Keyword: archaeology

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  • Dig it! Volunteers can sign up to excavate at Topper site

    04/08/2012 6:08:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Times and Democrat ^ | Thursday, April 5, 2012 | Albert Goodyear (probably)
    The University of South Carolina is accepting registrations from volunteers to help excavate archaeological sites along the Savannah River April 30-June 2. The expedition will be led by archaeologist Albert Goodyear, whose discoveries at the Topper site in Allendale County have captured international media attention. Volunteers will learn excavation techniques and how to identify Clovis and pre-Clovis artifacts in several prehistoric chert quarries. This year, some volunteers may also be involved in the excavation of a nearby Paleoamerican site known as the Charles site. The cost is $488 per week ($400 is tax-deductible) and includes evening lectures and programs, lunch...
  • Empuries: The Ancient Greek Town of Spain

    04/07/2012 8:17:56 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    EU Greek Reporter ^ | March 29, 2012 | Stella Tsolakidou
    The most western ancient Greek colony documented in the Mediterranean is revealing its secrets through the development of a Document Centre on Greek trade and presence in Iberia, according to the creators of the Iberia Graeca centre. Empúries, formerly known by its Spanish name Ampurias, was a town on the Mediterranean coast of the Catalan comarca of Alt Empordŕ in Catalonia, Spain. It was founded in 575 BC by Greek colonists from Phocaea with the name of Emporion, meaning "market". It was later occupied by the Romans, but in the Early Middle Ages, when its exposed coastal position left it...
  • Crucifixion: History, Archaeology (with photos!), and Why Jesus Died This Way

    04/07/2012 6:27:56 AM PDT · by NYer · 12 replies
    The Sacred Page ^ | April 6, 2012 | Michael Barber
    Today we meditate on the crucifixion of Jesus. In places around the world, images of the Christ crucified will be contemplated and venerated. Indeed, the image of the cross is quite familiar to us. It is part and parcel of Christian iconography. Perhaps, it is too familiar. Put frankly, the cross has in many ways been sanitized. To some extent, Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ (2004) helped bring attention to the actual violence associated with this form of ancient execution. Indeed, the attempt to re-dramatize the violence caused deep controversy. Some have even claimed that the film exaggerated...
  • DNA analysis shakes up Neandertal theories

    04/06/2012 10:21:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    Binghamton.edu ^ | April 4, 2012 | Gail Glover
    Focusing on mitochondrial DNA sequences from 13 Neandertal individuals, including a new sequence from the site of Valdegoba cave in northern Spain, the research team found some surprising results. When they started looking at the DNA, a clear pattern emerged. Neandertal individuals from Western Europe that were older than 50,000 years and individuals from sites in western Asia and the Middle East showed a high degree of genetic variation, on par with what might be expected from a species that had been abundant in an area for a long period of time. In fact, the amount of genetic variation was...
  • Young Mammoth Likely Butchered by Humans

    04/04/2012 3:32:01 PM PDT · by Renfield · 16 replies
    Discovery News ^ | 4-4-2012 | Jennifer Viegas
    A juvenile mammoth, nicknamed "Yuka," was found entombed in Siberian ice near the shores of the Arctic Ocean and shows signs of being cut open by ancient people. The remarkably well preserved frozen carcass was discovered in Siberia as part of a BBC/Discovery Channel-funded expedition and is believed to be at least 10,000 years old, if not older. If further study confirms the preliminary findings, it would be the first mammoth carcass revealing signs of human interaction in the region. The carcass is in such good shape that much of its flesh is still intact, retaining its pink color. The...
  • Researchers Say Gardom’s Edge Monolith Is Astronomical Marker (Dates Back To 2000 B.C.)

    04/03/2012 9:11:24 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 14 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Thu, Mar 29th, 2012 | John Shanks
    Researchers Say Gardom’s Edge Monolith Is Astronomical Marker A team of researchers from the Nottingham Trent University has suggested that a 4000-year-old unique triangular shaped monolith, known as the Gardom’s Edge monolith, was aligned to be an astronomical marker. The 2.2 meter high monolith, located in the Peak District National Park near Manchester, UK, has a striking, right-angled triangular shape that slants up towards geographic south. The orientation and inclination of the slope is aligned to the altitude of the Sun at mid-summer. The team believes that the monolith was set in place to give symbolic meaning to the location...
  • Hoard of 30,000 silver Roman coins discovered in Bath

