Posts by CottonBall

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  • All aboard the Obama, McCain, Rubio 'Train of Death' to the American Dream [FReepathon XXVII]

    05/01/2013 2:13:34 PM PDT · 135 of 701
    CottonBall to DJ MacWoW
    There was one guy that pushed it 24/7. We were all glad to see him go! lol

    Oh, good - glad to hear it! He must've posted a LOT because I remember seeing a lot of pro-amnesty posts. I guess I should've realized they were all from one person but I just glanced at the site back then without paying much attention to names and such. Coming from Mexifornia, I know what damage uncontrolled illegal immigration and can do - and when I saw so many pro-posts, I just moved on.....And it's great to find like-minded folks now.
  • All aboard the Obama, McCain, Rubio 'Train of Death' to the American Dream [FReepathon XXVII]

    05/01/2013 10:28:59 AM PDT · 44 of 701
    CottonBall to onyx

    I love seeing all these anti-illegal immigration posts!

    But wasn’t this site pro-amnesty not that long ago? Some time before I signed up, I was just lurking and what I saw didn’t make me want to join back then.

    Glad to see the turn around! I’ll have to contribute now, (after I check my bills this month).

  • Boehner voices support for emerging House immigration deal

    03/19/2013 12:07:18 PM PDT · 20 of 63
    CottonBall to AuntB

    Duncan Hunter has been standly firmly on the side of the law and conservatism since the 108th House passed HR4437, the best anti-illegal immigration bill ever. THAT would’ve fixed all the problems.

    Too bad Tancredo isn’t there to back him this time around.

  • Homesteading Thread #1, In Honor of Granny

    03/07/2013 4:41:09 PM PST · 261 of 261
    CottonBall to DelaWhere
    “Stinkbait” is our unique find-your-way-home keyword...

    LOL, I never knew that!
  • Homesteading Thread #1, In Honor of Granny

    03/02/2013 4:48:43 PM PST · 257 of 261
    CottonBall to jeffreypine

    I have no idea who you are.

    I think you posted to the wrong person.

  • Homesteading Thread #1, In Honor of Granny

    03/02/2013 4:47:54 PM PST · 256 of 261
    CottonBall to DelaWhere

    THESE AREN’T ANYTHING LIKE THE RECIPES GRANNY USED TO POST!!!!

    I don’t remember one recipe for cat, parakeet, or rats from the dear lady....

  • Homesteading Thread #1, In Honor of Granny

    03/02/2013 4:41:40 PM PST · 255 of 261
    CottonBall to teenyelliott
    We have a rabbit that gave birth to six babies, three of which were outside the nest and died before we found them. Lost another one last night to the cold, because apparently mama bunnies don't put their babies back in the nest when they get dragged out while nursing. Only two left. :(

    Awwww. Was she a new mother or is that a normal rabbit thing? Hard to believe they get the reputation for over-breeding if it's common to lose so many babies. Hope the remaining two are doing well.
  • Group Scent: The Social Glue of the Multi-cat Household

    02/28/2013 1:25:27 PM PST · 13 of 19
    CottonBall to Slings and Arrows
    Without thinking about it, cat owners sometimes act like social facilitators by brushing all of their cats with the same brush. As long as your cats enjoy being brushed and don’t become upset when smelling a brush that contains another cat’s scent, it’s a great way to create the social glue in your multi-cat household. If you haven’t been doing this already, but would like to give it a try, it’s easy and only takes a few minutes a day.

    I never knew that although I brush my pride daily, being persians. Maybe that's why they all get along. I thought they were just a lazy breed, too interested in napping and eating to fight much.
  • Homesteading Thread #1, In Honor of Granny

    02/12/2013 1:45:52 PM PST · 245 of 261
    CottonBall to CottonBall

    Here’s what I did with some olives I procured last year while walking around our city parks filled with beautiful olive trees:

    Firest - washed ‘em all real good. I only picked the black ones, since I don’t care for green that much and didn’t want to deal with lye at the moment either. Then divided them into 2 groups. One to brine and the other to salt-cure.

