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Posts by darrellmaurina

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  • Waking supervolcano makes North Korea and West join forces

    04/26/2016 7:33:53 PM PDT · 22 of 22
    darrellmaurina to dynachrome

    Sounds like the solution to global warming. /sarc

  • North Korea bans piercings and Western-style clothing

    04/26/2016 7:22:59 PM PDT · 20 of 20
    darrellmaurina to TigerLikesRooster

    Hard to argue that Western clothing isn’t becoming decadent, or that piercings aren’t a good idea.

    Even broken clocks are right twice a day, and this might be one of the few times the North Koreans have a good idea.

    Of course we all know North Korean society is evil. Their “clothing enforcers” are more like Maoist Red Guards than like the teachers who used to check clothing in American elementary and high schools to make sure it was appropriate.

  • Covenant College Forfeits Women’s Tennis Championship Match Because Scheduled On Sunday

    04/26/2016 7:16:25 PM PDT · 35 of 35
    darrellmaurina to PAR35

    I saw the same item today on Aquila Report. Good for Covenant for taking a stand on this.

    For the people who are arguing about the correct day for Sabbath observance — you’re missing the point. If I saw a secular college respecting the right of a Seventh Day Adventist or an Orthodox Jew to not work on Saturday, or the right of a Roman Catholic to attend Mass on Good Friday, I’d be happy that the school was respecting religious freedom.

    The issue is that people need to stand up for our religious freedoms or we will lose them. I think most Freepers will agree with that.

  • University expels grad student for personal Facebook post against gay ‘marriage’

    03/30/2016 10:52:07 PM PDT · 44 of 44
    darrellmaurina to PAR35; wagglebee
    4 posted on 2/29/2016, 1:41:09 PM by PAR35: “African name. Although the Christian part was a good hint, as well.”

    Yep. He's a refugee from Cameroon. Two university degrees already.

    Here's a link: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3468712/Christian-student-kicked-university-wrote-Facebook-messages-opposing-gay-marriage.html

    Normally a highly educated minority student would be praised by liberals. Obviously being pro-gay is more important to liberals in British social work than being tolerant of minority cultures.

    If he's an Anglican this could become an extremely interesting rebuke by the African Anglicans to the “mother country.”

    Even if he's not, this is a rebuke to a country which once sent missionaries to Africa to bring Africans out of pagan darkness, and now is receiving Christians from Africa trying to bring Englishmen out of pagan darkness.

  • Video: Donald Trump at the Republican Jewish Coalition Forum

    02/24/2016 6:19:08 PM PST · 103 of 103
    darrellmaurina to Zionist Conspirator; American Constitutionalist; xzins
    43 posted on 12/3/2015, 4:26:23 PM by Zionist Conspirator: “The guy probably has never even heard of chrstian Zionism in his entire life.”

    And that's really frustrating considering Trump's background in the Dutch Reformed world. Marble Collegiate Church isn't exactly a stereotypical RCA congregation, but when Trump was a child the Dutch heritage of the RCA on the east coast was still quite prominent, along with many ties directly to the Netherlands as a result of relief efforts to the Netherlands following World War II and Dutch immigration from the Netherlands.

    If there is ANY ecclesiastical group outside modern American evangelicalism with a centuries-long history of positive relations with the Jewish people, the Dutch Reformed are that group.

    I am quite aware that the East Coast RCA went liberal long before the Midwestern churches. But attitudes toward the Jewish people in the Dutch Reformed world did not change; if anything, they improved by the 1950s. Certainly there was not a heritage of anti-Jewish attitudes in the church circles where Trump was raised.

    Trump grew up in those circles. He should know better.

  • The dark past of anonymous sperm donation

    01/29/2016 2:54:45 AM PST · 43 of 43
    darrellmaurina to wagglebee; sargon; surroundedbyblue; napscoordinator
    37 posted on 1/25/2016, 1:34:41 PM by wagglebee: "Are you okay with the discarded embryos?"

    The issue of discarded embryos does appear to be an insurmountable issue with IVF, even for those who do not accept Roman Catholic teaching. I can see no possible way to argue that destroying a fertilized embryo is anything different from aborting a baby shortly before the end of the first trimester, or at any other point before the baby would be viable outside the womb.

    For those of us who believe abortion is murder even if the baby cannot yet survive outside the womb, IVF is at best extremely problematic because of the fertilized embryo issue, even if the biological parents are married and even if every one of the fertilized embryos is eventually implanted.

    At best, it creates a major temptation to say "enough" rather than implanting the remaining five or ten "extra embryos."

    At worst, it leads to selective reduction of what would otherwise be triplet, quadruplet or quintuplet pregnancies, or to genetic testing for sex selection or avoidance of genetic abnormalities. Just how many parents will willingly and deliberately implant an embryo known to have a life-altering genetic defect?

    Even if a hypothetical married couple is willing to implant all 20 embryos, perhaps two-by-two to maximize the chance of a successful pregnancy if both embryos successfully implant, and even implant an embryo which has been tested and known in advance will be a Down's Syndrome baby, there's still the problem that their money is being used to support a business which regularly destroys not just dozens or hundreds but quite literally THOUSANDS of embryos, and is engaged in the creation of large numbers of babies with fathers not married to their mothers.

    I don't want to be the one to tell a childless couple seeking IVF that their only chance of having a child is totally unacceptable under all circumstances -- but the whole IVF business seems to be inherently filled with temptations to murder even for parents with the best of motives.

    I'm not sure IVF is a crystal-clear, black-and-white, absolute choice between good and evil. Maybe if there were an IVF clinic which refused to serve any non-married couples, and refused to destroy any embryos, it might be less problematic.

    But with the way IVF clinics work now, it's basically buying the ability to have a baby from a clinic which routinely kills more embryos than most abortion clinics.

    That sure is getting way too close to the edge of the pit for me to be comfortable with it.

  • Donald Trump's Political Stroke of Genius : GOP Debate Apology to Ted Cruz and Scalia! (VANITY)

    12/15/2015 7:30:14 PM PST · 109 of 111
    darrellmaurina to Patton@Bastogne; St_Thomas_Aquinas; drstevej; OrthodoxPresbyterian; CCWoody; Wrigley; Gamecock; ...
    St_Thomas_Aquinas wrote: “Well, we know that he*s never asked God for forgiveness.”

    84 posted on 12/15/2015, 1:28:26 PM by Patton@Bastogne: “and that remark by Donald Trump, frankly, scares the hell out of me ... “

    And it should, Patton. I do not know how much of Norman Vincent Peale's “power of positive thinking” stuff Trump has internalized, but he clearly is acting externally in accord with the “gospel of success” he learned in Marble Collegiate Church.

    (I'm sending this to the GRPL Great Reformed Ping List because it has direct reference to the Dutch Reformed background of Donald Trump, something which will be relevant in Iowa but has been forgotten by most if not all of the national media.)

    I'm willing to vote for a non-evangelical. The biblical standards for civil rulers are not the same as those for church office. King David was not deposed for his actions in the sphere of the civil magistrate, but would have had to be deposed for his actions in the sphere of the church.

    Trump is better than a number of options on the Republican side, and far better than any of the Democratic options.

    But if Trump becomes the conservative candidate of choice, we're going to have to have a long, hard discussion about how a man who grew up under the politically conservative and pro-business preaching of Norman Vincent Peale can interact with the Christian conservative base of the Republican Party.

    Let's be fair. Trump grew up in what, by the standards of upper-class elite New York City society of the time, was a fairly conservative church. I know more than a bit about what it was like to be in elite upper-class Protestantism of the era when Trump was growing up. I know the Reformed Church in America quite well; even in its liberal East Coast regional synods, the RCA of that era was not really a traditional liberal Protestant denomination, though it has become so in more recent years. In the days before the demographic collapse of the mainline denominations and the rise of the modern evangelical movement, mainline churches were sometimes surprisingly biblical in what got taught by average members in Sunday School even if the preaching was problematic. And again, Marble Collegiate Church, by the standards of post-World War II New York City, was NOT a liberal church. It was not evangelical, but Trump's family could have found far worse places to worship.

    I am prepared to believe that Trump understands at least something of what the Reformed Church in America taught in the Heidelberg Catechism. Maybe his “positive Christianity” isn't as bad as it sounds to Midwestern Reformed or Southern Bible Belt ears.

    But Trump will have to do a lot to prove he's at least aware of what it means to be a Christian, let alone an evangelical Protestant.

    I am not stupid. Neither is Trump. You do not win Iowa as a conservative Republican without spending a LOT of time in places like Northwest Iowa and Pella, where the RCA and CRC and other Dutch Reformed denominations remain strong. Trump will be asked MANY questions about his personal faith due to his background in the RCA.

    Dutch Iowa farmers are not stupid either. They understand what the RCA is and will give Trump allowances for looseness. He's not a Baptist and can't be held to Southern Evangelical standards.

    But a lot of Iowa “VanderSomethings” will see through Trump real fast if he's trying to sell snake oil to evangelicals. It might work some places, but it won't work in Iowa for a man with an RCA background.

