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Keyword: blackdeath

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  • 'Eye-watering' Scale Of Black Death's Impact On England Revealed

    06/19/2016 5:11:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Last modified on Thursday 26 May 2016 | Maev Kennedy
    Scraps of broken pottery from test pits dug by thousands of members of the public have revealed the devastating impact of the Black Death in England, not just in the years 1346 to 1351 when the epidemic ripped Europe apart, but for decades or even centuries afterwards. The quantity of sherds of everyday domestic pottery -- the most common of archaeological finds -- is a good indicator of the human population because of its widespread daily use, and the ease with which it can be broken and thrown away. By digging standard-sized test pits, then counting and comparing the broken...
  • Did famine worsen the Black Death?

    01/07/2016 11:22:02 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Harvard News ^ | January 5, 2016 | Alvin Powell
    When the Black Death swept through Europe in 1347, it was one of the deadliest disease outbreaks in human history, eventually killing between a third and half of Europeans. Prior work by investigators has traced the cause to plague-carrying fleas borne by rats that jumped ship in trading ports. In addition, historical researchers believe that famine in northern Europe before the plague came ashore may have weakened the population there and set the stage for its devastation. Now, new research using a unique combination of ice-core data and written historical records indicates that the cool, wet weather blamed for the...
  • Medieval Plague May Explain Resistance to HIV

    03/10/2005 3:11:16 PM PST · by Pyro7480 · 47 replies · 1,885+ views
    Yahoo! News (Reuters) ^ | 3/10/2005 | n/a
    Medieval Plague May Explain Resistance to HIV LONDON (Agence de Presse Medicale) - The persistent epidemics of hemorrhagic fever that struck Europe during the Middle Ages provided the selection pressures that have made 10 percent of Europeans resistant to HIV infection, according to a UK study. A mutation called delta-32 in the cellular receptor dubbed CCR5 protects against HIV infection, and is found more often in Europeans than other populations. Scientists have previously suggested that the genetic mutation became common because it protected people against the Black Death or smallpox epidemics, while those with normal CCR5 were wiped out. But...
  • The viruses are out there, and they are out to get us

    02/27/2003 6:26:28 PM PST · by Wallaby · 16 replies · 1,270+ views
    The Canberra Times | 28 February 2003
    Not for commercial use. Solely to be used for the educational purposes of research and open discussion. The viruses are out there, and they are out to get us It is possible that the Black Death is not dead and that a new 'bird flu' is another potential mass killer The Canberra Times Section A; Pg 17 February 27, 2003 Thursday Final Edition LATE last month an eight-year-old girl from Hong Kong visiting relatives in southern China fell ill with influenza and was admitted to hospital. A week later she died, and since then her father has died of the...
  • The Next Pandemic

    09/02/2014 3:42:11 PM PDT · by blam · 32 replies
    The Week Magazine ^ | 9-2-2014 | The Week Staff
    By The Week Staff August 30, 2014Think Ebola is alarming? Scientists expect a much deadlier virus to emerge in the not-distant future. How likely is a pandemic? Epidemiologists believe we're statistically overdue for a global viral outbreak, which occurs every generation or so. This year's Ebola crisis is probably just a dress rehearsal: Though the virus has killed at least 1,420 people in Africa in the last five months, Ebola is transmitted only through intimate contact with bodily fluids and doesn't have the global reach of a true pandemic, such as Spanish influenza in 1918. Humanity had no prior exposure...
  • Deadly Black Death bug hasn't changed, but we have

    10/12/2011 6:26:05 PM PDT · by decimon · 46 replies
    Associated Press ^ | October 12, 2011 | Seth Borenstein
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Scientists have cracked the genetic code of the Black Death, one of history's worst plagues, and found that its modern day bacterial descendants haven't changed much over 600 years. Luckily, we have. > In devastating the population, it changed the human immune system, basically wiping out people who couldn't deal with the disease and leaving the stronger to survive, said study co-author Hendrik Poinar of McMaster University in Ontario. >
  • Europe's Chill Linked To Disease (Black Death Caused Little Ice Age?)