    Brined Olives - first made 3-4 slits vertically. Covered with a solution of one part salt to ten parts water; weighed down and covered. Checked every week after 3 weeks. It took about 5 to 6 weeks. Rinsed well. Stored in a 1:10 brine solution with red wine vinegar and a layer of olive oil.

    Dry - layer olives with coarse salt; shake and add salt daily. Took about four weeks. Needed lots of rinsing and then storing in plain water, changing daily, reduced the saltiness quite a bit. Store in warm water with red wine vinegar and a layer of olive oil. I think I liked these best even though they were not as pretty as the brined olives.

    There’s no need to ask what you are testing for or when they are ready;) You’ll know! (The unready olives are inedible, bitter, and you can’t get the taste out for hours, it seems)

    Other options to try later - oven-cured olives, oil-cured olives, and green olives.

  • Homesteading Thread #1, In Honor of Granny

    02/12/2013 1:02:16 PM PST · 244 of 261
    CottonBall to teenyelliott

    Those are great egg tips - thanks!

  • The Number One Reason To Invest In Gold… [There is a] One hundred percent [chance of inflation].

    02/12/2013 12:35:53 PM PST · 60 of 62
    CottonBall to MrB
    However, you’ll still need FRN cash when paying off government and utility bills.

    FRN?
  • The Number One Reason To Invest In Gold… [There is a] One hundred percent [chance of inflation].

    02/12/2013 7:26:28 AM PST · 55 of 62
    CottonBall to I want the USA back
    What good is gold? When you sell it you have to pay tax on the “profit!” Goldsellers are required to issue a 1099 when you sell gold back to them. Then you pay tax on the “appreciated value.”

    That's why I have silver instead.
  • Homesteading Thread #1, In Honor of Granny

    02/09/2013 6:20:57 PM PST · 236 of 261
    CottonBall to DelaWhere

    GREAT to see you back, DW!

    yes, granny was always here, even when we all disappeared for a time or two. I was always motivated to come back and see how she was doing and what is new.

    Hope you, Mrs. DW, and Christy are all doing well.

  • 'Harbinger' author pleads for return to God (at Presidential Inaugural Prayer Breakfast)

    02/07/2013 5:35:12 PM PST · 32 of 35
    CottonBall to jeffreypine

    I messed up. please ignore the prior.

    what is ... incredible... is that he was allowed to say this - to the pres and senators, no less!

  • QE's Folly: Diversion And Destruction

    02/04/2013 11:07:00 AM PST · 10 of 10
    CottonBall to jeffreypine

    ping

  • Homesteading Thread #1, In Honor of Granny

    01/30/2013 12:03:08 PM PST · 225 of 261
    CottonBall to Marmolade

    Good to see you back, Marm. It’s been a long time.

    Your goat adventures sound interesting, if not sad because of the loss of the mothers. Is that a frequent occurance with goats? (If so, I might change my plans on getting some and making goat cheese....)

    Please thank you son for his service for me. Is he still in the Marines or did he get out?

  • Bang For Your Buck: A Guide To Affordable & Reliable Firearms For Preppers

    01/28/2013 3:14:12 PM PST · 119 of 121
    CottonBall to Marcella
    I’ve mentioned that rifle already - it’s PINK and was $260.

    Pink? How darling!

    I had to get a pink camera - kept hubby and son from using it and changing the settings on me when I wasn't looking ;)
  • BREAKING: EASTERN SPORTS AND OUTDOOR SHOW *POSTPONED*

    01/24/2013 8:35:34 AM PST · 79 of 232
    CottonBall to CedarDave
    It is unfortunate that in the current emotionally charged atmosphere this celebratory event has become overshadowed by a decision that directly affected a small percentage of more than 1,000 exhibits showcasing products and services for those interested in hunting and fishing.