    I think a lot of Iowa Baptists and Iowa charismatics and Iowa nondenominational church leaders are on the phone to their Dutch friends asking, “You've talked to Trump. He's from your world. What do you think of him?”

    The answers from people whose names start with Vander- or end with -stra, -sma, or -ga may have a lot to do with Trump's rise or fall in Iowa.

  • S. Korea: (3rd LD) Police arrest Indonesian suspected of following terrorist group

    12/02/2015 4:44:41 PM PST · 9 of 9
    darrellmaurina to COBOL2Java; TigerLikesRooster
    5 posted on 11/18/2015, 9:33:00 AM by COBOL2Java: “Hopefully the NPA will be a little more aggressive in interrogating him than our authorities.”

    I don't know many people who think South Korean jails are nice places, or that the interrogators are nice people.

    This man won't get treated the way he would in Riyadh, Tehran or Baghdad, let alone by ISIS in Raqqah, but it sure won't go well for him, and will be much worse than Gitmo.

  • My Life with a Transgender Husband [Sad First Hand Testimonial]

    12/02/2015 4:25:48 PM PST · 64 of 64
    darrellmaurina to Hot Tabasco; DH; Resolute Conservative; fwdude; Louis Foxwell; sportutegrl; Slyfox
    32 posted on 11/18/2015, 10:41:07 AM by DH: “I don't think this woman actually had a viable business in the first place and that a lot of her story encompasses embellishment upon the actual facts.”

    44 posted on 11/18/2015, 3:15:17 PM by Hot Tabasco: “The actual facts of the story is that she lost her husband who claimed to be a tranny.........don't go off on a tangent.”

    I agree with Tabasco. This story hits home for me because I've known several wives and one husband whose marriages were destroyed by this sort of thing, marrying spouses who appeared normal but had a hidden crossdressing problem that then blew up into full-fledged homosexuality. I don't think it is possible to overestimate the level of real courage (not Jenner pseudo-courage) it takes for a woman to tell a story like this publicly. I'm not saying any of the people here on Free Republic are trying to “blame the victim” but I do think we need to be careful to avoid doing that.

    A few comments:

    1. Yes, there are things missing from the story. They're missing because she's focusing on the main point of her husband being a crossdresser who calls himself transgender, not secondary issues. Those secondary issues are important, but the article would have to be dozens of pages long to fully answer all the questions which could be asked about how a marriage fell apart.

    2. As fwdude correctly pointed out, “’Business owner’ does not necessarily mean an executive or a professional.” She doesn't explain what kind of business she was running, and the article didn't really need to get into that because the type of business wasn't relevant. It's very possible that it was a viable small business which generated an adequate income but not enough to support a family with several children and a large house with a mortgage. Lots of women have found that out the hard way after their husbands died, became disabled, or lost their jobs. To be fair, the loss of a wife's second job can also cause major problems for a husband whose job does not pay enough to afford their mortgage, car payments, student loans, etc. Of course it would be better not to get into that kind of debt, but many people make that mistake and our society actively encourages it.

    3. For PAR35 regarding child support: There are indicators in the article that her ex refused to pay child support for at least part of the time.

    4. Resolute Conservative wrote: “Odd, I have never seen a woman lose anything in a divorce. And he should have lost everything.” I have seen such things happen, and have seen them repeatedly. Good lawyers can do really bad things if the husband gets angry enough and the wife isn't vicious enough to fight fire with fire. In our modern liberal environment, we can't expect judges to believe it's the man's job to be the provider for the home, especially if both husband and wife owned their own businesses. If the woman doesn't play the feminist card she may lose a lot to an aggressive divorce lawyer if the judge doesn't believe it's his role to step in and ask hard questions about the financial settlement presented to him by the lawyers.

    5. Free Republic has a lot of successful entrepreneurs who have built some significant businesses. That's great. But it's not the same mentality as a former stay-at-home mom who later decided she wanted to have her own business as a second income. It takes a kick-butt entrepreneur to take a small business and build it into a medium-sized or big business. Not everybody is able to do that or even wants to do that.

    6. I agree with sportutegrl on one red flag: she seemed to trust her husband to handle her financial affairs, not only in her home but also in her business. However, small business owners know they have some things they're good at and some things they're bad at, and if she couldn't afford to hire a full-time bookkeeper (and most small business owners can't) it makes sense to focus on the core product and let others take care of the behind-the-scenes financial matters. It sounds like her husband had control of the finances in her home because she trusted him to manage them well, so why wouldn't she trust her husband to manage the financial affairs of her business as a free bookkeeper? Of course that turned out to be a REALLY bad decision but there's no way she could have known her husband would turn out to have this sort of problem. Clearly, being transgender is not on most people's radar screen of being something for wives to worry about.

    Bottom line: She's a victim of a very bad man. No, she probably didn't do all things right. But she is a victim not only of one bad man but of some really bad changes in society which encourage rather than punish men who do such things.

  • Battle breaks out over Wisconsin bill to keep boys out of girls restrooms

    12/02/2015 2:55:44 PM PST · 62 of 62
    darrellmaurina to V_TWIN; wagglebee; manc
    I learned something today. Apparently the “Cpl. Klinger” character was based on a real person, Lenny Bruce, who was in the Navy during World War II and got in trouble for wearing a WAVES female uniform. He claimed he was attracted to men and had been propositioned by men but had not yet committed homosexual acts. He succeeded in getting his discharge and became a comedian after the war.

    Here's a link which gives most of the details except the female uniform which apparently started this incident: http://www.thesmokinggun.com/documents/celebrity/lenny-bruces-gay-naval-ruse

  • Battle breaks out over Wisconsin bill to keep boys out of girls restrooms

    12/02/2015 2:27:45 PM PST · 61 of 62
    darrellmaurina to V_TWIN; wagglebee
    27 posted on 11/24/2015, 8:01:16 AM by V_TWIN: “liberalism may be the reason they are 'gender confused.' Don't remember this ever being an issue back in the day when I went to school.....weird.”

    Actually, you do remember issues of “gender identity confusion.” It was on a television show called M.A.S.H. and Cpl. Klinger was a joke. It was understood back then that a small number of sexually confused people existed, but they needed to be treated as mentally ill and put out of the Army. But because the Army knew Klinger was faking it, he wasn't allowed out. (Of course in the real world, someone like Klinger would never be tolerated in the Army of the 1950s; the character was a joke and everyone knew it.)

    I was reading some very liberal “sex positive” screeds recently from the 1960s and was amazed at how anti-gay the liberals, even the hard-core liberals, were back in the 1960s and 1970s. Some of the prominent advocates of the sexual revolution actually argued that encouraging co-ed dorms and co-ed showers would help men who were struggling with developing their own sexual identities. They understood that the British boarding school environment for boys had a bad history of generating homosexual behavior, and they thought the sexual revolution would help people by encouraging them to express their sexuality in heterosexual rather than homosexual ways.

    We are now at a point where the federal government is trying to force local school districts to do things which are even more radically left-wing than the leaders of the sexual revolution of the 1960s.

    This nonsense has gone on too long. Now that it's at the level of local school districts where it actually DOES affect real parents and real children in red states, it's time to fight back, and fight back hard.

    I don't think the moderate liberals really understand what kind of monster they've unleashed by letting the radical gay activists push transgender stuff onto local schools. We're not dealing anymore with relatively moderate homosexuals who are asking for the "right" to marry, but with extreme radicals trying to force high school girls to let "transgender" boys into their bathrooms.

    This is an issue where conservatives can win by making clear to the moderates and even many liberals what really is at stake. Lots of people don't care if Joe and Jim get a marriage license, but they care a great deal if their daughter Julie gets forced to share a bathroom or locker room with a gender-confused boy with male body parts.

  • Battle breaks out over Wisconsin bill to keep boys out of girls restrooms

    12/02/2015 2:04:38 PM PST · 60 of 62
    darrellmaurina to manc; wagglebee
    17 posted on 11/24/2015, 7:48:02 AM by manc: “This is insane. Boys using girls bathrooms and the left think this is alright!!!. Well done to all those on here who never tried to stop civil unions for homosexuals, because now of your ignorance then we have this crap to deal with.”

    True. However, this could point to a way to pit the militant feminists against the militant gays.

    Sexual harassment may not be as common as some feminists claim, but it does exist, and men with male body parts trying to use women's bathrooms and showers is an example.

    Remember, we're not talking about adults here. If a state university wants to let 18-year-old freshmen men and women share a shower in college dorms, that's a problem, but the students are adults and have the ability to deal with the problem on their own by a variety of means, one of them being that they transfer to another university and their parents stop paying for that sort of thing. But when 14-year-old freshmen HIGH SCHOOL female students are forced to shower and share a bathroom with a student who has male anatomy, and when in most cases the female student has no choice what school to attend, this becomes sexual harassment.

    I'm well aware that the militant feminist and militant homosexual camps overlap. But the overlap is not 100 percent, and nowhere close to 100 percent at the level of local schools. There are a lot of liberal women who think forcing their daughters to share a shower with a male student is very, very wrong.

