Free Republic 1st Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $20,240
23%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 23% is in!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: archaeology

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Dig it! Volunteers can sign up to excavate at Topper site

    04/08/2012 6:08:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Times and Democrat ^ | Thursday, April 5, 2012 | Albert Goodyear (probably)
    The University of South Carolina is accepting registrations from volunteers to help excavate archaeological sites along the Savannah River April 30-June 2. The expedition will be led by archaeologist Albert Goodyear, whose discoveries at the Topper site in Allendale County have captured international media attention. Volunteers will learn excavation techniques and how to identify Clovis and pre-Clovis artifacts in several prehistoric chert quarries. This year, some volunteers may also be involved in the excavation of a nearby Paleoamerican site known as the Charles site. The cost is $488 per week ($400 is tax-deductible) and includes evening lectures and programs, lunch...
  • Empuries: The Ancient Greek Town of Spain

    04/07/2012 8:17:56 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    EU Greek Reporter ^ | March 29, 2012 | Stella Tsolakidou
    The most western ancient Greek colony documented in the Mediterranean is revealing its secrets through the development of a Document Centre on Greek trade and presence in Iberia, according to the creators of the Iberia Graeca centre. Empúries, formerly known by its Spanish name Ampurias, was a town on the Mediterranean coast of the Catalan comarca of Alt Empordà in Catalonia, Spain. It was founded in 575 BC by Greek colonists from Phocaea with the name of Emporion, meaning "market". It was later occupied by the Romans, but in the Early Middle Ages, when its exposed coastal position left it...
  • Crucifixion: History, Archaeology (with photos!), and Why Jesus Died This Way

    04/07/2012 6:27:56 AM PDT · by NYer · 12 replies
    The Sacred Page ^ | April 6, 2012 | Michael Barber
    Today we meditate on the crucifixion of Jesus. In places around the world, images of the Christ crucified will be contemplated and venerated. Indeed, the image of the cross is quite familiar to us. It is part and parcel of Christian iconography. Perhaps, it is too familiar. Put frankly, the cross has in many ways been sanitized. To some extent, Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ (2004) helped bring attention to the actual violence associated with this form of ancient execution. Indeed, the attempt to re-dramatize the violence caused deep controversy. Some have even claimed that the film exaggerated...
  • DNA analysis shakes up Neandertal theories

    04/06/2012 10:21:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    Binghamton.edu ^ | April 4, 2012 | Gail Glover
    Focusing on mitochondrial DNA sequences from 13 Neandertal individuals, including a new sequence from the site of Valdegoba cave in northern Spain, the research team found some surprising results. When they started looking at the DNA, a clear pattern emerged. Neandertal individuals from Western Europe that were older than 50,000 years and individuals from sites in western Asia and the Middle East showed a high degree of genetic variation, on par with what might be expected from a species that had been abundant in an area for a long period of time. In fact, the amount of genetic variation was...
  • Young Mammoth Likely Butchered by Humans

    04/04/2012 3:32:01 PM PDT · by Renfield · 16 replies
    Discovery News ^ | 4-4-2012 | Jennifer Viegas
    A juvenile mammoth, nicknamed "Yuka," was found entombed in Siberian ice near the shores of the Arctic Ocean and shows signs of being cut open by ancient people. The remarkably well preserved frozen carcass was discovered in Siberia as part of a BBC/Discovery Channel-funded expedition and is believed to be at least 10,000 years old, if not older. If further study confirms the preliminary findings, it would be the first mammoth carcass revealing signs of human interaction in the region. The carcass is in such good shape that much of its flesh is still intact, retaining its pink color. The...
  • Researchers Say Gardom’s Edge Monolith Is Astronomical Marker (Dates Back To 2000 B.C.)

    04/03/2012 9:11:24 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 14 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Thu, Mar 29th, 2012 | John Shanks
    Researchers Say Gardom’s Edge Monolith Is Astronomical Marker A team of researchers from the Nottingham Trent University has suggested that a 4000-year-old unique triangular shaped monolith, known as the Gardom’s Edge monolith, was aligned to be an astronomical marker. The 2.2 meter high monolith, located in the Peak District National Park near Manchester, UK, has a striking, right-angled triangular shape that slants up towards geographic south. The orientation and inclination of the slope is aligned to the altitude of the Sun at mid-summer. The team believes that the monolith was set in place to give symbolic meaning to the location...
  • Hoard of 30,000 silver Roman coins discovered in Bath

    03/22/2012 6:37:19 PM PDT · by Engraved-on-His-hands · 27 replies · 1+ views
    The Telegraph [UK] ^ | March 22, 2012 | Andrew Hough
    More than 30,000 silver coins have been found by archaeologists working at the site of a new city-centre hotel. The hoard, believed to date from the third-century, was unearthed about 450 feet from the historic Roman Baths. Experts believe the “treasure trove” is the fifth largest hoard ever discovered in Britain and the largest from a Roman settlement. The coins, which have now been sent to the British Museum for further analysis, are fused together in a large block. This makes identification and counting difficult and conservators at central London Museum expect the task of analysing the coins to take...
  • Remarkable Russian Petroglyphs

