Free Republic 3rd Quarter Fundraising Target: $85,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $74,144
87%  
Woo hoo!! And we're now over 87%!! Less than $11k to go!! Let's git 'er done!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: asthma

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Put people first [Environmentalists outlawed the best asthma inhalers!]

    12/29/2007 10:02:50 AM PST · by grundle · 112 replies · 547+ views
    Pittsburgh Post-Gazette ^ | December 29, 2007 | SHAWN PIRRUNG
    This is the problem with the politicians, and especially those who are so worried about the environment: They forget what and who is important -- people. The reason I say this is because of what has happened with prescription inhalers used for asthma treatment. I recently needed to refill my inhaler and was told by the local pharmacist that the inhaler was now different because it contained ingredients that harmed the ozone layer. However, these ingredients were the most effective for helping calm down an asthma attack. I was also informed by the pharmacy that since the medication was altered,...
  • Worms infect more poor Americans than thought

    12/25/2007 10:17:24 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 66 replies · 1,385+ views
    Reuters ^ | December 25, 2007 | Maggie Fox, Health and Science Editor
    Roundworms may infect close to a quarter of inner city black children, tapeworms are the leading cause of seizures among U.S. Hispanics and other parasitic diseases associated with poor countries are also affecting Americans, a U.S. expert said on Tuesday. Recent studies show many of the poorest Americans living in the United States carry some of the same parasitic infections that affect the poor in Africa, Asia, and Latin America, said Dr. Peter Hotez, a tropical disease expert at George Washington University and editor-in-chief of the Public Library of Science journal PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases. Writing in the journal, Hotez...
  • Accuracy of 9/11 Health Reports Is Questioned

    09/07/2007 12:22:03 AM PDT · by neverdem · 5 replies · 449+ views
    NY Times ^ | September 7, 2007 | ANTHONY DePALMA and SERGE F. KOVALESKI
    Much of what is known about the health problems of ground zero workers comes from a small clinic in Manhattan that at the time of the trade center collapse had only six full-time doctors and a tiny budget. Yet in the weeks after 9/11, its doctors stepped into the fray in the absence of any meaningful effort by the city, state or federal government to survey, interview or offer treatment to potentially sickened recovery and cleanup workers. Since then, the clinic, the Irving J. Selikoff Center for Occupational and Environmental Medicine, based at Mount Sinai Medical Center, has examined more...
  • Guidelines Are Issued on Asthma and Youths

    08/29/2007 11:48:52 PM PDT · by neverdem · 27 replies · 297+ views
    NY Times ^ | August 30, 2007 | DENISE GRADY
    Children ages 5 to 11 with asthma require different treatment than do adults, guidelines issued yesterday by the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute say. The new guidelines are the first to recognize that this age group has distinct needs and should not be lumped together with adults, as has been done in the past. Specifically, these children can often control their asthma with inhalers that contain only steroid drugs, whereas adults are more likely to need inhalers that combine steroids and other medicines. (The steroids used to treat asthma are different from the ones that athletes take to bulk...
  • Survey Shows a High Rate of Asthma at Ground Zero

    08/28/2007 8:57:24 PM PDT · by neverdem · 4 replies · 213+ views
    NY Times ^ | August 28, 2007 | ANTHONY DePALMA
    Rescue and recovery workers at ground zero have developed asthma at a rate that is 12 times what would be expected for adults, according to findings released yesterday by the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene. Of nearly 26,000 workers surveyed in 2003 and 2004, 926 reported that they developed asthma for the first time after working at ground zero (a rate of 3.6 percent). In a group that size, under normal conditions, no more than 77 new cases of asthma (0.3 percent) would have been expected, according to the report, which is published in the current...
  • Image of asthmatic girl is used to promote NYC traffic-fee plan

    07/05/2007 3:43:42 PM PDT · by Extremely Extreme Extremist · 6 replies · 500+ views
    WCBSTV.COM ^ | 05 JULY 2007 | AP
    NEW YORK (AP) -- An image of a sad-looking little girl squeezing an asthma inhaler is being used to pressure state lawmakers into approving Mayor Michael Bloomberg's controversial plan to reduce traffic and pollution by charging motorists who drive into Manhattan. The tag line: ``She cannot hold her breath waiting for Albany to act.'' The flier is being mailed this week to 350,000 households throughout the city, urging residents to call lawmakers in Albany. The state legislature would have to come back for a special session to approve the plan before a July 16 application deadline for federal funding. Bloomberg's...
  • Antibiotic Use in First Year May Increase Asthma Risk