    They sound like a bunch of wimps. Hope they lost a ton of money with their spinelessness. A small percentage? Looks like it was enough for them to pull the plug on their show however.
  • NRA Withdraws from Eastern Sports & Outdoors Show

    01/23/2013 8:51:37 AM PST · 49 of 53
    CottonBall to matt04
    If they still have the space, they should put up a huge banner with their logo and text of the 2nd Ammendment. Same with Ruger, S&W and any others that pulled out.

    that's a great idea. Not only would they make a point by not being there, the sign would be a constant reminder - and with almost 200 vendors not being there, it would be a clear statement all over the place. But...hopefully there won't be that many attendees to notice ;)
  • Reid to Senate Republicans: Filibuster deal in 36 hours or face nuclear option

    01/22/2013 4:32:43 PM PST · 76 of 134
    CottonBall to MinuteGal
    The Left is certainly creative in coining buzz words and phrases guaranteed to scare the bejeebus out of the moronic low-information members of the public.

    Our side should be so adept.


    I'd hate to see them sink so low as to use inflammatory language to scare morons. However, that would at least show some backbone - something the Senate Republicans haven't done in decades.
  • Over 150 sponsors pull out of Eastern Sports and Outdoor Show; causing concern over fate of show

    01/22/2013 4:28:29 PM PST · 3 of 61
    CottonBall to Second Amendment First

    15% of the vendors pulling out? That’s a huge percentage.

    I wonder if they had to pay a fee and will now lose their money.

  • The 10 Commandments of Survival

    01/22/2013 9:56:22 AM PST · 66 of 87
    CottonBall to DuncanWaring; Marcella
    think what you're referring to is his assertion that those who died were the ones who expected to be released by a certain date; that date came and went and they were most disillusioned, and that disillusionment was what killed them. The ones who lived were those who accepted the fact that "we're gonna be here a while" and dealt with that.

    I think that's on the list-adaptability. Being able to adapt to changing circumstances is probably the best character trait for survival. Right up there on Darwin's list as well. (I need to start practicing it now because I don't like change.)
  • Homesteading Thread #1, In Honor of Granny

    01/21/2013 7:46:17 AM PST · 223 of 261
    CottonBall to teenyelliott

    One of the many items I am stockpiling is coffee filters. (And I don’t even drink coffee!)

    Here are some interesting uses for coffee filters. And you can buy 1,000 at the Dollar Tree for almost nothing even the large ones.

    1. Cover bowls or dishes when cooking in the microwave. Coffee filters make excellent covers.

    2. Clean windows, mirrors, and chrome... Coffee filters are lint-free so they’ll leave windows sparkling.

    3. Protect China by separating your good dishes with a coffee filter between each dish.

    4. Filter broken cork from wine. If you break the cork when opening a wine bottle, filter the wine through a coffee filter.

    5. Protect a cast-iron skillet... Place a coffee filter in the skillet to absorb moisture and prevent rust.

    6. Apply shoe polish. Ball up a lint-free coffee filter.

    7. Recycle frying oil. After frying, strain oil through a sieve lined with a coffee filter.

    8. Weigh chopped foods. Place chopped ingredients in a coffee filter on a kitchen scale.

    9. Hold tacos. Coffee filters make convenient wrappers for messy foods.

    10. Stop the soil from leaking out of a plant pot. Line a plant pot with a coffee filter to prevent the soil from going through the drainage holes.

    11. Prevent a Popsicle from dripping. Poke one or two holes as needed in a coffee filter..

    12. Do you think we used expensive strips to wax eyebrows? Use strips of coffee filters..

    13.. Put a few in a plate and put your fried bacon, French fries, chicken fingers, etc on them.. It soaks out all the grease.

    14. Keep in the bathroom. They make great “razor nick fixers.”

    15. As a sewing backing. Use a filter as an easy-to-tear backing for embroidering or appliquéing soft fabrics.

    16... Put baking soda into a coffee filter and insert into shoes or a closet to absorb or prevent odors.

