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Keyword: asat

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  • China Tests Anti-Satellite Missile

    11/09/2015 11:58:39 AM PST · by McGruff · 52 replies
    The Washington Free Beacon ^ | 11/9/2015 | Bill Gertz
    China recently conducted a flight test of a new missile capable of knocking out U.S. satellites as part of Beijing's growing space warfare arsenal. The test of a Dong Neng-3 exoatmospheric vehicle was carried out Oct. 30 from China's Korla Missile Test Complex in western China, said two defense officials familiar with reports of the test. A Chinese press report also provided details of what was said to be a missile defense interceptor flight test carried out Nov. 1. Photos of the missile's contrails were posted online.
  • China Tests Space Weapons As U.S. Pursues Space Disarmament

    11/18/2014 2:26:59 PM PST · by raptor22 · 8 replies
    Investor's Business Daily ^ | November 18, 2014 | IBD EDITORIALS
    Defense: Members of Congress warn that the State Department is working on arms accords to demilitarize space and ban anti-satellite weapons, leaving Russia and China with a huge lead in military space capabilities. On Jan. 17, 2012, then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton issued a statement announcing the Obama administration's intention to work with the European Union on an International Code of Conduct for Outer Space Activities. It was supposed to be sort of a "rules of the road" for space-faring nations to deal with issues such as the accumulating space junk jeopardizing satellites and manned space activities such as the...
  • Why Is China Testing Satellite-Hijacking Space Weapons?

    10/03/2013 4:29:19 PM PDT · by James C. Bennett · 25 replies
    Gizmodo ^ | 3 Oct 2013 | Adam Clark Estes
    Last week, China tested out a satellite that's capable of grabbing and capturing other satellites as they orbit the Earth. This normally wouldn't be such a big deal, except that it amounts to China conducting a weapons test in space. And that's worrisome—especially to the Pentagon. So what's up with this space weapons test? First of all, we're not diving into a Star Trek-like future any time soon—at face value, the Chinese satellite test sounds rather benign. Experts are unclear about how exactly the test went down, but it's pretty clear that a satellite with a moveable arm reached out...
  • India's ABM test: proven ASAT capability or a paper tiger?

    03/21/2011 9:50:24 AM PDT · by Sancho1984
    The DC Space Examiner reported on March 6, 2011 that India performed a test of the interceptor missile portion of its ballistic missile defense system. The test, the sixth of the test series, was reportedly a success and a validation of the technology to be integrated into India's defense system. The interceptor is purportedly the final component to be tested. As a byline, V.K. Saraswat, Scientific Adviser to the Defence Minister and the Defence Research and Development Organisation (DRDO) Director-General, stated this latest success demonstrated India's capability to effectively neutralize satellites belonging to an adversary.[1] While not the primary purpose...
  • Lockheed Martin submits bid for Space Fence

    11/19/2010 12:00:38 AM PST · by ErnstStavroBlofeld · 11 replies
    Brahmand.com ^ | 11/19/2010 | Brahmand.Com
    Lockheed Martin has submitted its proposal for the next phase of Space Fence, a program that will revamp the way the US Air Force identifies and tracks objects in space. Space Fence will replace the existing Air Force Space Surveillance System, or VHF Fence, which has been in service since the early 1960s. The new system’s initial operational capability is scheduled for 2015. The contract is valued at more than $3.5 billion. For this next phase of the Space Fence program, the Air Force will award up to two preliminary design review contracts worth up to a total of $214...
  • Space Wars: beginning of a new era

    11/18/2010 11:56:49 PM PST · by ErnstStavroBlofeld · 1 replies
    Brahmand.Com ^ | 11/19/2010 | Brahmand.com
    On 11 January, 2007, China military tested its anti-satellite weapon or ASAT by hitting Fengyun-1C, a derelict Chinese weather satellite. The satellite was smashed into at least 900 pieces. The experiment drew considerable international criticism. The reports were confirmed by the then National Security Council spokesman Gordon Johndroe. For the first known time in history, a missile launched from the ground destroyed an orbiting satellite. This provocative action by China highlighted a new paradigm shift in the worldwide military strategy.
  • US Warns PRC of Anti-Sat Debris

    10/29/2010 11:02:53 PM PDT · by ErnstStavroBlofeld · 12 replies
    DoD Buzz ^ | 10/28/2010 | Colin Clark
    Earlier this month, the State Department learned that debris from the Chinese weather satellite destroyed in their 2007 anti-satellite test would be coming uncomfortably close to another — functioning — Chinese satellite. So, like any good neighbor, State told China about the possibility of a collision. In technical terms, the US shared conjunction analysis with our PRC brethren. But, as often happens with the fabulously opaque Chinese government, the US isn’t sure if China heard us or believed us. At a conference on space debris last week in Germany, a U.S. military officer spoke with someone presumed to be a...
  • India’s missile defense / anti-satellite nexus

