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Keyword: archaeology

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  • Study Of Ancient Skulls Suggest There May Have Been Multiple Migrations Into The Americas

    03/06/2017 1:25:33 PM PST · by blam · 49 replies
    Phys.org/news ^ | 2-23-2017
    (Phys.org)—A trio of researchers affiliated with institutions in the U.S., Europe and South America has found evidence that suggests the native people of South America likely arrived from more than one place. In their paper published in the journal Science Advances, Noreen von Cramon-Taubadel, André Strauss and Mark Hubbe describe how they applied imaging technology to skulls that have been unearthed in Brazil and what was revealed. For many years, it was believed that a single wave of ancient immigrants made their way from Asia to North America and eventually to South America—the first people to exist in the New...
  • Top 10 Discoveries of 2016

    01/04/2017 11:12:28 PM PST · by YCTHouston · 11 replies
    Archaeology Magazine ^ | 12/12/2016 | The Editors
    The largest and most significant collection of Roman waxed writing tablets is providing an intriguing glimpse into life in early Roman London. More than 400 wooden tablets were unearthed by archaeologists from Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA) during excavations at the site of the Bloomberg company’s new European headquarters. Roman London (called Londinium) was founded around A.D. 50, and the recovered texts, written by ordinary residents, record various names, as well as events and transactions that took place during the settlement’s first few decades.
  • New Dead Sea Scrolls Fragments Found in Judean Desert

    12/23/2016 8:15:27 AM PST · by Red Badger · 22 replies
    www.haaretz.com ^ | 12-21-2016 | Philippe Bohstrom
    New fragments of the Dead Sea Scrolls have been found in the Cave of the Skulls by the Dead Sea in Israel, in a salvage excavation by Israeli authorities. The pieces are small and the writing on them is too faded to make out without advanced analysis. At this stage the archaeologists aren't even sure if they're written in ancient Hebrew, Aramaic or another language. “The most important thing that can come out of these fragments is if we can connect them with other documents that were looted from the Judean Desert, and that have no known provenance," says Dr....
  • Bronze Coin Dating Back to Maccabean Revolt Discovered in Jerusalem

    12/21/2016 6:55:59 AM PST · by Eleutheria5 · 32 replies
    A bronze coin that was in circulation in the time of King Antiochus IV Epiphanes, who decreed that the Jews must be annihilated and during whose reign the Maccabean revolt made famous in the Chanukah story took place, has been discovered at the Tower of David archaeological site in Jerusalem. The discovery, made during routine maintenance work, was a surprise to archaeologists working at the Tower of David citadel. The archaeologists believed they had thoroughly excavated the site during the last few decades. Nevertheless, chief conservator Orna Cohen noticed a metal object among the stones of the Hasmonean Wall inside...
  • Ancient Wind God Temple Found Under Mexico City Supermarket

    12/02/2016 12:41:07 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 19 replies
    Seeker ^ | 2 Dec, 2016 | ROSSELLA LORENZI
    The temple, 36 feet across, falls within what is believed to be the perimeter of a large ceremonial site in the Tlatelolco neighborhood. Archaeologists excavating the site of a demolished supermarket in Mexico City have unearthed a circular temple built more than 650 years ago for an Aztec deity. The platform, about 36 feet in diameter and four feet tall, was part of the sacred area of the city-state Tlatelolco and was likely dedicated to the god of wind Ehecatl-Quetzalcoatl. It now stands just yards away from the site of the Tlatelolco 1968 massacre, where Mexican soldiers killed protesting students....
  • Extremely rare and ancient 'thinking man' jug discovered in Israel

    11/23/2016 7:00:16 AM PST · by Red Badger · 25 replies
    www.ibtimes.co.uk ^ | November 23, 2016 13:54 GMT | By Hannah Osborne
    Excavators unearth the ancient 'thinking man' jug at at an archaeological site in Yehud, Israel (Israel Antiquities Authority) ================================================================================================================================== An ancient jug bearing the image of a "reflective" person has been discovered in Israel. The vessel dates back to the Middle Bronze Age and is believed to be approximately 3,800 years old. Archaeologists at the site in Yehud said similar pottery jugs have never before been found in the country. The jug is believed to have been a funeral offering to a "respected member of the ancient settlement," a statement from Israel Antiquities Authority said. It was found alongside daggers,...
  • Significant Bronze Age city discovered in Northern Iraq

    11/07/2016 7:32:42 AM PST · by JimSEA · 9 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 11/7/2016 | University of Tübingen
    Archeologists from the Institute for Ancient Near Eastern Studies (IANES) at the University of Tübingen have uncovered a large Bronze Age city not far from the town of Dohuk in northern Iraq. The excavation work has demonstrated that the settlement, which is now home to the small Kurdish village of Bassetki in the Autonomous Region of Kurdistan, was established in about 3000 BC and was able to flourish for more than 1200 years. The archeologists also discovered settlement layers dating from the Akkadian Empire period (2340-2200 BC), which is regarded as the first world empire in human history. Scientists headed...
  • Ancient Beverage Brewed In Milwaukee

