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Posts by AlbionGirl

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  • Discerning the Dove: Pentecost AD 2009

    06/24/2009 6:50:55 PM PDT · 8 of 8
    AlbionGirl to lightman

    I’d really like to add something, but I want to think about it some more so that what I write is well thought out and expressed.

    But if I don’t L, thanks for the ping.

  • Luther and Erasmus: The Controversy Concerning the Bondage of the Will

    03/23/2009 2:32:09 PM PDT · 12,898 of 12,905
    AlbionGirl to freedumb2003
    Hey Freedom,

    This was an excellent discussion, and I finally read both Luther and Erasmus's contribution to the debate.

    As noted by one of their translators: Luther brought a blunderbuss while Erasmus brought a rapier. Luther won, but not without leaving an enigma, and a turgid one at that. But, his child-like and sweet side can be found in his gratitude for, and comfort in, the blood of Christ and the grace of God. He was brave.

    I became a different person in 2007 than I had been in 2006. And now I'm quite different from the person I was in either of those years. Time marches on.

    Your profile page is so full!

    It's nice to be re-called, so thanks for the friendliness.

  • Judge's tears, rebuke close case (San Diego diocese in turmoil)

    11/04/2007 2:18:14 PM PST · 29 of 64
    AlbionGirl to Running On Empty

    I love you, my brother.

    The Peace of the Lord, which passeth all understanding be with you and all those whom you love.

  • Reforming the Daily Office: Examining Two New Lutheran Books

    10/23/2007 10:30:25 AM PDT · 14 of 17
    AlbionGirl to lightman
    Hi L,

    As always, thanks for the ping. I don't have anything of substance to add, but I don't want to let this opportunity pass without passing along some good news.

    Here in Rochester there is a Lutheran church downtown. It's ECLA and healthy, i.e. right thinking, from what I can observe. The priest is an energetic man and the vitality of the congregation is palpable. During the winter months they have a liturgy in German.

    There is hope, L, so do fight the good fight, but don't lose hope. With Jesus all things are possible, and sometimes when I pray I recognize the paltry quality of my faith by the absence of joy and true reliance.

    Remember, a revolution often makes the most noise just before it expires.

  • "Green Up, with the Word of God" (Sermon on Psalm 1)

    09/08/2007 6:00:09 PM PDT · 4 of 6
    AlbionGirl to Charles Henrickson

    Very nice, Pastor, and thanks for the ping.

  • Sermon for Vespers on August 21, 2007 (Mark 8:22-33)

    09/04/2007 7:27:24 PM PDT · 7 of 7
    AlbionGirl to lightman
    But the yoke of obedience has been laid upon our shoulders and in doing so we have been called to bear both the reality of the cross and the promise of the resurrection.

    Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. 29 Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. 30 For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.”
    (St. Matthew 11)
  • Sermon for Vespers on August 21, 2007 (Mark 8:22-33)

    09/04/2007 7:16:06 PM PDT · 6 of 7
    AlbionGirl to lightman
    To see Thee more clearly.
    To love Thee more dearly.
    To follow Thee more nearly.

    That's enough to bring tears to my eyes, L. Thank you.

  • The Cranach Altar Painting in St. Peter and St. Paul Church in Weimar, Germany

    09/04/2007 7:25:20 AM PDT · 11 of 19
    AlbionGirl to lightman
    Simbolo Della Fede

    Le porte, le porte! In sapienza stiamo intenti!

    Credo in un unico Dio, Padre, onnipotente, Creatore del cielo e della terra, e di tutte le realtà sia visibili che invisibili.

    E un unico Signore: Gesù Cristo, il Figlio di Dio, l'unigenito, il generato dal Padre prima di tutti i secoli. Luce da Luce; Dio vero da Dio vero; generato, non creato; coessenziale al Padre; mediante cui tutte le realtà presero esistenza.

    Che per noi uomini e per la nostra salvezza discese dai cieli e si incarnò dallo Spirito santo e dalla Vergine Maria, e si fece uomo.

    E fu crocifisso per noi sotto Ponzio Pilato, e soffrì, e fu sepolto.

    E risuscitò il terzo giorno, secondo le Scritture.

    E risalì ai cieli e siede alla destra del Padre.

    E di nuovo verrà con gloria a giudicare i vivi e i morti; il cui regno non avrà fine.

    E nello Spirito, che è santo, Signore, vivifico, procede dal Padre, insieme con il Padre e con il Figlio è adorato e glorificato, parlò per mezzo dei Profeti.

    E nell'unica, santa, cattolica e apostolica Chiesa.

    Confesso un unico Battesimo per la remissione dei peccati.

    Aspetto la risurrezione dei morti.

    E la vita del secolo venturo.

    Amen.

  • The Cranach Altar Painting in St. Peter and St. Paul Church in Weimar, Germany

    09/04/2007 7:16:25 AM PDT · 10 of 19
    AlbionGirl to lightman
    Thanks for the ping, L. Cranach's work is beautiful. My only lament, lacking the least intent of slighting my German brothers and sisters, is that he's not Italian.

    What follows is prayer from the Grand Collect from Divine Liturgies of Santi Giovanni il Crisostomo and Basilio il Grande. I'd translate, but I don't think I need to for you, and with just a little effort it can be understood by all.

    Il Signore is how Italians refer to Our Lord. It is at once an elevated yet democratic title; for one addresses both one's Patron and the poorest of the poor with the same signification.