    The liberals are good at applying divide-and-conquer strategies against conservatives. This is a great opportunity to do that the liberals. On this point, quite a few liberal advocates of women's rights can be our allies, even if they aren't allies on lots of other issues.

  • Justice Kennedy: Christians with convictions resigned under Hitler and they should today too

    11/16/2015 11:45:21 AM PST · 134 of 136
    darrellmaurina to Above My Pay Grade; wagglebee; Charles Henrickson
    9 posted on 10/29/2015, 12:38:32 PM by Above My Pay Grade: “So how did the Christians resigning in Nazi Germany work out for Germany and Europe?”

    This comment by Justice Kennedy is beyond belief.

    Perhaps one of our Missouri Synod Lutheran Freepers, Rev. Charles Henrickson, would like to weigh in on what Germans who were true Christians and who opposed the “German Christian” Nazi movement, did to oppose Hitler?

  • Feinstein 'Torture Report' outs Charles Martel as Islamophobe

    11/16/2015 10:55:00 AM PST · 47 of 47
    darrellmaurina to xzins
    Bump to the top. I think this photo needs some renewed attention given the events of last week.

    As bad as I feel for the French right now, I can't bring myself to put the tricolor flag of the French Revolution on my Facebook profile. Those who know the history of France and its modern post-World War II war on religion know this is a country which has not just decades but centuries of hatred for Christianity.

    There is no country in Europe which has a longer history of being friendly toward Islamic radicals. The Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini lived in France when the Shah of Iran threw him out. Many others did the same.

    If you've read the ISIS statement justifying its attack on France — and I have — they blast Paris as a “capital of prostitution and obscenity” but also as “the carrier of the banner of the Cross in Europe.” Link here: https://ent.siteintelgroup.com/Statements/is-claims-paris-attacks-warns-operation-is-first-of-the-storm.html

    How could that be? Islam, like most other non-Christian religions, focuses not so much on personal faith but rather on culture. In their view, the French are a Christian nation. Well maybe they were in the days of Charles Martel — the Frankish warlord who stopped the Muslim advance out of Spain and into Europe. But that was nearly thirteen centuries ago in the year 732 at the Battle of Tours.

    I hope the attack on France shows clearly that people who think we can claim Muslim attacks will stop if we say we are not a Christian nation are deluded. France is a secular nation in all senses of the word. Even their conservative political parties are secular and would be extreme leftists in America.

    But they are still attacked as “the carrier of the banner of the Cross in Europe.” France is no cross-carrier. But a good case can be made that America is (or at least has been in our past) and we might find the sword of the Cross is more powerful that the crescent of Islam. It certainly is more powerful than the atheism of the French Revolution.

  • North Korean Soldiers Assist Assad in the War Against the Syrian People

    10/19/2015 4:14:00 AM PDT · 43 of 45
    darrellmaurina to TigerLikesRooster
    I truly hope you're right, Tiger, about the number of troops being sent being minimal.

    It's one thing for North Korea to send small groups of special forces to be mercenary “palace guards” for Assad. (Actually, it's probably a really good idea for Assad who can't necessarily trust his own people.) But a large-scale deployment of North Koreans, or a deployment of enough North Koreans to come back and influence the North Korean leadership to send them out again to win more battles, could be a truly horrible development.

    As you know, Tiger, Korean troops on both sides of the DMZ are known for iron discipline. There are reasons why the US Army accepted President Park's offer to use South Korean troops in some of the nastiest engagements of the Vietnam War. Sending highly disciplined and aggressive North Korean troops into the Arab world, where military forces are not known for discipline, could create all sorts of problems. The Communist Viet Minh and Viet Cong ran from South Korean troops during the Vietnam War, due at least in part to some of the most horrible reprisals imaginable by South Koreans troops against Vietnamese Communists.

    If Arab insurgents decide that North Koreans are as dangerous as the Vietnamese Communists thought the South Koreans were, North Korea will get a reputation all over the Middle East for fierceness. Getting a reputation for fierceness and toughness in battle is not irrelevant in the Middle East.

  • North Korean Soldiers Assist Assad in the War Against the Syrian People

    10/19/2015 3:55:41 AM PDT · 42 of 45
    darrellmaurina to SevenofNine; TigerLikesRooster; AmericanInTokyo
    On second, thought, this could have real possibilities.

    The Arab world is well-known for its fear and loathing of dogs. Koreans are known for eating dogs. North Koreans are known for not having enough to eat.

    Maybe there will be a big export market for 개고기 (dog meat) from a victorious Assad regime in Syria to thank their North Korean liberators? Take a product worth little or nothing in the Arab world, and send it to North Korea where it's a delicacy.

    Unfortunately, the new "coalition of the willing" involving Russians, Iranians, Cubans, and North Koreans may actually be vicious enough to defeat ISIS. If they succeed, and if China decides Russian-imposed stability in the Middle East is what's necessary to get a regular flow of oil to Chinese industry, we have a much worse problem than we do today.

  • North Korean Soldiers Assist Assad in the War Against the Syrian People

    10/19/2015 3:23:57 AM PDT · 40 of 45
    darrellmaurina to SevenofNine; TigerLikesRooster; AmericanInTokyo
    13 posted on 10/16/2015, 10:48:23 AM by SevenofNine: “Hey Tiger least Assad would feed these guys LOL!”

    Putin's current adventures may lead to hummus being eaten in Pyongyang and kimchi being eaten in Damascus.

    Just about the last thing we need is a cadre of victorious North Korean combat veterans coming back to Pyongyang with money in their pockets, a taste for combat, an appreciation for Kim Jong-un sending them to a place with lots of food, and a desire to find new targets.

  • Why North Korea is so corrupt, and why that may be good

    10/19/2015 3:14:20 AM PDT · 12 of 15
    darrellmaurina to The_Republic_Of_Maine; GOPJ; TigerLikesRooster; AmericanInTokyo; blueunicorn6
    5 posted on 10/17/2015, 10:37:58 AM by The_Republic_Of_Maine: “Is it really more corrupt that the current g0vt of the USA?”

    Yes.

    Until Americans have lived in non-Western cultures, most of us will never fully understand how radical the Anglo-American concept of “Lex Rex” (i.e., the law is king, not the king is the law) really is. For much of the rest of the world, laws, business contracts, and even national constitutions are often guidelines, not hard and firm guarantees, and insisting on the written words is often considered undue “legalism.”

    There are places where official government corruption is worse than Asia. I'm quite aware that Confucian ethics has provided a helpful corrective in Asian countries that is in some ways comparable to the Judeo-Christian ethics which, along with Greco-Roman concepts of law, is the root of the Western concept of loyalty to written laws rather than personal loyalty to individual rulers.

    However, in countries such as North Korea where residual Confucian ethics have been replaced by aggressively atheist devotion to the leadership, truly horrible things can and do happen which are multiple orders of magnitude worse than things got in Communist nations of Europe. One would have to go to the Communist regimes of Africa to find places which are as corrupt as North Korea.

    The problem is more than Communism, although Communism is certainly a big part of the problem. Once a government has encouraged active overthrow of the older social order, taken over private property, and encouraged the covetousness of the "working class" against those who have more money and property, and attacked any culture-based religious belief that one's actions will bring eternal consequences, all sorts of bad things can happen. While European Communist regimes could be brutal and vicious in their enforcement of government authority, government corruption in European Communism never got as bad as what happened in Asian or African Communism, and there are reasons for that.

  • Is Obergefell binding? No, say 60 scholars

    10/15/2015 3:06:35 PM PDT · 33 of 33
    darrellmaurina to MikeJ; wagglebee
    4 posted on 10/12/2015, 8:16:45 AM by MikeJ: “I would not like to see the current president ignore the court’s recent opinion on the second amendment.”

    And that is precisely the problem.

    We need to make sure we know what we're getting into before we change longstanding precedent. Marbury v Madison is not a recent decision. It takes back to the days when some of the Founders were still living; Supreme Court review of the constitutionality of the laws is not something new or invented by the liberals.

    In fact, as recently as the presidency of FDR, President Roosevelt was attacking the Supreme Court for being **TOO CONSERVATIVE** in overturning some of his New Deal proposals as unconstitutional.

    Our Constitutional system of government has many checks and balances designed to make it very difficult to quickly change things in response to popular pressure. It's why we are a free republic, not a pure democracy. Many of the Founders had firsthand experience with pure democracy in New England and knew how dangerous it could be, even apart from their classical study of problems in Athenian democracy and popular rule in other classical Greek city-states.

    We are conservatives. We do not believe in radical revolution, or “all power to the people.” Profoundly undemocratic institutions such as the Supreme Court and the filibuster rules in the Senate exist for good reason.

    I am open to many ideas of how to overturn gay marriage. This one may work and I want to learn more. But I want to make sure that if we win on this battle in the fight, that we don't lose the war later by destroying the checks and balances intended to slow down change.

  • GOP: Obama's new regs on 'everything from prairie puddles to power plants'

    10/08/2015 5:50:47 PM PDT · 99 of 99
    darrellmaurina to nathanbedford
    89 posted on 10/8/2015, 8:52:47 AM by nathanbedford: “Thank you for your forthright apology which is unreservedly accepted.”

