16/2016 2:27:06 PM PST · by fishtank · 224 replies
    Proslogion ^ | Dec. 15, 2016 | Dr. Jay Wile
    Evolutionists Couldn’t Have Been More Wrong About Antibiotic Resistance Dec. 15, 2016 A colony of bacteria similar to the one analyzed in the study being discussed. (click for credit) A colony of bacteria similar to the one analyzed in the study being discussed. (click for credit) Back when I went to university, I was taught (as definitive fact) that bacteria evolved resistance to antibiotics as a result of the production of antibiotics. This was, of course, undeniable evidence for the fact that new genes can arise through a process of mutation and natural selection. Like most evolution-inspired ideas, however, the...
  • Tasmanian Devil Milk Kills Several Deadly Superbugs That Are Resistant to Existing Drugs

    11/16/2016 9:53:18 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 43 replies
    A whole new way to fight antibiotic resistance.Scientists have discovered that Tasmanian devil milk contains an arsenal of antimicrobial compounds that can kill some of the most deadly bacterial and fungal infections known to science - including golden staph. Tasmanian devils were found to produce six different types of these antimicrobial compounds - humans produce just one - and scientists were able to successfully synthesise them in the lab to test their effectiveness against a number of drug-resistant bacterial and fungal pathogens. When tested against 25 different bacterial and six fungal strains, the six varieties of antimicrobial compounds were found...
  • China on track to top the world in childhood obesity

    10/08/2016 7:24:37 PM PDT · by Mrs. Don-o · 31 replies
    South China Morning Post ^ | 08 October, 2016 | Jane Li
    China’s future is looking fatter, with the country on track to have the greatest number of overweight children aged five to 17.9 years by 2025, according to a report released by the World Obesity Federation. If trends continued, the mainland was expected to have 48.5 million overweight children in 2025, more than the population of Spain, the study said. That compared with a projected 17.3 million overweight children in India and 16.7 million in the United States. The study said an estimated 1.5 million Chinese children would have impaired glucose tolerance while 4.6 million would have fatty liver disease,...
  • Get Your Children Good and Dirty [WSJ Saturday Essay]

    09/16/2016 4:42:21 AM PDT · by SES1066 · 15 replies
    Wall Street Journal / WSJ.COM ^ | 09/15/16 | B. BRETT FINLAY and MARIE-CLAIRE ARRIETA
    Never before in human history have babies and children grown up so cleanly, and our diets have lost many of the elements most crucial to the health of our guts. We have become very bad hosts to our microbes. [snip] Babies and toddlers often aren’t allowed to play in the dirt or sand, and when they are, they are wiped clean immediately. Phrases like, “Yuck! Don’t play in the mud!” or “Don’t touch that bug, it’s dirty!” have become second nature. We need to unlearn these habits. By preventing babies and children from following their innate impulse to get dirty,...
  • WHO urges shift in STD treatment due to antibiotic resistance (Update)

    08/30/2016 1:48:55 PM PDT · by Tilted Irish Kilt · 27 replies
    medicalxpress ^ | August 30, 2016
    Growing resistance to antibiotics has complicated efforts to rein in common sexually transmitted diseases like gonorrhoea, chlamydia and syphilis, the World Health Organization warned Tuesday as it issued new treatment guidelines. Globally, more than one million people contract a sexually transmitted disease (STD) or infection (STI) every day, WHO said. "Chlamydia, gonorrhoea and syphilis are major public health problems worldwide, affecting millions of peoples' quality of life, causing serious illness and sometimes death," Ian Askew, head of WHO's reproductive health and research division, said in a statement.
  • Scientists sniff out new antibiotic - inside the human nose

    07/27/2016 1:44:03 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 17 replies
    www.theguardian.com ^ | 07 - 27 - 2016 | Staff
    Antibiotic made by nose microbes kills MRSA, say researchers, amid hopes that more weapons in the fight against drug resistance might be found in the body Nose-dwelling microbes produce an antibiotic which kills the hospital superbug MRSA, scientists have discovered. The finding suggests that the human body might harbour a rich variety of bacteria that could be harnessed in the fight against antibiotic resistance. Antibiotic resistance is a growing cause for concern, with experts warning of an impending “apocalyptic” situation in which patients die following routine surgery because of infections that can no longer be treated. Among the superbugs of...
  • Outbreak of super STI (Gonorrhea) is proving difficult to contain ("Untreatable" "Soon unstoppable")

    06/02/2016 4:00:15 PM PDT · by Mrs. Don-o · 73 replies
    mirror.co.uk ^ | June 2, 2016 | Dr Miriam Stoppard
    Gonorrhea was relatively benign in years gone by, going by the name “the clap” and was easily treated with penicillin. Now it’s a monster. A super-resistant form is cutting a swath through straight and gay communities. When it emerged in Leeds last year, the new superbug prompted a national alert when one of the main treatments became useless against it. The Neisseria ­gonorrhoeae infection is spread through unprotected vaginal, oral and anal sex. Left untreated, gonorrhoea can lead to pelvic inflammatory disease. Inflammation of the ­fallopian tubes can cause a blockage which can result in infertility. Gonorrhoea can also be...
  • The superbug that doctors have been dreading just reached the U.S.

