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Keyword: archaeology

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  • Ancient 'Vampire' Corpses Unearthed by Bulgarian Archaeologists

    06/06/2012 3:52:39 AM PDT · by Renfield · 25 replies
    Medical Daily ^ | 5-5-2012 | Christine Hsu
    More than 100 "vampire" corpses have been dug out from graves across Bulgaria during historic excavations, according to the country's archaeologists. Bozhidar Dimitrov, head of the National History Museum in the Bulgarian capital, Sofia, said on Tuesday that Bulgarian archaeologists have unearthed two skeletons from the Middle Ages pierced through the chest with iron rods to keep them from turning into the undead. Dimitrov said that the two "vampire" remains were found last weekend near the Black Sea town of Sozopol. The tradition of hammering an iron rod through the chest bones and heart of 'evil' people to prevent them...
  • Skeletal Trauma from Medieval Oslo

    05/31/2012 5:21:03 AM PDT · by Renfield · 11 replies
    Bones Don't Lie ^ | 5-1-2012 | Katy Meyers
    The Medieval period is one characterized throughout the Western world as one of violence. Artwork from this era shows not only violence done towards other cultural groups, but dangers and suffering from daily life. Historical texts document the violence of heroes and villains, their phrases often loaded with drama. Scholars have argued that this violence was part of the social environment and to some extent was institutionalized. However, judgements from text and art alone are limited by individual perception and bias. Human remains have been vital in understanding the extent and manner of violence in the Medieval period. While they...
  • Lead poisoning in Rome: The skeletal evidence

    05/31/2012 5:10:10 AM PDT · by Renfield · 14 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 2-24-2012 | http://www.poweredbyosteons.org/
    A recent article in the online publication io9, “The First Artificial Sweetener Poisoned Lots of Romans“ provided a (very) brief look at some of the uses of lead (Pb) in the Roman world, including the tired old hypothesis that it was rampant lead poisoning that led to the downfall of Rome - along with gonorrhoea, Christianity, slavery, and the kitchen sink. The fact the Romans loved their lead is not in question, with plenty of textual and archaeological sources that inform us of the uses of lead – as cosmetics, ballistics, sarcophagi, pipes, jewellery, curse tablets, utensils and cooking pots,...
  • Huge Ancient Civilization’s Collapse Explained

    05/29/2012 5:32:20 AM PDT · by Renfield · 47 replies
    LiveScience ^ | 5-28-2012 | Charles Choi
    The mysterious fall of the largest of the world's earliest urban civilizations nearly 4,000 years ago in what is now India, Pakistan, Nepal and Bangladesh now appears to have a key culprit — ancient climate change, researchers say. Ancient Egypt and Mesopotamia may be the best known of the first great urban cultures, but the largest was the Indus or Harappan civilization. This culture once extended over more than 386,000 square miles (1 million square kilometers) across the plains of the Indus River from the Arabian Seato the Ganges, and at its peak may have accounted for 10 percent of...
  • Archaeologists: Israeli artifacts support Solomon’s Temple

    05/12/2012 10:53:21 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 5 replies
    Sun Herald ^ | 05/12/2012 | MICHELE CHABIN - Religion News Service
    JERUSALEM -- Archaeologists have unearthed a trove of artifacts dating back to the time of the biblical King David that they say closely correspond to the description of Solomon’s Temple found in the Book of Kings. Hebrew University archaeologist Yosef Garfinkel said the find “is extraordinary” first because it marks the first time that shrines from the time of the early Israelite kings were found. In addition, two small, well-preserved models discovered in the excavations closely resemble elements described in the Bible. The multiyear excavations took place at Khirbet Qeiyafa, a fortified city about 20 miles southwest of Jerusalem, adjacent...
  • How the Cavemen Ate: Cookbook Reveals 77 Recipes Stretching Right Back to the Stone Age

    05/12/2012 11:02:10 AM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 19 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 4 May 2012 | Eddie Wrenn
    How the cavemen ate: Cookbook reveals 77 recipes stretching right back to the Stone Age (and they taste surprisingly good!) Fancy something new for dinner tonight? Well if you don't fancy a Chinese or a Thai, researchers have pulled together 77 recipes which were eaten during the Stone Ages. And the surprise is how delicious the recipes, some of them 16,000 years old, sound - with your typical Neolithic families spicing up their meals and using plenty of fresh fruit and herbs along with the simmering main dishes of game. A Culinary Journey Through Time can join Jamie Oliver and...
  • 3,000-year-old artifacts fuel Biblical archaeology debate

    05/08/2012 1:00:23 PM PDT · by Pharmboy · 37 replies
    The Times of Israel ^ | May 8, 2012 | MATTI FRIEDMAN
    New finds presented Tuesday from an intriguing site in the Judean Hills are part of a scholarly argument about the accuracy of the Bible The excavation at Hirbet Qeiyafa is currently one of the most important in the world of Biblical archaeology (Courtesy of Hebrew University of Jerusalem)Two rare 3,000-year-old models of ancient shrines were among artifacts presented by an Israeli archaeologist on Tuesday as finds he said offered new support for the historical veracity of the Bible. The archaeologist, Yosef Garfinkel of Hebrew University, is excavating a site known as Hirbet Qeiyafa, located in the Judean hills not far...
  • Roman Shipwreck Discovered Near Aeolian Islands