    03/22/2012 6:37:19 PM PDT · by Engraved-on-His-hands · 27 replies · 1+ views
    The Telegraph [UK] ^ | March 22, 2012 | Andrew Hough
    More than 30,000 silver coins have been found by archaeologists working at the site of a new city-centre hotel. The hoard, believed to date from the third-century, was unearthed about 450 feet from the historic Roman Baths. Experts believe the “treasure trove” is the fifth largest hoard ever discovered in Britain and the largest from a Roman settlement. The coins, which have now been sent to the British Museum for further analysis, are fused together in a large block. This makes identification and counting difficult and conservators at central London Museum expect the task of analysing the coins to take...
  • Remarkable Russian Petroglyphs

    03/22/2012 5:41:26 AM PDT · by Renfield · 32 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 3-18-2012 | Hanne Jakobsen
    Artefacts are usually displayed in museums but sometimes there are some that just can’t be put on exhibition – as is the case with one that is hidden deep in the Russian forests. It was known that there were rock carvings on some islands in Lake Kanozero, and Jan Magne Gjerde, project manager at the Tromsř University Museum, went out there to document them as part of his doctoral work however, when he and his colleagues had completed their work, the number of known petroglyphs had risen from 200 to over 1,000. “I still get chills up my spine when...
  • The writing on the wall: Symbols from the Palaeolithic

    03/22/2012 5:23:51 AM PDT · by Renfield · 6 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 3-12-2012
    In 2009, a ground-breaking study by Genevieve von Petzinger revealed that dots, lines and other geometric signs found in prehistoric European caves may be the precursor to an ancient system of written communication dating back nearly 30,000 years. Von Petzinger, with University of Victoria anthropology professor April Nowell, compiled the markings from 146 different sites in Ice Age France, making it possible to compare the signs on a larger scale than had ever previously been attempted. What made her research ‘new’ was that she was able to use a whole range of modern technology to compare inventories and digital images...
  • Monster Titanoboa Snake Invades New York (43' Prehistoric Snake Weighed 2,500 lbs.)

    03/21/2012 7:13:29 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 27 replies · 185+ views
    Yahoo! News ^ | March 21, 2012 | Claudine Zap
    Monster titanoboa snake invades New York New York commuters arriving at Grand Central Station were greeted by a monstrous sight: a 48-foot-long, 2,500-pound titanoboa snake. The good news: It's not alive. Anymore. But the full-scale replica of the reptile -- which made its first appearance at the commuter hub -- is intended, as Smithsonian spokesperson Randall Kremer happily admitted, to "scare the daylights out of people" -- actually has a higher calling: to "communicate science to a lot of people." The scientifically scary-accurate model will go a long way toward that: If this snake slithered by you, it would be...
  • Worsley Man: Hospital scanner probes Iron Age bog death

    03/11/2012 5:10:02 PM PDT · by Renfield · 30 replies · 3+ views
    BBC News ^ | 3-8-2012
    Bryan Sitch, curator of archaeology at the museum, said it now appeared the man had been beaten about the head, garrotted and then beheaded The head of an Iron Age man who died almost 2,000 years ago has been scanned in a Manchester hospital to shed light on how he died. Worsley Man is thought to have lived around 100 AD when Romans occupied much of Britain. Since its discovery in a Salford peat bog in 1958, the head has been kept at Manchester Museum on Oxford Road. The scans at the Manchester Children's Hospital have now revealed more details...
  • How a Ship Full of Fish Helped Recreate an Ancient Fish Sauce

    03/06/2012 10:18:22 AM PST · by Renfield · 20 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | 3-1-2012 | Peter Smith
    If you’re like me, the last post on the convoluted origins of our favorite fermented condiment—ketchup—probably left you wondering: What is the difference between Roman garum than modern Thai fish sauce? What little I know comes from an experiment performed by Sally Grainger, author of Cooking Apicus, recounted in the book Cured, Fermented and Smoked Foods. Grainger is a British chef and an experimental archeologist. She looked at studies on fish sauce amphorae (ceramic vessels) from archeological sites in Spain and North Africa. One of her more fascinating sources comes from a 2,000-year-old shipwreck discovered off the coast of Grado,...
  • Faces of Civil War sailors from sunken USS Monitor reconstructed in hopes of identifying them

    03/04/2012 3:58:49 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 29 replies
    AP ^ | Saturday Mar 3, 2012 | Steve Szkotak
    Faces of Civil War sailors from sunken USS Monitor reconstructed in hopes of identifying them Faces of 2 USS Monitor crewmembers reconstructed Recovery: The turret of the Civil War ironclad USS Monitor is lifted out of the ocean off the coast of Hatteras, N.C. on August 5, 2002 RICHMOND, Va. — When the turret of the Civil War ironclad Monitor was raised from the ocean bottom, two skeletons and the tattered remnants of their uniforms were discovered in the rusted hulk of the Union Civil War ironclad, mute and nameless witnesses to the cost of war. A rubber comb was...
  • Christ's disciples' remains 'discovered'