    03/22/2012 5:41:26 AM PDT · by Renfield · 32 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 3-18-2012 | Hanne Jakobsen
    Artefacts are usually displayed in museums but sometimes there are some that just can’t be put on exhibition – as is the case with one that is hidden deep in the Russian forests. It was known that there were rock carvings on some islands in Lake Kanozero, and Jan Magne Gjerde, project manager at the Tromsø University Museum, went out there to document them as part of his doctoral work however, when he and his colleagues had completed their work, the number of known petroglyphs had risen from 200 to over 1,000. “I still get chills up my spine when...
  • The writing on the wall: Symbols from the Palaeolithic

    03/22/2012 5:23:51 AM PDT · by Renfield · 6 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 3-12-2012
    In 2009, a ground-breaking study by Genevieve von Petzinger revealed that dots, lines and other geometric signs found in prehistoric European caves may be the precursor to an ancient system of written communication dating back nearly 30,000 years. Von Petzinger, with University of Victoria anthropology professor April Nowell, compiled the markings from 146 different sites in Ice Age France, making it possible to compare the signs on a larger scale than had ever previously been attempted. What made her research ‘new’ was that she was able to use a whole range of modern technology to compare inventories and digital images...
  • Monster Titanoboa Snake Invades New York (43' Prehistoric Snake Weighed 2,500 lbs.)

    03/21/2012 7:13:29 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 27 replies · 185+ views
    Yahoo! News ^ | March 21, 2012 | Claudine Zap
    Monster titanoboa snake invades New York New York commuters arriving at Grand Central Station were greeted by a monstrous sight: a 48-foot-long, 2,500-pound titanoboa snake. The good news: It's not alive. Anymore. But the full-scale replica of the reptile -- which made its first appearance at the commuter hub -- is intended, as Smithsonian spokesperson Randall Kremer happily admitted, to "scare the daylights out of people" -- actually has a higher calling: to "communicate science to a lot of people." The scientifically scary-accurate model will go a long way toward that: If this snake slithered by you, it would be...
  • Worsley Man: Hospital scanner probes Iron Age bog death

    03/11/2012 5:10:02 PM PDT · by Renfield · 30 replies · 3+ views
    BBC News ^ | 3-8-2012
    Bryan Sitch, curator of archaeology at the museum, said it now appeared the man had been beaten about the head, garrotted and then beheaded The head of an Iron Age man who died almost 2,000 years ago has been scanned in a Manchester hospital to shed light on how he died. Worsley Man is thought to have lived around 100 AD when Romans occupied much of Britain. Since its discovery in a Salford peat bog in 1958, the head has been kept at Manchester Museum on Oxford Road. The scans at the Manchester Children's Hospital have now revealed more details...
  • How a Ship Full of Fish Helped Recreate an Ancient Fish Sauce

    03/06/2012 10:18:22 AM PST · by Renfield · 20 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | 3-1-2012 | Peter Smith
    If you’re like me, the last post on the convoluted origins of our favorite fermented condiment—ketchup—probably left you wondering: What is the difference between Roman garum than modern Thai fish sauce? What little I know comes from an experiment performed by Sally Grainger, author of Cooking Apicus, recounted in the book Cured, Fermented and Smoked Foods. Grainger is a British chef and an experimental archeologist. She looked at studies on fish sauce amphorae (ceramic vessels) from archeological sites in Spain and North Africa. One of her more fascinating sources comes from a 2,000-year-old shipwreck discovered off the coast of Grado,...
  • Faces of Civil War sailors from sunken USS Monitor reconstructed in hopes of identifying them

    03/04/2012 3:58:49 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 29 replies
    AP ^ | Saturday Mar 3, 2012 | Steve Szkotak
    Faces of Civil War sailors from sunken USS Monitor reconstructed in hopes of identifying them Faces of 2 USS Monitor crewmembers reconstructed Recovery: The turret of the Civil War ironclad USS Monitor is lifted out of the ocean off the coast of Hatteras, N.C. on August 5, 2002 RICHMOND, Va. — When the turret of the Civil War ironclad Monitor was raised from the ocean bottom, two skeletons and the tattered remnants of their uniforms were discovered in the rusted hulk of the Union Civil War ironclad, mute and nameless witnesses to the cost of war. A rubber comb was...
  • Christ's disciples' remains 'discovered'