    02/27/2006 10:53:31 AM PST · by blam · 81 replies · 1,999+ views
    bbc ^ | 2-27-2006
    Europe's chill linked to disease By Kate Ravilious Bubonic plague may have wiped out over a third of Europe's population Europe's "Little Ice Age" may have been triggered by the 14th Century Black Death plague, according to a new study. Pollen and leaf data support the idea that millions of trees sprang up on abandoned farmland, soaking up carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. This would have had the effect of cooling the climate, a team from Utrecht University, Netherlands, says. The Little Ice Age was a period of some 300 years when Europe experienced a dip in average temperatures. Dr...
  • Black Death Casts A genetic Shadow Over England

    08/01/2007 2:00:38 PM PDT · by blam · 85 replies · 2,191+ views
    New Scientist ^ | Colin Barras
    Black Death casts a genetic shadow over England 12:26 01 August 2007 NewScientist.com news service Colin BarrasBlack Death as illustrated in a 15th century bible The Black Death continues to cast a shadow across England. Although the modern English population is more cosmopolitan than ever, the plagues known as the Black Death killed so many people in the Middle Ages that, to this day, genetic diversity is lower in England than it was in the 11th century, according to a new analysis. Rus Hoelzel at the University of Durham, UK and his colleagues looked at the mitochondrial DNA from human...
  • Black Death Mutant Gene Resists AIDS, Say Scientists (Virus)

    01/04/2005 7:21:29 PM PST · by blam · 73 replies · 3,016+ views
    Cheshire Online ^ | 1-4-2005 | Alan Weston
    Black Death mutant gene resists Aids, say scientists Jan 4 2005 By Alan Weston, Daily Post IT HAS been described as the 'world's greatest serial killer'. The Black Death was a catastrophe which wiped out nearly half the European population, with 20m people dying between 1348 and 1350. But new research being carried out by a team from Liverpool University has shown that the disease may have produced an unexpected side-effect - resistance to the deadly HIV/Aids virus. Professor Christopher Duncan and Dr Susan Scott have already caused shockwaves among historians with their claim that the Black Death was caused...
  • Plague Infected Humans Much Earlier Than Previously Thought

    10/24/2015 6:14:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | October 22, 2015 | Joseph Caputo of Cell Press
    Y. pestis was the notorious culprit behind the sixth century's Plague of Justinian, the Black Death, which killed 30%-50% of the European population in the mid-1300s, and the Third Pandemic, which emerged in China in the 1850s. Earlier putative plagues, such as the Plague of Athens nearly 2,500 years ago and the second century's Antonine Plague, have been linked to the decline of Classical Greece and the undermining of the Roman army. However, it has been unclear whether Y. pestis could have been responsible for these early epidemics because direct molecular evidence for this bacterium has not been obtained from...
  • The Mutant Genes Behind the Black Death

    10/09/2015 5:00:58 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 23 replies
    Quanta Magazine ^ | 10/6/15 | Carrie Arnold
    The Mutant Genes Behind the Black Death Only a few genetic changes were enough to turn an ordinary stomach bug into the bacteria responsible for the plague. Pieter Bruegel the ElderThe Triumph of Death (1562), by Pieter Bruegel the Elder. By: Carrie ArnoldOctober 6, 2015 Comments (1) Download PDF Print Each year, 4 million people visit Yosemite National Park in California. Most bring back photos, postcards and an occasional sunburn. But two unlucky visitors this summer got a very different souvenir. They got the plague.This quintessential medieval disease, caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis and transmitted most often by fleabites,...
  • Peasant Revolt Hits London

    08/10/2015 10:29:06 AM PDT · by 11th_VA · 35 replies
    New Historian ^ | June 13, 2015 | Daryl Worthington
    The 13th June marks the anniversary of the day Wat Tyler led the Peasant’s Revolt of 1381 into London. The English capital descended into chaos as the peasants burnt and looted the city, cementing the revolt as the most significant peasant uprising in the feudal period of English history. Originating in the South-East of England, it was when the revolt reached London that its significance became apparent. The peasants went on to capture the Tower of London, a feat which had never been done before. Two powerful figures, the Archbishop of Canterbury, and the King’s Treasurer, were killed by the...
  • Why Halley's Comet May Be Linked to Famine 1,500 Years Ago