    03/04/2012 5:06:29 AM PST · by Renfield · 24 replies
    Telegraph (UK) ^ | 3-4-2012 | Adrian Blomfield
    An amateur archaeologist and film maker claims to have identified what could be the remains of some of Christ's 12 disciples in a first century burial chamber buried beneath a block of flats in Jerusalem. A team led by Simcha Jacobovic, a Canadian documentary director, used a robot to photograph a number of limestone burial caskets, found below a block of flats, which may provide an unprecedented glimpse into Christianity's earliest days. But the potential significance of the discovery is almost certain to be overshadowed by controversy, with Mr Jacobovic using it as new evidence to bolster his widely disputed...
  • Ötzi the ice mummy's secrets found in DNA

    02/29/2012 5:28:47 AM PST · by Renfield · 11 replies · 3+ views
    NewScientist ^ | 2-26-2012 | Andy Coghlan
    Ötzi the ice mummy may have met his death in the Alps some 5300 years ago, but his descendants live on – on the Mediterranean islands of Corsica and Sardinia. The finding comes from an analysis of Ötzi's DNA, which also reveals he had brown eyes and hair, and was lactose intolerant. The ice mummy was found in 1991 on an Alpine glacier between Austria and Italy, where he met a violent end in the Neolithic.....
  • Found: Ancient Warrior's Helmet, Owner Unknown (Greek Mercenary Helmet, Circa 600 B.C.)

    02/28/2012 9:07:41 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 24 replies · 2+ views
    Live Science ^ | 28 February 2012 | Owen Jarus, LiveScience Contributor
    Found: Ancient Warrior's Helmet, Owner Unknown A Greek bronze helmet, covered with gold leaf and decorated with snakes, lions and a peacock's tail (or palmette), has been discovered in the waters of Haifa Bay in Israel. But how this helmet ended up at the bottom of the bay is a mystery. The helmet dates back around 2,600 years and likely belonged to a wealthy Greek mercenary who took part in a series of wars, immortalized in the Bible, which ravaged the region at that time. Archaeologists believe that he likely fought for an Egyptian pharaoh named Necho II. Dredging discovery...
  • Ancient barque to be reconstructed for museum

    02/25/2012 5:36:15 PM PST · by Engraved-on-His-hands · 8 replies · 1+ views
    Sail World ^ | February 25, 2012 | Renate Johns
    A Japanese University has provided a $10million grant to help see the reconstruction of one of the oldest known boats in the world, and the process has begun this week in Egypt, near the Giza Pyramid. With the help of the grant from Waseda University archaeologists on Monday began restoration on the 4,500-year-old almost 140ft (43 metre) so-called 'solar barque', which has shown signs of being used during the life of its owner Khufu(King Cheops) but was apparently also meant to carry him into the afterlife. Its 'sister' boat has already been restored and is housed in a specially built...
  • Aztec carvings tell story of cosmic battle

    02/20/2012 6:32:14 AM PST · by Renfield · 31 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 2-9-2012
    A total of 23 pre-Columbian stone plaques dating back over 550 years were discovered by archaeologists in front of the Great Temple of Tenochtitlan in Mexico City, with carvings illustrating Aztec myths including the birth of the god of war Huitzilopochtli. The sculpted images are carved on slabs of tezontle (a volcanic rock) and feature depictions of serpents, captives and warriors. They also feature other figures relating to the mythological origins of Aztec civilization. The stone carvings focus on the myths of Huitzilopochtli’s birth and the beginning of the Holy War. Raul Barrera from the National Institute of Anthropology and...
  • When opium was cheaper than whiskey – and Great Britain waged a "wicked" drug war

    02/19/2012 12:32:31 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 27 replies · 1+ views
    Cannon Beach Gazette ^ | Thursday, February 16, 2012 | Robert Lewis Knecht
    When opium was cheaper than whiskey – and Great Britain waged a "wicked" drug war When Opium Was Cheaper Than Whiskey - and Great Britain waged a "wicked" drug war The bottles have a beautiful aqua color to them. If you hold them up to the light, rainbows fire across the delicate patina. But their beauty belies the deadly reality behind the delicate hues. The bottles once held opium based "elixirs," such as Dr. McMunn's Elixir of Opium, most claiming to be a cure for a host of ailments, including the relief of "convulsions and spasmodic action," as well as...
  • Archaeologists strike gold in quest to find Queen of Sheba's wealth