    17. Use them to strain soup stock and to tie fresh herbs in to put in soups and stews.

    18.. Use a coffee filter to prevent spilling when you add fluids to your car.

    19.. Use them as a spoon rest while cooking and clean up small counter spills.

    20. Can use to hold dry ingredients when baking or when cutting a piece of fruit or veggies... Saves on having extra bowls to wash.

    21. Use them to wrap Christmas ornaments for storage.

    22. Use them to remove fingernail polish when out of cotton balls.

    23. Use them to sprout seeds.. Simply dampen the coffee filter, place seeds inside, fold it and place it into a plastic baggie until they sprout.

    24. Use coffee filters as blotting paper for pressed flowers. Place the flowers between two coffee filters and put the coffee filters in phone book..

    25... Use as a disposable “snack bowl” for popcorn, chips, etc.

    Not my own personally compiled list, but I use coffee filters for many of the above uses.

  • Heineman wants to eliminate the state income tax

    01/15/2013 8:52:06 AM PST · 5 of 15
    CottonBall to US Navy Vet
    If Gov Heineman get's this passed I will leave Iowa NEVER to return. I am getting a BELLYFUL of the LIBERAL HACK State.

    I met a farmer while passing through Iowa this summer that told me it was a conservative state. Was he just reminiscing? BEAUTIFUL state - the air smelled so fresh and clean.
  • Biden: W.H. readies 19 executive actions on guns

    01/14/2013 6:14:43 PM PST · 109 of 484
    CottonBall to fatnotlazy
    I am convinced that only civil war, an uprising of ordinary citizens, will rid us of this evil cancer. We cannot rely on lawful means. All of our institutions have been corrupted and compromised. We the People must fight.

    The slow death of creeping socialism has been happening for too long now to be able to turn it around.
  • Biden: W.H. readies 19 executive actions on guns

    01/14/2013 6:08:15 PM PST · 100 of 484
    CottonBall to Ben Mugged
    Texas Republican Rep. Steve Stockman threatened Monday afternoon that he would file articles of impeachment against President Barack Obama if he institutes gun control measures with an executive order.

    One congressman with guts! Wanna bet the House leadership villifies him?
  • Obama: Gun Lobby "Ginning Up Fear" That Government Will Take Away All Your Guns

    01/14/2013 1:03:46 PM PST · 27 of 52
    CottonBall to CSM
    In other words, we are only planning to take some of your guns away, you know just a few this month, then a few more next month and a few more the next month and on and on, till eventually we have taken them all away. But don’t worry, it isn’t that we are about to take them all away immediately.

    The honest thing to do is for them to just state they are taking away the second amendment. But libs have never prided themselves on their honesty. Just the opposite, in fact.
  • Americans Buy Enough Guns in Last Two Months to Outfit the Entire Chinese and Indian Armies

    01/14/2013 7:08:37 AM PST · 32 of 175
    CottonBall to Yosemitest
    The beauty of the Second Amendment is that it will not be needed until they TRY to take it.

    Thank you for bringing this issue back to its roots.
  • Food Storage: How much do you have right now?

    01/13/2013 9:17:56 PM PST · 118 of 120
    CottonBall to jeffreypine

    Good post here. Willnyou be linear in the morning - say around noon your time? Not to discuss anything already said. ONLY idle chitchat as if we just met. Oh wait w you that means your entire lifestory, complete w crying, lying, defending&protecting trash while attacking Dr l personally....maybe not what I want either...

  • Homesteading Thread #1, In Honor of Granny

    01/11/2013 1:07:32 PM PST · 205 of 261
    CottonBall to CottonBall

    Well, I only posted this twice. And added something while waiting for the SLOW connection. I’m doing better ;)

  • Homesteading Thread #1, In Honor of Granny

    01/11/2013 1:04:59 PM PST · 204 of 261
    CottonBall to teenyelliott

    Lovely idea with the mason jars and herbs. I LOVE mason jars, for some reason. Love growing herbs -although I just have parsley and basil right now because the others died.