    12/20/2013 6:21:32 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 34 replies
    livescience.com ^ | December 18, 2013 07:53am ET | Mike Wall, Senior Writer |
    A piece of the famous Halley's comet likely slammed into Earth in A.D. 536, blasting so much dust into the atmosphere that the planet cooled considerably, a new study suggests. This dramatic climate shift is linked to drought and famine around the world, which may have made humanity more susceptible to "Justinian's plague" in A.D. 541-542 — the first recorded emergence of the Black Death in Europe. The new results come from an analysis of Greenland ice that was laid down between A.D. 533 and 540. The ice cores record large amounts of atmospheric dust during this seven-year period, not...
  • The Pope and Rome – Synonymous, Right? Hmm … Let’s “See”

    02/12/2015 8:00:05 AM PST · by Salvation · 24 replies
    Archdiocese of Washington ^ | 02-11-15 | Msgr. Charles Pope
    The Pope and Rome – Synonymous, Right? Hmm … Let’s “See” By: Msgr. Charles PopeMost Catholics understandably link the Church, the Papacy, and Rome. We are “Roman” Catholics. The Pope lives in Rome. He is the Bishop of Rome and of the universal Church. Rome, the Papacy, and the Church are solidly linked terms and almost interchangeable. To say, “Rome has spoken … ” is to say the Pope has spoken, the Church has ruled.But this connection has not always held and the popes, for various reasons, have chosen or been “forced” to live outside of Rome.Among the lesser...
  • Rats reprieved as giant gerbils are blamed for the Black Death

    02/24/2015 3:05:16 PM PST · by SteveH · 53 replies
    The Times of London ^ | February 24, 2015 | Valentine Low
    Gerbils are cute and furry creatures. They may also, according to scientists, have been responsible for killing millions of people across Europe by spreading the plague. Researchers now believe that gerbils from Asia, rather than native black rats, were behind the repeated outbreaks of the bubonic plague in Europe.
  • Want Something Creepy? Step Inside Europe’s “Bone Churches”

    10/28/2014 8:34:22 AM PDT · by millegan · 29 replies
    ChurchPOP ^ | 2014 | ChurchPOP
    The Sedlec Ossuary in the Czech Republic looks very normal on the outside... (see pics at the link)
  • Ebola Battle Led by Larry, Curly, and Moe?

    10/30/2014 5:07:11 PM PDT · by Sean_Anthony · 20 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 10/30/14 | Dr. Don Boys
    It seems Larry, Curly, and Moe are handling the Ebola threat with understandable results: Death is the result of ineptitude, incoherence, and incertitude The population of Europe had outrun the food supply in the early 1300s, and in a few years, the poor were eating cats, dogs, and other animals. Some say they even ate their own children! People were dying, but rather slowly. Bubonic plague (Black Death) would prove to be more efficient and quicker than famine, much quicker. The bubonic plague cut its way through the Far East to Italy, then to the rest of Europe. It is...
  • Forget Ebola, Imagine Obama vs. the Black Death

    10/19/2014 6:51:03 AM PDT · by Abakumov · 14 replies
    Radix News ^ | October 19, 2014 | James S. Robbins
    Press Briefing by Press Clerk Earnest Jeste, 10/16/1348 Blondel the Minstrel Press Briefing Room 1:08 P.M. GMT JESTE: Good afternoon, everybody. Nice to see you all. Apologize for the delayed start today. Bramwell, do you want to get us started with questions? Q: Sure. Thank you. The King’s subjects are increasingly concerned about the spread of a malady that most call the Plague, which has killed multitudes in the Kingdom of Naples, the Holy Roman Empire and France. There are now cases popping up in our realm. Is the White Castle preparing a strategy to deal with the situation? JESTE:...
  • Is Ebola the Same Virus as the Black Death? Historical Similarities are Striking

    10/14/2014 9:26:42 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 42 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 10/14/2014 | Chriss Street
    Most people assume that the fourteenth-century Black Death that quickly ravaged the western world was a bacterial bubonic plague epidemic caused by flea bites and spread by rats. But the Black Death killed a high proportion of Scandinavians where it was too cold for fleas to survive. Biology of Plagues. Evidence from Historical Populations published by Cambridge University Press, analyzed 2,500 years of plagues and concluded that the Black Death was caused by a viral hemorrhagic fever pandemic similar to Ebola. If this is correct, the future medical and economic impacts from Ebola have been vastly underestimated.  Authors Dr. Susan Scott, a demographer,...
  • How The Bubonic Plague Actually Saved Europe In The 14th Century (Finance)

