Keyword: aztecs

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  • Rare Aztec Map Reveals a Glimpse of Life in 1500s Mexico

    12/15/2017 8:39:42 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 17 replies
    The map shows the land holdings and geneology of a family in central Mexico. It covers an area that runs from just north of Mexico City to just below Puebla, roughly 100 miles away to the southeast. The family, identified as “de Leon,” traced their lineage to the red figure seated in the middle of the image above, who was known as Lord-11 Quetzalecatzin. A century before the map was made, he was the major political leader of the region writes John Hessler, curator of the Jay I. Kislak Collection of the Archaeology of the Early Americas at the Library...
  • MS-13 foiled in attempt to kidnap, kill teen boy on Long Island

    12/09/2017 2:07:21 PM PST · by jazusamo · 47 replies
    Fox News ^ | December 9, 2017 | Fox News/AP
    Long Island police say they foiled an MS-13 kidnapping and murder plot when they saw the intended 16-year-old male victim being lured into a van. Plainclothes officers arrested five members and associates of the notorious immigrant street gang on conspiracy charges after Wednesday’s takedown in Brentwood, Newsday reported. President Trump went to Brentwood in July and vowed to crush MS-13, while pledging a tougher approach on immigration. "They have transformed peaceful parks and beautiful quiet neighborhoods into blood-stained killing fields," he said about the gang. "They're animals." Officers told Newsday that two of the suspects, Vidal Contrera-Ortiz, 18, and Miguel...
  • Taboo Truths About the Comanche

    10/11/2017 4:32:24 PM PDT · by SJackson · 84 replies
    Frotpagemagazine ^ | October 11, 2017 | Danusha V. Goska
    Were Native Americans really kinder, gentler and more spiritual? I used to, on some level, accept the popular notion that Native Americans were more spiritual and in tune with nature than European Americans, and that it was European Americans who brought war, sexism, and environmental degradation to an otherwise innocent, peaceful and Edenic Native America. As a kid I bought slim paperbacks from the Scholastic Book Club that taught me that Native Americans planted dead fish in their agricultural fields in order to fertilize them. I learned that North American Indians didn't have the wheel, bronze, iron, or steel, or...
  • The Fight to Bring Home the Headdress of an Aztec Emperor

    10/09/2017 10:48:47 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 22 replies
    Atlas Obscura ^ | SEPTEMBER 26, 2017 | JACOB MIKANOWSKI
    The brilliant object sits on display in a Viennese museum—and Mexico’s been wanting it back for decades.IN 1878, THE AUSTRIAN GEOLOGIST and explorer Ferdinand von Hochstetter went prospecting in the hills above Innsbruck. He wasn’t looking for gold or minerals. Rather, he needed exhibits for a newly founded Museum of Natural History in Vienna, of which he had just been named the director. He found what he was looking for in a dusty drawer of the Renaissance-built Ambras Castle—a magnificent piece of feather work, tucked away in a case together with assorted objects from North America, China, and the Sunda...
  • Tower of human skulls found in Mexico City dig casts light on Aztec sacrifices

    07/02/2017 4:47:10 PM PDT · by ifinnegan · 58 replies
    Guardian ^ | 7/1/17 | Reuters
    A tower of human skulls unearthed beneath the heart of Mexico City has raised new questions about the culture of sacrifice in the Aztec empire, after crania of women and children surfaced among the hundreds embedded in the forbidding structure. - - - “We were expecting just men, obviously young men, as warriors would be, and the thing about the women and children is that you’d think they wouldn’t be going to war,” said Rodrigo Bolanos, a biological anthropologist investigating the find. - - - The Aztecs and other Mesoamerican peoples performed ritualistic human sacrifices as offerings to the sun.
  • The Aztecs tower of skulls: Trophy rack of 650 severed heads found beneath Mexico City [tr]

    07/02/2017 4:48:38 AM PDT · by C19fan · 53 replies
    Reuters and AP ^ | July 2, 2017 | Staff
    A tower of human skulls unearthed beneath the heart of Mexico City has raised new questions about the culture of sacrifice in the Aztec Empire after crania of women and children surfaced among the hundreds embedded in the forbidding structure. Archaeologists have found more than 650 skulls caked in lime and thousands of fragments in the cylindrical edifice near the site of the Templo Mayor, one of the main temples in the Aztec capital Tenochtitlan, which later became Mexico City. The tower is believed to form part of the Huey Tzompantli, a massive array of skulls that struck fear into...
  • 2,300-year-old palace had a room just for killing people

    03/31/2017 9:04:55 AM PDT · by jr3000 · 72 replies
    New York Post, The Sun ^ | March 29, 2017 | Margi Murphy
    A mysterious palace that was home to a bloodthirsty and wealthy ruler some 2,300 years ago has been discovered in Mexico. The incredible building was once the home and business center for the ruler of an ancient empire that predates the Aztecs, scientists have claimed.
  • Decapitated victims discovered at excavation in Mexico

