Posts by dvwjr

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  • Blame Founding Fathers for GOP hold on Senate: Moran

    11/08/2014 2:34:36 PM PST · 47 of 68
    dvwjr to Publius
    I think that the Constitution goes even further. The only way to amend that section of Article V today would be to get all 50 current States to agree to unequal representation in the Senate in the form of an Amendment. Until that occurs, it would be a uniquely unconstitutional Amendment that would allow for unequal representation in the Senate without the unanimous consent of the States.
  • Space aliens walk among us? Indeed, claims retired Temple prof

    07/16/2014 4:45:48 AM PDT · 83 of 84
    dvwjr to july4thfreedomfoundation

    You might want to check out the 1998-2001 “remake” of “The Invaders” (1967-68) titled “First Wave”. It was on the SciFi channel and you can read about it here: http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0160277/reviews-33

    dvwjr

  • Space aliens walk among us? Indeed, claims retired Temple prof

    07/16/2014 4:18:43 AM PDT · 81 of 84
    dvwjr to Sirius Lee

    “... it’s the probing. I hate the anal probing. Damned aliens.”

  • Feds Stage Pre-Dawn Raid for Potato Gun

    10/30/2013 7:30:50 AM PDT · 44 of 64
    dvwjr to Darksheare

    The US Coast Guard is exempt from the Posse Comitatus Act during peace-time, anywhere they go...

    dvwjr

  • ‘Jack the Ripper’ as we know him never existed: researcher

    09/25/2013 6:40:28 PM PDT · 15 of 36
    dvwjr to donmeaker

    No, no ... That is Colonel Mustard, in the library, with the candle-stick! :-)

    Dvwjr

  • News from Virginia? (vanity)

    11/06/2012 3:05:23 PM PST · 46 of 49
    dvwjr to jmstein7

    Voted today in the 8th .Congressional district in Fairfax, Virginia - Westgate. Arrived at 3:00pm, took 55 minutes to vote, normally takes about 5 minutes. Longest lines for voting ever, going back to 1980 election for Reagan.

    dvwjr

  • Voter Fraud: NAACP Asking People If They'd Like to 'Support Obama' in Multiple States

    11/03/2012 9:10:30 PM PDT · 25 of 26
    dvwjr to databoss

    The Constitution never specifies a date for Presidential elections. That was left up to the Congress to specify the date on which the electors vote and the date the electors are selected by the several States.

    dvwjr

  • Romney Narrows Vote Gap After Historic Debate Win

    10/08/2012 8:17:26 AM PDT · 7 of 10
    dvwjr to Jim from C-Town
    Can not find the internals for the Gallup daily tracking Presidential preference Gallup poll, but the political ID breakdown (R/D/I) for seperate "who won the debate" Gallup poll looks as follows:
    Gallup poll, October 4-5, 2012 - debate poll



    Demographics Republican Democrat Independent Poll Numbers
    Favor Romney 97.0% 49.0% 70.1% Romney: 71.56% Romney
    Favor Obama 1.7% 38.6% 18.6% Obama: 19.89% Obama
    Favor Neither 1.3% 12.4% 11.4% Neither: 8.54% Neither
    Do not know: 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% Do not know: 0.00% Don’t Know
    100.0% 100.0% 100.0% Total: 100.0%
    Results
    (Weighting)
    `
    Poll Information Republican 31.51% Republican
    Gallup Democrat 33.24% Democrat
    10/4-5/2012 Independent 35.25% Independent
    MOE 4.0%
    749 Adults 100.0%
    password: poll
    Sauce.xls All Adults
    dvwjr Republican 236 31.51%
    Version 1.3 Democrat 249 33.24%
    10/27/2000 Independent 264 35.25%
    Free Republic Total: 749 100.00%



    dvwjr

  • MSNBC's Thomas Roberts Laughably Insists Democrats Didn't Control Congress for Two Years...

    09/21/2012 5:37:22 PM PDT · 23 of 30
    dvwjr to FredZarguna
    Originally posted by: FredZarguna
    "Nothing in your post changes the fact that they had control for two full years."


    Full control of the US Senate requires a filibuster-proof majority to pass legislation with the use of a cloture vote to prevent unlimited debate. The dates indicated in the above post denote the periods the Democrats had such full control. A simple majority control of the US Senate, committees and sub-committees and the legislative calendar was correct for the Democrats in the US Senate during the 111th Congress.

    Since the institution of the cloture rule in the US Senate during the 65th Congress, only eight sessions of Congress have had a party with a filibuster-proof majority in the US Senate. These filibuster-proof Congresses were: 74th, 75th, 76th, 77th, 89th, 94th, 95th, 111th - all controlled by Democrats. The Republicans have never had a filibuster-proof majority in the US Senate.

    Congress Years_Term Senate
    Majority
    Party
    Allotted
    Number of
    Senators
    Democrat Republican Others Vacant Votes
    required for
    Cloture
     
     
     