    02/11/2012 8:10:11 PM PST · by Engraved-on-His-hands · 15 replies
    The Guardian [UK] ^ | February 11, 2012 | Dalya Alberge
    A British excavation has struck archaeological gold with a discovery that may solve the mystery of where the Queen of Sheba of biblical legend derived her fabled treasures. Almost 3,000 years ago, the ruler of Sheba, which spanned modern-day Ethiopia and Yemen, arrived in Jerusalem with vast quantities of gold to give to King Solomon. Now an enormous ancient goldmine, together with the ruins of a temple and the site of a battlefield, have been discovered in her former territory. Louise Schofield, an archaeologist and former British Museum curator, who headed the excavation on the high Gheralta plateau in northern...
  • 'Woolly mammoth' spotted in Siberia

    02/08/2012 2:52:34 PM PST · by Red Badger · 139 replies
    The Sun - UK ^ | Wed Feb 08, 2012 | Staff
    A BEAST lurches through icy waters in a sighting a paranormal investigator thinks could prove woolly mammoths are not extinct after all. The animal – thought to have mostly died out roughly 4,000 years ago – was apparently filmed wading through a river in the freezing wilds of Siberia. The jaw-dropping footage was caught by a government-employed engineer last summer in the Chukotka Autonomous Okrug region of Siberia, it is claimed. He filmed the elephant-sized creature as it struggled against the racing water. Its hair matches samples recovered from mammoth remains regularly dug up from the permafrost in frozen Russia....
  • 'The Oldest (Neanderthal) Work Of Art Ever': 42,000-Year-Old Paintings Of Seals Found In Spain

    02/08/2012 10:36:42 AM PST · by blam · 89 replies · 1+ views
    The Daily Mail ^ | 2-7-2012 | Tom Worden
    'The Oldest (Neanderthal) Work Of Art Ever': 42,000-Year-Old Paintings Of Seals Found In Spanish Cave* Six paintings were found in the Nerja Caves, 35miles east of Malaga * They are the only known artistic images created by Neanderthal man By Tom Worden Last updated at 9:27 PM on 7th February 2012 Comments (38) Share The world's oldest works of art have been found in a cave on Spain's Costa del Sol, scientists believe. Six paintings of seals are at least 42,000 years old and are the only known artistic images created by Neanderthal man, experts claim. Professor Jose Luis Sanchidrian,...
  • Dog: Man's Best Friend for Over 33,000 Years (Oldest Known Evidence of Dog Domestication)

    02/05/2012 8:24:42 AM PST · by DogByte6RER · 33 replies
    FoxNews.com ^ | January 24, 2012 | FoxNews.com
    Dog: man's best friend for over 33,000 years He's been man's best friend for generations. An ancient dog skull found in Siberia and dating back 33,000 years presents some of the oldest known evidence of dog domestication. When combined with a similar find in Belgium, the two skulls indicate that the domestication of dogs by humans occurred repeatedly throughout early human history at different geographic locations -- rather than at a single domestication event, as previously believed. "Both the Belgian find and the Siberian find are domesticated species based on morphological characteristics," said Greg Hodgins, a researcher at the University...
  • Temple Menorah Stamp Affirms Jewish Claim to Land

    01/10/2012 1:55:40 AM PST · by Eleutheria5 · 23 replies
    Arutz Sheva ^ | 10/1/12 | Gil Ronen
    Just two weeks after a Temple era seal was displayed to the public, archeologists continue to dig up breathtaking proofs of the ancient and never-severed connection between Jews and the Land of Israel. This time, the find is a 1,500 year old tiny stamp discovered near the city of Akko, bearing the image of the seven-branched Temple Menorah. The stamp was used to identify baked products and probably belonged to a bakery that supplied kosher bread to the Jews of Akko in the Byzantine period. The ceramic stamp dates from the Byzantine period (6th century CE) and was uncovered in...
  • Ancient Texts Part of Earliest Known Documents

    12/31/2011 5:23:11 PM PST · by Engraved-on-His-hands · 27 replies
    Discovery News ^ | December 27, 2011 | Rossella Lorenzi
    A team of scholars has discovered what might be the oldest representation of the Tower of Babel of Biblical fame, they report in a newly published book. Carved on a black stone, which has already been dubbed the Tower of Babel stele, the inscription dates to 604-562 BCE. It was found in the collection of Martin Schøyen, a businessman from Norway who owns the largest private manuscript assemblage formed in the 20th century. Consisting of 13,717 manuscript items spanning over‭ ‬5,000‭ ‬years, the collection includes parts of the Dead Sea Scrolls, ancient Buddhist manuscript rescued from the Taliban, and even...
  • Flood waters unearth 18th century fort in Montgomery Co. (NY)