    06/22/2007 1:42:08 AM PDT · by neverdem · 17 replies · 344+ views
    NY Times ^ | June 19, 2007 | NICHOLAS BAKALAR
    The use of antibiotics in the first year of life is associated with an increased risk for asthma at age 7, a new study has found, and the reason may be that antibiotics destroy not only disease-causing microbes, but also those that are helpful to the developing immune system. Antibiotic use had a greater impact on children who would otherwise be considered at lower risk — children who lived in rural areas and those whose mothers did not have asthma — than on those who were already at increased risk because of an urban environment or genetic predisposition. Studies of...
  • Assembly Leader Challenges Toll Plan’s Health Benefits

    06/11/2007 10:08:07 PM PDT · by neverdem · 7 replies · 392+ views
    NY Times ^ | June 12, 2007 | DANNY HAKIM
    ALBANY, June 11 — Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver, in his strongest language yet against Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg’s plan to charge people who drive into the most congested parts of Manhattan during the day, questioned the health benefits of the proposal yesterday. He also suggested that many of the environmental goals Mr. Bloomberg has outlined could be accomplished without congestion pricing. His comments suggested that two hours of testimony by Mayor Bloomberg at an Assembly hearing on Friday had not swayed the Democrats who control the chamber. Mr. Silver even seemed to outline new concerns, saying that the plan could...
  • Study Links Rescuers’ Lung Ailment to Trade Center Collapse

    05/07/2007 8:12:30 PM PDT · by neverdem · 8 replies · 651+ views
    NY Times ^ | May 8, 2007 | ANTHONY DePALMA
    In the first clinical study to clearly link World Trade Center dust to serious and sometimes fatal diseases, doctors have found that the number of New York City rescue and recovery workers with a rare type of lung-scarring condition soared in the year after the trade center collapsed. Doctors from the Fire Department and at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine found that 13 firefighters and emergency medical service workers with the department developed sarcoidosis, a debilitating illness in which the lungs and other organs develop inflammation that produces lumps of cells, called granulomas. The illness can be controlled with...
  • Salve For The Lungs: Aspirin Might Prevent Asthma

    01/26/2007 3:46:21 PM PST · by blam · 27 replies · 1,022+ views
    Science News ^ | 1-27-2007 | Ben Harder
    Salve for the Lungs: Aspirin might prevent asthma Ben Harder Regular use of aspirin may prevent healthy adults from developing asthma, according to a 5-year study of male doctors. Inflammation in the lungs characterizes asthma. During an attack, inflamed airways constrict, obstructing air flow. The disease affects about 5 percent of men and more than 8 percent of women and children. It most frequently develops during childhood, and some kids outgrow it. For the current study, epidemiologist Tobias Kurth of Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and his colleagues analyzed data on some 22,000 male physicians who had participated in...
  • ICC Could Be Hazardous To Your Children's Health

    12/02/2006 6:21:28 PM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 23 replies · 821+ views
    Washington Post ^ | December 3, 2006 | John M. Balbus and Jim Fary
    More than 1 million residents of the Washington-Baltimore region already live close to heavily trafficked motorways where dangerous soot pollution is at levels that can trigger asthma attacks, heart attacks and respiratory disease. Building the $2.4 billion (and rising), 18-mile intercounty connector linking Interstate 270 to Interstate 95 through neighborhoods and near schools would worsen these health problems. Maryland Gov.-elect Martin O'Malley (D) reiterated his support for the road following his election last month, but if the public demands protection for our children and the elderly, he still could take steps to prevent these health hazards. The toxic pollution the...
  • An Epidemic No One Understands

    11/30/2006 9:46:43 PM PST · by neverdem · 63 replies · 1,864+ views
    NY Times ^ | November 28, 2006 | DENISE GRADY
    When our first son developed asthma as a 3-year-old, my husband and I felt pretty much blindsided. We were only a little less shocked when the same thing happened to our second son, at the same age. The disease turned out to be tenacious, and for years both boys needed inhalers or a nebulizer machine several times a day to prevent asthma attacks that could keep them up half the night, coughing and wheezing. Both had eczema, too, and the kind of food allergies — to nuts, peanuts and shellfish — that can lead to fatal reactions. What caused all...
  • A Study Links Trucks’ Exhaust to Bronx Schoolchildren’s Asthma