     
    65th 1917-1919 Democrat 96 54 42     <= 64 Two-thirds of Senators voting and present
    66th 1919-1921 Republican 96 47 49     <= 64 Cloture only on Legislation, not Nominations
    67th 1921-1923 Republican 96 37 59     <= 64  
    68th 1923-1925 Republican 96 42 53 1   <= 64  
    69th 1925-1927 Republican 96 41 54 1   <= 64  
    70th 1927-1929 Republican 96 46 48 1 1 <= 64  
    71st 1929-1931 Republican 96 39 56 1   <= 64  
    72nd 1931-1933 Republican 96 47 48 1   <= 64  
    73rd 1933-1935 Democrat 96 59 36 1   <= 64  
    74th 1935-1937 Democrat 96 69 25 2   <= 64  
    75th 1937-1939 Democrat 96 76 16 3   <= 64  
    76th 1939-1941 Democrat 96 69 23 3   <= 64  
    77th 1941-1943 Democrat 96 66 28 2   <= 64  
    78th 1943-1945 Democrat 96 57 38 1   <= 64  
    79th 1945-1947 Democrat 96 57 38 1   <= 64  
    80th 1947-1949 Democrat 96 51 45     <= 64  
    81st 1949-1951 Democrat 96 54 42     64 Two-thirds of all elected Senators
    82nd 1951-1953 Democrat 96 49 47     64 Cloture on Legislation and Nominations
    83rd 1953-1955 Republican 96 47 48 1   64  
    84th 1955-1957 Democrat 96 47/47/48/49 47/47/47/47 2/1/0/0 0/1/0/0 64  
    85th 1957-1959 Democrat 96 49 47     64  
    86th 1959-1961 Democrat 100 65 35     <= 67 Two-thirds of Senators voting and present
    87th 1961-1963 Democrat 100 64 36     <= 67 Cloture on Legislation and Nominations
    88th 1963-1965 Democrat 100 66 34     <= 67  
    89th 1965-1967 Democrat 100 68 32     <= 67  
    90th 1967-1969 Democrat 100 64 36     <= 67  
    91st 1969-1971 Democrat 100 57 43     <= 67  
    92nd 1971-1973 Democrat 100 54 44 2   <= 67  
    93rd 1973-1975 Democrat 100 56 42 2   <= 67  
    94th 1975-1977 Democrat 100 60 38 2   60 Three-fifths of all elected Senators
    95th 1977-1979 Democrat 100 61 38 1   60 Cloture on Legislation and Nominations
    96th 1979-1981 Democrat 100 58 41 1   60  
    97th 1981-1983 Republican 100 46 53 1   60  
    98th 1983-1985 Republican 100 46 54     60  
    99th 1985-1987 Republican 100 47 53     60  
    100th 1987-1989 Democrat 100 55 45     60  
    101st 1989-1991 Democrat 100 55 45     60  
    102nd 1991-1993 Democrat 100 56 44     60  
    103rd 1993-1995 Democrat 100 57/56 43/44     60  
    104th 1995-1997 Republican 100 48/47/46/46/47 52/53/54/53/53   0/0/0/1/0 60  
    105th 1997-1999 Republican 100 45 55     60  
    106th 1999-2001 Republican 100 45/45/45/46 55/54/55/54   0/1/0/0 60  
    107th 2001-2003 Rep/Dem 100 50/50/49/48/48 50/49/49/50/50 0/1/1/1/2 0/0/1/1/0 60  
    108th 2003-2005 Republican 100 48 51 1   60  
    109th 2005-2007 Republican 100 44 55 1   60  
    110th 2007-2009 Democrat 100 49 49 2   60  
    111th 2009-2011 Democrat 100 41/41/41/41/41/40/40/40/39/40/40/41/41/41/42 55/56/55/56/57/58/57/58/57/56/57/56 2   60 July 7, 2009 - August 25, 2009 | September 25, 2009 - February 4, 2010
    112th 2011-2013 Democrat 100 47 51 2   60  




    "Having a filibuster-proof majority for any period of that time near the end of session would have allowed them to pass the entirety of their agenda provided only that they were careful procedurally."

    Which is exactly how the PPACA was passed by the Democrats in the US Senate during late December 2009, at the end of the first session of the 111th Congress.

    "Furthermore, not all of the business of the Senate requires a cloture vote. The ACA, arguably the most important (read: damaging) piece of legislation was passed with less than a filibuster-proof majority."


    The PPACA was passed in the US Senate via the following two votes:

    1.) December 23rd, 2009 - 60 to 39 in favor of invoking cloture.
    2.) December 24th, 2009 - 60 to 39 in favor of passing the PPACA.

    Notice, in both of the recorded votes in the US Senate on the PPACA, each was performed with a filibuster-proof majority of 60 votes. Are there any other facts of which you are unsure?

    dvwjr

  • MSNBC's Thomas Roberts Laughably Insists Democrats Didn't Control Congress for Two Years...

    09/21/2012 3:34:37 PM PDT · 10 of 30
    dvwjr to Kaslin
    The Democrats controlled the House of Representatives during the 2009-2011 session with a (257/256/255) Democrat Majority to 178 Republican Minority.

    The Democrats had a filibuster proof Majority of 60 Senators (58 Democrats plus two "Independents" who voted with them) for the following time periods:

    1.) July 7th, 2009 to August 25th, 2009
    
    2.) September 25th, 2009 to February 4th, 2010 
    


    dvwjr

  • 9/14/2012 CBS NYT Poll analyzed

    09/15/2012 3:10:29 AM PDT · 44 of 52
    dvwjr to 1035rep; MNJohnnie
    CNN/ORC poll
    50.4 percent Democrats and
    45.4 percent Republicans
    4.2 percent independents.

    I find it unfortunate that too many posters on Free Republic are so quick to look for Democrat poll oversampling that such a sloppy analysis of the CNN/ORC poll, September 7-9 2012, PDF - Page #21 of 48, (Question 1/1A) by the Examiner is taken as gospel. Only 4.2% "Independents" in the CNN/ORC Likely Voter sample, really? The published data supports no such conclusion.

                                  Demo-      Indep-     Repub-
                        Total     crat       endent     lican     
    ----- ----- ------ ------   --------    --------   --------
    Obama,Biden, lean    52%       97%         40%         2%
    Romney,Ryan, lean    46%        3%         54%        96%
    Other                 *         *           *          *
    Neither               2%        *           4%         2%
    No opinion            1%        *           2%         *
    Sampling Error    +/-3.5    +/-6.0      +/-6.5     +/-6.5 
    

    The CNN/ORC question 1/1A table reproduced above has an unstated 95% confidence level (most poll do) for the (n~709) sample size of Likely Voters. The CNN/ORC table for the Total Likely Voter response has the margin of error (or confidence interval) of (+/- 3.5). This published sampling error for the Likely Voters is a rounded number as with the sample size of (n=709) the MoE is actually (+/- 3.68). Now that it is known that the CNN/ORC published MoE numbers are rounded, check the Democrat (+/- 6.0) sub-sampling error, this should be a sample size of 267. The Republican and Independent sub-sample error number of (+/-6.5) would both be derived from a sample size of 227. Since these published sample error number are rounded, they only indicate a range of sample sizes, depending on what the amount of rounding that was performed by CNN/ORC. The published sampling error number alone show that the sample contained more Democrats than either Republicans or Independents.