    12/13/2011 2:30:15 PM PST · by NYer · 28 replies
    Fox 23 ^ | December 13, 2011 | Katherine Underwood
    Irene’s flood waters tore up the parking lot at the Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site, uncovering remnants of an 18th century fort.“For the first time we now know where one block house of Fort Hunter was,” said Archeologist Michael Roets with the State Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation.Roets talked to reporters Tuesday while standing in middle of a block house, built by the British to accommodate about 20 soldiers.“We never would have had this exposed without the flood,” Roets said.During Irene, raging flood waters ripped up the parking lot and unearthed the foundation of a 24-by-24 foot block...
  • Solving the Mystery of a 35,000-Year-Old Statue

    12/12/2011 4:22:24 AM PST · by Renfield · 22 replies
    Spiegel (Germany) ^ | 12/09/2011 | Matthias Schulz
    Using a hand hoe and working in dim light, geologist Otto Völzing burrowed into the earth deep inside the Stadel cave in the Schwäbische Alb mountains of southwestern Germany. His finds were interesting to be sure, but nothing world-shaking: flints and the remnants of food eaten by prehistoric human beings. Suddenly he struck a hard object -- and splintered a small statuette. It was 1939 and Völzing didn't have much time. He had just been called up to serve in the military and World War II was about to begin. He quickly packed the pieces into a box and the...
  • Bronze age man's lunch: a spoonful of nettle stew

    12/05/2011 9:04:42 AM PST · by Renfield · 32 replies
    Guardian (UK) ^ | 12-03-2011 | Dalya Alberge
    Six boats hollowed out of oak tree trunks are among hundreds of intact artefacts from 3,000 years ago that have been discovered in the Cambridgeshire fens, the Observer can reveal. The scale, quality and condition of the objects, the largest bronze age collection ever found in one place in Britain, have astonished archaeologists – and barely a fraction of the site has been excavated. Unique textile fragments, wicker baskets and wooden sword handles have survived. There are even containers of food, including a bowl with a wooden spoon still wedged into the contents, now analysed as nettle stew, which may...
  • Archaeology and the New Testament

    12/03/2011 1:04:14 PM PST · by GonzoII · 6 replies · 1+ views
    Apologetics Press, Inc ^ | 2004 | Kyle Butt, M.A.
    Archaeology and the New Testament by  Kyle Butt, M.A. Any time a book alleges to report historical events accurately, that book potentially opens itself up to an immense amount of criticism. If such a book claims to be free from all errors in its historical documentation, the criticism frequently becomes even more intense. But such should be the case, for it is the responsibility of present and future generations to know and understand the past, and to insist that history, including certain monumental moments, is recorded and related as accurately as possible. The New Testament does not necessarily claim to...
  • Digging up history at old Transbay Terminal

    12/02/2011 7:26:34 PM PST · by thecodont · 6 replies
    San Francisco Chronicle / SFGate.com ^ | Friday, December 2, 2011 | Michael Cabanatuan, Chronicle Staff Writer
    When most people ponder the past at the Transbay Terminal construction site, they imagine the hustle and bustle of gray-suited commuters swarming in and out of the Art Deco-style train depot in the mid-20th century. But archaeologists working at the site during demolition of the dingy old terminal last winter and construction of its grand replacement have unearthed artifacts that help reveal what it must have been like to live in the Irish working-class neighborhood that existed in that part of the South of Market in the mid- to late 1800s. They've dug up bottles that once held soda, booze...
  • One of the earliest known examples of math homework

    12/01/2011 7:56:37 PM PST · by thecodont · 27 replies
    BoingBoing ^ | at 10:42 am Thursday, Dec 1 2011 | By Maggie Koerth-Baker
    It's stuff like this that makes me love archaeology. Turns out, we can trace the concept of math homework back to at least 2300 B.C.E., in ancient Mesopotamia. In the early 20th century, German researchers found several clay tablets at the site of Šuruppak. (Today, that's basically the Iraqi city of Tell Fara.) Some of the tablets appear to be the remains of math instruction, including two different tablets that are working the same story problem. A loose translation of the problem is: A granary. Each man receives 7 sila of grain. How many men? That is, the tablets concern...
  • 'Alien' Skull Discovery Tops South American Bone Finds