    05/15/2013 11:28:58 AM PDT · by blam · 33 replies
    TBI ^ | 5-15-2013 | Sam Ro
    How The Bubonic Plague Actually Saved Europe In The 14th Century Sam Ro May 15, 2013, 1:31 PM Studying the history of financial crises can be quite enlightening. Deutsche Bank's Peter Hooper just published an interesting report considering crises going back to the Middle Ages. Referring to the work of Juesus Huerta de Soto, Geld, Bankkredit und Konjunkturzyklen, and Stuttgart, Hooper summarizes what happened during the European credit crisis of the 14th century. What's interesting is how the country got out of the crisis. From Hooper's note (emphasis added): In the early 14th century banks in Florence engaged in a...
  • Plague Helped Bring Down Roman Empire

    05/12/2013 6:14:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 88 replies
    LiveScience ^ | May 10, 2013 | Charles Choi
    ...The bacterium that causes plague, Yersinia pestis, has been linked with at least two of the most devastating pandemics in recorded history. One, the Great Plague, which lasted from the 14th to 17th centuries, included the infamous epidemic known as the Black Death, which may have killed nearly two-thirds of Europe in the mid-1300s. Another, the Modern Plague, struck around the world in the 19th and 20th centuries, beginning in China in the mid-1800s and spreading to Africa, the Americas, Australia, Europe and other parts of Asia. Although past studies confirmed this germ was linked with both of these catastrophes,...
  • Black Death Genetic Code "Built"

    10/13/2011 3:44:55 AM PDT · by Just4Him · 16 replies
    BBC ^ | 10/12/2011 | Matt McGrath
    The genetic code of the germ that caused the Black Death has been reconstructed by scientists for the first time. The researchers extracted DNA fragments of the ancient bacterium from the teeth of medieval corpses found in London. They say the pathogen is the ancestor of all modern plagues. The research, published in the journal Nature, suggests the 14th Century outbreak was also the first plague pandemic in history.
  • Experts: Ebola Outbreak, Black Death 'Plague' Spread From Africa as Viruses

    10/11/2014 9:32:54 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 28 replies
    Breitbart's Big Government ^ | October 11, 2014 | Chriss W. Street
    Most assume that Black Death quickly ravaged the fourteenth century western world was a bacterial bubonic plague epidemic caused by flea bites and spread by rats. But the Black Death killed a high proportion of Scandinavians -- and where they lived was too cold for fleas to survive. A modern work gives us a clue into this mystery. The “Biology of Plagues” published by Cambridge University Press analyzed 2,500 years of plagues and concluded that the Black Death was caused by a viral hemorrhagic fever pandemic similar to Ebola. If this view is correct, the future medical and economic impacts...
  • Was Ebola Behind the Black Death?

    10/01/2014 6:26:49 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 52 replies
    ABC News ^ | July 30, 2014 | Jen Sterling
    Controversial new research suggests that contrary to the history books, the "Black Death" that devastated medieval Europe was not the bubonic plague, but rather an Ebola-like virus. History books have long taught the Black Death, which wiped out a quarter of Europe's population in the Middle Ages, was caused by bubonic plague, spread by infected fleas that lived on black rats. But new research in England suggests the killer was actually an Ebola-like virus transmitted directly from person to person. The Black Death killed some 25 million Europeans in a devastating outbreak between 1347 and 1352, and then reappeared periodically...
  • Europe goes back to the Middle Ages: Map shows how patchwork continent would look if every

    09/17/2014 6:42:02 AM PDT · by C19fan · 33 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | September 17, 2014 | Sam Webb
    This map shows how Europe would look if every separatist movement was granted its dream of independence. With the Scottish referendum just days away, the issue of regions breaking away from their traditional rulers is looming large over the continent. The map features well-known separatist movements, such as the powerful and vocal Basque Nationalist movement in northern Spain and southwestern France, as well as the more obscure, such as the Savoyan League, which supports the independence of the Savoy region of France, which has a population of around 405,500.
  • Chinese City Under Quarantine After Bubonic Plague Black Death

    07/22/2014 7:22:29 PM PDT · by lbryce · 56 replies
    You Tube Cosmo News ^ | July 22, 2014 | Staff
    A Chinese city has been sealed off and 151 people have been placed in quarantine since last week after a man died of bubonic Plague, state media said. The 30,000 residents of Yumen, in the north-western province of Gansu, are not being allowed to leave, and police at roadblocks on the perimeter of the city are telling motorists to find alternative routes, China Central Television (CCTV) said.
  • The Chances Of Surviving The Black Death