    Rounded MoE       (+/- 6.0)
    Rounded range   6.24  - 5.75
    Sample # range   247  -  290
    
    
    Rounded MoE       (+/- 6.5)
    Rounded range   6.88  - 6.25
    Sample # range   203  -  246
    


    Given the above Likely Voter sample data the following analysis follows:

    Here is how I see the political ID poll data breakdown for the CNN/ORC national poll published September 10th, 2012:

    The original national CNN data, 709 Likely Voters for September 07-09, 2012:

    Demographics Republican Democrat Independent Poll Numbers
    Romney 96% 3% 54% Romney 46%
    Obama 2% 97% 40% Obama 52%
    Neither/Other 2% 0% 4% Neither/Other 2%
    No Opinion: 1% 0% 2% No Opinion: 1%
    100.0% 100.0% 100.0% Total: 100.0%


    CNN/ORC poll, September 7-9 2012, PDF - Page #21 of 48, (Question 1/1A).


    The derived poll data presented below for the same national CNN, Likely Voters, n = 709

    Rounding the below by plus or minus (0.49%) yields above published (rounded) CNN two digit poll data.


    Demographics Republican Democrat Independent   Poll Numbers     Adjusted Numbers
    Romney 96.17% 2.51% 53.52% Romney 45.84% Romney   50.60%
    Obama 1.61% 97.36% 40.47% Obama 51.53% Obama   46.78%
    Neither/Other 1.61% 0.13% 3.95% Not Sure 1.79% Neither/Other   1.79%
    No Opinion: 0.61% 0.00% 2.06% Do not know: 0.84% No Opinion:   0.83%
      100.0% 100.0% 100.0% Total: 100.0%     100.0%
                     
                     
            Results       New Weighting
            (Weighting)        
        `            
    Poll Information     Republican 28.65% Republican     35.00%
    CNN     Democrat 39.01% Democrat     35.00%
    9/7-9/2012     Independent 32.34% Independent     30.00%
    MOE 3.68%                
    709 LV       100.0%       100.0%
    page #21/48                
                     
                     
                     




    Likely Voters 709    
    Demographics Republican Democrat Independent
    Total Raw Votes 203 277 229
    Percentage: 28.65% 39.01% 32.34%


    Looks as if CNN/ORC have published a Democrat [+10.36%] Likely Voter oversampled poll, with Independents comprising around 32.3% of the likely voter sample. Just for fun, at the far right of the spreadsheet data is a "what-if" the political ID breakdown was (35%R, 35%D, 30%I) - Romney on top by ~4%.


    dvwjr

  • Daily Presidential Tracking Poll (Romney 47% - Obama 46%)

    09/13/2012 4:48:19 PM PDT · 45 of 48
    dvwjr to randmwood

    I would not trust this website. The CNN/ORC poll for (n=709) Likely Voters that was released on 09/10/2012. It states that the political ID breakdown for said poll is (R/D/I) of:

    34.21% (R),
    43.86% (D),
    09.65% (I).

    The actual political ID breakdown for that CNN/ORC poll is closer to:

    28.70% (R),
    38.96% (D),
    32.35% (I).

    When an analysis site gets the basic political ID breakdown so far off, you have to question all of their derived numbers. The number of Independents the site implies was in the sample is way too low...

    dvwjr

  • The Rush Limbaugh LIVE Radio Show Thread - Tuesday, September 11, 2012

    09/11/2012 10:21:48 AM PDT · 25 of 54
    dvwjr to Yosemitest; IMissPresidentReagan
    Here is how I see the political ID poll data breakdown for the CNN/ORC national poll published September 10th, 2012:

    The original national CNN data, 709 Likely Voters for September 07-09, 2012:

    Demographics Republican Democrat Independent Poll Numbers
    Romney 96% 3% 54% Romney 46%
    Obama 2% 97% 40% Obama 52%
    Neither/Other 2% 0% 4% Neither/Other 2%
    No Opinion: 1% 0% 2% No Opinion: 1%
    100.0% 100.0% 100.0% Total: 100.0%


    CNN/ORC poll, September 7-9 2012, PDF - Page #21 of 48, (Question 1/1A).


    The derived poll data presented below for the same national CNN, Likely Voters, n = 709

    Rounding the below by plus or minus (0.49%) yields above published (rounded) CNN two digit poll data.


    Demographics Republican Democrat Independent   Poll Numbers     Adjusted Numbers  
    Romney 96.47% 2.51% 53.51% Romney 45.97% Romney   50.70% Romney
    Obama 1.51% 97.49% 40.49% Obama 51.51% Obama   46.80% Obama
    Neither/Other 1.51% 0.00% 3.95% Not Sure 1.71% Neither/Other   1.71% Neither/Other
    No Opinion: 0.51% 0.00% 2.05% Do not know: 0.81% No Opinion:   0.79% No Opinion:
      100.0% 100.0% 100.0% Total: 100.0%     100.0%  
                       
                       
            Results       New Weighting  
            (Weighting)          
        `              
    Poll Information     Republican 28.70% Republican     35.00%  
    CNN     Democrat 38.96% Democrat     35.00%  
    9/7-9/2012     Independent 32.35% Independent     30.00%  
    MOE 3.68%                  
    709 LV       100.0%       100.0%  
    page #21/48                  
                       
                       



    Looks as if CNN/ORC have published a Democrat [ +10.26%] Likely Voter oversampled poll. Just for fun, at the far right of the spreadsheet data is a "what-if" the political ID breakdown was (35%R, 35%D, 30%I) - Romney on top by ~4%.


    dvwjr

  • Did CNN Rig Its Own Poll?