    Thank you, Nathan Bedford. Disagreeing without being disagreeable is important (assuming, of course, that the disagreement is among people of goodwill, which isn't always the case, such as when dealing with true enemies of sworn oaths taken to preserve, protect, and defend the Constitution).

    So is following the agreed-upon rules of discussion, which includes PINGing people being discussed. I blew it, I was wrong, and the apology on my part is needed.

    I'm probably going to bow out of this debate and go back to reading without writing. Real life politics of city councils are going to consume much of my time for the next few days and weeks.

  • GOP: Obama's new regs on 'everything from prairie puddles to power plants'

    10/07/2015 10:40:26 AM PDT · 87 of 99
    darrellmaurina to ek_hornbeck; wagglebee

    Wagglebee, this comment by ek_hornbeck merits your attention: “...mass proliferation of what is basically a low quality product. America’s cultural and cognitive decline is inextricably linked to demographics.”

  • GOP: Obama's new regs on 'everything from prairie puddles to power plants'

    10/07/2015 10:34:41 AM PDT · 86 of 99
    darrellmaurina to nathanbedford; wagglebee
    Nathan Bedford, my apologies for failing to ping you. You are right; I should have done so. That was a mistake and not intentional on my end.

    I have been reading some of your posts when you comment on threads I read. While I read far more than I comment, I know that I can't evaluate a person in detail unless I take the time to read all or most of what they have said on a subject, or at least have said recently.

    Wagglebee has a history of “outing” trolls on Free Republic, whether they are liberals, libertarians who violate core conservative views, or others. I think he's better equipped than me to do such things. I have limits on my time and Wagglebee is much more active on Free Republic than I am.

    Nathan Bedford, I've read enough of what you've written over the years to know that you're not a troll. I haven't read enough to know what your views are with regard to reducing unwanted population groups.

    I trust you will understand that given the attention recently given to Margaret Sanger's speeches to groups of Klan-connected women, anyone in your position will be asked questions which need to be asked.

    Just because I disagree with someone on one issue doesn't mean I disagree with them on everything else. I am quite aware than many and probably most neo-Confederates are also political conservatives, and I assume many neo-Confederates today oppose abortion for anyone, including "undesirables." I don't even know if you're a full-blown neo-Confederate; I'm quite aware it's possible to be a supporter of Southern culture while totally objecting to some parts of its history. I mean it when I say I hope you don't agree with Sanger (and the Klan groups which invited her to speak) in selectively discouraging the growth of certain population groups.

    However, the fact remains that there are reasons why the Klan was not only anti-black but also anti-Catholic. Roman Catholic teaching on the inherent worth of all people, including minority groups, is incompatible with certain types of political conservatism.

    I'd like to say that evangelicals and Roman Catholics have always agreed on this issue, but I know that's not true. For a very long time Roman Catholics were fighting mostly on their own against the pro-abortion and eugenics agenda. They saw the risks long before most evangelicals did, and they deserve compliments for waking conservatives up outside their church.

  • GOP: Obama's new regs on 'everything from prairie puddles to power plants'

    10/05/2015 2:35:20 PM PDT · 77 of 99
    darrellmaurina to wagglebee
    Wow. Thank you for PINGing me to this.

    I'm going to mostly sit back and watch. People can be misunderstood, and may say things which reflect views for which they haven't thought out the consequences. But it certainly does seem that someone who takes a founder of the Klan for his online avatar may have more problems than an unfortunate avatar.

    People who advocate population control, whether voluntary or involuntary, open themselves to all sorts of opportunities for accusations that there are certain parts of the population which are undesirable and whose growth should be controlled. Certainly that is not a conservative view.

    But I've said things before which were misunderstood, and I'm raising this in the hope that this is a misunderstanding.

  • BREAKING: [Clerk Kim] Davis held in contempt taken by U.S. Marshals.

    10/05/2015 3:56:52 AM PDT · 746 of 747
    darrellmaurina to Louis Foxwell; DiogenesLamp; wagglebee; little jeremiah; editor-surveyor
    Thank you for your post, Louis Foxwell. Now that I understand you have also done extensive research on your family tree, it's clear you are not speaking out of ignorance, as I initially thought was the case. If you've read the documents and researched the laws, I can assume you have understood what you read.

    I am increasingly beginning to believe we may be dealing with a core difference between the older laws of states settled by people from New England and the older laws of states which had a tradition prior to the Revolutionary War of the Church of England being primarily responsible for conducting marriages and maintaining marriage records.

    Theology has consequences, and one of them in predominantly Reformed regions of Europe was that the civil government, not the church, was regarded as being responsible for recording and supervising marriage. That was a direct and deliberate response to the Roman Catholic view of marriage as a sacrament. While churches could and did hold “church weddings” with prayers for the couple getting married, the act of marriage was what happened in the courthouse, not the meetinghouse.

    While that system of dual marriage ceremonies was the general practice in the Netherlands, Geneva, and the Reformed cantons of Switzerland, that isn't what happened in most of colonial America for a variety of reasons, both practical (i.e., huge distances to the closest courthouse on the frontier) and principial.

    The common practice in modern America of ordained ministers serving as an agent of the government in solemnizing marriages isn't an innovation, though it certainly was helpful to circuit riding ministers on the frontier whose parishioners had no realistic way to get to a courthouse. On the contrary, it dates back to one of many compromises between more conservative Calvinists in the Church of England (the Puritan wing which eventually gave rise to Presbyterianism and Congregationalism) and the more traditional wing of the Church of England which won its ecclesiastical and political battles in the late 1600s to become what today would be considered Anglicanism.

    Compromises aren't always bad. Saying that an ordained minister acted as an agent of the state in solemnizing marriages avoided unnecessary fights over whether a marriage was or was not legitimate. It's not unlike one of the common compromises in Ulster during the early days of Puritanism, when many of the Irish bishops were sympathetic to Puritanism, and talked some Presbyterian candidates for pastorates of Scottish settlements in Ulster into accepting episcopal ordination while serving Presbyterian churches which were for all practical purposes independent of the Anglican diocese. If the Presbyterians agreed the local bishop was a godly man and held the office of presbyter in his own church, though denying that he had superintendency over other churches, they had no valid grounds to refuse to allow him to be one of many ministers laying hands on a candidate for ordination. In that way the man who had received episcopal ordination prior to pastoring a Presbyterian church avoided a fight over whether he had the right to preach, to solemnize marriages, and to perform other roles as an ordained clergyman.

    We can debate endlessly whether that compromise of clergy acting as agents of the state for the purpose of solemnizing marriages was or was not wise in the context of the 1600s. I think we can all concur that it's not going to work much longer in light of the Supreme Court decision this summer.

  • Shooting up America: Guns are a national disgrace

    10/03/2015 8:17:44 AM PDT · 50 of 59
    darrellmaurina to Bryanw92; MichaelCorleone
    31 posted on 10/3/2015, 9:11:28 AM by Bryanw92: “The Army vet was the only person with his head screwed on straight. He got shot many times, but nothing fatal. Because he fought. If there had been three of him, they could have taken this guy down easily, as the men on the train did.”

    It's just come to my mind that the GI Bill may have additional advantages. Put at least one person with military training in a majority of classrooms, and lots of young students may start understanding the value of the military and of an armed citizenry.

    I'm willing to bet there will be people at that community college who wish that military veteran had his gun as well as his hands as weapons in that classroom.

  • BREAKING: [Clerk Kim] Davis held in contempt taken by U.S. Marshals.

    10/03/2015 8:00:51 AM PDT · 731 of 747
    darrellmaurina to Louis Foxwell; DiogenesLamp; wagglebee; little jeremiah; editor-surveyor
    716 posted on 10/2/2015, 3:45:58 PM by Louis Foxwell: “What you saw was marriage bands, published and filed with the state announcing the marriage of so and so. Licensure was never required for marriage in a church as a religious rite until the 20th century.”

    Louis, state laws differ. You may be correct in some states. Perhaps in Virginia or other states which had a tradition of a state-supported Anglican clergy until the late 1700s, some vestiges of that may have remained into the 1800s with marriage laws.

    I am quite aware that under frontier conditions, circuit-riding ministers had to keep a record of marriages since the closest county official could be an impossibly long journey not just of days or weeks but of months. That was the exception, not the norm, and became less and less common as counties began to be organized on the frontier, with the goal of having everyone live within a one-day horseback ride of a county courthouse.

    That certainly was not what I saw with marriage licenses in the old archives of county courthouses in Iowa, or for that matter, genealogical records of marriages in other northern states. I have done very little genealogical research in the South so I can't speak with any level of assurance. I did have a few Quaker ancestors on my mother's side who moved out of the South prior to the Civil War and then left the Society of Friends, but I wouldn't want to extrapolate from those ancestors to other churches. I'm prepared to believe that the marriage practices of the Society of Friends might have been quite different from those of other churches in the same states in the same time period, and I don't have enough information to know for sure.