    03/29/2008 4:52:00 PM PDT · by blam · 75 replies · 3,714+ views
    The chances of surviving the Black Death Why did some people survive the Black Death, and others succumb? At the time of the plague – which ravaged Europe from 1347 to 1351, carrying off 50 million people, perhaps half the population – various prophylactics were tried, from the killing of birds, cats and rats to the wearing of leather breeches (protecting the legs from flea bites) and the burning of aromatic spices and herbs. Now it seems that the best way of avoiding death from the disease was to be fit and healthy. Sharon DeWitte and James Wood of the...
  • Black Death Targeted The Weak

    01/30/2008 8:59:46 AM PST · by blam · 14 replies · 524+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 1-30-2008 | Roger Highfield
    Black Death targeted the weak By Roger Highfield, Science Editor Last Updated: 10:01pm GMT 28/01/2008 The Black Death, which killed one person in every three in Europe, was not as indiscriminate as thought, according to studies of remains in mass grave in East Smithfield. Skeletons of plague victims in a mass grave at East Smithfield, London The toll was so high during its height in the 1300s that many have concluded that anyone and everyone who came into contact with the agent, thought to be a bacterium, was doomed. But research published today shows that people who were physically frail...
  • New study sheds light on survivors of the Black Death

    05/30/2014 6:37:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 48 replies
    UofSC ^ | 5/7/2014 | Peggy Binette
    A new study suggests that people who survived the medieval mass-killing plague known as the Black Death lived significantly longer and were healthier than people who lived before the epidemic struck in 1347. Caused by the bacteria Yersinia pestis, the Black Death wiped out 30 percent of Europeans and nearly half of Londoners during its initial four-year wave from 1347 – 1351... The findings have important implications for understanding emerging diseases and how they impact the health of individuals and populations of people... She says the Black Death was a single iteration of a disease that has affected humans since...
  • Black Death skeletons unearthed by Crossrail project

    03/31/2014 11:43:12 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 33 replies
    BBC ^ | 29 March 2014 Last updated at 20:00 ET | James Morgan
    Records say thousands of Londoners perished and their corpses were dumped in a mass grave outside the City, but its exact location was a mystery. Archaeologists now believe it is under Charterhouse Square near the Barbican. They plan to expand their search for victims across the square - guided by underground radar scans, which have picked up signs of many more graves. Crossrail's lead archaeologist Jay Carver says the find "solves a 660-year-old mystery". "This discovery is a hugely important step forward in documenting and understanding Europe's most devastating pandemic," he said
  • Black Death may have scuppered Roman Empire

    01/28/2014 3:29:18 PM PST · by Renfield · 31 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 1-28-2014 | Debora MacKenzie
    hat caused the fall of the Roman Empire? A devastating plague that struck during the reign of Emperor Justinian in 541 AD, killing a quarter of the population, seems to have landed the final blow, but the identity of the infection was a mystery. Now sequencing of DNA taken from two skeletons buried in Bavaria, Germany, in the 6th century has uncovered the complete genome of Yersinia pestis, the bacteria also blamed for the Black Death that struck Europe in 1348. The find suggests that Y. pestis may have emerged to ravage humanity several times. Hendrik Poinar at McMaster University...
  • Plague decoded: Researchers link 2 of the most devastating pandemics in history

    01/27/2014 5:08:06 PM PST · by John W · 118 replies
    ctvnews.ca ^ | January 27, 2014 | Christina Commisso
    An international team of scientists has discovered that two of the most devastating pandemics in human history -- responsible for killing as much as half the population in Europe at the time -- were caused by strains of the same bacterium. The researchers announced Monday that the Plague of Justinian and the Black Death were caused by distinct strains of the same pathogen, and warned that similar pandemics can strike again. The Plague of Justinian struck in the 6th century and is estimated to have killed between 30 and 50 million people -- virtually half the world’s population as it...
  • Black Death comes to California