    What follows after the brief prayers is The Creed, which I will post separately.

    I ask you, L, is there a more beautiful language than Italian?

    In pace preghiamo il Signore.

    Signore, Dio nostro, il tuo potere è incomparabile e la tua gloria inconcepibile; la tua misericordia è immensa e il tuo amore per gli uomini ineffabile: Tu proprio, Sovrano, secondo la tua benignità, guarda su di noi e su questo santo tempio e tra di noi e tra quanti pregano con noi rendi copiose le tue misericordie e le tue indulgenze.

    Poiché è a Te che spetta ogni gloria, onore e adorazione: Padre, e Figlio e santo Spirito, ora e sempre, e nei secoli dei secoli.

    Amen.

  • A Society of the Cross

    08/31/2007 8:33:19 AM PDT · 11 of 18
    AlbionGirl to lightman
    Hi L,

    Thanks for the ping and God bless.

  • Cancer's Unexpected Blessings by Tony Snow

    07/22/2007 11:19:59 AM PDT · 45 of 54
    AlbionGirl to Dr. Eckleburg

    Thanks for the ping, Dr. E.

    Don’t have much to add, just that I’m not surprised to read this from Tony Snow. He exuded the Grace of God so many times when he interviewed both friend and ‘foe’ alike.

    May he continue to feel the embrace of the Good Shepherd, every day of his life.

  • LA Cardinal Apologizes to Plaintiffs

    07/15/2007 7:38:36 PM PDT · 48 of 74
    AlbionGirl to Running On Empty; Tax-chick

    R, thanks for keeping me in your thoughts. I appreciate it.

    The best to you, and to you too, Tax-chick.

  • Independence Day Propers

    07/04/2007 9:30:24 AM PDT · 5 of 6
    AlbionGirl to lightman
    Hi L. Blessed Independence Day to you too.

    I’m sitting here writing to you in the peace of my little apartment, wages paid while at leisure and not at work. I’m having an excellent cappuccino. Wish I could make one for you and the rest of the posters on this thread. I think when I retire, the Lord Willing, I’ll buy a good commercial espresso machine, German or Italian made, and set up shop in a nook of an office building that caters to lawyers. I’ve this vision of my little triangular nook, replete with two sturdy mannequins, more like sturdy cut-outs, with little bubble dialogues hovering above their heads. I’d change the dialogue every few days. What do you think?

    Let’s say it’s the 3rd of July, 2021.…

    My female cardboard cut-out, let’s call her Sara. My male cut-out who looks like you would imagine St. Joseph to look, let’s call him Abraham, though, to those who knew him way back when he remains Abram.

    Elizabeth says to Abraham, what do you suppose the basest of vices is? Abraham replies: how can you even ask that, Sara? But since you do, ingratitude!

    My prayer today, L is that Our Lord remind us of the copious bloodshed of our young men throughout the life of our Country who died on the battlefield so miserably far away from hearth and home. I know I’ve heard the Italian terra whisper where they fell, thank you for liberating and never occupying.

    That Our Lord remind us of the awful price we paid in our Civil War. That he remind us that we demanded our Black brothers lay down their lives for us in our wars of the twentieth century, and then we made them walk on opposite sides of the street from us.

    That our Lord prepare us and convince us that we must tap into that which makes us capable of both great sin and great accomplishment, if we are called again to remove the boot of tyranny from the throat of those, who for whatever reason, cannot do it for themselves. And, to finally ask Our Lord for the forbearance towards those who following rescue inevitably despise their benefactors because they are a constant and sore reminder of their ignominy and their debt.

    L, don’t know if you remember the UN talks following 9-11, but the Polish delegate (can’t remember his title) said that during the occupation of the USSR, the notion aphoristically advanced was that the way to acquire freedom was to attack the United States and force an occupation. I wonder if there were countries during the Roman Empire who harbored the same idea?

  • Godly Foundation of America

    07/03/2007 7:46:45 AM PDT · 7 of 10
    AlbionGirl to fgoodwin; Forest Keeper
    I have a deep and abiding love for the Founding Fathers. I see their flaws, they may have even told us a 'Noble Lie', but they are without historical equal, in my view.

    Benjamin Franklin said that he who would bring primitive Christianity to bear (read: the Sermon on the Mount or the blueprint for living it, 1 Cor. 13) would change the face of the world. For our Fathers who did not confess Christ, let us pray for the Extraordinary Grace of God, which I'm quite sure He takes pleasure in extending. I've always bristled at the phrase, 'God's good pleasure' it always seemed too human for me, but maybe I'm wrong. Our Fathers are also Lincoln and Teddy Roosevelt. Here's a short 'Preaching Letter' from TR ((1858–1919) to his kids:

    A PREACHING LETTER
    White House, Oct. 2, 1903.

    DEAR KERMIT:

    I was very glad to get your letter. Am glad you are playing football. I should be very sorry to see either you or Ted devoting most of your attention to athletics, and I haven't got any special ambition to see you shine overmuch in athletics at college, at least (if you go there), because I think it tends to take up too much time; but I do like to feel that you are manly and able to hold your own in rough, hardy sports. I would rather have a boy of mine stand high in his studies than high in athletics, but I could a great deal rather have him show true manliness of character than show either intellectual or physical prowess; and I believe you and Ted both bid fair to develop just such character.