    05/26/2016 12:58:23 PM PDT · by C19fan · 51 replies
    Washington Post ^ | May 26, 2016 | Lena H. Sun and Brady Dennis
    For the first time, researchers have found a person in the United States carrying bacteria resistant to antibiotics of last resort, an alarming development that the top U.S. public health official says could mean "the end of the road" for antibiotics. The antibiotic-resistant strain was found last month in the urine of a 49-year-old Pennsylvania woman. Defense Department researchers determined that she carried a strain of E. coli resistant to the antibiotic colistin, according to a study published Thursday in Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, a publication of the American Society for Microbiology. The authors wrote that the discovery "heralds the...
  • “DIY Antibiotics”: What To Grow to Protect Your Health In a Crisis

    05/01/2016 4:47:36 PM PDT · by Mechanicos · 40 replies
    Freedom Outpost ^ | April 30, 2016 | Mac Slavo
    ... Yes, you can make your own anti-biotics at home. I’ll show you how to make a really super powerful one (it’s easy to do). Anyone can do it. Most people will want to do this in their backyards or on a patio. But I suppose you could do it indoors too. This one I’ll show you how to make is way more complex than anything the pharmaceutical companies can produce, yet it is simpler and easier to make. No, you won’t need a lab of chemistry set. No, you won’t need microscopes or chemicals. Nope, you won’t even need...
  • This superbug is resistant to last-resort antibiotics. It's been found on multiple continents.

    01/01/2016 4:03:42 PM PST · by bitt · 44 replies
    THE WEEK ^ | 12/25/2015 | Helen Branswell
    Epidemiologists — people who track diseases — use an expression: Seek and ye shall find. It's a reminder that sometimes when you see a phenomenon, it may not be entirely new. It may be that you've only just noticed it. Well, the world seems to be having a major seek-and-ye-shall-find moment right now with a worrisome new superbug. In late December, reports emerged that the mcr-1 gene, which confers resistance to an important antibiotic of last-resort, has been found in bacteria previously collected in the Netherlands, Laos, Algeria, Thailand, and France. There is reason to believe it may also be...
  • Antibiotic resistance: World on cusp of 'post-antibiotic era'

    11/20/2015 4:13:13 PM PST · by sparklite2 · 38 replies
    BBC News ^ | 19 November 2015 | James Gallagher
    The world is on the cusp of a "post-antibiotic era", scientists have warned after finding bacteria resistant to drugs used when all other treatments have failed. They identified bacteria able to shrug off the drug of last resort - colistin - in patients and livestock in China. They said that resistance would spread around the world and raised the spectre of untreatable infections.
  • This new report paints a troubling picture of America’s fast food chains

    09/15/2015 7:40:35 PM PDT · by ConservativeStatement · 51 replies
    Business Insider ^ | September 15, 2015 | Julia Calderone and Dave Mosher,
    An alliance of consumer, health, and environmental groups have released a new report showing how the nation's top 25 fast food companies by sales stack up on their policies regarding antibiotic use in their meat. The results are dismal: The report gave 20 of the 25 companies failing grades for not effectively responding to a "growing public health threat by publicly adopting policies restricting routine antibiotic use" in meat.
  • Home-Brew: Scientists Tweak Yeast to Grow Morphine

    05/19/2015 8:16:04 PM PDT · by smokingfrog · 31 replies
    NBC ^ | 5-19-15 | Maggie Fox
    Researchers have figured out how to get yeast to produce morphine, codeine and other similar drugs and have immediately urged regulators to control these drug-brewing yeasts before people start trying to make them at home. They genetically engineered simple brewer's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and came up with a strain that can make very complicated plant compounds that include opioid drugs such as morphine, as well as some antibiotics and muscle relaxants. It's an important technical step, because now these drugs have to be synthesized directly from plants—an inefficient process. The yeast process isn't that efficient yet, either, but once it's...
  • Discovery lays the foundation for yeast-based drug synthesis [Morphine,& Opioids!]

    05/18/2015 12:06:04 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 8 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 05-18-2015 | Journal reference: Nature
    Fans of homebrewed beer and backyard distilleries already know how to employ yeast to convert sugar into alcohol. But a research team led by bioengineers at the University of California, Berkeley, has gone much further by completing key steps needed to turn sugar-fed yeast into a microbial factory for producing morphine and potentially other drugs, including antibiotics and anti-cancer therapeutics. Over the past decade, a handful of synthetic-biology labs have been working on replicating in microbes a complex, 15-step chemical pathway in the poppy plant to enable production of therapeutic drugs. Research teams have independently recreated different sections of the...
  • Antibiotics that target mitochondria effectively eradicate cancer stem cells...

    02/08/2015 4:37:54 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 25 replies
    Impact Journals ^ | January 22, 2015 | Various
    Abstract Here, we propose a new strategy for the treatment of early cancerous lesions and advanced metastatic disease, via the selective targeting of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a.k.a., tumor-initiating cells (TICs). We searched for a global phenotypic characteristic that was highly conserved among cancer stem cells, across multiple tumor types, to provide a mutation-independent approach to cancer therapy. This would allow us to target cancer stem cells, effectively treating cancer as a single disease of “stemness”, independently of the tumor tissue type. Using this approach, we identified a conserved phenotypic weak point – a strict dependence on mitochondrial biogenesis for...
  • The World Is Facing A Health Crisis It Doesn't Have The Weapons To Attack

    12/10/2014 11:24:12 PM PST · by blam · 12 replies
    BI _ Reuters ^ | 12-11-2014 | Kate Kelland, Reuters
    Kate Kelland, Reuters December 10, 2014LONDON, Dec 11 (Reuters) - Drug-resistant superbugs could kill an extra 10 million people a year and cost up to $100 trillion by 2050 if their rampant global spread is not halted, according to a British government-commissioned review. Such infections already kill hundreds of thousands of people a year and the trend is growing, the review said, adding: "The importance of effective antimicrobial drugs cannot be overplayed." Former Goldman Sachs chief economist Jim O'Neill, who led the work, noted that in Europe and the United States alone around 50,000 people currently die each year from...