    09/10/2012 9:25:22 PM PDT · 5 of 16
    dvwjr to 867V309
    Here is how I see the political ID poll data breakdown for the CNN/ORC national poll published September 10th, 2012:

    The original national CNN data, 709 Likely Voters for September 07-09, 2012:

    Demographics Republican Democrat Independent Poll Numbers
    Romney 96% 3% 54% Romney 46%
    Obama 2% 97% 40% Obama 52%
    Neither/Other 2% 0% 4% Neither/Other 2%
    No Opinion: 1% 0% 2% No Opinion: 1%
    100.0% 100.0% 100.0% Total: 100.0%


    CNN/ORC poll, September 7-9 2012, PDF - Page #21 of 48, (Question 1/1A).


    The derived poll data presented below for the same national CNN, Likely Voters, n = 709

    Rounding the below by plus or minus (0.49%) yields above published (rounded) CNN two digit poll data.


    Demographics Republican Democrat Independent   Poll Numbers     Adjusted Numbers  
    Romney 96.47% 2.51% 53.51% Romney 45.97% Romney   50.70% Romney
    Obama 1.51% 97.49% 40.49% Obama 51.51% Obama   46.80% Obama
    Neither/Other 1.51% 0.00% 3.95% Not Sure 1.71% Neither/Other   1.71% Neither/Other
    No Opinion: 0.51% 0.00% 2.05% Do not know: 0.81% No Opinion:   0.79% No Opinion:
      100.0% 100.0% 100.0% Total: 100.0%     100.0%  
                       
                       
            Results       New Weighting  
            (Weighting)          
        `              
    Poll Information     Republican 28.70% Republican     35.00%  
    CNN     Democrat 38.96% Democrat     35.00%  
    9/7-9/2012     Independent 32.35% Independent     30.00%  
    MOE 3.68%                  
    709 LV       100.0%       100.0%  
    page #21/48                  
                       
                       



    Looks as if CNN/ORC have published a Democrat [ +10.26%] Likely Voter oversampled poll. Just for fun, at the far right of the spreadsheet data is a "what-if" the political ID breakdown was (35%R, 35%D, 30%I) - Romney on top by ~4%.


    dvwjr

  • Mitt Romney would lead eight in unskewed data from newest CNN/ORC poll

    09/10/2012 9:23:15 PM PDT · 18 of 35
    dvwjr to Numbers Guy; reprobate
    Here is how I see the political ID poll data breakdown for the CNN/ORC national poll published September 10th, 2012:

    The original national CNN data, 709 Likely Voters for September 07-09, 2012:

    Demographics Republican Democrat Independent Poll Numbers
    Romney 96% 3% 54% Romney 46%
    Obama 2% 97% 40% Obama 52%
    Neither/Other 2% 0% 4% Neither/Other 2%
    No Opinion: 1% 0% 2% No Opinion: 1%
    100.0% 100.0% 100.0% Total: 100.0%


    CNN/ORC poll, September 7-9 2012, PDF - Page #21 of 48, (Question 1/1A).


    The derived poll data presented below for the same national CNN, Likely Voters, n = 709

    Rounding the below by plus or minus (0.49%) yields above published (rounded) CNN two digit poll data.


    Demographics Republican Democrat Independent   Poll Numbers     Adjusted Numbers  
    Romney 96.47% 2.51% 53.51% Romney 45.97% Romney   50.70% Romney
    Obama 1.51% 97.49% 40.49% Obama 51.51% Obama   46.80% Obama
    Neither/Other 1.51% 0.00% 3.95% Not Sure 1.71% Neither/Other   1.71% Neither/Other
    No Opinion: 0.51% 0.00% 2.05% Do not know: 0.81% No Opinion:   0.79% No Opinion:
      100.0% 100.0% 100.0% Total: 100.0%     100.0%  
                       
                       
            Results       New Weighting  
            (Weighting)          
        `              
    Poll Information     Republican 28.70% Republican     35.00%  
    CNN     Democrat 38.96% Democrat     35.00%  
    9/7-9/2012     Independent 32.35% Independent     30.00%  
    MOE 3.68%                  
    709 LV       100.0%       100.0%  
    page #21/48                  
                       
                       



    Looks as if CNN/ORC have published a Democrat [ +10.26%] Likely Voter oversampled poll. Just for fun, at the far right of the spreadsheet data is a "what-if" the political ID breakdown was (35%R, 35%D, 30%I) - Romney on top by ~4%.


    dvwjr

  • CNN Poll: Obama up six points over Romney

    09/10/2012 8:00:44 PM PDT · 77 of 78
    dvwjr to nhwingut
    Here is how I see the political ID poll data breakdown for the CNN/ORC national poll published September 10th, 2012:

    The original national CNN data, 709 Likely Voters for September 07-09, 2012:

    Demographics Republican Democrat Independent Poll Numbers
    Romney 96% 3% 54% Romney 46%
    Obama 2% 97% 40% Obama 52%
    Neither/Other 2% 0% 4% Neither/Other 2%
    No Opinion: 1% 0% 2% No Opinion: 1%
    100.0% 100.0% 100.0% Total: 100.0%


    CNN/ORC poll, September 7-9 2012, PDF - Page #21 of 48, (Question 1/1A).


    The derived poll data presented below for the same national CNN, Likely Voters, n = 709

    Rounding the below by plus or minus (0.49%) yields above published (rounded) CNN two digit poll data.


