Keyword: atomicbomb

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  • JAPANESE HAPPY OBAMA TO VISIT HIROSHIMA, APOLOGY OR NOT

    05/11/2016 7:14:03 AM PDT · by PROCON · 55 replies
    AP ^ | May 11, 2016 | MIKI TODA AND MARI YAMAGUCHI
    TOKYO (AP) -- Japanese are welcoming President Barack Obama's decision to visit the atomic-bombed city of Hiroshima, and those interviewed Wednesday said they aren't seeking an apology. Even those who want one realize that such a demand would have ruled out a U.S. presidential visit.
  • Kerry plans no apology for wartime atomic bomb on Hiroshima visit

    04/10/2016 3:09:32 PM PDT · by PROCON · 62 replies
    Reuters ^ | April 10, 2016 | Arshad Mohammed and Kiyoshi Takenaka
    HIROSHIMA, Japan (Reuters) - John Kerry will not offer an apology for the United States' use of the atomic bomb against Japan when he becomes the first U.S. secretary of state to visit the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum on Monday, a senior U.S. official said. Kerry is visiting the city, which was obliterated by a U.S. atomic bomb on Aug. 6, 1945, to attend gathering of foreign ministers from the Group of Seven (G7) advanced economies that Japan opened on Sunday with a call to end nuclear weapons.
  • The Third Atomic Bomb: Japan's Atomic Bomb

    08/20/2015 5:17:01 AM PDT · by WhiskeyX · 88 replies
    YouTube ^ | 2005 | Amerimage Productions; West Park Pictures
    In August 1945, during the final stage of the Second World War, the United States dropped atomic bombs on the Japanese cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The two bombings, which killed at least 129,000 people, remain the only use of nuclear weapons for warfare in human history.
  • Why dropping the bomb 70 years ago was necessary, and why we need to be ready to do it again

    08/09/2015 10:16:30 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 31 replies
    The National Post ^ | August 9, 2015 | George Jonas
    On the morning of Aug. 6, 1945, shortly after 8:00 a.m. local time, a lone American B-29 was conducting what seemed to be a reconnaissance flight at high altitude over the Japanese city of Hiroshima. At about 16 minutes after 8:00, the aircraft released an object over the centre of town. Attached to parachutes, the object floated down slowly enough to give the four-engine Boeing Superfortress time to turn and lumber out of the airspace. The atom bomb exploded at about 1,900 feet above the centre of Hiroshima. The devastation was cataclysmic. Immediate casualties, dead and injured, numbered approximately 115,000....
  • ATOMIC BOMB WIPED OUT 60% OF HIROSHIMA; SHOCK AWED FLIERS; TOKYO CABINET MEETS (8/8/45)

    08/08/2015 6:20:03 AM PDT · by Homer_J_Simpson · 42 replies
    Microfilm-New York Times archives, Monterey Public Library | 8/8/45 | W.H. Lawrence, Sidney Shalett, Luther Huston, Harold Callender, Drew Middleton, Hanson W. Baldwin
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  • Hiroshima: Thoughts on an awful anniversary [Do the Ends Justify the Means?]

    08/06/2015 8:52:11 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 104 replies
    Pajamas Media ^ | 08/06/2015 | Roger Kimball
    I mean “awful” in the old sense of “full of awe.”It is not often that I agree with the politics espoused by The Guardian, England’s most left-wing serious newspaper (or perhaps I mean its most serious left-wing paper). But several years ago on this date — August 6 —The Guardian published a sober and clear-sighted article about the terrifying event whose anniversary today commemorates: I mean, of course, the atomic bombing of Hiroshima. The article by the journalist Oliver Kamm won my wholehearted endorsement and I wrote about it at the time.The idea that the atomic bombing of Hiroshima...
  • Hiroshima marks 70 years since atomic bomb

    08/05/2015 5:44:08 PM PDT · by LeoWindhorse · 37 replies
    BBC World News ^ | Aug 5 , 2015 | BBC
    Residents in the Japanese city of Hiroshima are commemorating the 70th anniversary of the first atomic bomb being dropped by a US aircraft.
  • A Manhattan Project Veteran Had a Unique View of Atomic Bomb Work