    10/29/2006 10:30:53 PM PST · by neverdem · 6 replies · 502+ views
    NY Times ^ | October 29, 2006 | MANNY FERNANDEZ
    In New York City, air pollution levels have typically been monitored by inanimate objects, at more than a dozen locations around town. But in the South Bronx, from 2002 to 2005, air pollution monitors went mobile. They went to the playground, to the gritty sidewalks, even to the movies. A group of schoolchildren carried the monitors everywhere they went. The instruments, attached to the backpacks of children with asthma, allowed researchers at New York University to measure the pollution the children were exposed to, morning to night. The South Bronx is home to miles of expressways, more than a dozen...
  • Lawsuit seeks ban on smoking around apartment complex

    06/29/2006 7:43:23 PM PDT · by SmithL · 18 replies · 559+ views
    AP ^ | 6/29/6
    Los Angeles -- The father of a 5-year-old asthmatic girl has sued the apartment complex where the family lives in an attempt to stop residents from smoking in common areas. The lawsuit, filed Wednesday in Superior Court, alleges that second-hand smoke from common areas around the complex have hurt Melinda Birke's health. The areas include the swimming pools, the barbecue areas, the children's playground, the outdoor dining area and the entrances to the rental office and clubhouse. The girl has had pneumonia three times since 2003, and has suffered from asthma and chronic allergies since she was 18 months old,...
  • Immune System Cells May Be Cause of Asthma

    03/17/2006 7:14:02 AM PST · by SheLion · 37 replies · 702+ views
    WEDNESDAY, March 15 (HealthDay News) -- As medical technologies improve, researchers are rooting out more information about possible causes of common diseases, such as asthma.One new finding, reported in the March 16 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine, is that immune system cells long thought to cause asthma may not be the primary culprit behind the disease."We found that asthma is caused not by T-helper 2 cells as has been previously thought, but by a novel class of cells called natural killer T cells," said one of the study's authors, Dr. Dale Umetsu, a professor of pediatrics at...
  • Asthmatics Beware: The Government May Ban Your Inhaler

    01/27/2006 3:07:55 PM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 102 replies · 2,204+ views
    Center for Individual Freedom ^ | January 26, 2006 | CFIF
    Eco-terrorists have struck again. Not in the dead of night, to be pursued by diligent agents of the FBI, but right out in the open, in a public meeting, under the auspices of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). On January 24, one of those ubiquitous FDA panels of "outside experts" voted, by an 11 to seven margin, to recommend that FDA ban non-prescription, over-the-counter asthma inhalers, used routinely by millions of asthma-sufferers to control the symptoms of their debilitating condition. As frequently noted in the press, while such recommendations are not binding, they are most often adopted. The...
  • Art Bell: 'Just be nice'

    01/21/2006 9:27:00 PM PST · by JennysCool · 24 replies · 1,112+ views
    Pahrump Valley Times ^ | 1/21/2006 | Staff
    Listeners to KNYE radio heard from owner Art Bell on the air Tuesday morning, during a break in his music format, broadcast on 95.1 FM from Pahrump. The recent widower, whose wife Ramona was laid to rest just last week, spoke lovingly of her, saying he knew she would want him to keep KNYE running. Bell said his wife handled all their finances, mentioning that he didn't even know the PIN number on his bank account. He also doesn't cook. "It was my intention to leave a rich widow," Bell said. "Not the other way around." He announced he will...
  • ICS Most Effective For Persistent Asthma In Children (ICS = inhaled corticosteroids)

    01/12/2006 1:17:31 AM PST · by neverdem · 292+ views
    While both inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) and leukotriene receptor antagonists (LTRA) have been proven to help control mild-to-moderate persistent asthma in school-age children, a new study shows ICS may be the more effective treatment. Response Profiles to Fluticasone and Montelukast in Mild-to-Moderate Persistent Childhood Asthma is featured in the January 2006 issue of the Journal of Allergy & Clinical Immunology (JACI) and is currently available on the JACI's Web site at www.jacionline.org. The JACI is the peer-reviewed, scientific journal of the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology (AAAAI). The 16-week study was conducted as a multi-center, double-masked, 2-sequence crossover trial...
  • Ramona Bell (Mrs. Art Bell) Dies

