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Keyword: barryfell

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  • Who Really Discovered America?

    07/14/2002 2:08:47 PM PDT · by blam · 179 replies · 18,652+ views
    Who Really Discovered America? Did ancient Hebrews reach the shores of the North and South American continents thousands of years before Christopher Columbus? What evidence is there for Hebrew and Israelite occupation of the Western Hemisphere even a thousand years before Christ? Was trans-Atlantic commerce and travel fairly routine in the days of king Solomon of Israel? Read here the intriguing, fascinating saga of the TRUE DISCOVERERS OF AMERICA! William F. Dankenbring A stone in a dry creek bed in New Mexico, discovered by early settlers in the region, is one of the most amazing archaeological discoveries in the Western...
  • (Prince) Madoc In America

    07/10/2003 5:56:52 PM PDT · by blam · 74 replies · 7,275+ views
    Madoc In AmericaNative American Histories in the USA Is truth stranger than fiction? Of course it is; it always has been One subject that has been debated for the last four hundred years was whether or not a Khumric-Welsh Prince called Madoc discovered America. Queen Elizabeth I was persuaded by her advisors that this was so and the Khumric-Welsh discovery was put forward as somehow giving England a prior claim in the political wrangles over first rights in the New World of the Americas. No one ever thought to investigate the British records. Caradoc of Llancarfan wrote about it circa...
  • First Australians did not boost fire activity

    12/08/2010 7:23:50 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | Monday, December 6, 2010 | Bob Beale
    The arrival of the first people in Australia about 50,000 years ago did not result in significantly greater fire activity, according to a landmark new research report on the continent's fire history going back 70,000 years. Despite a widely held belief that the frequent use of fire by Aboriginal people resulted in vegetation change and other environmental impacts in prehistoric times, the most comprehensive study of Australian charcoal records has found they had no major impact on fire regimes... On large time scales, overall fire activity in Australia predominantly reflects prevailing climate, with less activity in colder glacial periods and...
  • Aboriginal folklore leads to meteorite crater

    01/12/2010 9:59:26 AM PST · by Palter · 17 replies · 968+ views
    COSMOS ^ | 07 Jan 2010 | Aaron Cook
    SYDNEY: An Australian Aboriginal 'Dreaming' story has helped experts uncover a meteorite impact crater in the outback of the Northern Territory. Duane Hamacher, an astrophysicist studying Aboriginal astronomy at Sydney's Macquarie University, used Google Maps to search for the signs of impact craters in areas related to Aboriginal stories of stars or stones falling from the sky. One story, from the folklore of the Arrernte people, is about a star falling to Earth at a site called Puka. This led to a search on Google Maps of Palm Valley, about 130 km southwest of Alice Springs. Here Hamacher discovered what...
  • Megafauna cave painting could be 40,000 years old

    05/31/2010 1:31:34 AM PDT · by Palter · 23 replies · 717+ views
    ABC ^ | 31 May 2010 | Emma Masters
    Scientists say an Aboriginal rock art depiction of an extinct giant bird could be Australia's oldest painting. The red ochre painting, which depicts two emu-like birds with their necks outstretched, could date back to the earliest days of settlement on the continent. It was rediscovered at the centre of the Arnhem Land plateau about two years ago, but archaeologists first visited the site a fortnight ago. A palaeontologist has confirmed the animals depicted are the megafauna species Genyornis. Archaeologist Ben Gunn said the giant birds became extinct more than 40,000 years ago. "The details on this painting indicate that it...
  • Human role in big kangaroo demise

    06/27/2009 9:09:29 PM PDT · by Fred Nerks · 15 replies · 1,633+ views
    BBC Science and Technology ^ | Monday, 22 June 2009 22:25 UK | By Jason Palmer Science and technology reporter, BBC News
    Debate has raged about the demise of “whopper hopper” P. goliah A fossil study of the extinct giant kangaroo has added weight to the theory that humans were responsible for the demise of “megafauna” 46,000 years ago. The decline of plants through widespread fire or changes toward an arid climate have also played into the debate about the animals’ demise. But an analysis of kangaroo fossils suggested they ate saltbush, which would have thrived in those conditions. The research is in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. There has long been dissent in the palaeontology community about the cause...
  • Ancient penguin DNA raises doubts about accuracy of genetic dating techniques