    07/26/2015 8:34:14 PM PDT · by Theoria · 24 replies
    The New York Times ^ | 26 July 2015 | James Barron
    Benjamin Bederson turned past the page in the diary from long ago, the page he had burned a hole through, and mentioned things he had done since that summer of 1945. Was an experimental atomic physicist, he said. Worked as a professor at New York University, taught almost every course in physics, was editor in chief of the American Physical Society and helped usher physics journals into the electronic age. He left out the part about helping to usher in the atomic age the part about testing the ignition switches for the atomic bomb that was dropped on Nagasaki...
  • The Legacy of America's First Atomic Bombs

    07/24/2015 9:29:44 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 32 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | July 24, 2015 | James Kunetka
    After long and difficult negotiations, an agreement was recently concluded in Vienna between Iran and six Western powers, including the United States, to curb that nations nuclear weapons program. The discussions highlight two stark facts: First, that however difficult the negotiations, implementing the terms of the agreement will be equally if not more challenging. And second, that atomic weapons are relatively easy to manufacture by nations with sufficient scientific and technological expertise. On this last point, it is worthwhile remembering the events of 70 years ago in order to better understand the issues of today. On August 6 and 9,...
  • The Tsar Bomba Was a 50-Megaton Monster Nuke

    04/02/2015 5:50:38 AM PDT · by C19fan · 23 replies
    War is Boring ^ | April 1, 2015 | Paul Richard Huard
    Maj. Andrei Durnovtsev, a Soviet air force pilot and commander of a Tu-95 Bear bomber, holds a dubious honor in the history of the Cold War. Durnovtsev flew the aircraft that dropped the most powerful nuclear bomb ever. It had an explosive force of 50 megatons, or more than 3,000 times more powerful than the Hiroshima weapon. Over the years, historians identified many names for the test bomb.
  • The Story of Nagasaki

    08/09/2014 1:11:18 AM PDT · by right-wing agnostic · 29 replies
    Atomic Archive ^ | Unknown | Atomic Archive Staff
    By May of 1945 an exhausted and overrun Germany had surrendered. The war in Europe was over. The United States, aided by Great Britain, moved closer and closer to Japan. Massive suicide attacks by the Japanese caused great losses to the Pacific Fleet, but did not deter its drive. Japan, thinking the Soviet Union was a friendly neutral in the war in the Pacific, submitted unofficial peace feelers to the United States through them. The Soviet Union, secretly wanting to join the war against Japan, suppressed the feelers. Ironically, the Japanese military made it impossible to pursue peace directly, as...
  • No apology: Japan deserved Enola Gay's visit

    08/06/2014 8:52:08 PM PDT · by right-wing agnostic · 40 replies
    The Hook ^ | December 11, 2003 | Neil Steinberg
    There's a museum in Tokyo dedicated to Japan's ample history of warfare. But if you visit the plainly named Military Museum, you'll find no reference to the grotesque medical experiments the Japanese army conducted in World War II or the sex slaves it kidnapped.
  • The American Flag Daily: Hiroshima

    08/06/2014 4:12:28 AM PDT · by Master Zinja · 4 replies
    The American Flag Daily ^ | August 6, 2014 | JasonZ
    On this date in 1945, the United States dropped the first atomic bomb used in combat on the Japanese city of Hiroshima, causing possibly as many as 80,000 deaths, with thousands more later from radiation and other illnesses. While many still debate the morality of the use of the atomic bombs on Hiroshima and Nagasaki, there is no doubt that, had the Japanese not surrendered following the dropping of the bombs, the Allied invasion of Japan, scheduled to begin on November 1, 1945, would have likely caused millions of casualties on both sides before Japan would have capitulated.
  • Barton J. Bernstein: American conservatives are the forgotten critics of the atomic bombing of Japan

    08/06/2014 2:28:23 AM PDT · by No One Special · 56 replies
    San Jose Mercury News ^ | Agust 2, 2014 | Barton J. Bernstein
    "The use of the atomic bomb, with its indiscriminate killing of women and children, revolts my soul," he wrote. "The only difference between this and the use of gas (which President Franklin D. Roosevelt had barred as a first-use weapon in World War II) is the fear of retaliation." Those harsh words, written three days after the Hiroshima bombing in August, 1945, were not by a man of the American left, but rather by a very prominent conservative -- former President Herbert Hoover, a foe of the New Deal and Fair Deal. In 1959, Medford Evans, a conservative writing in...
  • Last living crew member of Enola Gay dies in Georgia at age 93