    01/05/2006 11:30:07 PM PST · by JennysCool · 162 replies · 8,292+ views
    Unknown Country ^ | January 5, 2004 | Anne Streiber
    Art Bell's beloved wife of fifteen years, Ramona, died unexpectedly last night after an asthma attack. At present, the exact cause of Mrs. Bell's death has not been determined. It apparently took place during her sleep. Until her death, Art and Ramona Bell had not been apart a day since they were married. Mrs. Bell had suffered from asthma for years, and took her normal steps to control the attack, which occured sometime last night in Laughlin, Nevada where the Bells were taking a brief vacation. Ramona Bell was 47 years old.
  • Woman With Asthma Wins Court Ruling Over Breath Test

    01/01/2006 3:23:54 PM PST · by digger48 · 105 replies · 4,973+ views
    INDIANAPOLIS -- Not being able to blow hard enough for a breath test for alcohol is not the same as refusing to take the test, the Indiana Court of Appeals ruled. The 3-1 ruling Friday reversed a Hancock Superior Court decision. The case involved a woman who was charged with refusing a breath test under Indiana's implied consent law following an accident in which she was suspected of drunken driving. According to court documents, a Hancock County sheriff's deputy administered field sobriety tests, including a portable breath test, to Meredith Upchurch after a December 2004 traffic accident. The deputy then...
  • FDA wants stronger asthma drug warnings

    11/20/2005 3:44:00 PM PST · by neverdem · 18 replies · 988+ views
    Seattle Post-Intelligencer ^ | November 18, 2005 | STEPHEN OHLEMACHER
    ASSOCIATED PRESS WASHINGTON -- The Food and Drug Administration warned Friday that three asthma drugs may increase the risk of severe asthma attacks and even death. The agency asked the manufacturers of Advair, Serevent and Foradil to strengthen the warning labels to reflect this risk. The FDA said that even though the drugs decrease the frequency of asthma attacks, they can make the attacks more severe when they occur. The agency said the drugs should be prescribed only if other medicines do not control patients' asthma. Advair had sales of $4.7 billion in 2004, making it one of GlaxoSmithKline's top-selling...
  • Pillows - a hot bed of fungal spores

    10/17/2005 3:26:05 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 78 replies · 1,525+ views
    Researchers at The University of Manchester funded by the Fungal Research Trust have discovered millions of fungal spores right under our noses - in our pillows. Aspergillus fumigatus, the species most commonly found in the pillows, is most likely to cause disease; and the resulting condition Aspergillosis has become the leading infectious cause of death in leukaemia and bone marrow transplant patients. Fungi also exacerbate asthma in adults. The researchers dissected both feather and synthetic samples and identified several thousand spores of fungus per gram of used pillow - more than a million spores per pillow. Fungal contamination of bedding...
  • Monster Mold Threatens Health in the South

    09/27/2005 1:48:36 PM PDT · by Past Your Eyes · 67 replies · 1,787+ views
    Earthlink.net ^ | September 27, 2005 | Silverman, Breed, Marchione
    NEW ORLEANS - Wearing goggles, gloves, galoshes and a mask, Veronica Randazzo lasted only 10 minutes inside her home in St. Bernard Parish. Her eyes burned, her mouth filled with a salty taste and she felt nauseous. Her 26-year-old daughter, Alicia, also covered in gear, came out coughing. "That mold," she said. "It smells like death." Mold now forms an interior version of kudzu in the soggy South, posing health dangers that will make many homes tear-downs and will force schools and hospitals to do expensive repairs.
  • Worms to help combat allergies

    09/05/2005 2:12:29 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 7 replies · 237+ views
    BBC ^ | 9/5/05 | Jonathan Amos
    Irish scientists are investigating parasitic worms to try to find new ways to prevent asthma and reduce allergies.Dr Padraic Fallon, from Trinity College Dublin, and colleagues have already managed to cure asthma in lab mice by infecting them with the tiny creatures. The team now has to explain how the parasites achieve this feat at a molecular level. If they can do that, they should then be able to synthesise a new drug compound to treat asthma in people. On the riseAsthma and other allergies have increased almost threefold over the last 30 years in many developed countries, including...
  • Triggers: When Laughter Isn't Funny

    06/09/2005 5:28:54 PM PDT · by neverdem · 6 replies · 417+ views
    NY Times ^ | June 7, 2005 | ERIC NAGOURNEY
    Pollen, dust mites and pet allergens, sure. But laughter? Yes, says a new study that suggests that laughing should be added to the list of things that can set off an asthma attack. The research was presented at a recent conference of the American Thoracic Society. The author of the study, Dr. Stuart M. Garay, said he had established the connection between laughter and asthma attacks in a survey of patients at the New York University Medical Center, where he teaches. More than half of the 235 patients surveyed reported that laughing set off their attacks. It ranked with better...
  • For Asthmatics, Laughter Is No Laughing Matter