    There! you will think this a dreadfully preaching letter! I suppose I have a natural tendency to preach just at present because I am overwhelmed with my work. I enjoy being President, and I like to do the work and have my hand on the lever. But it is very worrying and puzzling, and I have to make up my mind to accept every kind of attack and misrepresentation. It is a great comfort to me to read the life and letters of Abraham Lincoln. I am more and more impressed every day, not only with the man's wonderful power and sagacity, but with his literally endless patience, and at the same time his unflinching resolution.

    FK, ping per our previous posts on the Nativity thread, and an update for you.

    Based on Garibaldi's abilities as warrior and General, President Lincoln wanted to put Garibaldi in charge of one of the Union regiments, if regiment is the proper term. However, Garibaldi declined because he thought the Emancipation of slaves was moving too slowly.

    America, that's a good Italian name, don't you think? Viva l'America, FK, finche il mondo non e piu!

  • CHURCH GREW IN UNDERSTANDING OF MARY’S ROLE

    06/15/2007 6:36:39 PM PDT · 325 of 921
    AlbionGirl to GoLightly
    ...knowing something as important as the way I feel about Mary.

    Isn't this a great picture? Look at the baby's face. So sweet, so innocent.

  • The man who dared to laugh at the Pope ["Out of the Storm: The Life and Legacy of Martin Luther"]

    06/15/2007 6:15:28 PM PDT · 49 of 57
    AlbionGirl to GoLightly
    Go, I thought you might like the following. Czeslaw Milosz wrote it.

    Undoubtedly, the hope of Salvation has paled and now it is so weakened that no images are associated with it. Therefore, even when you tell yourself, "If you want to save your soul, you should renounce things which are the most precious to you, your creative work, a romance, power or other satisfactions of your ambitions," it is so hard to accomplish this. Once, when Salvation signified a palm in Heaven, and damnation, eternal tortures in the abysses of Hell, people, it seems, had a stronger incitement to search for saintliness and to temper their gluttonous appetites. Not at all. They killed, committed adultery, grabbed the land of their neighbor, and were avid for fame. Something is wrong here. The tangible presence of Paradise, as promised to the Islamic faithful who fell in battle against the infidel, may increase their fervor in combat, but, in general, life on earth and the idea of Salvation seem to belong to two different orders, hardly connected.

    It is not improbable that Martin Luther guessed this when he made Salvation dependent not upon acts but upon Grace.

    Now, a little more connected to the topic of the thread...

    Diarmaid MacCulloch wrote a History of the Reformation just a couple of years ago. He's more gentle when describing Catholic defects and you can see by the phrases he uses, who he has the better opinion of. For instance, he refers to Calvin as 'buttoned' up. Right from the get go, I could see that his sympathies were not solidly in the Reformers camp. Not that they should be either, and, in my view, he managed to keep that from becoming a problem.

    The period that Martin Luther lived in may not have been a let's see your smile era, but the people, I think, did have a sarcastic side or pretty developed sense of humor, however you would prefer to describe based on excerpt below.

    Lurking in a little English country church, at Preston Bissett in Buckinghamshire, is an object lesson in the difficulty of understanding the religious outlook of past generations. Holding up the arch at the entrance to the chancel, the most sacred part of the church building, are two carved stone figures, sculpted sometime in the early 14th century. The figure on the north side, crouched on all fours under the weight of the arch, is displaying his ample buttocks towards the high altar, the place where, day by day before the Reformation, the priest of Preston presided at the Mass, transforming breand and wine into the flesh and blood of the crucified Christ. Some later vandal has knocked the head off the carving, as with countless other carvings in Protestant Europe, but the buttocks are unscathed (see Plate 1A) [Me: the plate shows an enormous backside.)

    It is easier to understand a Protestant sparing the buttocks -which would admirable convey what he or she thought of the miracle of the Mass- than to understand why they were carved in the first place.

    Preston Bissett's priest could hardly have avoided staring at them as he blessed the people at the end of the Mass, before processing down the altar steps and out through the wooden screen which filled the chancel arch and hid the sculpture from his parishoners' eyes....Did the carving express the impatience which many devout people felt with their clergy when they did not perform their sacred task to public satisfaction? Was it meant to be a warning to a lazy or incompetent priest, or was it a private joke? Was it a symbol of Satan who sought to destroy the Church's proclamation of good news at God's altar?

    Otherwise the meaning of the figure is now irrecoverable from a belief system where the physical and the spiritual were much more intimately, unexpectedly and exuberantly fused than they became in the Reformation and Counter-Reformation.

    I think he also noted in the book that there were two sets of Commandments making the rounds at the time. Tried to find exact excerpt, but couldn't.

    Finally, I think that our image of Luther in some measure at least is based on book titled Table Talk that is supposed to be a record of what Luther said. And, for what it's worth, Owen Chadwick, another very well-reputed historian of the Reformation wrote the following in The Reformation

    The characteristic memory of Luther is of a man presiding at his own table, with his colleagues and friends around, arguing with him, or listening to his divinity, his politics and his humour. One of the friends shamefacedly took out a notebook and began to jot down Luther's remarks. The habit spread, and twelve different reporters made collections. Luther sometimes mocked nut neither resented nor forbade these deferential scribes. Twenty years after his death, one of them, Aurifaber, published a collection from a variety of collections . Thenceforth Luther's Table Talk became a classic of the Reformation. Rude and outspoken he might often be; 'Dear husband', said Catherine, 'you are too rude'. 'They teach me to be rude" replied Luther. He was so outspoken that his enemies leaped to make capital out of the Table Talk. It is unreliable as a source for details of history, particularly when the events occured many years before the date of the reported conversation; and Aurifaber's text was not untouched by improvement or interpolation. But it is a unique and authentic picture of a man and a divine; he who would understand Luther's person and mind cannot neglect it. It is impossible to apply any epithet to him less than the old classical epithet magnanimous, in its original sense of great-hearted.
  • THE HOLY PATRIARCH TIKH0N (And The Cost of Discipleship)

    06/15/2007 10:09:54 AM PDT · 4 of 4
    AlbionGirl
    "Grace is free, but it will cost you your life."