    11/23/2011 10:57:17 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 38 replies
    Yahoo ^ | Tue, Nov 22, 2011 | Tammy Lee Morris
    It wasn't discovered by Indiana Jones and it isn't crystal, but an elongated skull that is as long as the 20-inch body it belongs to is raising interest after it was discovered in Peru. According to a report from The Sideshow, the remains of the unidentified "creature" was described as having a "triangle-shaped" skull and was at first believed to have been a child with a misshapen head, but according to a news report, anonymous Russian and Spanish scientists claim the remains belong to an extraterrestrial being. While the discovery of the skull seems to be a somewhat real-life version...
  • New Find Sheds Light on Ancient Site in Jerusalem

    11/23/2011 8:10:21 AM PST · by lbryce · 5 replies
    AP via Yahoo News ^ | November 23, 2011 | MATTI FRIEDMAN
    Newly found coins underneath Jerusalem's Western Wall could change the accepted belief about the construction of one of the world's most sacred sites two millennia ago, Israeli archaeologists said Wednesday. The man usually credited with building the compound known to Jews as the Temple Mount and to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary is Herod, a Jewish ruler who died in 4 B.C. Herod's monumental compound replaced and expanded a much older Jewish temple complex on the same site. But archaeologists with the Israel Antiquities Authority now say diggers have found coins underneath the massive foundation stones of the compound's Western...
  • Oldest rock art in Egypt discovered

    11/17/2011 4:49:02 PM PST · by Renfield · 16 replies
    Yale News ^ | 11/10/2011 | Dorie Baker
    Using a new technology known as optically stimulated luminescence (OSL), a team of Belgian scientists and Professor John Coleman Darnell of Yale have determined that Egyptian petroglyphs found at the east bank of the Nile are about 15,000 years old, making them the oldest rock art in Egypt and possibly the earliest known graphic record in North Africa. The dating results will be published in the December issue of Antiquity (Vol. 85 Issue 330, pp. 1184–1193). The site of the rock art panels is near the modern village of Qurta, about 40km south of the Upper-Egyptian town of Edfu. First...
  • Is the Wood Recently Found on Mt. Ararat from the Ark?

    11/16/2011 7:49:05 AM PST · by fishtank · 86 replies
    Answers in Genesis ^ | Nov. 9, 2011 | Andrew A. Snelling
    From the conclusion: "Conclusion If the wooden remains of the Ark were to be found on Mt. Ararat, then samples of that wood would be expected to yield C-14 dates of between 20,000 years and 50,000 years, consistent with the C-14 dates of pre-Flood wood found fossilized in the geologic record of the Flood. Even though the true age of such fossilized pre-Flood wood should be only 4,500 years or so old, around the date for the biblical Flood, these grossly inflated C-14 dates obtained in conventional radiocarbon dating laboratories are due to those laboratories ignoring the very much less...
  • 'Sabre-toothed squirrel': First known mammalian skull from Late Cretaceous ...

    11/03/2011 1:42:52 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 29 replies · 1+ views
    http://www.physorg.com ^ | 03 NOVEMBER 2011 | Provided by University of Louisville
    Paleontologist Guillermo Rougier, Ph.D., professor of anatomical sciences and neurobiology at the University of Louisville, and his team have reported their discovery of two skulls from the first known mammal of the early Late Cretaceous period of South America. The fossils break a roughly 60 million-year gap in the currently known mammalian record of the continent and provide new clues on the early evolution of mammals. Details of their find will be published Nov. 3 in Nature. Co-authors are Sebastián Apesteguía of Argentina's Universidad Maimónides and doctoral student Leandro C. Gaetano. The new critter, named "Cronopio dentiacutus" by the paleontologists,...
  • Hunters present in North America 800 years earlier than previously thought: DNA analysis

    10/20/2011 12:18:28 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 51 replies
    http://www.physorg.com ^ | 20 OCT 2011 | Provided by Texas A&M University
    The tip of a bone point fragment found embedded in a mastodon rib from an archaeological site in Washington state shows that hunters were present in North America at least 800 years before Clovis, confirming that the first inhabitants arrived earlier to North America than previously thought, says a team of researchers led by a Texas A&M University archaeologist. Michael Waters, director of the Center for the Study of the First Americans in the Department of Anthropology at Texas A&M, and colleagues from Colorado, Washington and Denmark believe the find at the Manis site in Washington demonstrates that humans were...
  • UK taxi driver becomes first mummy for 3,000 years