    07/02/2010 5:59:48 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    ANSAmed ^ | July 2010 | unattributed
    The wreck of a Roman ship from the first century AD which is still whole and has over 500 wide-mouthed amphorae onboard has been discovered to the south of the island of Panarea... [announced] by the Regional Councillor for Cultural Heritage, Gaetano Armao, and by the Superintendent, Sebastiano Tusa. ''From the first surveys,'' said Tusa, ''we can establish that it is a merchant shipping measuring around 25 metres, in perfect condition, which transported fruit and vegetables from Sicily to the markets in the north. The style of the amphorae is in fact typical of the 'workshops' of the island and...
  • Ancient Map Gives Clue to Fate of 'Lost Colony' (Britain's Roanoke Island in the Late 16th Century)

    05/05/2012 1:51:27 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 6 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 04 May 2012 | The Telegraph
    A new look at a 425-year-old map has yielded a tantalising clue about the fate of the Lost Colony, the settlers who disappeared from Britain's Roanoke Island in the late 16th century. Experts from the First Colony Foundation and the British Museum in London discussed their findings Thursday at a scholarly meeting on the campus of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Their focus: the "Virginia Pars" map of Virginia and North Carolina created by explorer John White in the 1580s and owned by the British Museum since 1866. "We believe that this evidence provides conclusive proof that...
  • Did Ancient Drifters 'Discover' British Columbia?

    04/25/2012 4:58:58 PM PDT · by Theoria · 28 replies
    The Tyee ^ | 03 April 2012 | Daniel Wood
    Legends and bits of evidence tell a story of Asians arriving here long, long ago. Part one of two. "Even pale ink is better than memory." -- Chinese proverbAs the tide creeps over the sand flats of Pachena Bay south of Bamfield, it brings ashore the flotsam of the Pacific that -- on occasion -- hints at extraordinary travels and a mystery of historic proportions. Amid the kelp, in decades past, hundreds of green-glass fishing floats would arrive intact on the Vancouver Island coast, having ridden the powerful Japanese Current in year-long transits from Asia. But on rare occasions, entire...
  • Archaeologists Excavate Ancient Phoenician Port City [ Tel Achziv ]

    04/21/2012 8:10:52 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Thursday, April 5, 2012 | Gwyn Davies et al
    The ruins of the site rest atop a sandstone hill, hugging the far northern coast of the current State of Israel near the border with Lebanon. One can see later-period standing structures that provide the backdrop for what is now a national park and beach resort. But below the surface, and beneath the ocean waves, lie the remains of an ancient harbor town that reach back in history to as long ago as Chalcolithic times (4500 -3200 BC)... Known today as Tel Achziv, its remnants have been explored and excavated before, by Moshe Prausnitz from 1963 through 1964 and, in...
  • Archaeological Find Supports Biblical Portrait of the Davidic Kingdom

    04/23/2012 6:45:30 AM PDT · by NYer · 37 replies
    The Sacred Page ^ | April 20, 2012
    In 2008 I first ran a story about a major archaeological discovery at Khirbet Qeiyafa. The Israeli Antiquities Authority is releasing the preliminary report of the finds at Khirbet Qeiyafa. As I explained then, the findings are challenging skeptical scholars' claims. As I explained then, according to skeptical scholars the accounts of the kingdoms of David and Solomon are myths--essentially the Israelite equivalent of Arthurian legends of Camelot and the Roundtable. In short, in their view, it was simply fabricated. After Israel's Babylonian exile, the Jewish leaders invented these stories. The Israelites simply "idealized" their past; the Davidic traditions...
  • Medieval Abbot's Grave Uncovered

    04/20/2012 2:08:28 PM PDT · by NYer · 24 replies
    New Liturgical Movement ^ | April 19, 2012 | SHAWN TRIBE
    Extraordinary discovery of 12th century abbot's grave For something like seven centuries he had lain undisturbed. He – or at least his remains – survived Henry VIII’s destruction of his abbey in 1537, eluded the grave-robbers that followed, and avoided discovery by Victorian archaeologists. Even deep excavations and the underpinning of the crumbling building in the 1930s failed to unearth him. But the abbot who headed Britain’s second richest and most powerful Cistercian monastery may soon be unmasked... [...] The skeleton of a portly figure was discovered almost by fluke when emergency repairs had to be made to the abbey...
  • Swedish Stonehenge? Ancient stone structure spurs debate