    05/27/2005 2:42:14 PM PDT · by fortunecookie · 13 replies · 393+ views
    Reuters ^ | Fri May 27, 1:08 PM ET | By Alison McCook
    For asthmatics, laughter is no laughing matter Fri May 27, 2005 1:08 PM ET By Alison McCook NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - More than half of people with asthma have symptoms that are triggered by laughter, according to new study findings presented this week. Laughter is "one more trigger in a long list of triggers" for asthma, study author Dr. Stuart Garay of the New York University Medical Center in New York told Reuters Health. However, among people with symptoms brought on by laughter, nearly half said they could laugh attack-free when their asthma was under better control. To Garay,...
  • Doctors join attack on fish medicine

    05/27/2005 11:32:48 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 6 replies · 414+ views
    The Times of India ^ | 5/27/2005 | Staff
    HYDERABAD: The asthma fish medicine mela, for decades an annual fixture of the Hyderabadi summer, is coming under attack from a coalition of rationalists, scientists and allopathy doctors. On Thursday, almost a fortnight before this year's chapter, the Indian Medical Association (IMA) has entered the fray and demanded a ban on the medicine, which is shoved into the mouth of a live fish and administered to asthma patients.Lakhs of people come to Hyderabad on Mrigasira Karte day (this year, June 8) in the belief that the medicine, which the Bathini Goud brothers claim is a family secret of 147 years,...
  • Grandchildren of smokers at risk

    04/09/2005 8:20:36 PM PDT · by paulat · 67 replies · 1,201+ views
    The London Sunday Times ^ | 4/09/05 | Not Listed
    Grandchildren of smokers at risk NEW research suggests women who smoke while pregnant are putting their grandchildren as well as their children at risk, writes Jonathan Leake. The study suggests that some of the chemicals in smoke can permanently alter the DNA of those exposed to it in ways that can be inherited by smokers’ children, grandchildren and possibly subsequent generations too. The researchers analysed asthma rates in both the children and grandchildren of women who smoked during pregnancy. They found the grandchildren of such women had 2.1 times the normal risk of developing asthma. The children of women who...
  • Think Cats Make Your Kid Sneeze? Try Cockroaches

    03/08/2005 4:17:39 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 14 replies · 761+ views
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Cockroaches worsen asthma symptoms in children far more than furry pets or dust mites, U.S. researchers reported on Tuesday. High-rise apartments in Northeastern U.S. cities were the worst places for the allergic effects of cockroaches, the team at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas found. Single-family houses were the worst for dust mites -- miscroscopic creatures that live in bedding and furniture. "We found that a majority of homes in Chicago, New York City and the Bronx had cockroach allergen levels high enough to trigger asthma symptoms, while a majority of homes in Dallas...
  • NYC:The truth on bar smoking ban

    03/06/2005 7:57:33 AM PST · by SheLion · 121 replies · 3,172+ views
    Times Argus ^ | 3-4-05 | Amy McCloskey
    In reference to the story "Smoking ban for bars on Legislative agenda" on Feb. 14 by John Zicconi, all I can say is "Hogwash." I own a successful bar in Greenwich Village. In 2004, we were voted the Best Lounge in New York by CitySearch. My business is down 30 percent since 2002. Since nothing has changed but the smoking ban, I can attribute this precipitous drop to nothing else. It's remarkable to read that "A New York City official on Thursday will travel to Vermont to testify that Big Apple pub receipts have increased 12 percent since the city's...
  • I'm desperate to leave, says pregnant mom in asthma zone

    02/16/2005 2:34:33 PM PST · by LibWhacker · 10 replies · 615+ views
    Yahoo! News | New York Post ^ | 2/16/05 | Andrea Peyser
    SOMETIMES, late at night, little Samantha Rodriguez cries in her bed. The 3-year-old's skin cracks and burns from the eczema that has plagued her since birth. And her weak, small lungs wheeze and cough from chronic asthma. Her mom, Regina Rodriguez, just holds onto her daughter, helplessly. Regina, 25, is three months pregnant now with her second child. And what her growing family needs more desperately than anything, she knows, is fresh air. Perhaps a dash of sunshine on their faces. But living in the South Bronx, bunched up amid a bus stop, factories and the malodorous traffic of the...
  • Do smokers have any rights?