    08/21/2015 5:53:52 PM PDT · by markomalley · 9 replies
    Spero News ^ | 8/21/15 | Martin Barillas
    Mexico's National Institute of Anthropology and History announced that archaeologists have found the macabre remains of human sacrifice left behind by Mexico's Aztec ancestors.Known as a tzompantli, the archaeologists found a structure that consists of a rack of the skulls of human sacrificial victims that was once part of a temple complex in Tenochtitlan - the capital of the Aztecs that is now Mexico City.he tzompantli was found on Calle Guatemala, a street that runs at the eastern end of the Metropolitan Cathedral in the modern city's central square. According to El Universal - a Mexican daily - researchers found...
  • Massive Human Skull Rack Found at Aztec Temple

    08/21/2015 3:14:48 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 70 replies
    Discovery ^ | Rossella Lorenzi
    Found on the western side of what was once the Templo Mayor complex in Tenochtitlan, in modern Mexico City, the partially unearthed skull rack was likely built between 1485 and 1502 and may have been about 112 feet (34 meters) long and 40 feet (12 meters) wide. Mostly belonging to young adult men, but also to women and children, several of the unearthed skulls feature holes on both sides, suggesting they belonged to a tzompantli. This was a rack on which the skulls of sacrificed people were arranged on wooden poles and displayed... To make the scene even more horrifying,...
  • 1014 AD impact event causes Atlantic tsunami and end of Aztec’s Fourth Sun?

    01/11/2012 12:29:51 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 16 replies
    2012Quest ^ | January 12th, 2011 | Gary C. Daniels
    The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle states that in England 1014 AD, on the eve of St. Michael’s day (September 28, 1014) “came the great sea-flood, which spread wide over this land, and ran so far up as it never did before, overwhelming many towns, and an innumerable multitude of people.” This is clearly a reference to a tsunami similar to the one that struck Indonesia in December 2004 which killed over 250,000 people. What could have caused this tsunami? Could a meteor or comet impact in the Atlantic Ocean have been the cause? Researcher Dallas Abbott of the Lamont Doherty Earth Observatory...
  • Murrieta Counter-Protest: Pro-Amnesty 'Aztecs' Shout 'White Supremacists Out!'

    07/06/2014 4:41:53 PM PDT · by equalator · 52 replies
    BreitBart ^ | 7-4-2014 | Michelle Moons
    Pro-amnesty activists beat drums and danced in full Aztec regalia, chanting, "White supremacists out, white supremacists out!" at a counter-demonstration at the Murrieta Border Patrol station Friday. Anti-illegal immigration protestors shouted "stop illegal immigration" right next to the dancing demonstrators one the north end of the roadblocks. At the south end, the crowd was largely made up of the anti-illegal immigration protestors, who assembled peacefully.
  • Severed head offering found in Aztec temple

    08/15/2013 6:37:32 AM PDT · by Renfield · 22 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 7-28-2013
    Archaeologists from the National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) recently found the decapitated skull of an individual still lying in the offering bowl, dating back 500 years ago at the Tlatelolco temple site in Mexico City.The area is excavated within the tourist site. Image: INAH Tlatelolco is a site in Mexico City where remains of the pre-Columbian city-state of the same name have been found centred on the Plaza de las Tres Culturas, which is a large square surrounded on three sides by a excavated Aztec monuments and a seventeenth-century church called the Templo de Santiago.According to the archaeologist...
  • Climate, Not Spaniards, Brought Diseases That Killed Aztecs

    08/01/2013 1:22:07 PM PDT · by Renfield · 48 replies
    Discover Magazine ^ | 8-1-2013 | Linda Marsa
    The wild swings in weather that are expected to become commonplace as the planet gets warmer—more frequent and severe droughts, followed by drenching rains—change ecosystems in a way that awaken and expedite the transmission of once dormant diseases. Intriguingly, this type of weather pattern may be what led to the fall of the once mighty Aztec Empire in the early 16th century–and not as is commonly held, by the invasion of European colonialists, who brought with them diseases like mumps, measles and smallpox for which the native populations lacked immunity. Curious timing When Hernando Cortes and his army conquered Mexico...
  • Pacific island claims to be the roots of Mexico [ Mexcaltitan was Atzlan? ]