    You may or may not be aware that outside the Anglican and Roman Catholic traditions, marriage for Protestants has historically been regarded as a civil matter and church weddings were prayer services for the couple. In some Protestant nations, two separate marriage ceremonies were conducted in reaction against a Roman Catholic view of marriage as a sacrament. It would take me more time than I have today to track down and post links to documented proof of the marriage practices of Puritan New England, but there's no question that by the early 1800s, marriage licenses were being issued by and regulated by the civil authority in states which were populated largely by people who had formerly lived in New England.

    The bottom line is that your view of marriage not having state authority behind it until the early 20th century simply cannot be documented in the historical record, even in the United States. You may be right about Roman Catholic countries where the church took over numerous functions during the Middle Ages due to the collapse of the civil state and a sacramental view of marriage, but that model would be hard to find outside of Europe and nations composed largely of European immigrants.

  • Vatican Source: Pope Blindsided By Meeting With Controversial Kentucky Clerk

    10/03/2015 7:32:35 AM PDT · 26 of 30
    darrellmaurina to wagglebee; Mrs. Don-o; trisham; onyx
    My guess, for whatever it's worth, is that we're seeing a very new pope who has not spent a large amount of time in Rome or one of the other major power centers of the church, and who has not yet appointed his own people to key positions.

    As a result, he has to trust those under him to make decisions which reflect his views. Sometimes mistakes happen. Sometimes “mistakes” are made deliberately by people who want to influence their superiors or those outside the leadership.

    In the political and corporate world, new CEOs and new governors and new presidents often have this problem. The history of ecclesiastical organizations show they are not immune to the same issues.

    I think we'll know more in time as we see who gets punished or promoted following this incident. But since the Roman Catholic Church is not a democracy and does not have to answer to constituents, that time may be a long time coming.

    I do think the Pope is going to discover, if he has not already done so, that the world of the Vatican is not the same as the world of Peronist or post-Peronist Argentina. Pope Francis seems to have filled the pastoral role of a bishop in Argentina, bringing a message of mercy to a country where military strongmen have ruled for a very long time and often without much mercy. He made it possible to say, “there are two sides to this issue, and we cannot demonize the other side.”

    That message may well have been needed in Argentina. One thing you **CANNOT** do without consequences in a Roman Catholic country is to persecute the senior clergy, and giving protection to political dissenters may have been the right role for an Argentine bishop.

    Pope Benedict is now the one making the decisions, not merely the one trying to influence those in decisionmaking positions to have mercy. Time will tell how well he learns to handle the levers of power now that he's actually pulling them, not merely trying to convince a secular ruler to use them well.

  • Vatican Source: Pope Blindsided By Meeting With Controversial Kentucky Clerk

    10/03/2015 7:16:17 AM PDT · 24 of 30
    darrellmaurina to marshmallow; onyx; wagglebee; Mrs. Don-o; trisham

    Bookmarked for later. Thanks for the ping, Onyx.

    As I’ve said on another thread, here...

    http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/3343917/posts?page=50

    ... “I’m not going to level attacks on the current pope because I don’t know what he believes. Right now I don’t think anyone knows for sure what the pope believes outside of his closest circles. That is not good for anyone who cares about biblical truth, whether inside or outside of the Roman Catholic Church. Uncertain trumpets do not mobilize forces; on the contrary, they invite attack from enemies who are always probing for weaknesses and opportunities. Whatever Pope Francis does or does not believe, he’s permitting a perception not only to take root but also to blossom that says the Pope wants to be more loving and more gentle, not only to sinners who fail to obey church teaching but also to people who disagree with church teaching. The first might or might not be a good thing. Pastoral wisdom requires telling the difference between a repentant sinner and an obstinate evildoer, and that is not always easy to know. The second — tolerating those who want to tear down the church from the inside — is always wrong.”

  • Pope Francis’ only ‘real audience’ at U.S. embassy was with former gay student and his partner

    10/03/2015 6:59:00 AM PDT · 50 of 50
    darrellmaurina to wagglebee
    I feel the pain of Roman Catholics. It has been many years since you had a Pope who was not perceived as a stalwart for conservative Catholics. The firm stances of Pope John Paul II and Pope Benedict XVI had the effect not only of mobilizing Roman Catholics but also attracting significant numbers of frustrated Protestants who saw their own churches falling into liberalism.

    I'm not going to level attacks on the current pope because I don't know what he believes. Right now I don't think anyone knows for sure what the pope believes outside of his closest circles. That is not good for anyone who cares about biblical truth, whether inside or outside of the Roman Catholic Church. Uncertain trumpets do not mobilize forces; on the contrary, they invite attack from enemies who are always probing for weaknesses and opportunities.

    Whatever Pope Francis does or does not believe, he's permitting a perception not only to take root but also to blossom that says the Pope wants to be more loving and more gentle, not only to sinners who fail to obey church teaching but also to people who disagree with church teaching.

    The first might or might not be a good thing. Pastoral wisdom requires telling the difference between a repentant sinner and an obstinate evildoer, and that is not always easy to know. The second — tolerating those who want to tear down the church from the inside — is always wrong.

    As a Protestant, I know what I believe is the solution to such problems. That solution is not available to Roman Catholics.

    If your church is what your church doctrine says it is, God will take care of the problem for you since no human authority exists which is able to do so.

    All I can do as an outsider is to pray for Roman Catholics. Your church has, for at least two generations since the 1960s, been the strongest force in America fighting abortion, as well as fighting for traditional values in many other areas. In a lot of other parts of the world, the same has been true.

    I will be very unhappy if that changes.

  • Shooting up America: Guns are a national disgrace

    10/03/2015 6:35:57 AM PDT · 22 of 59
    darrellmaurina to MichaelCorleone
    4 posted on 10/3/2015, 8:22:56 AM by MichaelCorleone: “Do people really buy this nonsense?”

    Unfortunately, many do.

    In most conservative circles, even if people don't own guns and even if they've never fired a weapon, they know people personally who do — often lots of people who do. If you know people who are decent and responsible, and if you know they own guns, you're less likely to object to gun ownership even if you don't choose to own one.

    That's not the case for people in parts of America where guns are severely regulated or in social circles where they are stigmatized.

    “Jim, people are often afraid of what they do not understand. Why would you object to something you've never used and never even taken the time to learn about?”

    I've found that phrase helpful in dealing with liberals because it is a sentence out of their playbook on other issues which have nothing to do with guns.

    Here's another one.

    “Julie, have you ever considered that one of the best protections for a woman against a physically superior man is a small handgun? Training doesn't care about gender, and it can be a great equalizer between a well-trained woman and the brute strength of a male aggressor.”

  • BREAKING: [Clerk Kim] Davis held in contempt taken by U.S. Marshals.

    10/02/2015 1:28:04 PM PDT · 713 of 747
    darrellmaurina to Yaelle; GIdget2004; xzins; wagglebee; little jeremiah
    445 posted on 9/3/2015, 1:59:21 PM by Yaelle: “Imagine a hospital worker who is Jehovas Witness (doesn’t believe in transfusions?) who gets transferred to a transfusion dept. They would have to beg for a transfer, or quit. If as a Jew I were told I’d have to work on Saturday, I’d have to go against my religion or quit. You can be asked anything legal by your boss, and you need to perform it. Period. You can always quit. This was a stupid performance.”

    Actually, Yaelle, that is **NOT** the law. The Religious Freedom Restoration Act, which codifies much older principles and precedents, was put into place precisely to protect religious minorities such as those of your Jewish faith from being abused by employers.

    As with most laws, the devil is in the details. To make a very long and complicated issue short, if you claim a sincerely held religious belief prevents you from doing something your employer wants, the courts do not have the right to inquire into whether your beliefs are right or wrong. All they can do is determine whether your beliefs are sincerely held.

    Once that has been determined, your employer **MUST** show a good-faith effort to accommodate your sincerely held religious beliefs. Often (actually nearly all the time) that's possible. An Orthodox Jew or Seventh Day Adventist can and should be allowed to work on Sundays rather than Saturdays. If the employee must get home before sundown on Friday to observe the Sabbath, that employee can be allowed to come in early on Friday morning.

    Those are common-sense accommodations. Most of the time they work. Exceptions exist, but the burden of proof is on the employer to prove that an accommodation cannot be offered once employees have proved the sincerity of their religious belief.

    Conservative Christians, now that it's clear we are in the minority (at least on the national level) are going to have to become much more aware of our rights under the law. Minority religions have asked for and received accommodations for a very long time. Those accommodations don't have a “don't apply” clause for people who wear crosses.

  • BREAKING: [Clerk Kim] Davis held in contempt taken by U.S. Marshals.

    10/02/2015 1:20:37 PM PDT · 712 of 747
    darrellmaurina to Louis Foxwell; DiogenesLamp; wagglebee; little jeremiah; editor-surveyor; Responsibility2nd; ...
    606 posted on 9/3/2015, 4:22:15 PM by Louis Foxwell: “Marriage was never a contract with the state until early in the 20th century. It has become a worthless and troublesome infringement on personal liberty.”

    I don't know why this factually false information keeps being posted on Free Republic. It's been going on for years, with numerous people. Not meaning to attack you; you're just the latest person I've seen and I happen to be annoyed enough about other issues that I'm responding.