    03/04/2012 5:06:29 AM PST · by Renfield · 24 replies
    Telegraph (UK) ^ | 3-4-2012 | Adrian Blomfield
    An amateur archaeologist and film maker claims to have identified what could be the remains of some of Christ's 12 disciples in a first century burial chamber buried beneath a block of flats in Jerusalem. A team led by Simcha Jacobovic, a Canadian documentary director, used a robot to photograph a number of limestone burial caskets, found below a block of flats, which may provide an unprecedented glimpse into Christianity's earliest days. But the potential significance of the discovery is almost certain to be overshadowed by controversy, with Mr Jacobovic using it as new evidence to bolster his widely disputed...
  • Ötzi the ice mummy's secrets found in DNA

    02/29/2012 5:28:47 AM PST · by Renfield · 11 replies · 3+ views
    NewScientist ^ | 2-26-2012 | Andy Coghlan
    Ötzi the ice mummy may have met his death in the Alps some 5300 years ago, but his descendants live on – on the Mediterranean islands of Corsica and Sardinia. The finding comes from an analysis of Ötzi's DNA, which also reveals he had brown eyes and hair, and was lactose intolerant. The ice mummy was found in 1991 on an Alpine glacier between Austria and Italy, where he met a violent end in the Neolithic.....
  • Found: Ancient Warrior's Helmet, Owner Unknown (Greek Mercenary Helmet, Circa 600 B.C.)

    02/28/2012 9:07:41 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 24 replies · 2+ views
    Live Science ^ | 28 February 2012 | Owen Jarus, LiveScience Contributor
    Found: Ancient Warrior's Helmet, Owner Unknown A Greek bronze helmet, covered with gold leaf and decorated with snakes, lions and a peacock's tail (or palmette), has been discovered in the waters of Haifa Bay in Israel. But how this helmet ended up at the bottom of the bay is a mystery. The helmet dates back around 2,600 years and likely belonged to a wealthy Greek mercenary who took part in a series of wars, immortalized in the Bible, which ravaged the region at that time. Archaeologists believe that he likely fought for an Egyptian pharaoh named Necho II. Dredging discovery...
  • Ancient barque to be reconstructed for museum

    02/25/2012 5:36:15 PM PST · by Engraved-on-His-hands · 8 replies · 1+ views
    Sail World ^ | February 25, 2012 | Renate Johns
    A Japanese University has provided a $10million grant to help see the reconstruction of one of the oldest known boats in the world, and the process has begun this week in Egypt, near the Giza Pyramid. With the help of the grant from Waseda University archaeologists on Monday began restoration on the 4,500-year-old almost 140ft (43 metre) so-called 'solar barque', which has shown signs of being used during the life of its owner Khufu(King Cheops) but was apparently also meant to carry him into the afterlife. Its 'sister' boat has already been restored and is housed in a specially built...
  • Aztec carvings tell story of cosmic battle

    02/20/2012 6:32:14 AM PST · by Renfield · 31 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 2-9-2012
    A total of 23 pre-Columbian stone plaques dating back over 550 years were discovered by archaeologists in front of the Great Temple of Tenochtitlan in Mexico City, with carvings illustrating Aztec myths including the birth of the god of war Huitzilopochtli. The sculpted images are carved on slabs of tezontle (a volcanic rock) and feature depictions of serpents, captives and warriors. They also feature other figures relating to the mythological origins of Aztec civilization. The stone carvings focus on the myths of Huitzilopochtli’s birth and the beginning of the Holy War. Raul Barrera from the National Institute of Anthropology and...
  • When opium was cheaper than whiskey – and Great Britain waged a "wicked" drug war

    02/19/2012 12:32:31 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 27 replies · 1+ views
    Cannon Beach Gazette ^ | Thursday, February 16, 2012 | Robert Lewis Knecht
    When opium was cheaper than whiskey – and Great Britain waged a "wicked" drug war When Opium Was Cheaper Than Whiskey - and Great Britain waged a "wicked" drug war The bottles have a beautiful aqua color to them. If you hold them up to the light, rainbows fire across the delicate patina. But their beauty belies the deadly reality behind the delicate hues. The bottles once held opium based "elixirs," such as Dr. McMunn's Elixir of Opium, most claiming to be a cure for a host of ailments, including the relief of "convulsions and spasmodic action," as well as...
  • Archaeologists strike gold in quest to find Queen of Sheba's wealth

    02/11/2012 8:10:11 PM PST · by Engraved-on-His-hands · 15 replies
    The Guardian [UK] ^ | February 11, 2012 | Dalya Alberge
    A British excavation has struck archaeological gold with a discovery that may solve the mystery of where the Queen of Sheba of biblical legend derived her fabled treasures. Almost 3,000 years ago, the ruler of Sheba, which spanned modern-day Ethiopia and Yemen, arrived in Jerusalem with vast quantities of gold to give to King Solomon. Now an enormous ancient goldmine, together with the ruins of a temple and the site of a battlefield, have been discovered in her former territory. Louise Schofield, an archaeologist and former British Museum curator, who headed the excavation on the high Gheralta plateau in northern...