    10/28/2016 9:51:13 AM PDT · by fishtank · 27 replies
    Archaeology ^ | 10-25-16 | NPR
    ANCIENT BEVERAGE BREWED IN MILWAUKEE MILWAUKEE, WISCONSIN — NPR reports that archaeologist Bettina Arnold of the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee and her research team worked with Lakefront Brewery to try to re-create an alcoholic beverage that had been placed in a bronze cauldron and buried in a grave sometime between 400 and 450 B.C. in what is now Germany. The recipe was based upon the research of paleobotanist Manfred Rösch, who analyzed the residues in the Iron Age cauldron. He found evidence of honey, meadowsweet, barley, and mint—ingredients in a type of beverage known as a braggot.
  • Ghost fleet: Explorers accidentally find a graveyard of more than 40 perfectly preserved ancient sh

    10/24/2016 12:09:25 PM PDT · by ColdOne · 27 replies
    dailymail.co.uk ^ | 10/24/16 | Shivali Best
    Full title.......Ghost fleet: Explorers accidentally find a graveyard of more than 40 perfectly preserved ancient shipwrecks at the bottom of the Black Sea............................ The Black Sea Maritime Archaeology Project has been scouring the sea bed of the Black Sea The primary focus is to carry out geophysical surveys, but over 40 shipwrecks have also been found They are 'astonishingly well preserved' due to the lack of oxygen in the Black Sea's 'dead zone' The findings provide new information on the communities living on the Black Sea coast
  • Roman coins ID'd in Japanese ruins, but their origin baffles

    10/18/2016 7:08:04 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 16 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Oct 18, 2016 9:18 PM EDT | Mari Yamaguchi
    The eyes of a visiting archaeologist lit up when he was shown the 10 tiny, tarnished discs that had sat unnoticed in storage for two and a half years at a dig on a southern Japan island. He had been to archaeological sites in Italy and Egypt, and recognized the “little round things” as old coins, including a few likely dating to the Roman Empire. “I was so excited I almost forgot what I was there for, and the coins were all we talked about,” said Toshio Tsukamoto of the Gangoji Institute for Research of Cultural Property in Nara, an...
  • Archaeologists unearth ancient gate-shrine in Israel [Psalm 85]

    09/29/2016 2:49:44 PM PDT · by Jan_Sobieski · 5 replies
    Fox News ^ | 9/28/2016 | Staff
    Israeli archaeologists have unearthed a 2,900-year-old gate-shrine they say confirms the biblical story of King Hezekiah, who mandated the worship of God and the rejection of all other deities. The gate-shrine in Tel Lachish National Park was uncovered decades ago, but a new excavation has completely exposed the gate, which is the largest one known from the First Temple period. "The size of the gate is consistent with the historical and archaeological knowledge we possess, whereby Lachish was a major city and the most important one after Jerusalem," said excavation director Sa'ar Ganor. According to the Book of Kings, he...
  • First Temple-Era Gate Shrine Unearthed in Israel [PHOTOS]

    09/28/2016 9:23:26 AM PDT · by Lera · 28 replies
    Breaking Israel News ^ | 9/28/16 | Jonathan Benedek
    Archaeologists have unearthed a city-gate and shrine dating to the First Temple Era. An Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) team headed by Sa'ar Ganor discovered the ruins in the Tel Lachish National Park. "Tel Lachish was the most important city in Judea, after Jerusalem," Ganor told Tazpit Press Service (TPS). "This is the biggest city-gate we have found in the Land of Israel." "The size of the gate is consistent our historical and archaeological data that indicates Lachish was a major city and the most important one after Jerusalem," Ganor said. The city gate is approximately 24 by 24 meters in...
  • Listen To The World's Oldest-Known Melody (1400 BC)

    09/27/2016 10:12:31 AM PDT · by blam · 64 replies
    Fox News Science - Newser ^ | 9-27-2016 | Elizabeth Armstrong Moore
    Elizabeth Armstrong Moore September 27, 2016 In 1950, a collection of 29 tablets was discovered in the ruins of Ugarit, an ancient city in the northern region of present-day Syria, but only one had survived the intervening centuries well enough to be deciphered. Known as H6, the 3,500-year-old clay tablet revealed a simple hymn specifying the use of nine lyre strings and the intervals between them, much like an "ancient guitar tab," reports ClassicFM, which has recently picked up the story. The resulting melody, it says, isn't just the oldest discovered in the world, but "utterly enchanting." Musician and composer...
  • Human skeleton discovered at Antikythera shipwreck after more than 2,000