    07/26/2013 11:48:47 AM PDT · by TangledUpInBlue · 54 replies
    ABC News via Yahoo ^ | 7/26/13 | Katie Moisse
    A plague-infected squirrel has closed a California campground for at least a week, according to Los Angeles County health officials. The squirrel, trapped July 16 in the Table Mountain Campgrounds of Angeles National Forest, tested positive for the infection Tuesday, prompting a health advisory and the closing of the campground while investigators tested other squirrels and dusted the area for plague-infected fleas. "Plague is a bacterial infection that can be transmitted to humans through the bites of infected fleas, which is why we close affected campgrounds and recreational areas as a precaution while preventive measures are taken to control the...
  • Mass grave in London reveals how volcano caused global catastrophe

    08/05/2012 5:20:32 AM PDT · by Renfield · 38 replies
    The Guardian (UK) ^ | 8-4-2012 | Dalya Alberge
    When archaeologists discovered thousands of medieval skeletons in a mass burial pit in east London in the 1990s, they assumed they were 14th-century victims of the Black Death or the Great Famine of 1315-17. Now they have been astonished by a more explosive explanation – a cataclysmic volcano that had erupted a century earlier, thousands of miles away in the tropics, and wrought havoc on medieval Britons. Scientific evidence – including radiocarbon dating of the bones and geological data from across the globe – shows for the first time that mass fatalities in the 13th century were caused by one...
  • Oregon man suffering from the plague is in critical condition

    06/13/2012 7:57:29 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 97 replies
    New York Daily News ^ | June 13, 2012 | Philip Caulfield
    An Oregon man is at death's door in a hospital battling a rare case of the infamous “Black Death” plague, health officials said. The unidentified man, who is in his 50s, was bitten on the hand while trying to pull a mouse away from a stray cat on June 2 and got sick several days later, doctors at St. Charles Medical Center-Bend told The Oregonian newspaper. The man was thought to be suffering from septicemic plague — meaning the ruthless bacteria was spreading in his bloodstream — and was in critical condition on Tuesday, doctors said. Karen Yeargain, the county...
  • Black death DNA unravelled (Genetic code of 'mother' of deadly bubonic plague reassembled)

    10/13/2011 1:35:49 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 17 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 10/12/2011
    Scientists used the degraded strands to reconstruct the entire genetic code of the deadly bacterium. It is the first time experts have succeeded in drafting the genome of an ancient pathogen, or disease-causing agent. The researchers found that a specific strain of the plague bug Yersinia pestis caused the pandemic that killed 100 million Europeans - between 30 per cent and 50 per cent of the total population - in just five years between 1347 and 1351. They also learned that the strain is the "mother" of all modern bubonic plague bacteria. "Every outbreak across the globe today stems from...
  • Black Death Bacterium Identified: Genetic Analysis of Medieval Plague Skeletons...

    09/03/2011 7:46:55 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | Monday, August 29, 2011 | via AlphaGalileo
    A team of German and Canadian scientists has shown that today's plague pathogen has been around at least 600 years. The Black Death claimed the lives of one-third of Europeans in just five years from 1348 to 1353. Until recently, it was not certain whether the bacterium Yersinia pestis -- known to cause the plague today -- was responsible for that most deadly outbreak of disease ever. Now, the University of Tübingen's Institute of Scientific Archaeology and McMaster University in Canada have been able to confirm that Yersinia pestis was behind the great plague... Previous genetic tests indicating that the...
  • Colorado Cat Tests Positive for Bubonic Plague

    06/08/2011 11:42:42 AM PDT · by EBH · 47 replies
    Catster ^ | 6/8/11
    Officials in Boulder County, Colo., announced last week that a pet cat and a dead squirrel tested positive for the bubonic plague. The cat’s owner took it to the Humane Society of Boulder Valley to be checked by veterinarians, and it was there that the presence of the bacteria was confirmed. A dead squirrel also tested positive for the plague. Jennifer Bolser, chief veterinarian at the Humane Society clinic, said that the cat brought the dead squirrel home and likely became infected from it. The bubonic plague is caused by a bacterium called Yersinia pestis. It begins its life cycle...
  • Plague researcher in Chicago dies from infection (Yersinia pestis, septicemic plague infection)