    02/15/2005 8:24:48 AM PST · by SheLion · 271 replies · 3,681+ views
    eco-logic Powerhouse.com ^ | February 15, 2005 | Alan Caruba
    Do people who enjoy smoking have any rights? Increasingly, the answer is no. It is essential to keep in mind that smoking cigarettes, cigars, or pipes is an entirely personal choice. No one is required to smoke. Millions voluntarily stop smoking every year. People have been smoking, and enjoying tobacco products for a very long time, but now they have been demonized and ostracized. Using the power of government, to tax, smokers are being ripped off at every level. Recently, New York City sent letters to 2,300 residents giving them thirty days to pay the taxes on the cartons of...
  • NYC:New York Hits Online Sellers of Cigarettes

    02/12/2005 2:20:01 PM PST · by SheLion · 279 replies · 3,661+ views
    New York Times.com ^ | 2-12-05 | IAN URBINA
    Concerned about the booming trade in online cigarette sales, New York state officials have begun using a variety of techniques to clamp down on the trade, saying New York City alone is losing more than $75 million a year in uncollected tax revenues because of the sales.In recent weeks, Attorney General Eliot Spitzer has been pushing local postal officials and private carriers to stop delivering cigarettes bought online. His office has also recently begun negotiations with credit card companies to block transactions of online cigarettes.These efforts were given added push recently as local officials from the federal Bureau of Alcohol,...
  • The Trouble With Henry (Controversy About Heimlich for Drowning and Asthma Victims)

    01/06/2005 5:35:20 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 1 replies · 430+ views
    Metro ^ | January 6 | Shane Johnson
    Controversy doesn't deter prominent doctors from hailing the enigmatic Dr. Heimlich SINCE CO-DISCOVERING the "sub-diaphragmatic thrust" in 1974, Dr. Henry Heimlich's namesake maneuver has irrefutably saved the lives of thousands of choking diners the world over. But despite dogged self-promotion, Heimlich's subsequent medical maneuvers have been thoroughly panned by the medical intelligentsia. Along the way, the 84-year-old Cincinnati-based thoracic surgeon has allied himself with a small band of respected medical professionals, including the director of the Salt Lake County Health Department from 1971 to 1993, Dr. Harry Gibbons. The two met in 1974 when Gibbons, an aerospace physician by trade,...
  • Link Found Between Cleaning Products and Asthma

    12/24/2004 8:58:41 AM PST · by Scenic Sounds · 15 replies · 565+ views
    Medical News Today ^ | December 24, 2004 | Staff
    There is a connection between exposure of domestic cleaning products and wheezing in toddlers, which is an early sign of asthma, according to new research. The study of 14,000 children up to the age of three and a half, published in the journal Thorax found that exposure to household products such as bleach, aerosols, carpet and window cleaners increased the risk of wheezing. Youngsters born into the top ten per cent of families using such products the most were more than twice as likely to suffer from wheezing compared to the bottom ten per cent, who used them the least....
  • Israeli study finds citrus oils may hold key for treatment of asthma

    12/16/2004 6:05:14 PM PST · by ddtorque · 11 replies · 591+ views
    For the more than 20 million Americans suffering from asthma (including 6.1 million children), a cure may be looking no farther than the lemons in your refrigerator. According to a study at the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, a key to preventing asthma might be found in a lemon, a rose or a pine tree. In the study, inhalation of limonene, the main component found in the essential oil of citrus, prevented asthma symptoms in animals. The findings were published in the journal Bioorganic and Medicinal Chemistry.
  • Nighttime, and Fevers Are Rising

    09/27/2004 11:12:04 PM PDT · by neverdem · 6 replies · 690+ views
    NY Times ^ | September 28, 2004 | ABIGAIL ZUGER
    When bedtime comes, as all children and sick people know, the boogeymen come out of the closet. Darkness, silence and isolation can turn chairs into tigers, and make even trivial health problems seem ominous and hopeless. But illness that goes bump in the night may not be just a patient's inner child coming out. Doctors have sensed for centuries that many diseases actually do get worse at night, and science has begun to confirm this impression. The emotions nighttime elicits, although they certainly do not help matters, are not primarily to blame. Instead, it is the body's internal chemicals and...
  • The Asthma Attack