    Demographics Republican Democrat Independent   Poll Numbers     Adjusted Numbers  
    Romney 96.47% 2.51% 53.51% Romney 45.97% Romney   50.70% Romney
    Obama 1.51% 97.49% 40.49% Obama 51.51% Obama   46.80% Obama
    Neither/Other 1.51% 0.00% 3.95% Not Sure 1.71% Neither/Other   1.71% Neither/Other
    No Opinion: 0.51% 0.00% 2.05% Do not know: 0.81% No Opinion:   0.79% No Opinion:
      100.0% 100.0% 100.0% Total: 100.0%     100.0%  
                       
                       
            Results       New Weighting  
            (Weighting)          
        `              
    Poll Information     Republican 28.70% Republican     35.00%  
    CNN     Democrat 38.96% Democrat     35.00%  
    9/7-9/2012     Independent 32.35% Independent     30.00%  
    MOE 3.68%                  
    709 LV       100.0%       100.0%  
    page #21/48                  
                       
                       



    Looks as if CNN/ORC have published a Democrat [ +10.26%] Likely Voter oversampled poll. Just for fun, at the far right of the spreadsheet data is a "what-if" the political ID breakdown was (35%R, 35%D, 30%I) - Romney on top by ~4%.


    dvwjr bottombottomfont face= valign= height=TahomaTahomafont face=bottom height=

  • CNN: Obama 52% Romney 46%, but...

    09/10/2012 7:42:47 PM PDT · 66 of 77
    dvwjr to Viennacon; Dilbert San Diego
    Here is how I see the political ID poll data breakdown for the CNN/ORC national poll published September 10th, 2012:

    The original national CNN data, 709 Likely Voters for September 07-09, 2012:

    Demographics Republican Democrat Independent Poll Numbers
    Romney 96% 3% 54% Romney 46%
    Obama 2% 97% 40% Obama 52%
    Neither/Other 2% 0% 4% Neither/Other 2%
    No Opinion: 1% 0% 2% No Opinion: 1%
    100.0% 100.0% 100.0% Total: 100.0%


    CNN/ORC poll, September 7-9 2012, PDF - Page #21 of 48, (Question 1/1A).


    The derived poll data presented below for the same national CNN, Likely Voters, n = 709

    Rounding the below by plus or minus (0.49%) yields above published (rounded) CNN two digit poll data.


    Demographics Republican Democrat Independent   Poll Numbers     Adjusted Numbers  
    Romney 96.47% 2.51% 53.51% Romney 45.97% Romney   50.70% Romney
    Obama 1.51% 97.49% 40.49% Obama 51.51% Obama   46.80% Obama
    Neither/Other 1.51% 0.00% 3.95% Not Sure 1.71% Neither/Other   1.71% Neither/Other
    No Opinion: 0.51% 0.00% 2.05% Do not know: 0.81% No Opinion:   0.79% No Opinion:
      100.0% 100.0% 100.0% Total: 100.0%     100.0%  
                       
                       
            Results       New Weighting  
            (Weighting)          
        `              
    Poll Information     Republican 28.70% Republican     35.00%  
    CNN     Democrat 38.96% Democrat     35.00%  
    9/7-9/2012     Independent 32.35% Independent     30.00%  
    MOE 3.68%                  
    709 LV       100.0%       100.0%  
    page #21/48                  
                       
                       



    Looks as if CNN/ORC have published a Democrat [ +10.26%] Likely Voter oversampled poll. Just for fun, at the far right of the spreadsheet data is a "what-if" the political ID breakdown was (35%R, 35%D, 30%I) - Romney on top by ~4%.


    dvwjr valign= width= align= width= size=24 /fontTahoma/tdright/font2bottomnbsp; align= height=bottom

  • Why the Obama-Romney Race May Not Be the Dead Heat Polls Describe

    09/05/2012 12:53:22 AM PDT · 24 of 44
    dvwjr to meadsjn
    Originally posted by: meadsjn

    "I see a blowout coming -- 59% to 39% -- not quite a record, but devastating enough to dismantle the Dem machine up and down the tickets."




    Fairly optimistic. Even Reagan's second election (1984) never made your 59% popular vote victory hurdle; only Harding (1920), Nixon (1972), Roosevelt (1936), and Johnson (1964) exceeded said mark...

    Presidential election results listed by Popular vote (for elections with Popular vote) sorted in decending order:

    "Popular" Vote       Winning Percentage  
    Victory Margin Year Party Winner Electoral Vote "Popular" Vote  
    22.58% 1964 Democrat Johnson(36) 90.33% 61.05%  
    24.25% 1936 Democrat Roosevelt(32) 98.49% 60.80%  
    23.15% 1972 Republican Nixon 96.65% 60.67%  
    26.17% 1920 Republican Harding 76.08% 60.32%  
    18.21% 1984 Republican Reagan 97.58% 58.77%  
    17.41% 1928 Republican Hoover 83.62% 58.21%  
    17.76% 1932 Democrat Roosevelt(32) 88.89% 57.41%  
    15.40% 1956 Republican Eisenhower 86.06% 57.37%  
    18.83% 1904 Republican Roosevelt(26) 70.59% 56.42%  
    12.34% 1828 Democrat Jackson 68.20% 55.97%  
    11.80% 1872 Republican Grant 78.10% 55.63%  
    10.85% 1952 Republican Eisenhower 83.24% 55.18%  
    10.06% 1864 Republican Lincoln 90.60% 55.02%  
    9.96% 1940 Democrat Roosevelt(32) 84.56% 54.74%  
    16.81% 1832 Democrat Jackson 76.00% 54.23%  
    25.22% 1924 Republican Coolidge 71.94% 54.04%  
    7.50% 1944 Democrat Roosevelt(32) 81.36% 53.39%  
    7.72% 1988 Republican Bush(41) 79.18% 53.37%  
    6.07% 1840 Whig Harrison(9) 79.60% 52.88%  
    7.27% 2008 Democrat Obama 67.80% 52.87%  
    5.32% 1868 Republican Grant 72.80% 52.66%  
    6.12% 1900 Republican McKinley 65.32% 51.64%  
    8.53% 1908 Republican Taft 66.46% 51.57%  
    4.33% 1896 Republican McKinley 60.63% 51.03%  
    6.97% 1852 Democrat Pierce 85.80% 50.84%  
    14.20% 1836 Democrat Van Buren 57.80% 50.83%  
    9.74% 1980 Republican Reagan 90.89% 50.75%  
    2.46% 2004 Republican Bush(43) 53.20% 50.73%  
    2.06% 1976 Democrat Carter 55.20% 50.08%  
    0.17% 1960 Democrat Kennedy 56.42% 49.72%  
    4.48% 1948 Democrat Truman 57.06% 49.55%  
    1.46% 1844 Democrat Polk 61.80% 49.54%  
    3.12% 1916 Democrat Wilson 52.17% 49.24%  
    8.51% 1996 Democrat Clinton 70.45% 49.23%  
    0.25% 1884 Democrat Cleveland(22) 54.60% 48.50%  
    0.02% 1880 Republican Garfield 58.00% 48.27%  
    -3.02% 1876 Republican Hayes 50.10% 47.95%  
    -0.51% 2000 Republican Bush(43) 50.37% 47.87%  
    -0.80% 1888 Republican Harrison(23) 58.10% 47.82%  
    4.79% 1848 Whig Taylor 56.20% 47.28%  
    3.01% 1892 Democrat Cleveland(24) 62.39% 46.02%  
    12.17% 1856 Democrat Buchanan 58.80% 45.28%  
    0.70% 1968 Republican Nixon 55.95% 43.42%  
    5.56% 1992 Democrat Clinton 68.77% 43.01%  
    14.44% 1912 Democrat Wilson 81.92% 41.84%  
    21.72% 1860 Republican Lincoln 59.40% 39.82%  
    -10.43% 1824 Dem-Reps Adams(6) 32.20% 30.92%  



    dvwjr td width=99123

  • Academic model predicts big Romney win (Model has predicted every winner since 1980)

    08/23/2012 8:47:57 PM PDT · 31 of 31
    dvwjr to Buckeye McFrog

    The Constitution with the provision for electors appointed by the State legislatures ensures that each State always has its proper representation, no matter how said electors are selected.

    The popular vote to chose electors allowed by each State Legislature does not gain validity based on the number of voters participating, since if weather conditions were so severe that it would probably affect rural voters more than urban voters.

    Say only two percent of voters in a State could make it to the polling locations, the State legislature could then decide to directly appoint the electors as being a more representative action of the State’s presidential preference, as is their right.

    Look at Florida in the 2000 election, if the Gore legal challenges had pushed the Florida elector selection into the ‘safe harbor’ zone, the Florida State legislature would have been within its right to directly appoint a slate of electors - the only “do-over” allowed.

    dvwjr

  • Bounce: New polls show Romney leading in Michigan, Wisconsin after Ryan pick

    08/21/2012 8:58:03 PM PDT · 10 of 13
    dvwjr to Shaka

    The poll internals show that the political ID breakdown is:

    34% - Republican
    32% -Democrat
    34% - Independent

    so that is a Rep +2 sample.

    dvwjr

  • Purple Poll: A small bump for Romney, but not a game change. (Romney 47 Obama 46)

    08/15/2012 7:07:35 PM PDT · 11 of 13
    dvwjr to lacrew; kevao
    I see that poll data breakdown just a little differently for the National polling PurplePoll data. Cannot perform the same for each individual State since the n=600 over-sample is not broken down for each of the four target States.

    The original national PurplePoll data, 1000 Likely Voters for August 13-14, 2012:

    Demographics Republican Democrat Independent Poll Numbers
    Romney 87.0% 12.0% 50.0% Romney 47.00%
    Obama 9.0% 85.0% 39.0% Obama 46.00%
    Not Sure 4.0% 3.0% 11.0% Not Sure 6.00%
    Do not know: 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% Do not know: 0.00%
    0.49% 100.0% 100.0% 100.0% Total: 100.0%


    PurplePoll August 2012, PDF - Page #8 of 12.


    The derived poll data presented below for the same national PurplePoll, Likely Voters = 1000

    Rounding the below by plus or minus (0.5%) yields above published two digit poll data.


    Demographics Republican Democrat Independent Poll Numbers
    Romney 86.7% 11.7% 49.6% Romney 47.20% Romney
    Obama 9.4% 85.1% 39.1% Obama 46.40% Obama
    Not Sure 3.8% 3.2% 11.3% Not Sure 6.40% Not Sure
    Do not know: 0.00% 0.00% 0.00% Do not know: 0.00% Don’t Know
    100.0% 100.0% 100.0% Total: 100.0%
    Results
    (Weighting)
    `
    Poll Information Republican 28.60% Republican
    PurplePoll Democrat 34.30% Democrat
    8/13-14/2012 Independent 37.10% Independent
    MOE 3.1%
    1000 LV 100.0%
    Likely
    Republican 286 28.60%
    Democrat 343 34.30%
    Independent 371 37.10%
    Total: 1000 100.00%



    Looks like a Democrat +5.7% Likely Voter oversampled poll. The percentage number of Independents also seems a bit high...


    dvwjr font face= height=/nobr2br align=bottom106bottom`Tahoma21rightfont face=91Tahoma21

  • If Obama and Romney tie in the electoral college, then what? (Plus poll to FReep)

    07/12/2012 6:19:09 AM PDT · 24 of 28
    dvwjr to kevkrom; Stosh
    Sorry, the 12th Amendment modified the Constitution to have the House of Representatives choose from the top THREE electoral vote recipients, not the original FIVE, if there is not a candidate with a majority electoral vote. The Senate would choose from the top TWO electoral vote recipients at that time.


    dvwjr

  • Might We See a Landslide?

    06/21/2012 3:08:34 PM PDT · 72 of 114
    dvwjr to LS; napscoordinator
    Originally posted by: LS
    "Look at the historical numbers when the loser got 43% of the vote."