    So I’ll see if hubby wants to create the holders for me on the kitchen walls when he gets home...oh, wait, I have NO kitchen walls to speak of.

    Well, I’ll save the picture and the idea for when I get my dream house, with a rustic country kitchen. They’d fit perfect in it.

  • Homesteading Thread #1, In Honor of Granny

    01/11/2013 12:57:05 PM PST · 201 of 261
    CottonBall to teenyelliott

    Lovely idea with the mason jars and herbs. I LOVE mason jars, for some reason. Love growing herbs -although I just have parsley and basil right now because the others died.

    So I’ll see if hubby wants to create the holders for me on the kitchen walls when he gets home...

  • Homesteading Thread #1, In Honor of Granny

    01/11/2013 12:53:53 PM PST · 200 of 261
    CottonBall to teenyelliott

    Did I post 3 times! How embarassing....

    Sorry all. The connection seems to be slow, and I’m not the most patient person.....I must’ve clicked ‘Post’ again and again...

  • Homesteading Thread #1, In Honor of Granny

    01/11/2013 12:49:41 PM PST · 199 of 261
    CottonBall to Duchess47

    Thank you for saying that, Duchess. It’s hard to know who is out there, quietly reading.

    So here’s another recipe: I”m going to try to limit my recipe contributions to dishes made with stored foods, so those of us in prepping mode (vs homesteading, since we don’t have a farm yet!). Unless I cook something I find people like and then I’ll post it here anyway!

    Here’s one made with barley. I never knew I liked barley until I started storing it and figured I better learn how to use it. Now I”m a big fan. Chewier than rice, it seems more substantial and filling to me, needing less meat to go with it.

    BARLEY INFO
    ___________________________________________________
    Here’s a description of the grain I found:
    Description.—Barley is stated by historians to be the oldest of all cultivated grains. It seems to have been the principal bread plant among the ancient Hebrews, Greeks, and Romans. The Jews especially held the grain in high esteem, and sacred history usually uses it interchangeably with wheat, when speaking of the fruits of the Earth.
    Among the early Greeks and Romans, barley was almost the only food of the common people and the soldiers. The flour was made into gruel, after the following recipe: “Dry, near the fire or in the oven, twenty pounds of barley flour, then parch it. Add three pounds of linseed meal, half a pound of coriander seeds, two ounces of salt, and the water necessary.” If an especially delectable dish was desired, a little millet was also added to give the paste more “cohesion and delicacy.” Barley was also used whole as a food, in which case it was first parched, which is still the manner of preparing it in some parts of Palestine and many districts of India, also in the Canary Islands, where it is known as gofio. Of this custom a lady from Palestine writes: “The reapers, during barley harvest, take bunches of the half-ripe grain, and singe, or parch, it over a fire of thorns. The milk being still in the grain, it is very sweet, and is considered a delicacy.”

    In the time of Charles I, barley meal took the place of wheat almost entirely as the food of the common people in England. In some parts of Europe, India, and other Eastern countries, it is still largely consumed as the ordinary farinaceous food of the peasantry and soldiers. The early settlers of New England also largely used it for bread making. At the present day only a very insignificant quantity of barley is used for food purposes in this country, and most of this in the unground state.

    Barley is less nutritious than wheat, and to many people is less agreeable in flavor. It is likewise somewhat inferior in point of digestibility. Its starch cells being less soluble, they offer more resistance to the gastric juice.
    There are several distinct species of barley, but that most commonly cultivated is designated as two-rowed, or two-eared barley. In general structure, the barley grain resembles wheat and oats.