    08/10/2004 12:25:39 PM PDT · by neverdem · 28 replies · 938+ views
    NRO ^ | August 10, 2004 | Rich Lowry
    E-mail Author Author Archive Send to a Friend <% printurl = Request.ServerVariables("URL")%> Print Version August 10, 2004, 8:32 a.m. The Asthma AttackPoisonous politics. Is George W. Bush against black children breathing? In the current political environment, no charge against President Bush is too poisonous or preposterous to make, including this one. In promoting his new book, which basically accuses Bush of being a fascist, environmental activist Robert F. Kennedy Jr. has loosed this assault: "One out of every four black children in New York now has asthma. Those asthma attacks are triggered by pollution from power plants, which George...
  • Antibiotics linked to huge rise in allergies

    05/27/2004 10:23:47 AM PDT · by Born Conservative · 17 replies · 301+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 5/27/2004 | James Randerson
    The increasing use of antibiotics to treat disease may be responsible for the rising rates of asthma and allergies. By upsetting the body's normal balance of gut microbes, antibiotics may prevent our immune system from distinguishing between harmless chemicals and real attacks. "The microbial gut flora is an arm of the immune system," says Gary Huffnagle at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbour. His research group has provided the first experimental evidence in mice that upsetting the gut flora can provoke an allergic response. Asthma has increased by around 160 per cent globally in the last 20 years. Currently...
  • Flu Shot Added to Babies' Recommended Schedule

    04/30/2004 7:59:23 PM PDT · by neverdem · 35 replies · 731+ views
    The Washington Post ^ | April 30, 2004 | NA
    FINDINGS Influenza has been added to the recommended schedule of shots for all infants, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said yesterday. The CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, the American Academy of Pediatrics and the American Academy of Family Physicians recommend that, beginning in fall 2004, all children age 6 months to 23 months, as well as household and out-of-home caregivers for such children, receive an annual influenza vaccine, the CDC said. The CDC had been moving toward the recommendation even before this past flu season, which began early and featured a nasty strain of virus that killed...
  • Asthma linked to global warming, experts say

    04/30/2004 7:17:44 AM PDT · by presidio9 · 46 replies · 480+ views
    CTV.ca ^ | Fri. Apr. 30 2004
    The health of millions of children worldwide is threatened by global warming and air pollution. The world's poorest kids are at highest risk, experts say, of getting caught in a growing asthma epidemic. In a report released Thursday, researchers at the Harvard Medical School's Center for Health and the Global Environment said the warming global climate is releasing more allergens into the air. Once floating in the sky, the allergens combine with pollutants such as ozone and soot, resulting in a recipe for a health crisis. "The combination of air pollutants, aeroallergens, heat waves and unhealthy air masses -- increasingly...
  • Naval Aviation Schools Command Meets MTV

    03/13/2004 9:29:27 PM PST · by BykrBayb · 4 replies · 389+ views
    Navy NewsStand ^ | 3/12/2004 | Lt. Karen Eifert, Naval Aviation Schools Command Public Affairs
    Story Number: NNS040311-12 Release Date: 3/12/2004 6:19:00 AM By Lt. Karen Eifert, Naval Aviation Schools Command Public Affairs PENSACOLA, Fla. (NNS) -- MTV visited Naval Aviation Schools Command (NASC) over Valentine’s Day weekend to film an episode of "Made," a reality television program that normally airs on MTV Saturdays at 3 p.m. The premise of the episode involving NASC was to take an ordinary 16-year-old high school student named Adam Pears and help him achieve his goal of becoming a varsity athlete. The question immediately became, “Can a 5’8” and 120-pound individual with minimal athletic training who is also an...
  • Boy accused of inhaler attack released from juvenile center

    01/19/2004 1:51:25 PM PST · by chance33_98 · 18 replies · 202+ views
    Boy accused of inhaler attack released from juvenile center ABC13 Eyewitness News (1/18/04 - MAGNOLIA) — There was an unusual Sunday court hearing in a very unusual case - a teenager arrested, accused of misusing his asthma inhaler. 50 most recent local headlines The student at Montgomery County's Magnolia High School was arrested last week after a teacher was taken to the hospital, overcome by the medication from the teen's inhaler. Sixteen-year-old Michael Todd finally left the Montgomery County Juvenile Service Center on Sunday. He'd been locked up inside for four days. A hearing Sunday led to his release....
  • Teen arrested after teacher sickened by his asthma medicine