    10/18/2011 1:24:26 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 17 replies
    http://www.physorg.com ^ | 18 Oct 2011 | Staff
    A former British taxi driver has become the first person in the world for 3,000 years to be mummified in the same way as the pharaohs. Channel Four viewers will see Alan Billis turned into a mummy over the space of a few months as his body is preserved using the techniques which the ancient Egyptians used on Tutankhamun. Billis had been terminally ill with cancer when he volunteered to undergo the procedure which a scientist has been working to recreate for many years. The 61-year-old from Torquay in Devon had the backing of his wife Jan, who said: "I'm...
  • Archaeologists find blade production earlier than originally thought

    10/17/2011 8:23:34 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 54 replies
    http://www.physorg.com ^ | 17 OCT 2011 | Provided by Tel Aviv University
    Archaeology has long associated advanced blade production with the Upper Palaeolithic period, about 30,000-40,000 years ago, linked with the emergence of Homo Sapiens and cultural features such as cave art. Now researchers at Tel Aviv University have uncovered evidence which shows that "modern" blade production was also an element of Amudian industry during the late Lower Paleolithic period, 200,000-400,000 years ago as part of the Acheulo-Yabrudian cultural complex, a geographically limited group of hominins who lived in modern-day Israel, Lebanon, Syria and Jordan. Prof. Avi Gopher, Dr. Ran Barkai and Dr. Ron Shimelmitz of TAU's Department of Archaeology and Ancient...
  • 100,000-year-old ochre toolkit and workshop discovered in South Africa

    10/13/2011 11:32:56 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 10 replies
    http://www.physorg.com ^ | 13 Oct 2011 | Provided by University of the Witwatersrand
    An ochre-rich mixture, possibly used for decoration, painting and skin protection 100,000 years ago, and stored in two abalone shells, was discovered at Blombos Cave in Cape Town, South Africa. "Ochre may have been applied with symbolic intent as decoration on bodies and clothing during the Middle Stone Age," says Professor Christopher Henshilwood from the Institute for Human Evolution at the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, who together with his international team discovered a processing workshop in 2008 where a liquefied ochre-rich mixture was produced. The findings will be published in the journal Science tomorrow. The two coeval, spatially associated...
  • Cannibalism Confirmed Among Ancient Mexican Group

    10/06/2011 5:45:10 PM PDT · by Renfield · 32 replies
    National Geographic ^ | 9-30-2011 | Sabrina Valle
    It's long been rumored that an ancient, isolated people in what's now northern Mexico ate their own kind, in the hopes that they'd be able to eat corn later. Now an analysis of more than three dozen bones bearing evidence of boiling and defleshing confirms that the Xiximes people were in fact cannibals, archaeologists say. The Xiximes believed that ingesting the bodies and souls of their enemies and using the cleaned bones in rituals would guarantee the fertility of the grain harvest, according to historical accounts by Jesuit missionaries...
  • Bowls of Fingers, Baby Victims, More Found in Maya Tomb

    09/25/2011 6:27:22 AM PDT · by Renfield · 59 replies
    National Geographic ^ | 7-21-2010 | John Roach
    Reeking of decay and packed with bowls of human fingers, a partly burned baby, and gem-studded teeth—among other artifacts—a newfound Maya king's tomb sounds like an overripe episode of Tales From the Crypt. But the tightly sealed, 1,600-year-old burial chamber, found under a jungle-covered Guatemalan pyramid, is as rich with archaeological gold as it is with oddities, say researchers who announced the discovery Friday. "This thing was like Fort Knox," said Brown University archaeologist Stephen Houston, who led the excavation in the ancient, overgrown Maya town of El Zotz. Alternating layers of flat stones and mud preserved human bones, wood...
  • Mideast riddle: Strange stone structures caught on camera

    09/17/2011 3:24:59 PM PDT · by NYer · 67 replies
    CBS ^ | September 15, 2011 | Owen Jarus
    Giant stone structures in the Azraq Oasis in Jordan They stretch from Syria to Saudi Arabia, can be seen from the air but not the ground, and are virtually unknown to the public. They are the Middle East's own version of the Nazca Lines -- ancient "geolyphs," or drawings, that span deserts in southern Peru -- and now, thanks to new satellite-mapping technologies, and an aerial photography program in Jordan, researchers are discovering more of them than ever before. They number well into the thousands. Referred to by archaeologists as "wheels," these stone structures have a wide variety of...
  • Gardens were important to ancient civilizations

    09/01/2011 4:50:15 PM PDT · by Renfield · 9 replies
    We tend to think of garden design as a relatively new vocation. The truth told by archaeological findings not only lays such thoughts to rest, it tells a tale of a rich and ancient heritage of garden design. One such finding shows a garden of Ninevah, in present-day Iraq, that dates back to 650 BC. There are date palms, trees and shrubs of many types. True, an enemy's severed head is seen hanging from one of the trees, but times were different, or are they? They did like their gardens, however. Our vision of ancient Egyptian temples is one of...
  • Leftists in Last-Minute Bid to Halt Ir David Excavations