    "...what is nearest to God is precisely the need of one's neighbor"

    Bonhoeffer

  • THE HOLY PATRIARCH TIKH0N (And The Cost of Discipleship)

    06/15/2007 10:06:52 AM PDT · 3 of 4
    AlbionGirl
    Less prattle and more essay:
    Of course, his uprightness, courage and firmness were duly appreciated by the enemies of the Church ruling over Russia and for a certain period be was kept in jail awaiting a trial, while the sentence of a death penalty was already announced by the soviet press. But at that time, the soviet government was not strong enough to dictate its orders to other countries, as it does now, so the interference of the USA, where the Holy Patriarch had spent five years as Archbishop of the Russian Orthodox Church, and the famous memorandum of Curson, put an end to the imprisonment of the Patriarch.

    After many months spent in prison, he was released, and immediately resumed his duties. But release from prison did not end his martyrdom, and did not mean that be was not subjected to close surveillance, most painful restrictions, and continual interrogatories by Tcheka. His relations not only with the outer world, but with his bishops, were complicated to such a degree that often he could not obtain full and true information about some event, although his decisions or instructions on the subject were greatly required. This sometimes led to misunderstand ings which were gladly seized upon by his enemies. The constant pressure of the Tcheka on his mind was a severe added burden to his troubles. One can only wonder at his endurance.

  • THE HOLY PATRIARCH TIKH0N (And The Cost of Discipleship)

    06/15/2007 10:04:53 AM PDT · 2 of 4
    AlbionGirl
    Being inspired is a lot like falling in love. I wonder if it's the same for married people? They seem to have forgotten what's it's like to be inspired by their bride or their husband. They seem spent, or worse, ironic. Lord save us single people from the abusing pall of the ironic couple.

    I found this piece on the Noble Patriarch because of the mention he gets in this piece which sent the G/P shivers down my red, white and blue, spine

  • THE HOLY PATRIARCH TIKH0N (And The Cost of Discipleship)

    06/15/2007 10:00:27 AM PDT · 1 of 4
    AlbionGirl
  • How the West Really Lost God (A New Look at Secularization)

    06/10/2007 5:24:48 PM PDT · 34 of 49
    AlbionGirl to Greg F

    Thanks for this post and ‘welcome regarding the Weber link.

  • How the West Really Lost God (A New Look at Secularization)

    06/10/2007 2:18:49 PM PDT · 30 of 49
    AlbionGirl to Kolokotronis
    By the way, what part of GREECE did you say your people were from? :)

    In whatever part they gather around the table to eat together, shout together and weep together.

  • How the West Really Lost God (A New Look at Secularization)

    06/10/2007 2:15:52 PM PDT · 29 of 49
    AlbionGirl to Ethan Clive Osgoode
    I've been on a life-long quest for beauty and never knew it until recently. And I don't think it's a conscious quest. It may follow from Baptism, I don't know. The following from David Hart, an Orthodox genius who writes of God and beauty, and who speaks, I think to your idea on personal liberty.
    Hell is the perfect concretization of ethical freedom, perfect justice without delight, the soul’s work of legislation for itself, where ethics has achieved its final independence from aesthetics. Absolute subjective liberty is known only in hell. [H]ell is the purest interiority. [I]t is a turning in, a fabrication of an inward depth, a shadow, a privation, a loss of the whole outer world, a refusal of the surface.

    Before I ever knew who Mr. Hart was though, I was a big fan of Leonard Cohen, who wrote the following song. At first glance, it may seem at odds with the ideas of Mr. Hart, but I think they are similarly beautiful.

    I Came So Far For Beauty

    I came so far for beauty
    I left so much behind
    My patience and my family
    My masterpiece unsigned
    I thought I'd be rewarded
    For such a lonely choice
    And surely she would answer
    To such a very hopeless voice
    I practiced all my sainthood
    I gave to one and all
    But the rumours of my virtue
    They moved her not at all
    I changed my style to silver
    I changed my clothed to black
    And where I would surrender
    Now I would attack
    I stormed the old casino
    For the money and the flesh
    And I myself decided
    What was rotten and what was fresh
    And men to do my bidding
    And broken bones to teach
    The value of my pardon
    The shadow of my reach
    But no, I could not touch her
    With such a heavy hand
    Her star beyond my order
    Her nakedness unmanned
    I came so far for beauty
    I left so much behind
    My patience and my family
    My masterpiece unsigned

  • How the West Really Lost God (A New Look at Secularization)

    06/10/2007 1:54:52 PM PDT · 28 of 49
    AlbionGirl to GoLightly
    I wasn't aware of the commentaries you mention, but thanks for the addy and the very good reponse to my post.