    Simply deprived of its outer husk, the grain is termed Scotch milled or pot barley. Subjected still further to the process by which the fibrous outer coat of the grain is removed, it constitutes what is known as pearl barley. Pearl barley ground into flour is known as patent barley. Barley flour, owing to the fact that it contains so small a proportion of gluten, needs to be mixed with wheaten flour for bread-making purposes. When added in small quantity to whole-wheat bread, it has a tendency to keep the loaf moist, and is thought by some to improve the flavor.
    The most general use made of this cereal as a food, is in the form of pearl, or Scotch, barley. When well boiled, barley requires about two hours for digestion.

    General Suggestions for Cooking Barley.—The conditions requisite for cooking barley are essentially the same as for oatmeal. It is best cooked slowly. Four parts of water to one of grain will be needed for steaming or cooking in a double boiler, and from four to five hours’ time will be required, unless the grain has been previously soaked for several hours, in which case three hours will do. If the strong flavor of the grain is objected to, it may be soaked over night and cooked in fresh water. This method will, however, be a sacrifice of some of the nutriment contained in the grain. Barley thus soaked will require only three parts water to one of barley for cooking.

    YUMMY BARLEY RECIPE
    __________________________________________________________

    And the recipe: it’s easy to make, yummy if you like a chewy casserole, although I do use less sour cream than the recipe states. Maybe start with adding half and then see how you like it.

    Barley Stroganoff

    1 lb ground beef
    2 tsp Olive oil
    3/4 cup chopped onion
    1 tsp oregano
    8 oz mushrooms
    3/4 cup chopped celery
    1 tsp salt & 3/4 tsp pepper
    1/2 tsp marjoram
    1 cup sour cream
    2 cups cooked barley
    1 tsp flour
    1/2 cup half and half

    Cook ground beef until brown and crumbled in large pieces. Drain and remove from pan. Add OO, onion, and mushrooms and cook 4-5 min. Season with oregano, marjoram, s&p. Cook 4 more minutes. Stir in half and half. Blend together sour cream and flour. Stir in sour cream mixture, barley, and neat. Cook over low heat until bubbly and heated.

  • Homesteading Thread #1, In Honor of Granny

    01/11/2013 12:27:50 PM PST · 194 of 261
    CottonBall to teenyelliott

    Please don’t get discouraged! I am reading and learning from and enjoying your posts. And your website.

    The contributions to granny’s threads were hit and miss too, with people coming to the threads more often when something happened that made them want to prep more! Something political or of a natural disaste nature. Sometimes it was slow, with only granny posting most things. Bless her, she had the persistence and patience of a saint!

    When I get notices on the prepping ping of new articles, I’ll post this thread there - I used to do that way back when too. The two topics merge very well together, IMO.

  • Homesteading Thread #1, In Honor of Granny

    01/11/2013 12:17:09 PM PST · 191 of 261
    CottonBall to teenyelliott

    Please don’t get discouraged! I am reading and learning from and enjoying your posts. And your website.

    The contributions to granny’s threads were hit and miss too, with people coming to the threads more often when something happened that made them want to prep more! Something political or of a natural disaste nature. Sometimes it was slow, with only granny posting most things. Bless her, she had the persistence and patience of a saint!

    When I get notices on the prepping ping of new articles, I’ll post this thread there - I used to do that way back when too. The two topics merge very well together, IMO.

  • Homesteading Thread #1, In Honor of Granny

    01/11/2013 12:06:53 PM PST · 189 of 261
    CottonBall to teenyelliott

    Please don’t get discouraged! I am reading and learning from and enjoying your posts. And your website.

    The contributions to granny’s threads were hit and miss too, with people coming to the threads more often when something happened that made them want to prep more! Something political or of a natural disaste nature. Sometimes it was slow, with only granny posting most things. Bless her, she had the persistence and patience of a saint!

    When I get notices on the prepping ping of new articles, I’ll post this thread there - I used to do that way back when too. The two topics merge very well together, IMO.

  • Homesteading Thread #1, In Honor of Granny

    01/11/2013 9:28:50 AM PST · 186 of 261
    CottonBall to DelaWhere

    Oops, mentioned you without pinging you!