    01/16/2004 11:28:30 PM PST · by chance33_98 · 98 replies · 319+ views
    Teen arrested after teacher sickened by his asthma medicine ABC13 Eyewitness News (1/16/04 - MAGNOLIA, TX) — A bizarre story in Magnolia ends with a teenager in lock up and a teacher in the hospital. Now the boy's family is concerned he's being treated unfairly. The boy's family says eyewitnesses actually saw the boy take a couple of puffs from his rescue inhaler for treatment of asthma, then blowing the medicine at a teacher. The family, though, says he's a good kid and the charge of using deadly force simply doesn't fit the crime. Judy McCreary wants desperately to...
  • Grasshopper swarm leaves 11 dead

    11/01/2003 7:09:26 PM PST · by aculeus · 17 replies · 194+ views
    Sydney Morning Herald ^ | November 2, 2003 | Reuters
    Eleven people died and thousands were taken to hospital with breathing difficulties after a swarm of grasshoppers invaded a town in central Sudan. Health authorities in Wad Medani, capital of the central al-Jezira state, said an epidemic of what they considered to be asthma had afflicted 1,685 people since October 22, all of whom had since been cured. The government-owned Al-Anbaa newspaper reported 11 people had died from the breathing difficulties. "The appearance of the epidemic is linked to the unprecedented increase in the grasshopper insects," the daily quoted the health authorities as saying. Resident Joseph Mogum in Wad Medani,...
  • Zero-Tolerance Watch

    10/14/2003 4:45:25 PM PDT · by Paul Atreides · 7 replies · 134+ views
    <p>"On Friday, school officials decided to expel Kivi but not press criminal charges," reports Houston's KPRC-TV. Says Kivi: "I'm happy. Everything's final. I'm expelled till after Christmas and I can come back after Christmas, but I won't." He and Ferguson are both leaving Caney Creek High to be home-schooled.</p>
  • School Replies to Inhaler Incident

    10/14/2003 3:10:39 PM PDT · by arjay · 26 replies · 266+ views
    Email
    I received the following reply from the school district regarding the inhaler incident in Texas. I thought this group would be interested. From: "Gregory S. Poole" Your Email is based on erroneous information. It is also an example of how the Internet, with all its glory, often misses the key ingredient of information gathering, which is substantiation. Ø No student was ever in any life-threatening situation. Student confidentiality does not permit us to be specific but it has already been reported in a Houston paper that the student in question went to the clinic for a minor headache. During both...
  • Teen won't face charges for sharing inhaler

    10/11/2003 7:02:26 AM PDT · by IronKros · 49 replies · 460+ views
    Houston chronicle ^ | Oct. 11, 2003
    A Montgomery County teenager, expelled from school for letting his girlfriend use his prescription asthma inhaler, will face no criminal charges, his mother said Friday. The 15-year-old's family reached an agreement with school officials and attorneys during a hearing at Caney Creek High School on Friday. The boy can return after the Christmas holidays, but his family said they have decided he will be home-schooled. On Sept. 23, the teen accompanied his girlfriend to the nurse's office because she was having asthma problems. The nurse reported he lent the girl the inhaler. Family members say he was trying to help,...
  • Student expelled for loaning inhaler reaches deal with school (Zero Tolerance Alert)

    10/11/2003 3:49:23 AM PDT · by chance33_98 · 35 replies · 296+ views
    Student expelled for loaning inhaler reaches deal with school Brandon Kivi was expelled from school for loaning his girlfriend Andra Ferguson his asthma inhaler. By Chris Adams ABC13 Eyewitness News (10/10/03 - CONROE) — A Conroe teenager got the nation's attention when his girlfriend had an asthma attack and he let her borrow his inhaler. But he got more than that. He got expelled from school and a felony charge. It's all about 'zero tolerance' and it was the focus of a hearing that was supposed to take place Friday. But instead of that hearing, a deal was worked...
  • Teen Faces Expulsion and Felony For Loaning Girlfriend Medicine

    10/09/2003 5:43:19 PM PDT · by dogbyte12 · 50 replies · 286+ views
    KTRK ABC-13 ^ | 10-8-03 | Chris Adams
    ABC13 Eyewitness News (10/08/03 - CONROE) — There's controversy over a school's zero tolerance drug policy. Some say it's gone too far. A 15-year-old faces expulsion after giving an inhaler to his girlfriend during an asthma attack that happened at school Boyfriend and girlfriend, 15-year-olds Brandon Kizi and Andra Ferguson are both asthma sufferers and both students at Caney Creek High School. At least, they were, until Andra began suffering an asthma attack at school. "I couldn't breathe, and I was just very short of breath," recalled Andra. "My chest was tightened up and it was hurting." Brandon described the...