    I have personally seen marriage licenses in county courthouses dating back to the early 1800s. Government-issued marriage licenses long predate the “early 20th century,” and long predate the 1800s, as well.

    That may be a good or a bad thing, but it's a matter of indisputable fact.

    The state has legitimate government interests in protecting and promoting marriage, not the least of which interests include child custody and inheritance rights.

    It is a mark of social collapse that we now have huge percentages of children born out of wedlock, and even those born within marriage are quite likely to experience divorce. The government can and should be promoting and encouraging marriages. The fact that it isn't doing so, and actually is doing damage to marriage, doesn't mean that it doesn't have a legitimate interest in marriage.

    Politicians sometimes do things which hurt the people they're supposed to be helping. That's nothing new. Damaging marriage is just a new example of government governing badly.

  • Pope Francis’ only ‘real audience’ at U.S. embassy was with former gay student and his partner

    10/02/2015 12:52:18 PM PDT · 21 of 50
    darrellmaurina to wagglebee
    1 posted on 10/2/2015, 1:54:35 PM by wagglebee: “It's hard to know what to believe here, but I am certain that I don't trust Pope Francis.”

    Agreed. I have no goal — and for that matter, no motive — to defend Pope Francis. What I do know is it is unavoidable that Pope Francis must trust his local leaders, in this case the archbishop who invited Kim Davis, to implement many things. That's the same at the upper levels of politics and business: people really **ARE** policy.

    I am more inclined to trust the “Inside the Vatican” magazine on issues like this than a former student of the Pope from long ago, simply because the reporter has been covering the Vatican for a very long time, he is in a position to know what is happening behind the scenes, and (for people who are not naive about ecclesiastical politics) he has a great deal more to lose than most people in this situation if his article is wrong: http://insidethevatican.com/news/letter-38-2015-kim-and-francis

    Maybe what we have is a politically naive pope who just wants to be “pastoral” and is being used by others. Maybe we have something worse. Maybe we have something better, i.e., someone who is cunningly wise and has an end-game much bigger than we know on the outside. After all, the Catholic world does not revolve around the United States and the Pope does have bigger problems than worrying what Americans think of him.

    We'll know much more when we see what happens to the Archbishop who invited Kim Davis. What the Pope knew about Kim Davis and when he knew it may never be known to the outside world. What is important is what actions the Pope takes next, now that he knows of the uproar.

  • Missouri Students Walk Out Of Class In Protest of Transgender Locker Rooms

    10/02/2015 11:02:17 AM PDT · 115 of 115
    darrellmaurina to xzins; All; Diamond; Eric in the Ozarks; wagglebee; little jeremiah
    This isn't just a local issue anymore. Every school district in Missouri will have to address this in the near future.

    Here's the proposed policy on transgender students, drafted by the Missouri Consultants on Education. It came up at one of our county's local school boards the day after it was proposed, and as would be expected in a quite conservative school district, was immediately tabled pending legal advice. Not all districts have board members and staff who will act as quickly, and lots of parents won't realize what's happening until the board has already acted.

    Diamond, Eric in the Ozarks — please help push this out to others in Missouri. Wagglebee, please do the same with any evangelical or traditional Roman Catholic Freepers you know in Missouri. It needs more attention than it has gotten.

    You want this in your local schools?

    “The Board of Education believes that all students are entitled to a quality education in a safe environment. This belief extends to the growing number of transgender students, that is, students who self-identify with a gender that is different from their biological sex.

    “The Board seeks to balance the privacy needs of all students with the preferences of transgender students and their parents/guardians. This policy sets forth the practices that are in place for the welfare of all of our students. This policy does not anticipate every situation that might occur with respect to transgender students, and the needs of each transgender student must be assessed on a case-by-case basis.

    “Student Identity

    “Transgender students are permitted to select a first name and pronoun that more closely matches their gender identity. This chosen name shall be used by the District staff to communicate verbally and electronically other than in official school records. Changes of name shall not be permitted to exceed one name change per school year.

    “Official school records shall continue to list the birth name and biological sex of the student. The student or their parents/guardians may obtain a name change through the court system. In such case, the District will amend its official school records to comply with the court order.

    “Restrooms

    “The district, when requested, will designate a gender-neutral restroom(s) in each building with the appropriate signage.

    “All students, regardless of their gender identity will have the option of using the gender neutral restroom, or the restroom designated for their biological sex.

    “Locker Rooms/Showering Facilities

    “Elementary students are not required to change into PE uniforms and, hence, do not require showering.

    “In District secondary schools, students who elect to participate in physical education classes that require access to locker rooms or showering facilities will be expected to use those facilities designated for their biological gender. However, upon request of a transgender student and/or their parents, alternatives will be considered. In consultation with the student and parents, the alternative will include, but not be limited to, on-line PE courses, independent study; scheduling adjustments to include early access to change and showering facilities; separate enclosed change and shower room within the locker room. Each such request would be considered on a case-by-case basis. However, if consensus cannot be reached with the student/parents, the District will select an option that is in the best interest of all students.

    “Apparel

    “Transgender students are permitted to dress in the same manner as the gender with which they identify. However, all students are required to dress consistently with the school's dress code.

    “Extra-Curricular/School Activities

    “Similarly, all students are permitted to wear apparel associated with their gender or gender identity. On occasion, student activity groups schedule overnight trips. Students will be assigned rooms, with sponsor approval, mutually agreed upon by student roommates. The District is a member of the Missouri State High School Activities Association (MSHSAA). As such, the District is required to adhere to MSHSAA regulations regarding athletic participation by transgender students.”

  • Hillsboro High students walk out over transgender dispute

    10/02/2015 10:49:46 AM PDT · 111 of 111
    darrellmaurina to envisio; Todd_Gray; Carl Vehse
    This is also a lot bigger issue than just one school. Every school district in Missouri will have to address this in the near future.

    Here's the proposed policy on transgender students, drafted by the Missouri Consultants on Education. You want this in your local schools?

    “The Board of Education believes that all students are entitled to a quality education in a safe environment. This belief extends to the growing number of transgender students, that is, students who self-identify with a gender that is different from their biological sex.

    “The Board seeks to balance the privacy needs of all students with the preferences of transgender students and their parents/guardians. This policy sets forth the practices that are in place for the welfare of all of our students. This policy does not anticipate every situation that might occur with respect to transgender students, and the needs of each transgender student must be assessed on a case-by-case basis.

    “Student Identity

    “Transgender students are permitted to select a first name and pronoun that more closely matches their gender identity. This chosen name shall be used by the District staff to communicate verbally and electronically other than in official school records. Changes of name shall not be permitted to exceed one name change per school year.

    “Official school records shall continue to list the birth name and biological sex of the student. The student or their parents/guardians may obtain a name change through the court system. In such case, the District will amend its official school records to comply with the court order.

    “Restrooms

    “The district, when requested, will designate a gender-neutral restroom(s) in each building with the appropriate signage.

    “All students, regardless of their gender identity will have the option of using the gender neutral restroom, or the restroom designated for their biological sex.

    “Locker Rooms/Showering Facilities

    “Elementary students are not required to change into PE uniforms and, hence, do not require showering.

    “In District secondary schools, students who elect to participate in physical education classes that require access to locker rooms or showering facilities will be expected to use those facilities designated for their biological gender. However, upon request of a transgender student and/or their parents, alternatives will be considered. In consultation with the student and parents, the alternative will include, but not be limited to, on-line PE courses, independent study; scheduling adjustments to include early access to change and showering facilities; separate enclosed change and shower room within the locker room. Each such request would be considered on a case-by-case basis. However, if consensus cannot be reached with the student/parents, the District will select an option that is in the best interest of all students.

    “Apparel

    “Transgender students are permitted to dress in the same manner as the gender with which they identify. However, all students are required to dress consistently with the school's dress code.

    “Extra-Curricular/School Activities

    “Similarly, all students are permitted to wear apparel associated with their gender or gender identity. On occasion, student activity groups schedule overnight trips. Students will be assigned rooms, with sponsor approval, mutually agreed upon by student roommates. The District is a member of the Missouri State High School Activities Association (MSHSAA). As such, the District is required to adhere to MSHSAA regulations regarding athletic participation by transgender students.”

  • Hillsboro High students walk out over transgender dispute

    10/02/2015 10:47:49 AM PDT · 110 of 111
    darrellmaurina to envisio; Todd_Gray; Carl Vehse
    4 posted on 9/1/2015, 9:35:31 AM by envisio: “and reporter, stop saying SHE! He is not a girl.”