    11/10/2009 10:54:53 AM PST · by decimon · 155 replies · 2,464+ views
    Oregon State University ^ | Nov 10, 2009 | Unknown
    CORVALLIS, Ore. - Penguins that died 44,000 years ago in Antarctica have provided extraordinary frozen DNA samples that challenge the accuracy of traditional genetic aging measurements, and suggest those approaches have been routinely underestimating the age of many specimens by 200 to 600 percent. In other words, a biological specimen determined by traditional DNA testing to be 100,000 years old may actually be 200,000 to 600,000 years old, researchers suggest in a new report in Trends in Genetics, a professional journal. The findings raise doubts about the accuracy of many evolutionary rates based on conventional types of genetic analysis. “Some...
  • Mega-Tsunami Theory Disputed (Australia)

    02/03/2008 4:35:17 PM PST · by blam · 47 replies · 256+ views
    The Australian ^ | 2-3-2008
    Mega-tsunami theory disputed February 03, 2008 SUPPOSED evidence Australia has been subject to prehistoric tsunamis up to 20m in height over the past 10,000 years could just be the result of Aboriginal occupation, a major conference is set to hear tomorrow. Archaeologists from the Australian National University say the theory about the mega-tsunamis, which has influenced the development of emergency service plans in Western Australia, is not supported by evidence. In 2003 Australian geological researchers suggested prehistoric tsunamis over the past 10,000 years were much larger than those recorded since European settlement, including findings of surges up to 20m in...
  • 'Fires wiped out' ancient mammals

    07/08/2005 9:39:15 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 33 replies · 967+ views
    BBC ^ | 7/8/05 | Helen Briggs
    The first humans to arrive in Australia destroyed the pristine landscape, probably by lighting huge fires, the latest research suggests.The evidence, published in Science magazine, comes from ancient eggshells. These show birds changed their diets drastically when humans came on the scene, switching from grass to the type of plants that thrive on scrubland. The study supports others that have blamed humans for mass extinctions across the world 10-50,000 years ago. Many scientists believe the causes are actually more complex and relate to climate changes during that period, but, according to Dr Marilyn Fogel, of the Carnegie Institution in Washington,...
  • Archaeologist Claims 12,000-Year-Old Solstice Site in Clarke County[VA]

    10/23/2011 6:16:29 PM PDT · by FritzG · 12 replies
    Clarke Daily News ^ | 23 Oct 2011 | Edward Leonard
    Bear’s Den Rock has captured the attention of travelers in the northern Shenandoah Valley since colonial times and for thousands of years before by the indigenous people who hunted and fished in the region. Now, a local archaeologist believes that the prominent outcrop just south of Virginia’s Route 7 in Clarke County is a part of a larger 12,000 year old celestial calendar used by Native Americans to mark the changing of the seasons. Archaeologist Jack Hranicky believes that a 12,000-year-old solstice site has been discovered in Clarke County, Virginia“Although archaeological sites have been discovered across the United States, there’s...
  • Book Review: Discovering a Lost Heritage: The Catholic Origins of America

    09/02/2009 1:49:58 PM PDT · by GonzoII · 49 replies · 1,524+ views
    catholicism.org ^ | August 28th, 2009 | Eleonore Villarrubia
    - Catholicism.org - http://catholicism.org - Book Review: Discovering a Lost Heritage: The Catholic Origins of AmericaPosted By Eleonore Villarrubia On August 28, 2009 @ 2:24 pm In Articles, Book Reviews, Catholic America, History | 2 Comments So, you think you know your American history? Well, this little gem of a book, a Catholic history of our country, will probably leave you quivering, both with shock at your lack of knowledge of some of the “true facts” of our past and with indignation that this information is not taught in American schools and is absent from standard textbooks. Why, you ask,...
  • Cave Skeleton Is European, 1,300 Years Old

    09/30/2002 3:47:50 PM PDT · by blam · 68 replies · 3,344+ views
    Sunday Gazette Mail ^ | 9-29-2002 | Rick Steelhammer
    Cave skeleton is European, 1,300 years old, man says Archaeologist group wants a look at evidence Sunday September 29, 2002 By Rick Steelhammer STAFF WRITER MORGANTOWN — The man who first advanced the theory that markings carved on in a Wyoming County cave are actually characters from an ancient Irish alphabet has found human remains at the site, which tests indicate are European in origin and date back to A.D. 710, he maintains. Robert Pyle of Morgantown says that a DNA analysis of material from the skeleton’s teeth roots was conducted by Brigham Young University. That analysis, he says, shows...
  • Books, Magazines, Movies, Music

    07/11/2004 9:34:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 189 replies · 14,979+ views
    Amazon ^ | March 2004 | Anatoly T. Fomenko
    History: Fiction or Science? by Anatoly T. Fomenko