    All good stuff - we miss you here. There’s a granny memorial homesteading thread being created here and of course, you came to mind.

  • To "The Precious Metal Purchasing Act" From Executive Order 6102 - Santelli's Take

    01/11/2013 9:19:35 AM PST · 35 of 35
    CottonBall to E. Pluribus Unum
    I'll be so glad when the shooting starts simply because we won't be subjected to the drip-drip-drip anymore.

    Same here. It is the waiting that is stressful. And the uncertainty as to the when and how.
  • Homesteading Thread #1, In Honor of Granny

    01/11/2013 8:40:41 AM PST · 185 of 261
    CottonBall to teenyelliott
    Th oven thing, I assume it is the heat that causes the jars to seal. I made some applesauce a few months ago, and it was so hot when I put it in the jars they sealed all by themselves, without traditional canning.

    Pretty neat - one less step to do! In thinking about it.....the high heat causes the air in the jar to expand, so when the lid is put on when the jar and contents are hot, there is less air molecules in there than at room temp. When it all cools, there is a sort of a vaccum as the molecules shrink closer together into a smaller volume. I imagine that creates the suction that holds on the lid. Probably the same method as when doing conventional canning.

    I'm sure DelaWhere explained this to me once and I just forgot. He is a great combination of engineering and homesteading. Although I don't think he ever called what he was doing 'homesteading', it was just his way of life. Granny was, of course, everyone's grandma and DW was either our grandpa or kind uncle, depending on your age. Those old threads are priceless.

    And I know granny is pleased watching her memory, work, and efforts being revived by you ;)
  • Homesteading Thread #1, In Honor of Granny

    01/11/2013 8:33:51 AM PST · 184 of 261
    CottonBall to teenyelliott

    Just ordered it - thanks for the tip!

  • Homesteading Thread #1, In Honor of Granny

    01/11/2013 8:30:43 AM PST · 183 of 261
    CottonBall to teenyelliott
    All the photos of animals on my site are ours. If you are talking about the banner photo up top, that is Wally, our little Southdown Babydoll wether. I have a bunch of his wool sitting right here to wash and process, if I ever have time!!!

    Yes, the banner, that's what I meant. Wool? How neat! Do you spin it into yarn? That is something on my list to learn. Do you know you are living my fantasy life, LOL?
  • To "The Precious Metal Purchasing Act" From Executive Order 6102 - Santelli's Take

    01/11/2013 8:26:20 AM PST · 34 of 35
    CottonBall to Einherjar
    but then i lost all the gold in a tragic boating accident.

    Lots of leaky boats out there - they can't be trusted. Same thing happened ot all our guns.
  • Homesteading Thread #1, In Honor of Granny

    01/11/2013 8:05:25 AM PST · 182 of 261
    CottonBall to Califreak

    Let me know how you like them.

    My guests gobbled them up (and took the rest home!)

  • BREAKING NEWS: Reports of shooting at Taft High School [CA]

    01/10/2013 5:07:00 PM PST · 93 of 118
    CottonBall to Artcore
    I know I'll catch grief for saying this; but my first thought was: “This corrupt and evil Administration had something to do with this.” Hey, look what they did in Fast and Furious! Can you blame me for thinking this?

    I thought the same think about Sandy Hook. The Colorado shootings didn't net them enough support for gun control, so they instigated a new crisis with school children.
  • Homesteading Thread #1, In Honor of Granny

    01/10/2013 9:59:30 AM PST · 176 of 261
    CottonBall to teenyelliott

    Thanks for the dent corn idea and Honeyville. They have great shipping prices so that’s doable. If I can’t figure out how to find some locally.

    My grinder can handle dent corn, so that’ll work well.

    BTW, is the picture of the sheep on your website one of your critters? She has such a sweet face.