    04/19/2012 1:53:22 PM PDT · by Engraved-on-His-hands · 17 replies
    Fox News ^ | April 19, 2012 | Crystal Gammon
    Ancient Scandinavians dragged 59 boulders to a seaside cliff near what is now the Swedish fishing village of Kaseberga. They carefully arranged the massive stones — each weighing up to 4,000 pounds (1,800 kilograms) — in the outline of a 220-foot-long (67-meter) ship overlooking the Baltic Sea. Archaeologists generally agree this megalithic structure, known as Ales Stenar ("Ale's Stones"), was assembled about 1,000 years ago, near the end of the Iron Age, as a burial monument. But a team of researchers now argues it's really 2,500 years old, dating from the Scandinavian Bronze Age, and was built as an astronomical...
  • Viking-era 'piggy bank' yields silver treasure

    04/12/2012 6:07:47 PM PDT · by Engraved-on-His-hands · 7 replies
    The Local [Sweden] ^ | April 11, 2012 | David Landes
    A bronze, Viking-era "piggy-bank" containing thousands silver coins dating from the 11th century has been unearthed on the Baltic island of Gotland in what Swedish archaeologists have described as a "fantastic" treasure find. The silver treasure was found last Thursday during an archaeological examination of a field in Rone, on southern Gotland. "We had an expert out there with a metal detector who got a signal that he's found something pretty big," Per Widerström, an archaeologist with the Gotland Museum, told The Local. The same field has yielded previous treasure finds, including a well-known discovery from the 1880s, when a...
  • Dig it! Volunteers can sign up to excavate at Topper site

    04/08/2012 6:08:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Times and Democrat ^ | Thursday, April 5, 2012 | Albert Goodyear (probably)
    The University of South Carolina is accepting registrations from volunteers to help excavate archaeological sites along the Savannah River April 30-June 2. The expedition will be led by archaeologist Albert Goodyear, whose discoveries at the Topper site in Allendale County have captured international media attention. Volunteers will learn excavation techniques and how to identify Clovis and pre-Clovis artifacts in several prehistoric chert quarries. This year, some volunteers may also be involved in the excavation of a nearby Paleoamerican site known as the Charles site. The cost is $488 per week ($400 is tax-deductible) and includes evening lectures and programs, lunch...
  • Empuries: The Ancient Greek Town of Spain

    04/07/2012 8:17:56 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    EU Greek Reporter ^ | March 29, 2012 | Stella Tsolakidou
    The most western ancient Greek colony documented in the Mediterranean is revealing its secrets through the development of a Document Centre on Greek trade and presence in Iberia, according to the creators of the Iberia Graeca centre. Empúries, formerly known by its Spanish name Ampurias, was a town on the Mediterranean coast of the Catalan comarca of Alt Empordŕ in Catalonia, Spain. It was founded in 575 BC by Greek colonists from Phocaea with the name of Emporion, meaning "market". It was later occupied by the Romans, but in the Early Middle Ages, when its exposed coastal position left it...
  • Crucifixion: History, Archaeology (with photos!), and Why Jesus Died This Way

    04/07/2012 6:27:56 AM PDT · by NYer · 12 replies
    The Sacred Page ^ | April 6, 2012 | Michael Barber
    Today we meditate on the crucifixion of Jesus. In places around the world, images of the Christ crucified will be contemplated and venerated. Indeed, the image of the cross is quite familiar to us. It is part and parcel of Christian iconography. Perhaps, it is too familiar. Put frankly, the cross has in many ways been sanitized. To some extent, Mel Gibson’s The Passion of the Christ (2004) helped bring attention to the actual violence associated with this form of ancient execution. Indeed, the attempt to re-dramatize the violence caused deep controversy. Some have even claimed that the film exaggerated...
  • DNA analysis shakes up Neandertal theories

    04/06/2012 10:21:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    Binghamton.edu ^ | April 4, 2012 | Gail Glover
    Focusing on mitochondrial DNA sequences from 13 Neandertal individuals, including a new sequence from the site of Valdegoba cave in northern Spain, the research team found some surprising results. When they started looking at the DNA, a clear pattern emerged. Neandertal individuals from Western Europe that were older than 50,000 years and individuals from sites in western Asia and the Middle East showed a high degree of genetic variation, on par with what might be expected from a species that had been abundant in an area for a long period of time. In fact, the amount of genetic variation was...
  • Young Mammoth Likely Butchered by Humans

    04/04/2012 3:32:01 PM PDT · by Renfield · 16 replies
    Discovery News ^ | 4-4-2012 | Jennifer Viegas
    A juvenile mammoth, nicknamed "Yuka," was found entombed in Siberian ice near the shores of the Arctic Ocean and shows signs of being cut open by ancient people. The remarkably well preserved frozen carcass was discovered in Siberia as part of a BBC/Discovery Channel-funded expedition and is believed to be at least 10,000 years old, if not older. If further study confirms the preliminary findings, it would be the first mammoth carcass revealing signs of human interaction in the region. The carcass is in such good shape that much of its flesh is still intact, retaining its pink color. The...