    Don't blame the reporter or the St. Louis Post Dispatch; blame the Associated Press. This is a lot bigger than one newspaper or one reporter. Or, at least, don't put the blame primarily on the local people.

    http://www.glaad.org/reference/transgender

    “The Associated Press Stylebook provides guidelines for journalists reporting on transgender people and issues.
    According to the AP Stylebook, reporters should ‘use the pronoun preferred by the individuals who have acquired the physical characteristics of the opposite sex or present themselves in a way that does not correspond with their sex at birth. If that preference is not expressed, use the pronoun consistent with the way the individuals live publicly.’ (see AP & New York Times Style)”

  • ‘Sister Wives’ stars cite gay ‘marriage’ ruling in bid to legalize polygamy

    10/02/2015 9:48:19 AM PDT · 42 of 43
    darrellmaurina to MeganC; Hildy; wagglebee; little jeremiah
    9 posted on 8/28/2015, 6:35:45 PM by MeganC: “I agree with their reasoning that if marriage is no longer just between one man and one woman because of a nebulous ‘right to dignity’ then there is no legal argument left to justify criminalizing committed polygamous relationships among consenting adults.”

    Agreed. There's probably no legal way around this now that homosexual marriages have been approved. Apart from a massive seismic shift in our political culture, I see no way to amend the Constitution or to get rid of enough Supreme Court justices to overturn the underlying legal reasoning.

    I hope I'm wrong.

    In the meantime, it should be interesting to see how mainstream modern Mormons in Utah react to being forced to accept legal polygamy of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints. There are reasons why this case started in Utah, and why the "family" involved had to leave the state out of fear of arrest.

    I'm PINGing Hildy because if I remember correctly, the FCLDS is also an issue in her county in Arizona. Perhaps she has some insights on this from the perspective of her state where the legal battles may be different from those of Utah.

  • Transgender soldiers may get time off to have sex-change operations after military ban dropped

    10/02/2015 9:21:52 AM PDT · 25 of 28
    darrellmaurina to Gay State Conservative
    18 posted on 8/28/2015, 7:30:28 PM by Gay State Conservative: “China, Russia, North Korea and Iran (among others) are watching this and laughing their hindquarters off!”

    I think Russia has allowed open homosexuals in their military for a while, and sex change surgery is probably too expensive for anyone outside the upper elites to afford. Otherwise, you're probably right.

    Sooner or later, someone is going to leak (deliberately or otherwise) a briefing paper or video from someone in Iran or China saying that America no longer needs to be feared because it not only permits but promotes immorality and degeneracy in its military. North Korea probably won't care unless American military degeneracy shows up in the South Korean military, but if Kim Jong-un decided transvestite American soldiers have propaganda value in convincing his people that Americans are awful, this might show up all over North Korea as an example of why Americans are not only bad but also weak.

    Whatever high-ranking officers may have done in private, Asian military forces have been known for centuries for strict obedience to orders. That doesn't mean that some very bad things (mass rapes of enemies, for example) didn't happen. Religion and morality have not historically been viewed as “private matters” in Asian society — they've been part and parcel of support for the government — and giving soldiers a moral framework so they do what they're told when their superiors aren't looking is part of that framework. It doesn't make much difference to the government whether its citizens and soldiers follow Mao's “little red book,” Confucian ethics, Buddhism, Shinto emperor worship, or something else, as long as it keeps them in line and doing what they're told.

    As for Iran, their radical Islamic fundamentalism makes pretty obvious why they would regard this as degeneracy.

    Sooner or later, we're going to see the consequences of people learning the hard way what happens when young soldiers no longer know “what right looks like.” I hope it doesn't happen when a better-disciplined military with a strong faith in the wrong god kicks our rear ends and defeats us in battle.

  • Trump says it’s time to move on from gay ‘marriage’ battle: ‘The Supreme Court ruled.’

    10/01/2015 8:17:00 AM PDT · 390 of 390
    darrellmaurina to Fiji Hill; xzins
    388 posted on 8/30/2015, 3:05:40 PM by Fiji Hill: “What I like most about Trump is his attitude. He’s a fighter who refuses to back down, and he will never apologize for offending the politically incorrect crowd. He stands in stark contrast to the supine and timorous ‘leadership’ that has been provided for so long by the Boehners, McConnells, Romneys, McCains, Grahams, Corkers, Flakes and so on.”

    Let’s be fair. Trump deserves credit for making it politically possible for candidates who are actual conservatives to say things which are not politically correct without being crucified for doing so. For example, compared to “blasts from the Trump,” nothing Ben Carson said about Islam sounds particularly radical or extreme. It’s not at all clear that Carson would not have come under severe pressure to apologize if Trump weren’t in this race. Trump has made being “politically incorrect” not only possible but also helpful, and others are benefiting from his actions.

    Trump also deserves credit for making the money of a traditional GOP-e candidate irrelevant, or at least much less relevant. Mitt Romney was able to use his money to devastating effect by creating an illusion of inevitability. Jeb Bush’s campaign this year probably counted on being able to do the same thing.

    As far as I’m concerned, Trump is running for the wrong office. I wish he were running for mayor of New York City or governor of New York State. He may well be the most conservative man who could realistically be elected to either position, given the makeup of the electorate there.

    At the presidential level, conservatives can do better, and I hope we do.

  • Syria builds park in honor of North Korea founder Kim Il Sung

    09/30/2015 6:42:37 PM PDT · 5 of 8
    darrellmaurina to SaveFerris; AmericanInTokyo; TigerLikesRooster
    I'll comment. The enemy of your enemy may not be your friend, but he can be useful.

    It is extremely unfortunate that Vladimir Putin sees the issues with ISIS more clearly than Barack Obama. On the other hand, if the old Soviet-era allies can do a better job of defeating ISIS in Syria and Iraq than the Soviets did of defeating Islamic radicals in Afghanistan, it's hard to argue that they'll be doing something useful.

    Defeating ISIS would be a good thing. What scares me is what will happen next if the North Koreans and the Russians and the Iranians actually win in Syria and Iraq. What message will that send to others in the Middle East who see Assad winning by seeking the aid of people like that?

    Russia has had interests in Syria for decades. I can understand them trying to back up the Assad regime. Same for Iran. Also, I know that North Korea has had quiet ties with Syria for a long time. But the open and public involvement of North Korea could signal a desire by the boy-dictator to assert himself and his multi-million-man army on the world stage.

    I'll ask again: What will happen if they win? Are we prepared for a world in which the Middle East becomes the playground of Russians and North Koreans, with Chinese money and technology in the background running the oilfields and buying Sunni silence about Iran through purchasing lots of oil?

  • BREAKING: [Clerk Kim] Davis held in contempt taken by U.S. Marshals.

    09/30/2015 6:28:29 PM PDT · 710 of 747
    darrellmaurina to tanknetter
    Sorry tanknetter... failed to ping you to my post #709 in which I mentioned your post #68.
  • BREAKING: [Clerk Kim] Davis held in contempt taken by U.S. Marshals.

    09/30/2015 6:26:38 PM PDT · 709 of 747
    darrellmaurina to mware
    57 posted on 9/3/2015, 12:15:13 PM by mware: “If Pope Francis has the nerve he should hold her up as an example of Christian courage against a sinful law when he visits the US later this month.”

    It appears that he did. I have a lot of problems with what the Pope has said on a number of issues, but if this report turns out to be true, he did the right thing: http://insidethevatican.com/news/letter-38-2015-kim-and-francis

    Here's a New York Times article on this: http://www.nytimes.com/2015/09/30/us/county-clerk-kim-davis-who-denied-gay-couples-visited-pope.html

    68 posted on 9/3/2015, 12:16:34 PM by tanknetter: If there’s one positive about this, it’s that Matt Bevins probably just won the governorship. And KY Democrats have lost their state house majority.

    Barack Obama's "War on Coal" is wrecking the Democratic Party in West Virginia, as well as other neighboring states where rural Appalachian conservative Democrats are a major factor. Pushing a gay agenda drove Kim Davis out of the Democratic Party, and a lot of others will likely follow.

    If Barack Obama's goal were to destroy the Democratic Party in the rural South, he couldn't be doing a better job of it.

    Being perceived as anti-God, anti-gun, and pro-gay is not a recipe for attracting and keeping Southern Democrats.

    If this stuff continues, we may end up seeing the United Mine Workers inviting Republican candidates to Labor Day parades all over Appalachia, and Democrats switching party affiliations in droves. Maybe something good will come out of this after all.

  • Forcing Girls To Share A Bathroom With A Gender-Confused Boy Is Abuse

    09/30/2015 6:01:58 PM PDT · 54 of 54
    darrellmaurina to Clintonfatigued
    Every school district in Missouri will have to address this in the near future. Here's the proposed policy on transgender students, drafted by the Missouri Consultants on Education. You want this in your local schools?

    “The Board of Education believes that all students are entitled to a quality education in a safe environment. This belief extends to the growing number of transgender students, that is, students who self-identify with a gender that is different from their biological sex.

    “The Board seeks to balance the privacy needs of all students with the preferences of transgender students and their parents/guardians. This policy sets forth the practices that are in place for the welfare of all of our students. This policy does not anticipate every situation that might occur with respect to transgender students, and the needs of each transgender student must be assessed on a case-by-case basis.

    “Student Identity

    “Transgender students are permitted to select a first name and pronoun that more closely matches their gender identity. This chosen name shall be used by the District staff to communicate verbally and electronically other than in official school records. Changes of name shall not be permitted to exceed one name change per school year.