    09/02/2008 9:51:06 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies · 262+ views
    Houston Chronicle ^ | August 30, 2008 | Jeremy Schwartz
    For local officials and some historians, Mexcaltitan is nothing less than the mythical Aztlan, birthplace of the ancient Aztecs. According to legend, the Aztecs left an island in 1091 and wandered for two centuries before settling in what is now Mexico City. There, they founded the legendary city of Tenochtitlan, an island city of canals and floating gardens, and lorded over an empire that stretched from Guatemala to northern Mexico before the Spanish conquered them in 1521... In Mexcaltitan, located in the Pacific state of Nayarit, clues that this was once Aztlan are tantalizing. In Nahuatl, the language of the...
  • The DNA of Aztec conquest: Genetic evidence tracks missing inhabitants of Mexican city

    11/03/2012 11:36:55 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Nature ^ | Wednesday, October 24, 2012 | Brian Switek
    Mata-Míguez and his colleagues sampled mitochondrial DNA from 25 bodies recovered from patios outside excavated Xaltocan houses. The remains dated from between 1240 and 1521, and so acted as markers of the population before and after the occupation. It turned out that the DNA in the pre-conquest samples did not match those of the post-conquest ones, indicating that a new biological influence came with cultural overthrow. The team concedes that its sample is small and may not be entirely representative of the historical conquest. "We originally thought the question was simply a matter of whether the population was replaced or...
  • Mexican sacrifice victims came from afar

    04/12/2007 2:23:37 PM PDT · by SwinneySwitch · 27 replies · 648+ views
    UKTV ^ | April 12, 2007
    Archaeologists have discovered new evidence to suggest ancient Mexicans brought human sacrifice victims from locations hundreds of miles away. New evidence has been found to suggest ancient Mexicans could have brought people hundreds of miles for use as human sacrifices. Archaeologists examined the DNA of the skeletons of 50 sacrificial victims found at the Pyramid of the Moon at the Teotihuacan ruins in Mexico, finding that they may have originated from Mayan, Pacific or Atlantic areas hundreds of miles away. Experts believe that the bodies could have been decapitated between 50 and 500 AD, while the pyramid was being built....
  • Ancient Mexican City Raises Questions About Mesoamerica's Mother Culture

    10/14/2007 9:20:42 AM PDT · by blam · 43 replies · 661+ views
    My San Antonio ^ | Tracy L. Barnett
    Ancient Mexican city raises questions about Mesoamerica's Mother Culture Web Posted: 10/11/2007 05:17 PM CDT Tracy L. Barnett Express-News Travel Editor TAMUIN, Mexico — Deep in the Huastec jungle the enormous carved stone monolith stands, suspended over the pool of water where a team of archaeologists discovered it. A powerful woman stands at the center of the carving, flanked by two smaller decapitated women. A stream of liquid flows from the headless women toward the woman in the center. Altug S. Icilensu/Special to the Express-NewsThe leader salutes the musicians before beginning the Malinche, a traditional Huastec dance. The women on...
  • Who Really Discovered America?

    07/14/2002 2:08:47 PM PDT · by blam · 182 replies · 18,652+ views
    Who Really Discovered America? Did ancient Hebrews reach the shores of the North and South American continents thousands of years before Christopher Columbus? What evidence is there for Hebrew and Israelite occupation of the Western Hemisphere even a thousand years before Christ? Was trans-Atlantic commerce and travel fairly routine in the days of king Solomon of Israel? Read here the intriguing, fascinating saga of the TRUE DISCOVERERS OF AMERICA! William F. Dankenbring A stone in a dry creek bed in New Mexico, discovered by early settlers in the region, is one of the most amazing archaeological discoveries in the Western...
  • Archaeologists find the largest amount of skulls at the most sacred temple of the Aztec empire

    10/06/2012 5:37:07 PM PDT · by Renfield · 36 replies
    ArtDaily.org ^ | 10-7-2012 | Adriana Perez Licon
    MEXICO CITY (AP).- Mexican archaeologists said Friday they uncovered the largest number of skulls ever found in one offering at the most sacred temple of the Aztec empire dating back more than 500 years. The finding reveals new ways the pre-Colombian civilization used skulls in rituals at Mexico City's Templo Mayor, experts said. That's where the most important Aztec ceremonies took place between 1325 until the Spanish conquest in 1521. The 50 skulls were found at one sacrificial stone. Five were buried under the stone, and each had holes on both sides — signaling they were hung on a skull...
  • Pictures: Mass Sacrifice Found Near Aztec Temple

    08/31/2012 6:18:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 45 replies
    National Geographic ^ | August 2012 | A.R. Williams
    Sixteen feet (five meters) below street level in Mexico City, archaeologists have found a jumble of 1,789 bones from children, teenagers, and adults along with the complete skeleton of a young woman. The burial, dating to the 1480s, lies at the foot of the main temple in the sacred ceremonial precinct of the Aztec capital, Tenochtitlan, founded by the Aztecs in 1325. The Aztecs dominated central Mexico until falling to Spanish conquistadores in 1521. Although several burials with multiple remains have been uncovered previously in this precinct, this is the first that includes human bones from such a wide span...