    09/21/2009 11:55:48 AM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 18 replies · 1,240+ views
    Reuters on Yahoo ^ | 9/21/09 | Julie Steenhuysen
    CHICAGO (Reuters) – Public health officials are investigating the death of a University of Chicago researcher who studied plague bacteria and was found to have the microbe in his blood, university officials said on Monday. Malcolm Casadaban, who died on September 13, was researching a weakened strain of the plague bacteria Yersinia pestis. Because it is missing key proteins, the strain is not normally harmful to people. Medical center spokesman John Easton said Casadaban had the laboratory strain of Yersinia pestis in his blood, suggesting he had a form of the infection known as septicemic plague, which can kill even...
  • Scientists Discover Why Plague Is So Lethal

    05/05/2008 3:19:54 PM PDT · by blam · 17 replies · 137+ views
    Science Daily ^ | Society for General Microbiology
    Scientists Discover Why Plague Is So Lethal ScienceDaily (May 5, 2008) — Bacteria that cause the bubonic plague may be more virulent than their close relatives because of a single genetic mutation, according to research published in the May issue of the journal Microbiology.Yersinia pestis, direct fluorescent antibody stain (DFA), at 200x magnification. (Credit: CDC / Courtesy of Larry Stauffer, Oregon State Public Health Laboratory) "The plague bacterium Yersinia pestis needs calcium in order to grow at body temperature. When there is no calcium available, it produces a large amount of an amino acid called aspartic acid," said Professor Brubaker...
  • Disabling Key Protein May Give Physicians Time To Treat Pneumonic Plague

    01/27/2007 3:41:17 PM PST · by blam · 289+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 1-26-2007 | WU School Of Medicine
    Source: Washington University School of Medicine Date: January 27, 2007 Disabling Key Protein May Give Physicians Time To Treat Pneumonic Plague Science Daily — The deadly attack of the bacterium that causes pneumonic plague is significantly slowed when it can't make use of a key protein, scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis report in this week's issue of Science. Scanning electron micrograph depicting a mass of Yersinia pestis bacteria (the cause of bubonic plague) in the foregut of the flea vector. (Credit: Rocky Mountain Laboratories, NIAID, NIH) Speed is a primary concern in pneumonic plague, which...
  • Study of ancient and modern plagues finds common features

    11/21/2008 9:01:03 PM PST · by neverdem · 24 replies · 1,190+ views
    biologynews.net ^ | November 21, 2008 | NA
    In 430 B.C., a new and deadly disease—its cause remains a mystery—swept into Athens. The walled Greek city-state was teeming with citizens, soldiers and refugees of the war then raging between Athens and Sparta. As streets filled with corpses, social order broke down. Over the next three years, the illness returned twice and Athens lost a third of its population. It lost the war too. The Plague of Athens marked the beginning of the end of the Golden Age of Greece. The Plague of Athens is one of 10 historically notable outbreaks described in an article in The Lancet Infectious...
  • Plague Victims Discovered After 1500 Years (Justinian)

    04/10/2008 3:16:15 PM PDT · by blam · 57 replies · 266+ views
    Adnkronos ^ | 4-10-2008
    Italy: Plague victims discovered after 1500 years Rome, 10 April (AKI) - The remains of hundreds of victims, believed to have been killed in a plague that swept Italy 1500 years ago, have been found south of Rome. The bodies of men, women and children were found in Castro dei Volsci, in the region of Lazio, during excavations carried out by Lazio archaeological office. News of the extraordinary discovery was reported in the magazine, "Archeologia Viva". The victims are believed to have been victims of the Justinian Plague, a pandemic that killed as many as 100 million people around the...
  • An Empire's Epidemic (Justinian Plague)

    09/18/2006 4:38:39 PM PDT · by blam · 38 replies · 1,248+ views
    UCLA ^ | 5-6-2002 | Thomas H Maugh II
    An Empire's Epidemic Scientists Use DNA in Search for Answers to 6th Century Plague By THOMAS H. MAUGH II, Times Staff Writer By the middle of the 6th century, the Emperor Justinian had spread his Byzantine Empire around the rim of the Mediterranean and throughout Europe, laying the groundwork for what he hoped would be a long-lived dynasty. His dreams were shattered when disease-bearing mice from lower Egypt reached the harbor town of Pelusium in AD 540. From there, the devastating disease spread to Alexandria and, by ship, to Constantinople, Justinian's capital, before surging throughout his empire. By the time...
  • Bubonic Plague Traced To Ancient Egypt (Black Death)