    Only thing I want to add is that even those wanting that "the law" should rule the hearts of men can't run from Jesus' comprehensive Founding of all that they deem worthwhile.

    Hippies were a prime example of trying to take what Jesus left, throw in a little of Jesus himself for good measure, and then setting him aside as some sort of incidental comrade. Hence the vanity of the thinking that Jesus was a democrat, and the even greater vanity of the fundamentalists who assert the oppposite.

    When I was reading The Life of Jesus, it struck me how much we all really want to find the veritable and touchable Historical Jesus. And, I think that's because our knowledge of Him through Scripture really is like looking through a glass darkly. We can't really lay hold of His Divinity in a way that's touchable, so we look for the human to make it more easily apprehended. It's a never ending search for those who feel the call to Imitation.

  • How the West Really Lost God (A New Look at Secularization)

    06/09/2007 7:57:53 PM PDT · 22 of 49
    AlbionGirl to sandyeggo

    Thank you. Especially for posting the whole thing instead of just a link. It gets its proper due that way.

  • How the West Really Lost God (A New Look at Secularization)

    06/09/2007 6:37:46 PM PDT · 17 of 49
    AlbionGirl to The Spirit Of Allegiance
    I didn't want to forget the link for you. This one is for Max Weber, and the book in question. The other one, I had in mind for you isn't really relevant to this, so I skipped it, thinking maybe you wouldn't find it interesting after all.
  • How the West Really Lost God (A New Look at Secularization)

    06/09/2007 6:19:43 PM PDT · 16 of 49
    AlbionGirl to GoLightly
    Maybe. But I think once the Empire became the Church and the Church became the Empire, something magnificent was gained, but something plain, but essential was lost, or at the very least, deeply buried.

    I just finished reading The Life of Jesus, by Ernest Renan. It moved me a lot. He denied the Incarnation, the Trinity, etc., and at first I was worried about reading it, thinking it would adversely affect my Faith. But just the opposite happened -you can't be afraid to read things, that's a mark of fear and servility.

    Anyway, he does a masteful job of bringing the human Jesus into the fore. But as he does it, the main thought that accompanies everything is this Human must needs be Divine.

    It was also a sad read, because I sensed that he wanted to believe, but his logic forbade it. And because of that there was a melancholy strain through the whole thing.

  • How the West Really Lost God (A New Look at Secularization)

    06/09/2007 6:10:23 PM PDT · 15 of 49
    AlbionGirl to redgolum
    Thanks. I really like military history, though I miss a lot when I read it, because I'm female and lack a lot of basic info. Though that was never a problem for Margaret Thatcher.

    I think that I read about his truce in Carnage and Culture, by Victor Davis Hanson. I think that I also read in C&C that in very early warfare the soldiers could get together and depose a general, if he was not doing his job. When I read of this, all I could think of was Robert MacNamara. I don't know how any person could have the heart to write the book he wrote, so many years and so, so many deaths after the fact. To pierce the hearts of those family members who were left behind.

    If it would have been up to me, I would have given him 30 days worth of food, a good knife and I would have exiled him to Borneo or some other country where they're reputed to still have head-hunters.

  • How the West Really Lost God (A New Look at Secularization)

    06/09/2007 6:02:03 PM PDT · 14 of 49
    AlbionGirl to The Spirit Of Allegiance
    Hi Spirit. I have a couple of very good links that I'll get to you tomorrow, if that's ok.

    Spirit, in the late 40s my Mom was washing clothes, in the dead of winter, in a river, in the mountains of Italyl. That's not that long ago.

    I tell my parents still, I would have died at 16 from not wanting to live that life. They laugh heartily because they know that I know, even though I never actually lived it.

    During that time, everyone did need one another, but it didn't make them better people or better Christians, when all is said and done. A very contracted nature and an abiding jealousy was part and parcel of the peasant class. And while I think jealousy is not a defect known only to peasants, to peasants who really are bright, energetic and hard workers but who can't climb out of that pit of misery because of economics, it gnarls them.

    There is an Italian saying Patria e Pagnotta (a loaf of bread). It's sort of hard to translate, but it amounts to this: your fatherland is the land that can feed you.

    The opposing side to all of this is that surfeit deadens us.

    Earlier this week, I read something that said Satan's optimum view would look a lot like suburbia. Not because people who live in the suburbs are great sinners, it's rather the oppposite, they're kind of dead.

    Milton Freidman (I think it was him, anyway) was chronicling the very early 18th Century and he said that a lot of the Puritans were not going to church, and instead were pretty bent on having a 'good time', if you know what I mean. So much so, that laws began to be enacted to get them to shape up. My kind of people: real, live, honest-to-goodness sinners. You know, the kind that neeed The Physician.

    In the end, perhaps the scarcity/surfeit thing is a wash and as such not worth much in terms of providing a rememdy, if a rememdy is indeed needed.

  • How the West Really Lost God (A New Look at Secularization)

    06/09/2007 6:02:02 PM PDT · 13 of 49
    AlbionGirl to The Spirit Of Allegiance
    Hi Spirit. I have a couple of very good links that I'll get to you tomorrow, if that's ok.

    Spirit, in the late 40s my Mom was washing clothes, in the dead of winter, in a river, in the mountains of Italyl. That's not that long ago.

    I tell my parents still, I would have died at 16 from not wanting to live that life. They laugh heartily because they know that I know, even though I never actually lived it.

