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Keyword: ayaadassaad

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  • Five Years Later, Anthrax Questions Swirl Anew at FBI

    10/13/2006 3:46:10 PM PDT · by Shermy · 242 replies · 5,329+ views
    Newhouse ^ | October 13, 2006 | Kevin Coughlin
    Nobody has been arrested for the anthrax mailings of 2001, but many people have paid for the crime. Five died and at least 17 others got sick. The Federal Bureau of Investigation has been frustrated. Careers have crumbled. Taxpayers have gotten socked for billions of dollars to shore up bioterror defenses that some experts say still fall short. Now, an analysis from the FBI itself, buried in a microbiology journal, is raising more questions about the investigation. In the August issue of Applied and Environmental Microbiology, FBI scientist Douglas Beecher sought to set the record straight. Anthrax spores mailed to...
  • FBI anthrax probe revisits former Detrick researcher

    05/16/2004 7:53:37 PM PDT · by freeperfromnj · 46 replies · 629+ views
    The Associated Press ^ | 5/16/2004, 6:32 p.m. ET | DAVID DISHNEAU
    <p>HAGERSTOWN, Md. (AP) — The FBI, revisiting an old lead in the anthrax investigation, recently interviewed a former Fort Detrick researcher and his co-workers about his whereabouts when the letters were mailed, he and his lawyer said Sunday.</p> <p>Ayaad Assaad, who now works for the federal Environmental Protection Agency, said the agents also quizzed him Tuesday about his knowledge of producing finely powdered anthrax like that used in the letters.</p>