    07/14/2010 4:30:21 PM PDT · by James C. Bennett
    The Space Review ^ | 5/10/2010 | Victoria Samson
    While China’s 2007 anti-satellite (ASAT) test and its missile defense intercept test earlier this year have attracted much attention and concern, another emerging space power has also been expressing its interest in developing those capabilities yet attracting very little notice: India. Given enthusiastic statements by Indian officials about what they see as the need for ASATs and the country’s continued missile defense efforts, this could be worrisome. Though most of the rhetoric can be chalked up to regional rivalry, and much of the grandstanding downplays the level of technical capacity that still needs to be developed, India’s plans for missile...
  • Report: China site of anti-satellite weapons test program believed located in western province

    06/19/2010 1:46:45 AM PDT · by ErnstStavroBlofeld · 6 replies · 322+ views
    East-Asia-Intel.com ^ | 6/9/2010 | East-Asia-Intel.com
    China most likely conducted its January 2007 anti-satellite weapon test in the Kuerle region of western Xinjiang province, according to a report by the Kanwa Asian Defense news service. The service reported June 1 that “reconnaissance satellite intelligence” identified “facilities that have appeared to the South of Kuerle.” Large phased array radar antenna are located in a desert region to the south of Kuerle. The two phased array radar are similar to the Arrow II ballistic missile interception system designed by Israel, the report said. Additionally, China’s Second Artillery, which is in charge of all missiles, has a missile test...
  • Polyus-Russian ASAT Weapon

    05/01/2010 12:13:43 AM PDT · by ErnstStavroBlofeld · 4 replies · 348+ views
    Astronautix ^ | unknown | Ed Grondine
    The Polyus military testbed was put together on a crash basis as an answer to America's Star Wars program. It was built around a surplus TKS manned spacecraft and was meant to test prototype ASAT and Star Wars defense systems. It failed to reach orbit, but it had succeeded, it would have been the core module of a new Mir-2 space station. Its mere presence could have decisively changed the shape of the Cold War in its final months. In 1985, it became clear that the Energia launch vehicle would be ready for launch before the Buran space shuttle that...
  • Russian company eyes offensive military satellite

    02/20/2010 1:25:37 AM PST · by ErnstStavroBlofeld · 3 replies · 304+ views
    RT,com ^ | 1/26/2010 | RT
    Leading Russian spacecraft producer Energia has presented a concept of a universal military satellite with offensive capabilities. The 20-ton orbiter with a life expectancy of 10 to 15 years would be powered by a 150 to 500 kilowatt nuclear reactor and will be able to “monitor territories and airspace, provide informational superiority – including in armed conflicts – and perform target designation and traffic control. It will also be offensive-capable,” said Energia head Vitaly Lopota, as cited by ITAR-TASS news agency. He did not specify what offensive capabilities the satellite would have; whether it will be able to target other...
  • Satellite Substitutes Seriously Sought

    01/28/2010 1:35:19 PM PST · by ErnstStavroBlofeld · 20 replies · 627+ views
    The Strategy Page ^ | 1/28/2010 | The Strategy Page
    U.S. Air Force is concerned about American dependence on space satellites, particularly the GPS birds. The air force believes China is developing the ability to carry out a major attack on American military satellites. Their proposed solution is to take GPS out of orbit, and make it portable. High flying aircraft, UAVs or blimps would take over satellite communications, surveillance and navigation (GPS) chores, although for smaller areas. This would make GPS, and other satellite functions, more resilient to attack. This is part of a trend in which military satellites are getting priced out of the market by cheaper manned...
  • Aims and Motives of China's Recent Missile Defense Test

    01/22/2010 9:13:16 PM PST · by ErnstStavroBlofeld · 267+ views
    Jamestown Foundation ^ | 1/21/2010 | Russell Hsiao
    The U.S. government announced on January 6 that it awarded the defense manufacturer, Lockheed Martin, a contract to build the Patriot Advanced Capability-3 (PAC-3) missiles for Taiwan. The agreement is part of an arms package that the United States agreed to sell to Taiwan in 2008 (eTaiwan news, January 7). The Indian government also recently declared that it was expanding its anti-ballistic missile system to include an anti-satellite program (ASM) (Space News, January 4). Following these announcements the People's Republic of China (PRC) announced on January 11 that it had successfully tested a "ground-based, midcourse missile interception technology." The Chinese...
  • India Targets China's Satellites