    During that time, everyone did need one another, but it didn't make them better people or better Christians, when all is said and done. A very contracted nature and an abiding jealousy was part and parcel of the peasant class. And while I think jealousy is not a defect known only to peasants, to peasants who really are bright, energetic and hard workers but who can't climb out of that pit of misery because of economics, it gnarls them.

    There is an Italian saying Patria e Pagnotta (a loaf of bread). It's sort of hard to translate, but it amounts to this: your fatherland is the land that can feed you.

    The opposing side to all of this is that surfeit deadens us.

    Earlier this week, I read something that said Satan's optimum view would look a lot like suburbia. Not because people who live in the suburbs are great sinners, it's rather the oppposite, they're kind of dead.

    Milton Freidman (I think it was him, anyway) was chronicling the very early 18th Century and he said that a lot of the Puritans were not going to church, and instead were pretty bent on having a 'good time', if you know what I mean. So much so, that laws began to be enacted to get them to shape up. My kind of people: real, live, honest-to-goodness sinners. You know, the kind that neeed The Physician.

    In the end, perhaps the scarcity/surfeit thing is a wash and as such not worth much in terms of providing a rememdy, if a rememdy is indeed needed.

  • How the West Really Lost God (A New Look at Secularization)

    06/09/2007 5:30:23 PM PDT · 11 of 49
    AlbionGirl to Defiant

    Thanks.

  • How the West Really Lost God (A New Look at Secularization)

    06/09/2007 5:29:48 PM PDT · 10 of 49
    AlbionGirl to Condor 63
    As long as mankind faces death man will cast about for the hand of God.

    I don't disagree, but the way you phrased the truth, makes it seem that man is attached to God only insofar as his inferiority permits, and, if that's true, what kind of children are we?

  • How the West Really Lost God (A New Look at Secularization)

    06/09/2007 2:39:16 PM PDT · 4 of 49
    AlbionGirl to AdamSelene235
    From your profile page:

    How we burned in the prison camps later thinking: What would things have been like if every police operative, when he went out at night to make an arrest, had been uncertain whether he would return alive? If during periods of mass arrests people had not simply sat there in their lairs, paling with terror at every bang of the downstairs door and at every step on the staircase, but had understood they had nothing to lose and had boldly set up in the downstairs hall an ambush of half a dozen people with axes, hammers, pokers, or whatever was at hand? The organs would very quickly have suffered a shortage of officers and, notwithstanding all of Stalin's thirst, the cursed machine would have ground to a halt."

    "If. . . if . . . We didn't love freedom enough. And even more – we had no awareness of the real situation. We spent ourselves in one unrestrained outburst in 1917, and then we hurried to submit. We submitted with pleasure! . . . We purely and simply deserved everything that happened afterward."

    -- Alexander Solzhenitsyn

    The first quote hits you hard, as it should. Whose quote is that, if you don't mind me asking?

    First quote made me think of a situation during WWII (I think) in which both companies of soldiers, Allied and Axis were on the brink of refusing to fight one another. It was just before Christmas day.

  • How the West Really Lost God (A New Look at Secularization)

    06/09/2007 2:27:35 PM PDT · 3 of 49
    AlbionGirl
    This is not as dire a report as the title suggests. Am only half way through article myself.

    But can't help but notice already something I've always held, and that's that surfeit makes us truly strangers to one another, and misery or scarcity makes enmity between us, and brings to the fore the smallness of man.

    Economics really does matter.

    Currently reading Weber's the Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism. It's fascinating. And it too reveals something I always held and that is that the Protestant work ethic is born of piety and not greed.

    Max Weber was a genius!

  • How the West Really Lost God (A New Look at Secularization)

    06/09/2007 2:21:46 PM PDT · 1 of 49
    AlbionGirl
  • Remarks of Pr Bradley Schmeling, Candidate for Bishop, ELCA Southeastern Synod, June 2, 2007

    06/07/2007 7:47:41 AM PDT · 23 of 25
    AlbionGirl to lightman
    I also yearn for a church where two brothers in Christ, colleagues and friends, who both pray to serve faithfully and with integrity don't find themselves on the opposite side of the table in a disciplinary hearing room but side by side in the reign of God. I'm praying that the churchwide assembly will change the policy that precludes gay and lesbian pastors from serving in congregations that will call them, not because I think we've arrived at any kind of agreement or consensus, but because I want to level the mission field to make it fair for all those who are lured by the Spirit to announce "Jesus loves you."

    Hi, L.

    Principalities and powers indeed. Don't you find it odd that this bishop (not!) would use the word lure in conjunction with the Holy Spirit?

    I love language, L, it's sacred to me. It is one of God's finest tools, at the disposal of both simple and complex natures alike, by the Truth.

    I think we have aided and abetted the homosexual cause: where heterosexual continence dwells, the homosexual militant dare not advance.

    When I was in high school there were a few teachers that were gay. A couple of them, obviously so. You would see them having dinner together in local restaurants, etc. They knew, that we knew, and they didn't care. They lived their life as they saw fit and felt no need to be accepted by those of us who present day homosexuals are now vying for moral parity with (not!). One of these men was my senior English teacher. My final project for the first semester of that year was Judas' suicide note.

    He was a good teacher and a fair man, and I never thought of him in negative terms. What I'm really trying to get at is that homosexuals are our brothers and sisters in Christ, but just like those who abort, gossip, and slander, they cannot expect us to call evil something less inflammatory or more neutral.