    “Official school records shall continue to list the birth name and biological sex of the student. The student or their parents/guardians may obtain a name change through the court system. In such case, the District will amend its official school records to comply with the court order.

    “Restrooms

    “The district, when requested, will designate a gender-neutral restroom(s) in each building with the appropriate signage.

    “All students, regardless of their gender identity will have the option of using the gender neutral restroom, or the restroom designated for their biological sex.

    “Locker Rooms/Showering Facilities

    “Elementary students are not required to change into PE uniforms and, hence, do not require showering.

    “In District secondary schools, students who elect to participate in physical education classes that require access to locker rooms or showering facilities will be expected to use those facilities designated for their biological gender. However, upon request of a transgender student and/or their parents, alternatives will be considered. In consultation with the student and parents, the alternative will include, but not be limited to, on-line PE courses, independent study; scheduling adjustments to include early access to change and showering facilities; separate enclosed change and shower room within the locker room. Each such request would be considered on a case-by-case basis. However, if consensus cannot be reached with the student/parents, the District will select an option that is in the best interest of all students.

    “Apparel

    “Transgender students are permitted to dress in the same manner as the gender with which they identify. However, all students are required to dress consistently with the school's dress code.

    “Extra-Curricular/School Activities

    “Similarly, all students are permitted to wear apparel associated with their gender or gender identity. On occasion, student activity groups schedule overnight trips. Students will be assigned rooms, with sponsor approval, mutually agreed upon by student roommates. The District is a member of the Missouri State High School Activities Association (MSHSAA). As such, the District is required to adhere to MSHSAA regulations regarding athletic participation by transgender students.”

  • Free Republic will continue the fight for Liberty and against godless socialism and fascist judges!

    09/30/2015 5:49:42 PM PDT · 272 of 273
    darrellmaurina to Jim Robinson

    I said some of this earlier today on a different thread, but it bears repeating.

    Jim Robinson deserves thanks for refusing to back down on core conservative issues like abortion and homosexuality. I am not happy with some of where I see the conservative movement going and I’m glad Jim Robinson and Free Republic are refusing to go down a bad road.

    I don’t agree with everything Jim Robinson says. There’s been lots of discussion of Kim Davis’ beliefs and I clearly don’t agree with some of what her church teaches. We live in America and people have a Constitutional right to disagree.

    However, we can learn a lot about people by who their enemies are, and on which issues they’re willing to take a stand and fight, rather than just talk.

    Kim Davis and Jim Robinson both have the right enemies. That counts for a lot in my book.

  • Kim Davis ORDERED released!

    09/30/2015 5:04:32 PM PDT · 320 of 322
    darrellmaurina to dfwgator; xzins; cripplecreek; Chauncey Uppercrust; wagglebee
    33 posted on 9/8/2015, 12:05:02 PM by dfwgator: “Never thought we’d praise a Democrat so much.”

    Perhaps this is an important reminder to conservatives that sometimes the people who stand up for what's right are people in some unusual places.

    Kim Davis has now decided to leave the Democratic Party. I've checked her county's election statistics; that decision could cause serious problems. There are lots of Democrats in her county — the Democrats have more than a two-to-one advantage in party registration — and it's not just traditional old-school Southern conservative Democrats. Morehead State University is in her county, where Dr. April Miller, the lesbian who wanted to marry Karen Roberts and began this gay marriage fight, is a tenured professor of early childhood education. She was apparently hired a decade ago by the university as an assistant dean, though her faculty page now indicates only her role as a professor, not her role as an assistant dean.

    Kim Davis won her last election by only a slim margin despite succeeding her mother in office and having been a deputy clerk for years. It doesn't take much to guess that there's going to be a huge effort to defeat her in the next election, and that there will be a major effort to register college students to vote in Rowan County who might not normally vote, or who might not normally vote in Rowan County.

    Getting to govern means getting to 50 percent and winning elections. Sometimes that means working with people who don't agree with us on everything — and sometimes it means conservative Democrats will wake up and realize they're in the wrong party.

    Too bad it took going to jail for her to learn that lesson.

  • Planned Parenthood Founder Said She'd Leave Country If JFK Elected--Because He Was Catholic

    09/30/2015 2:26:02 PM PDT · 17 of 17
    darrellmaurina to wagglebee
    Many people in America of the 1950s were opposed to Roman Catholicism, which in the days before Vatican II presented a very different face to the world than it does today.

    Evangelical Protestants have theological reasons to object to Roman Catholicism which date back to the Reformation. Those reasons are clear, they're written down in the confessions of their churches, and they are not unlike what was decreed against them on the other side by the Council of Trent.

    What's not widely understood today is that for much of the 1800s and for the first half of the 1900s, liberal Protestants and secularists made common cause with evangelical Protestants to fight Roman Catholic influence in America. Margaret Sanger's comments, which today would be considered extreme bigotry not associated with liberalism, are part of that older consensus.

    It seems clear that what Sanger failed to understand during the 1960 presidential election was that Roman Catholicism was not of a single mind. Cradle Catholics like those in the Kennedy family may have claimed the name of Catholic but were not living in any serious way as faithful Catholics.

    The election of a Roman Catholic president could have marked the beginning of an entirely new Roman Catholic dominance of American political life, as the ward bosses of places like Chicago, Boston and New York City, most of whom were Roman Catholic Democrats, worked together with the rising power of Hispanics in places like California and Florida to put Roman Catholicism into a dominant position in America.

    Why didn't that happen?

    In large measure, that didn't happen because lots of Roman Catholics cared no more about what their church believed than liberal Protestants did. The liberal Protestants didn't leave their churches; they simply worked from within to change church doctrine. Liberal Catholics may have been unable to formally change church doctrine, but they did an awfully good job of hollowing out the church's ability to effectively enforce it.

    By the 1980s, it became patently obvious that conservative Catholics and conservative Protestants had a lot more in common than either did with liberals in their churches, and the common front against abortion was a big part of that.

  • Kids publisher Scholastic launches massive promo of ‘trans’ book for grade 3s

    09/30/2015 1:15:03 PM PDT · 42 of 42
    darrellmaurina to cradle of freedom; wagglebee; AmericanInTokyo; TigerLikesRooster
    7 posted on 9/10/2015, 1:35:13 PM by cradle of freedom: "Welcome to GAY NORTH KOREA!"

    That's being insulting to the North Koreans. I think they have more morals.

  • With new bill, US elitists plotting to weaponize gay ‘marriage’ and stamp out dissent

    09/30/2015 12:41:13 PM PDT · 25 of 25
    darrellmaurina to wagglebee
    Rick Santorum was correct in the last presidential campaign when he said that some people's idea of liberty and freedom owes more to the French Revolution than to the American Revolution.

    Conservative republicans need to understand that. We are not monarchists. We do believe some things which in the late 1700s were truly radical. We do believe in “We the People,” not some sort of hereditary nobility or educated aristocracy or monied business elite, being the root of government. And for that reason we can and should reject the idea of a majority of nine black-robed unelected judges being able to make fundamental changes in our nation's laws. That kind of system is not a republic but a system of unelected “philosopher kings,” and conservatives need to reject it as contrary to our values.

    But we can't go to the other extreme and follow the model of the French Revolution. We believe in a republic, not a pure democracy, and there are important differences between the two.

  • The gay rights movement’s war with reality is hurting people

    09/30/2015 12:20:12 PM PDT · 20 of 20
    darrellmaurina to napscoordinator; wagglebee
    3 posted on 9/14/2015, 12:04:31 PM by napscoordinator: “Damn conservative Bruce Jenner has done more damage to our country then anyone else since Obama was elected. Seriously now all we hear is transgender rights. It is gross.”

    Perhaps a bit like the Brady Bill? Pick a person who is identified as a conservative, find one issue where he's wrong, and run with it.

    Liberal divide-and-conquer strategies work.

    I understand that conservatives don't get to govern if we can't get to 50 percent. We have to work with people who disagree with us on some issues; that's the reality of living in a republic.

    But when we take people who agree with us on 80 or 90 percent of issues and ally ourselves with them, we need to so with our eyes wide open. That's easier in a multiparty European parliamentary system where small parties can be clear about what they believe and in which coalitions are above-board and honest in declaring their differences. But it must be done in the American system as well or bad things will happen.

    What's happened with Jenner is a pretty big bad thing.

  • ‘She’s got girl parts’: Parents outraged after school allows girl to use boys’ bathroom

    09/30/2015 12:06:01 PM PDT · 40 of 40
    darrellmaurina to wagglebee
    This isn't limited to one school district in Missouri. A statewide association has just produced a set of recommended guidelines for dealing with transgender students. It blew up at one of our county's school boards last week and every school district in Missouri will have to address this in the near future.

    Here's a link to another thread on Free Republic where I posted the proposed policy on transgender students, drafted by the Missouri Consultants on Education: http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/3338532/posts?page=59#59

    This isn't San Francisco. This isn't Greenwich Village. This isn't even Chicago or Denver. This is MISSOURI, for crying out loud.

    Want this in your local schools?

    If something like this can be proposed in a conservative state like ours, just imagine what could happen elsewhere, and perhaps is already happening.