    01/22/2010 2:02:58 AM PST · by ErnstStavroBlofeld · 382+ views
    Thai-Asian News ^ | 1/22/2010 | Peter J Brown
    Memories in New Delhi run deep about how India's relative tardiness in developing strategic offensive systems [nuclear weapons] redounded in its relegation on 'judgment day' [when the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty was signed in 1968] to the formal category of non-nuclear weapons state," said Sourabh Gupta, senior research associate at Samuels International Associates in Washington, DC. "With its early support of the former US president George W Bush's ballistic missile defense program and its current drive to develop anti-ballistic missile/anti-satellite capability, New Delhi is determined not to make the same mistake twice," added Gupta. "If and when globally negotiated restraints are...
  • Space systems and missile defense in 2010

    01/18/2010 9:33:22 PM PST · by ErnstStavroBlofeld · 2 replies · 478+ views
    The Space Review ^ | 1/18/2010 | Taylor Dinerman
    The recent Chinese missile defense test is just one of many signs that anti-ballistic missile systems are the “must have” military fashion accessory of 2010. For China the need for such weapons is obvious: the only neighbors they have who lack a real or potential short- to medium-range missile capability are Laos, Burma, and perhaps Mongolia. All of their other neighbors, especially Russia, North Korea. and India, have been building up their rocket forces at a rapid rate. For both Europe and China, any effective BMD requires space-based early warning sensors similar to the US Defense Support Program satellites based...
  • Smashing RORSATs: the origin of the F-15 ASAT program

    01/15/2010 2:26:50 AM PST · by ErnstStavroBlofeld · 1 replies · 471+ views
    The Space Review ^ | 01/11/2010 | Dwayne Day
    In early 2008, when the United States Navy used a missile launched from a guided missile cruiser to shoot down a failed American reconnaissance satellite, many people in the United States and around the world interpreted it as a response to the Chinese test of an anti-satellite (ASAT) weapon a year before. Although the US government went out of its way to assert that the action was entirely prompted by concern that toxins in the satellite could reach a populated area, it is certain that, during the weeks leading up to the shootdown, officials in the government debated the political...
  • India Developing Anti-satellite Technology

    01/04/2010 9:11:57 PM PST · by ErnstStavroBlofeld · 5 replies · 499+ views
    Space News ^ | 1/04/2010 | By Peter B. de Selding
    India has begun development of lasers and an exoatmospheric kill vehicle that could be combined to produce a weapon to destroy enemy satellites in orbit, the director-general of India’s defense research organization said Jan. 3. “The kill vehicle, which is needed for intercepting the satellite, needs to be developed, and that work is going on as part of the ballistic missile defense program,” said V.K. Saraswat, director-general of the Defence Research and Development Organisation, which is part of India’s Ministry of Defence. In a televised press briefing during the 97th Indian Science Congress in Thiruvananthapuram, Saraswat said the program includes...
  • Soviet Star Wars

    12/10/2009 12:37:13 AM PST · by ErnstStavroBlofeld · 10 replies · 695+ views
    Air and Space Smithsonian ^ | 1/01/2010 | Dwayne A. Day And Robert G. Kennedy III
    It sounds like something from a James Bond movie: a massive satellite, the largest ever launched, equipped with a powerful laser to take out the American anti-missile shield in advance of a Soviet first strike. It was real, though—or at least the plan was. In fact, when Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev walked out of the October 1986 summit in Reykjavik, Iceland, because President Ronald Reagan wouldn't abandon his Strategic Defense Initiative, or SDI, the Soviets were closer to fielding a space-based weapon than the United States was. Less than a year later, as the world continued to criticize Reagan for...
  • THE CASE FOR SPACE-BASED DEFENSE

    11/18/2009 9:08:49 PM PST · by bruinbirdman · 7 replies · 538+ views
    American Foreign Policy Council ^ | 11/18/2009 | Ilan Berman, ed.
    THE CASE FOR SPACE-BASED DEFENSE The growing interest in nuclear technology by countries such as Iran presages the possibility that one or more nations may attempt to harness such a capability in the form of an electro-magnetic pulse (EMP) attack against the United States, a prominent political scientist has warned. Such a scenario, writes Brian Kennedy of the Claremont Institute in the November 24th edition of the Wall Street Journal, is not far-fetched. "It would require the Iranians to be able to produce a warhead as sophisticated as we expect the Russians or the Chinese to possess. But that is...
  • Selling China The Rope To Hang Us

    10/16/2009 5:37:32 PM PDT · by raptor22 · 9 replies · 822+ views
    Investor;s Business Daily ^ | October16, 3009 | IBD staff
    National Security: On the eve of a visit by China's No. 2 ranking military officer, the Obama administration loosens export controls on technology that will benefit Chinese missile development. It's deja vu all over again. The Pentagon has announced that Chinese Gen. Xu Caihou will visit the United States and meet with Defense Secretary Robert Gates on Oct. 26. Xu is vice chairman of the People's Liberation Army Central Military Commission. While here, Xu will visit American military installations around the U.S., including the U.S. Pacific Command. Perhaps Xu will bring with him a note of thanks for the administration's...