    03/11/2004 3:40:50 PM PST · by blam · 96 replies · 5,507+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | 3-10-2004 | Cameron Walker
    Bubonic Plague Traced to Ancient Egypt Cameron Walker for National Geographic News March 10, 2004 The bubonic plague, or Black Death, may have originated in ancient Egypt, according to a new study. "This is the first time the plague's origins in Egypt have been backed up by archaeological evidence," said Eva Panagiotakopulu, who made the discovery. Panagiotakopulu is an archaeologist and fossil-insect expert at the University of Sheffield, England. King Tutankhamun lies in his burial chamber in the Valley of the Kings, Egypt. Some researchers now believe that the bubonic plague, or Black Death, originated in the village where builders...
  • China paper warns of impact from euro crisis "Black Death"

    08/21/2011 9:50:14 PM PDT · by TigerLikesRooster · 9 replies
    Reuters ^ | 08/21/11 | Chris Buckley
    China paper warns of impact from euro crisis "Black Death" Reuters By Chris Buckley | Reuters – 3 hrs ago BEIJING (Reuters) - The "Black Death" of debt crisis across the Euro zone will hurt China by sapping demand for exports, although Beijing's relatively small holdings of euro assets will limit any damage to foreign exchange reserves, the nation's top official newspaper said on Monday. The bleak diagnosis for the euro's prospects appeared in the overseas edition of the People's Daily, the top newspaper of China's ruling Communist Party, in a commentary by a former central bank official and an...
  • Fall of Rome Recorded in Trees

    01/18/2011 10:49:18 PM PST · by neverdem · 38 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 13 January 2011 | Andrew Curry
    Enlarge Image Preserved. Climate changes recorded in tree rings correlate with important events in European history, such as the Black Death. Credit: Wikimedia When empires rise and fall and plagues sweep over the land, people have traditionally cursed the stars. But perhaps they should blame the weather. A new analysis of European tree-ring samples suggests that mild summers may have been the key to the rise of the Roman Empire—and that prolonged droughts, cold snaps, and other climate changes might have played a part in historical upheavals, from the barbarian invasions that brought about Rome's collapse to the Black...
  • BBC:Roman Rise, Fall 'Recorded in Trees' (Climate Change Led to Fall of Empire) BARF-A-GANZA!

    01/16/2011 9:19:55 AM PST · by lbryce · 60 replies · 1+ views
    BBC News ^ | January 14, 2010 | Mark Kinver
    An extensive study of tree growth rings says there could be a link between the rise and fall of past civilisations and sudden shifts in Europe's climate. A team of researchers based their findings on data from 9,000 wooden artifacts from the past 2,500 years. They found that periods of warm, wet summers coincided with prosperity, while political turmoil occurred during times of climate instability. The findings have been published online by the journal Science. "Looking back on 2,500 years, there are examples where climate change impacted human history," co-author Ulf Buntgen, a paleoclimatologist at the Swiss Federal Research Institute...
  • Climate Changes Linked to Fall of Roman Empire

    01/14/2011 5:02:29 AM PST · by Oldeconomybuyer · 42 replies · 1+ views
    Discovery News ^ | January 14, 2011 | By Emily Sohn
    A prolonged period of wet weather spurred the spread of the Bubonic plague in medieval times, according to a new study. And a 300-year spell of unpredictable weather coincided with the decline of the Roman Empire. Climate change wasn't necessarily the cause of these and other major historical events, researchers say. But the study offers the most detailed picture yet of how climate and society have been intertwined for millennia. Again and again, the data suggest, climate has impacted culture in dramatic ways. Unusually extreme and frequent shifts in weather patterns between 250 and 550, for example, coincided with a...
  • Cause of the big plague epidemic of Middle Ages identified

    10/20/2010 12:55:40 AM PDT · by neverdem · 50 replies
    PhysOrg.com ^ | October 11, 2010 | NA
    Geographical position of the five archaeological sites investigated. Green dots indicate the sites. Also indicated are two likely independent infection routes (black and red dotted arrows) for the spread of the Black Death (1347-1353) after Benedictow. ©: PLoS Pathogens The 'Black Death' was caused by at least two previously unknown types of Yersinia pestis bacteria. The latest tests conducted by anthropologists at the Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) have proven that the bacteria Yersinia pestis was indeed the causative agent behind the "Black Death" that raged across Europe in the Middle Ages. The cause of the epidemic has always remained...