    Alway glad to provide some data. Here are the Presidential elections sorted (in acending order) by the "Popular Vote" percentage of the major party losing candidate.


    "Popular" Vote Winning Percentage Losing Percentage
    Victory Margin Year Party Winner Electoral Vote "Popular" Vote Electoral Vote "Popular" Vote Loser Party
    21.72% 1860 Republican Lincoln 59.40% 39.82% 23.80% 18.10% Breckenridge S.Democrat (D)
    14.44% 1912 Democrat Wilson 81.92% 41.84% 16.57% 27.40% Roosevelt(26) Progressive (R)
    25.22% 1924 Republican Coolidge 71.94% 54.04% 25.61% 28.82% Davis Democrat
    12.17% 1856 Democrat Buchanan 58.80% 45.28% 38.50% 33.11% Freemont Republican
    26.17% 1920 Republican Harding 76.08% 60.32% 23.92% 34.15% Cox Democrat
    24.25% 1936 Democrat Roosevelt(32) 98.49% 60.80% 1.51% 36.55% Landon Republican
    14.20% 1836 Democrat Van Buren 57.80% 50.83% 24.80% 36.63% Harrison(9) Whig
    16.81% 1832 Democrat Jackson 76.00% 54.23% 17.00% 37.42% Clay Nat-Reps
    5.56% 1992 Democrat Clinton 68.77% 43.01% 31.23% 37.45% Bush(41) Republican
    23.15% 1972 Republican Nixon 96.65% 60.67% 3.16% 37.52% McGovern Democrat
    18.83% 1904 Republican Roosevelt(26) 70.59% 56.42% 29.41% 37.59% Parker Democrat
    22.58% 1964 Democrat Johnson(36) 90.33% 61.05% 9.67% 38.47% Goldwater Republican
    17.76% 1932 Democrat Roosevelt(32) 88.89% 57.41% 11.11% 39.65% Hoover(31) Republican
    18.21% 1984 Republican Reagan 97.58% 58.77% 2.42% 40.56% Mondale Democrat
    8.51% 1996 Democrat Clinton 70.45% 49.23% 29.55% 40.72% Dole Republican
    17.41% 1928 Republican Hoover 83.62% 58.21% 16.38% 40.80% Smith Democrat
    9.74% 1980 Republican Reagan 90.89% 50.75% 9.11% 41.01% Carter(39) Democrat
    -10.43% 1824 Dem-Reps Adams(6) 32.20% 30.92% 37.90% 41.35% Jackson(7) Dem-Reps
    15.40% 1956 Republican Eisenhower 86.06% 57.37% 13.75% 41.97% Stevenson Democrat
    4.79% 1848 Whig Taylor 56.20% 47.28% 43.80% 42.49% Cass Democrat
    0.70% 1968 Republican Nixon 55.95% 43.42% 35.50% 42.72% Humphrey Democrat
    3.01% 1892 Democrat Cleveland(24) 62.39% 46.02% 32.66% 43.01% Harrison(23) Republican
    8.53% 1908 Republican Taft 66.46% 51.57% 33.54% 43.04% Bryan Democrat
    12.34% 1828 Democrat Jackson 68.20% 55.97% 31.80% 43.63% Adams(6) Nat-Reps
    11.80% 1872 Republican Grant 78.10% 55.63% 18.00% 43.83% Greeley Democrat
    6.97% 1852 Democrat Pierce 85.80% 50.84% 14.20% 43.87% Scott Whig
    10.85% 1952 Republican Eisenhower 83.24% 55.18% 16.76% 44.33% Stevenson Democrat
    9.96% 1940 Democrat Roosevelt(32) 84.56% 54.74% 15.44% 44.78% Willkie Republican
    10.06% 1864 Republican Lincoln 90.60% 55.02% 9.00% 44.96% McClellan Democrat
    4.48% 1948 Democrat Truman 57.06% 49.55% 35.59% 45.07% Dewey Republican
    6.12% 1900 Republican McKinley 65.32% 51.64% 34.68% 45.52% Bryan Democrat
    7.27% 2008 Democrat Obama 67.80% 52.87% 32.20% 45.60% McCain Republican
    7.72% 1988 Republican Bush(41) 79.18% 53.37% 20.63% 45.65% Dukakis Democrat
    7.50% 1944 Democrat Roosevelt(32) 81.36% 53.39% 18.64% 45.89% Dewey Republican
    3.12% 1916 Democrat Wilson 52.17% 49.24% 47.83% 46.12% Hughes Republican
    4.33% 1896 Republican McKinley 60.63% 51.03% 39.37% 46.70% Bryan Democrat
    6.07% 1840 Whig Harrison(9) 79.60% 52.88% 20.40% 46.81% Van Buren(8) Democrat
    5.32% 1868 Republican Grant 72.80% 52.66% 27.20% 47.34% Seymour Democrat
    2.06% 1976 Democrat Carter 55.20% 50.08% 44.61% 48.02% Ford(38) Republican
    1.46% 1844 Democrat Polk 61.80% 49.54% 38.20% 48.08% Clay Whig
    0.02% 1880 Republican Garfield 58.00% 48.27% 42.00% 48.25% Hancock Democrat
    0.25% 1884 Democrat Cleveland(22) 54.60% 48.50% 45.40% 48.25% Blaine Republican
    2.46% 2004 Republican Bush(43) 53.20% 50.73% 46.70% 48.27% Kerry Democrat
    -0.51% 2000 Republican Bush(43) 50.37% 47.87% 49.44% 48.38% Gore Democrat
    -0.80% 1888 Republican Harrison(23) 58.10% 47.82% 41.90% 48.62% Cleveland(22,24) Democrat
    0.17% 1960 Democrat Kennedy 56.42% 49.72% 40.78% 49.55% Nixon(37) Republican
    -3.02% 1876 Republican Hayes 50.10% 47.95% 49.90% 50.97% Tilden Democrat
    No Popular Vote 1789 No Party Washington 85.20% n/a 42.00% n/a Adams(2) No Party
    No Popular Vote 1792 No Party Washington 97.80% n/a 57.00% n/a Adams(2) No Party
    No Popular Vote 1796 Federalist Adams(2) 51.40% n/a 49.30% n/a Jefferson(3) Dem-Reps
    No Popular Vote 1800 Dem-Reps Jefferson 52.90% n/a 52.90% n/a Burr Dem-Reps
    No Popular Vote 1804 Dem-Reps Jefferson 92.00% n/a 8.00% n/a Pinckney Federalist
    No Popular Vote 1808 Dem-Reps Madison 69.30% n/a 26.70% n/a Pinckney Federalist
    No Popular Vote 1812 Dem-Reps Madison 58.70% n/a 40.80% n/a D.Clinton Federalist
    No Popular Vote 1816 Dem-Reps Monroe 82.80% n/a 15.40% n/a King Federalist
    No Popular Vote 1820 Dem-Reps Monroe 98.30% n/a 0.00% n/a NONE NONE