    07/30/2014 4:22:58 AM PDT · by Freeport · 30 replies
    Fox News ^ | July 29, 2014 | N/A
    ATLANTA The last surviving member of the crew that dropped an atomic bomb on Hiroshima, hastening the end of World War II and forcing the world into the atomic age, has died in Georgia. Theodore VanKirk, also known as "Dutch," died Monday of natural causes at the retirement home where he lived in Stone Mountain, Georgia, his son Tom VanKirk said. He was 93. VanKirk flew nearly 60 bombing missions, but it was a single mission in the Pacific that secured him a place in history. He was 24 years old when he served as navigator on the Enola...
  • Atom bomb nearly detonated over North Carolina in 1961

    09/21/2013 6:42:38 AM PDT · by nuconvert · 61 replies
    The US Air Force came dramatically close to detonating a huge atomic bomb over North Carolina in 1961, according to a newly declassified document published by Britain's Guardian newspaper on Saturday.Two hydrogen bombs were accidentally dropped over the city of Goldsboro, North Carolina on January 23, 1961 when the B-52 plane carrying them broke up in mid-air, according to the file.
  • It wasnt necessary to hit them with that awful thing --- Why dropping the A-Bombs was wrong

    08/10/2013 6:09:00 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 317 replies
    Washington Examiner ^ | 08/10/2013 | Timothy Carney
    Based on a detailed investigation of all the facts and supported by the testimony of the surviving Japanese leaders involved, it is the Surveys opinion that certainly prior to 31 December 1945 and in all probability prior to 1 November 1945, Japan would have surrendered even if the atomic bombs had not been dropped, even if Russia had not entered the war, and even if no invasion had been planned or contemplated.That was a conclusion of the 1946U.S. Bombing Survey ordered by President Harry Truman in the wake of World War II.Gen. Dwight Eisenhower said in 1963, the Japanese were...
  • Atomic bomb re-enacting dropped from Ohio air show

    04/18/2013 8:54:51 AM PDT · by oxcart · 32 replies
    Associated Press ^ | April 18, 2013 | By DAN SEWELL
    CINCINNATI (AP) -- A popular southwest Ohio air show has canceled plans to stage a re-enactment of the devastating World War II atomic bomb attack on Japan after protests, officials said Thursday. Dayton Air Show spokeswoman Brenda Kerfoot said the June 22-23 event at Dayton International Airport will keep a planned "Great Wall of Fire" pyrotechnic show but not as an event meant to re-enact the Aug. 6, 1945, bombing of Hiroshima. The B-29 plane "Fifi," similar to the Enola Gay B-29 bomber used to attack Japan, will remain in the show but in a separate role. Air show officials...
  • NOAA.gov - (Subject: C5c) Why Don't We Try to Destroy Tropical Cyclones by Nuking Them?

    Subject: C5c) Why don't we try to destroy tropical cyclones by nuking them? Contributed by Chris Landsea During each hurricane season, there always appear suggestions that one should simply use nuclear weapons to try and destroy the storms. Apart from the fact that this might not even alter the storm, this approach neglects the problem that the released radioactive fallout would fairly quickly move with the tradewinds to affect land areas and cause devastating environmental problems. Needless to say, this is not a good idea. Now for a more rigorous scientific explanation of why this would not be an effective...
  • Enrico Fermis Anniversary (World's first nuclear reactor was built in the middle of Chicago)

    12/06/2012 2:00:50 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 11 replies
    National Review ^ | 12/06/2012 | Robert Zubrin
    This week marks the 70th anniversary of a turning point in human history. It was on December 2, 1942, that Enrico Fermi ordered the control rods pulled from the nuclear reactor he had built under the west stands of the University of Chicagos Stagg Field stadium, thereby initiating the first artificial sustained-fission reaction in human history. A cryptic message flashed the electrifying news back to Washington. The Italian navigator has landed in the new world. The consequences of Fermis success were profound. Within two and a half years, the Manhattan Project advanced to build both uranium-isotope-separation and plutonium-manufacturing facilities on...