    I read something the other day that pointed out that Satan was the first Whig. :) You'll find no bigger fan of freedom of thought than me. Freedom of thought, though, can never trump the Truth and can never be allowed to label evil good, without aggressive opposition.

    Closing in on a couple of years now, the first time I attended Divine Liturgy, one of the Orthodox parishioners gave me a few pamphlets. These were well done and they covered the basic beliefs of Orthodoxy. One of the pamphlets covered the issue of homosexuality and stated point blank that what was expected of the homosexual was just what was expected of the heterosexual: chastity. Who can argue with the Truth, L?

  • Deliver Us From Evil

    05/18/2007 2:31:03 PM PDT · 266 of 270
    AlbionGirl to RobbyS
    My basic problem is going after actions forty years ago rather than within reliable memory.

    I agree. Only caveat I would add is that when something like this happens to you, you do remember well, even to details of clothes you were wearing and that kind of thing. But even with corroborating testimony, the question remains, why did you wait so long? That's not blaming the victim. That's asking an eminently reasonable question. A question that anyone would ask if one of his family members were accused of such a thing. Another question I would ask is why do you want money for the ordeal?

    I'm just guessing here, but when the scandal first broke I had the sense that there would be people jumping on the bandwagon who might not have had a claim at all. A church perceived as rich is an inviting target, couple that with the fact that being the world's biggest, and for the most part, well thought of but seemingly secretive religious body, and you have yet another easy inroad.

    If liberty means anything at all to us, it can't be that some one just levels an accusation at either an individual or an organization and that becomes a verity.

    In fact, I would support legislation that punished a false accuser as seriously as the offender. Once someone accuses you of a crime like pederasty, even if you should go to trial and be acquitted, your reputation is toast, and no amount of money or even front page news retraction will change that.

    But what grinds me more than anything is that no one even notices the real offense, the great blunder, which was to allow the priesthood to fill up with sexually perverted homosexuals who are allowed to fill the ranks of the Church probably all the way up to Cardinal, who conceal the sins of others because in so doing they are concealing their own.

    You're right. But I think a lot of people did get that, and that's what made it so scandalous. All of that gets lost in the ugliness of the charges and battle to try to find out if the charges are true.

    Let's face it, the first urge that presents itself to the pederast or the homosexual is not willed. Their first mistake is giving in to the first impulse. I'd bet that if they were stong enough to resist that, the appetite would begin to subside. Though I don't have full confidence that that would be so for the pederast because a very contorted psyche must be present to produce or stimulate that appetite. For the person who does try to resist or conquer such an appetite, it must be a tremendous cross.

    Please don't misunderstand, I'm not trying to excuse such depravity at all, but I think one has to try to understand it. I think a person with homosexual inclinations, even if he's never given into the urge (it's hard for me to believe such a person exists, to be honest with you) should not be allowed to be a priest or a minister. I think you're playing with fire otherwise.

  • The Reality of Romanism

    05/18/2007 9:57:31 AM PDT · 315 of 453
    AlbionGirl to PetroniusMaximus
    Well, on second thought...

    Not to worry, that happens to me a lot.

    Though when he was younger, he did have cherubic cheeks...

    I'll have to check out his youtube debut later, and thanks.

  • The Reality of Romanism

    05/18/2007 9:52:55 AM PDT · 314 of 453
    AlbionGirl to irishtenor
    If you are going to mention the Irish...
    Ya gotta ping me!

    I promise to remember, and I love the Irish. They're white Italians, as far as I can tell. :)Though I do ask forgivness in advance, should I forget. La vecchiaia, don't you know. To save you the google trouble that means old age.

    At 51, when I try to use that as an exuse with my Mom, she replies in her sweet, and mishevious broken English, you got a long way to go, baby!

  • Keeping Holy-day at Ascensiontide

    05/18/2007 9:42:13 AM PDT · 9 of 10
    AlbionGirl to Charles Henrickson
    I can see where you're coming from, Pastor, as it might take something away from the true Awe of the Ascension. I know a lot of people don't like the guitar being played at worship, but I always liked it. A single flute is beautiful too.

    We learned a song, can't remember if it was named Let there be Peace, or Let it Begin With Me,

    Let there be peace on earth,
    and let it begin with me
    Let there be peace on earth
    a peace that was meant to be

    To take each moment,
    and live each moment
    in peace, eternally
    Let there be peace on earth
    And let it begin with me

    The song was beautiful and simple with just the guitar as instrument.

    On the other hand, I'm with C.S. Lewis in that I really dislike the organ. It is intolerably intrusive. Just after you'd communed and were kneeling down, the organist would start belting out these chords. It made you just want to turn to the loft and shout, for Pete's sake, will you please keep it down! I'm trying to meditate and pray here!

  • Keeping Holy-day at Ascensiontide

    05/18/2007 2:14:07 AM PDT · 4 of 10
    AlbionGirl to lightman
    Thank you so much for the ping, L. This is a moving piece and does my heart good.

    Steven was very impressed that we were about to have a worship service, for the Amish regard Ascension Day as a great Holy-day on which none but the most necessary of work should be done. Perhaps this is motivated by fear, for the Ascension Gospel tells us that ‘this Jesus, who has been taken from you, will return in the same manner.” (Luke); which, when juxtaposed with the warning that “on that day two men will be working in the field, one will be taken, and one will be left?” (Matthew) could give rise to the notion that those working on Ascension Day were risking their own personal parousia. Irrespective, it is faithful.