    08/30/2011 2:34:17 PM PDT · by Eleutheria5 · 18 replies
    Arutz Sheva ^ | 30/8/11 | David Lev
    A group of 150 archaeologists and students sent a petition Tuesday to Environment Minister Gilad Erdan and Sport and Culture Minister Limor Livnat, asking them to drop their support for a law that formalizes private archaeological digs and research at national parks and historical sites. The petition says that the law would “politicize archaeology in Israel and damage the independence of researchers," and calls for the ministers to oppose the "privatization of archaeology," which, they write, would be the death knell of archaeology in Israel. But supporters of the law said that there were already hundreds of independent and private...
  • 'Britain's first pre-Roman planned town' found near Reading

    08/20/2011 8:10:56 AM PDT · by decimon · 21 replies
    BBC ^ | August 17, 2011 | Louise Ord
    Archaeologists believe they have found the first pre-Roman planned town discovered in Britain.It has been unearthed beneath the Roman town of Silchester or Calleva Atrebatum near modern Reading. The Romans are often credited with bringing civilisation to Britain - including town planning. But excavations have shown evidence of an Iron Age town built on a grid and signs inhabitants had access to imported wine and olive oil. Prof Mike Fulford, an archaeologist at the University of Reading, said the people of Iron Age Silchester appear to have adopted an urbanised 'Roman' way of living, long before the Romans arrived. "It...
  • Michigan Copper in the Mediterranean

    08/06/2011 4:11:06 PM PDT · by Renfield · 84 replies
    Grahamhancock.com ^ | 8-2011 | Jay Stuart Wakefield
    The Shipping of Michigan Copper across the Atlantic in the Bronze Age (Isle Royale and Keweenaw Peninsula, c. 2400BC-1200 BC) Summary Recent scientific literature has come to the conclusion that the major source of the copper that swept through the European Bronze Age after 2500 BC is unknown. However, these studies claim that the 10 tons of copper oxhide ingots recovered from the late Bronze Age (1300 BC) Uluburun shipwreck off the coast of Turkey was “extraordinarily pure” (more than 99.5% pure), and that it was not the product of smelting from ore. The oxhides are all brittle “blister copper”,...
  • Ancient Sacrificer Found With Blades in Peru Tomb?

    08/01/2011 12:35:48 PM PDT · by Renfield · 6 replies
    National Geographic News ^ | 7-28-2011 | Ker Than
    ~~~snip~~~ The new tomb discovery was made during excavations of a section of Chotuna-Chornancap that was used to perform crop-fertility rituals, according to the team. The skeleton belonged to a male between 20 and 30 years old, and that the tomb was built sometime in the late 1200s or early 1300s A.D., toward the end of the Sicán period, they say. The cause of death of the tomb's inhabitant is unknown, but based on the kind and quantity of artifacts buried with him—including ceramic pots, a skirt made of copper disks, and ornate copper knives—the team thinks he was a...
  • How early reptiles moved

    07/27/2011 9:19:08 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 7 replies
    http://www.physorg.com ^ | 07-27-2011 | Staff + Provided by Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena
    Jena (Germany) Modern scientists would have loved the sight of early reptiles running across the Bromacker near Tambach-Dietharz (Germany) 300 million years ago. Unfortunately this journey through time is impossible. But due to Dr. Thomas Martens and his team from the Foundation Schloss Friedenstein Gotha numerous skeletons and footprints of early dinosaurs have been found and conserved there during the last forty years. "It is the most important find spot of primitive quadruped vertebrates from the Perm in Europe," says Professor Dr. Martin S. Fischer from the University Jena (Germany). The evolutionary biologist and his team together with the Gotha...
  • Ancient Bell Found in Jerusalem Old City Sewer Rings Again

    07/25/2011 6:52:05 AM PDT · by NYer · 11 replies
    Fox News ^ | July 24, 2011
    JERUSALEM –  A tiny golden bell pulled after 2,000 years from an ancient sewer beneath the Old City of Jerusalem was shown Sunday by Israeli archaeologists, who hailed it as a rare find. The orb half an inch in diameter has a small loop that appears to have been used to sew it as an ornament onto the clothes of a wealthy resident of the city two millennia ago, archaeologists said. When Eli Shukron of the Israel Antiquities Authority shook it Sunday, the faint metallic sound was something between a clink and a rattle. The bell's owner likely "walked in...