  • Homesteading Thread #1, In Honor of Granny

    01/10/2013 8:20:39 AM PST · 174 of 261
    CottonBall to teenyelliott

    DelaWhere used to talk about oven canning too. I could never quite understand the scientific process that caused the lids to ‘ping’ when no air was removed, so I’ve never done it myself. I’ve only used the oven to kill critters before adding an oxygen absorber.

    I have wheatberries stored, not flour, because the wheatberries last for decades and the nutritional value of flour the highest right after being ground. The hard shell around the wheatberry is nature’s perfect encapsulator. We probably don’t even need to go the extra mile of using oxygen absorbers and mylar - wheatberries have been found in Egyptian tombs and were still edible.

    Pretty neat idea with the candle! Sounds like an old-fashioned remedy that is still valid today.

  • Homesteading Thread #1, In Honor of Granny

    01/09/2013 5:31:49 PM PST · 166 of 261
    CottonBall to CottonBall

    Italian Garlic Knot

    1 cup warm water
    2 T oil
    1 tsp sugar
    1/2 tsp salt
    3 1/2 cups flour
    1 T yeast
    Garlic Butter Ingredients
    2 T oil
    1/2 tsp salt
    2 T butter
    4 garlic cloves

    Combine the warm water, oil, sugar, and salt. Add flour and dry yeast all at once. Stir. Knead dough for 8 to 10 minutes, adding more flour if necessary to make a smooth, elastic dough. Cover and let rise for about 30 minutes. Heat oil and butter in a skillet and add minced garlic and salt. Cook and stir for about 5 min. Grease two large baking sheet. Punch down dough and roll out on a floured surface into a 12 x 12” rectangle. Using a pizza cutter, cut dough into twelve strips each 1 inch wide. Cut strips in half. Tie each strip into a knot. Put twelve per baking sheet, covering with a towel and rising for 20 to 30 minutes, until nearly double. Brush each lightly with some of the garlic butter, trying to get bit of minced garlic on the rolls. Bake at 375° for 15 to 20 minutes. Transfer immediately to a large bowl, pour remaining garlic butter over rolls, and toss to coat.

    _______________________________________________________
    I’m having some people over for dinner and thought I’d try this recipe. I’m pretty sure I got it from one of granny’s threads because I have pages of recipes in my ‘to try’ file, most of them from her.

    They are pretty good and very easy to make. The knot is a cute idea and really easy to do. They look fancier than they are. The only thing I did different was I used up all the garlic-butter in basting the rolls so had none left to toss them in. Not sure I’d want to ‘toss’ hot and squishy rolls anyway - they probably wouldn’t be so pretty after that! The garlic bits added a lot of flavor so be sure to slip those in the crevices of the rolls. After being cooked, the garlic isn’t overwhelming - just tasty.

  • Homesteading Thread #1, In Honor of Granny

    01/09/2013 10:25:14 AM PST · 165 of 261
    CottonBall to MHGinTN

    I was wondering how much root space they needed. So I better wait until it warms up enough here to put them in the ground, since I don’t have large pots or a way to water them when gone.

    My gardening problems - or learning how to garden - are because I’m gone to the mountains off and on during the summer. My gardens in the valley haven’t done well without attention. Although the weeds thrive! And what I’ve planted in the mountains, like raspberries and potatoes, haven’t done well when I’m gone because of a lack of consistent water.

  • Ten Under-Rated Prepping Item

    01/09/2013 9:37:30 AM PST · 96 of 101
    CottonBall to Kartographer

    I’m late to the thread, but still hoping someone will be here to help.

    Bic lighters - I’ve been doing matches since the lighters I’ve bought tend to not work after while. I get the long-handled ones to light our wood stove, so maybe Bic brand short ones don’t have that problem.

    What is the best way to store matches? I wonder if the chemicals on the tips don’t last with time. I could put them in mylar with oxygen absorbers if that would help. (I’ve stored silver that way - because the coins look much prettier untarnished ;)