    09/20/2016 3:08:48 AM PDT · by Islander7 · 21 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | Sept 19, 2016 | By Associated Press and Cheyenne Macdonald
    Full title: Human skeleton discovered at Antikythera shipwreck after more than 2,000 years at the bottom of the sea Buried beneath sand and the fragments of ancient pottery, researchers have discovered the 2,000-year-old remains of a sailor who died upon the ill-fated 'Antikythera ship.' Archaeologists have investigated the famous shipwreck off a tiny Greek island for which it's named for over a century, revealing a trove of remarkable artefacts – including the mysterious 'Antikythera Mechanism,' thought to be a 'guide to the galaxy.'
  • Unearthed Where David Battled Goliath

    09/15/2016 9:16:33 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 15 replies
    Algemeiner ^ | September 11, 2016 | Maayan Jaffe-Hoffman
    Archaeologists believe they have found the location of the battle between David and Goliath, narrated in the Book of Samuel, in a mysterious two-gated city from the early 10th century. Known by its modern name, Khirbet Qeiyafa, the site is located in the the Elah Valley, 20 miles southwest of Jerusalem. The excavation project took nearly seven years, and was led by Professor Yosef Garfinkel, the Yigal Yadin Chair of Archeology at Hebrew UniversityÂ’s Institute of Archeology in Jerusalem, together with SaÂ’ar Ganor from the Israel Antiquities Authority and Professor Michal Hazel of Southern Adventist University of Tennessee. Through the...
  • Beneath This Medieval German Town Lie Over 25 Miles of Forgotten Tunnels

    09/11/2016 4:57:56 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 14 replies
    Smithsonian ^ | September 7, 2016 | Jennifer Nalewicki
    O n the surface, Oppenheim looks like your typical German town resting along the banks of the Rhine River. But there's more to Oppenheim than beer halls and a Gothic-style cathedral from the Middle Ages. Beneath its narrow cobblestone streets lies something deeper—an entire labyrinth of tunnels and cellars. “The town is practically honeycombed with cavities,” Wilfried Hilpke, a tour guide with Oppenheim’s tourism office, tells Smithsonian.com. Hilpke should know. For the past ten years, he’s spent much of his time leading hour-long hardhat tours of Oppenheim’s elaborate tunnel system, taking visitors through a journey that covers just a fraction...
  • Archaeology team makes world-first tool discovery

    08/08/2016 6:38:05 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 30 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 8/8/2016 | A. Nowell
    How smart were human-like species of the Stone Age? New research published in the Journal of Archaeological Science by a team led by paleoanthropologist April Nowell of the University of Victoria reveals surprisingly sophisticated adaptations by early humans living 250,000 years ago in a former oasis near Azraq, Jordan. The research team from UVic and partner universities in the US and Jordan has found the oldest evidence of protein residue -- the residual remains of butchered animals including horse, rhinoceros, wild cattle and duck -- on stone tools. The discovery draws startling conclusions about how these early humans subsisted in...
  • Oldest Egyptian writing on papyrus displayed for first time

    07/14/2016 3:35:11 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 10 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | 7/14/16 | AFP
    Cairo (AFP) - The Egyptian Museum in Cairo is showcasing for the first time the earliest writing from ancient Egypt found on papyrus, detailing work on the Great Pyramid of Giza, antiquities officials said Thursday. The papyri were discovered near Wadi el-Jarf port, 25 kilometres (15 miles) south of the Gulf of Suez town of Zafarana, the antiquities ministry said. The find by a French-Egyptian team unearths papers telling of the daily lives of port workers who transported huge limestone blocks to Cairo during King Khufu's rule to build the Great Pyramid, intended to be his burial structure. One document...
  • The Hittite capital hosts ambassadors

    07/11/2016 11:47:26 PM PDT · by Cronos · 4 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | 12 July 2016 | HDN
    The archaeological site of Hattusha, the capital of the Hittite civilization which entered the UNESCO World Heritage list in 1986, was visited by a number of ambassadors in Turkey over the weekend as part of its two-day 30th anniversary celebrations organized by the governor’s office in the Central Anatolian province Çorum. The ancient site is notable for its cuneiform inscriptions, one of the most important discoveries at the site, consisting of official correspondence and contracts, as well as legal codes, procedures for cult ceremonies, oracular prophecies and literature of the ancient Near East. The cuneiforms entered the UNESCO Memory...
  • Archaeologists unearth 87,000 artifacts including wig curlers and a punch bowl... (Philly)

    07/04/2016 4:15:31 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 17 replies
    The London Daily Mail ^ | July 3, 2016 | Ollie Gillman
    Excavating toilets might not seem like glamorous work. But this team of archaeologists were not complaining when they unearthed 87,000 artifacts dating back to the American Revolution while digging up 250-year-old outhouses in Philadelphia. The Commonwealth Heritage Group made the fascinating find on a dig at the site of the new Museum of the American Revolution, which opens next year. Twelve of the brick bathrooms were uncovered during the dig just two blocks away from Philadelphia's Independence Hall, the Huffington Post reported. Intricate crockery, finely detailed jugs, wig curlers and an array of beads were found during the excavation....