    I don't know how familiar you are with NY State, L, but the Finger Lakes region, where a few Amish make their home, is very beautiful. It is a shame that Ithaca has become such a liberal town. It should be a conservative town!

    Anyway, I had a friend who lived out that way, in Romulus. One cool, fall day we went for a walk past a great Amish farm and as we passed the windows, we saw these little Amish kids, with bonnet covered heads, pop up and then quickly pop back down, in that innocent embarrassment that only children truly possess.

    In Albion, there are also some Amish families. Their corn fields don't boast manicured rows; even the life of the weeds is respected. In concession to modern times -which is impossible to avoid- they use a public phone booth when the need to make a call arises.

    They are an important Christian witness, as the memory of that 13 year-old martyred girl plainly shows us.

    A quiet imagination and a quiet dedication to the Law is their signature. The Law matters. God grant that we recover it.

    God bless, L and thanks again.

  • The Reality of Romanism

    05/17/2007 2:50:58 PM PDT · 159 of 453
    AlbionGirl to Dr. Eckleburg; blue-duncan
    Pubs close?

    I'm not sayin' nothin' 'bout drinkin' and the Irish or the Scottish here at all...

    Did you know that when digging the Erie canal and following a day's work (12 to 14 hours), the Irish used to arrange boxing matches with each other?

    Is that a different breed, or what? Irish men...

    Then, of course, we have the Italian Cardinals who when transporting the coffin of Alexander VI, got into some little tiff (that's hard to believe, isn't it?), dropped the casket and started sword fighting.

  • The Reality of Romanism

    05/17/2007 2:22:23 PM PDT · 149 of 453
    AlbionGirl to blue-duncan; Dr. Eckleburg
    Depends on the time the pub closed.

    Exactly!

  • 'The Nativity Story' Movie Problematic for Catholics, "Unsuitable" for Young Children

    05/17/2007 1:36:38 PM PDT · 14,739 of 16,256
    AlbionGirl to Forest Keeper
    I think that Harley made an excellent case that whether the first Christians centered around the Eucharist is highly debatable. So far as I am aware, there is no scripture indicating that Paul centered his worship around the Eucharist as practiced today by Roman Catholics. If there was, then I would probably BE a Roman Catholic. :)

    I thought his post was cogent too.

    To me, it always comes down to the sovereignty of God and what kind of relationship He intended to have with us. With the Eucharist, and the meaning behind it, we have a group of men squarely in between us laymen and God. God doesn't dispense grace to us individually, men of the Church do. Salvation doesn't come from God directly, it comes through the men of the Church through the sacraments, etc. Anything important has to go through a buffer of fallible men.

    There's a lot there that I agree with. The thing that prompts a lot of debate though is necessary or mandated contiguity between ecclesiology and sotierology (sp?).

  • The Reality of Romanism

    05/17/2007 1:25:44 PM PDT · 112 of 453
    AlbionGirl to Dr. Eckleburg
    Related to discussions of late, and when you get the chance and if you're so inclined, A Cheer for Denominations.
  • The Reality of Romanism

    05/17/2007 1:18:03 PM PDT · 105 of 453
    AlbionGirl to Gamecock; Dr. Eckleburg
    By the way, GC, you're a little late with posting this piece, my friend. I read it last week, over at the Boar's Head Tavern.

    He looks almost plastic, and I know you probably will think a little worse of me because of it, but he used to be fun to watch while you were high.

  • The Reality of Romanism

    05/17/2007 12:47:08 PM PDT · 78 of 453
    AlbionGirl to Dr. Eckleburg
    Do you remember Earnest Ansley (sp?) on TV and his KAPOW!

    It was Earnest Angley. Bad rug, cherubic face and just before the KAPOW, ran the refrain "Evil demon, COME OUT!"

  • Deliver Us From Evil

    05/17/2007 3:44:58 AM PDT · 233 of 270
    AlbionGirl to adiaireton8; kosta50
    The two interlocutors are in entirely different conceptual worlds.

    I couldn't agree more with this.

    I do think Catholics church shop too though. They go from one Catholic church to another because one doesn't suit their taste and the other does: one is too liberal the other too conservative, they don't like one priest they do like another.

    That said, I'd like to ask both of you to not include me in your responses to another poster or the to-ing and fro-ing that comes from that.

    I know this post had to do with something I said, so the response is understandable, but I perfer to limit the pings in my New Forum Posts To You! to those I'm having a one-on-one conversation with. It makes it much easier to check messages -and then if nothing is there to exit forum- without having to sift through excess pings.

  • Deliver Us From Evil

    05/16/2007 5:17:51 PM PDT · 211 of 270
    AlbionGirl to Dr. Eckleburg
    No one, let his almsgiving be as great as it may, no one, even if he pour out his blood for the Name of Christ, can be saved...

    I suppose that's one way to advance a see we're not really all that hung up on works argument. Could that be more extreme?

    Though I think Vatican II advanced the idea that the Orthodox, the Jew, the Moslem, the Protestant, and those trying to be good people can be saved, the only thing I can say to that quote is my goodness!

  • Deliver Us From Evil

    05/16/2007 2:43:26 PM PDT · 199 of 270
    AlbionGirl to Campion
    Bowing before the Eucharist? Certainly they do.

    ok. do they have something similar to perpetual adoration, and if so, what's it called or like?