    Hope this helps,

    dvwjr /nobr

  • Treaty Negotiated In Secret – Hidden Even from Congressmen Who Oversee Treaties...

    06/14/2012 9:00:04 PM PDT · 28 of 62
    dvwjr to july4thfreedomfoundation

    I guess that you missed that event when the House of Representatives IMPEACHED President Clinton just a few years ago? My how time flies...

    The Senate holds the TRIAL after a President is IMPEACHED by the House, where Clinton was found ‘NOT Guilty’. In fact, the Senate can not hold a trial until a President has been IMPEACHED by the House of Representatives.

    Glad to help you out with your mis-understanding...

    dvwjr

  • GALLUP/USA TODAY POLL: Obama's Gay Marriage Endorsement Is Turning More Voters Away

    05/11/2012 7:44:56 PM PDT · 33 of 55
    dvwjr to WILLIALAL; radioone
    Based on the Gallup poll of May 10, 2012 - question number two:

    2.) "Does President Obama’s support for same-sex marriage make you more likely to vote for him, less likely to vote for him, or doesn’t it make any difference?"

    The Gallup poll data for this poll:

    Poll Information
    Gallup
    05/10/12
    MOE 4.0%
    1013 Adults



    From the Gallup Poll, May 10, 2012 PDF file.

    Demographics Republican Democrat Independent Poll Numbers
    Less Likely 52.0% 10.0% 23.0% Less Likely: 26.00%
    More Likely 2.0% 24.0% 11.0% More Likely: 13.00%
    No Difference 46.0% 65.0% 63.0% No Difference: 60.00%
    Do not know: 0.00% 1.00% 3.00% Do not know: 2.00%
    100.0% 100.0% 100.0% Total: 100.0%



    The below table which was derived via Excel Solver, and when the data is rounded to plus or minus 0.49% to a simple two digit number, it matches the above published Gallup poll data.

    Demographics Republican Democrat Independent Poll Numbers
    Less Likely 51.6% 10.5% 23.1% Less Likely: 25.57%
    More Likely 2.0% 23.7% 10.7% More Likely: 13.23%
    No Difference 46.0% 64.7% 63.4% No Difference: 59.62%
    Do not know: 0.40% 1.10% 2.74% Do not know: 1.58%
    100.0% 100.0% 100.0% Total: 100.0%



    which yields a solution set for the absent Gallup poll political ID breakdown, now shown for Republican, Democrat and Independents as follows:

    All Adults
    Republican 248 24.48%
    Democrat 363 35.83%
    Independent 402 39.68%
    Total: 1013 100.00%



    dvwjr bottom align=24All Adults21 size=

  • LIVE THREAD: Results in CO., MN., MO.

    02/08/2012 2:34:26 AM PST · 950 of 1,000
    dvwjr to LUV W; JediJones
    Originally posted by: JediJones
    Can you imagine if the general election were held staggered like this in different states over 4 months time?


    Given the Constitutional mandate that the Electors always had to VOTE for President/Vice-President on the same day, it seems strange to us now that from 1792 to 1844 the date of the APPOINTMENT of the Electors for President and Vice-President by the States of the Union were staggered over a 34 day period. While not four months, this 34 day selection/election period for Electors for the first fifteen Presidential elections was finally ended and replaced with a single date for said appointment/election of Electors by the several States by the Congress.

    The reason for the change was that the Congress could no longer avoid the fact that members of a certain political Party (which shall go nameless) would vote for electors in their home State and then 'move' to a bordering State which had a later election date and then vote for electors in their 'new' home State, and then repeat to yet another bordering State which had their elections even later in that 34 day period. After this great electoral tour was complete, they would return to their original 'home' State content with the knowledge that they had done more than their fair share in upholding the tradition of voting early and often... After the 1844 elections the Congress changed the Law in 1845 those voting shenanigans could no longer take place.

    1792 through 1844:

    ...[E]lectors shall be appointed in each State for the election of a President and Vice-President of the United States, within thirty-four days preceding the first Wednesday in December, one thousand seven hundred and ninety-two, and within thirty-four days preceding the first Wednesday in December in every fourth year succeeding the last election, which Electors shall be equal to the number of Senators and Representatives, to which the several States may by Law be entitled at the time...

    from 1 Stat. 239, Section 1


    Source: TheGreenPapers.com : DATES OF U.S. PRESIDENTIAL ELECTION "EVENTS" (about mid-page)


    dvwjr

  • Gingrich surges in the Sunshine State

    01/25/2012 4:05:31 PM PST · 28 of 30
    dvwjr to cnsmom

    On the matter of the Virginia Primary, it a “semi”-proportional contest, just as was South Carolina. All State primaries/caucuses held before April 1st 2012 (except for Florida) can not be winner-take-all. However, the way that the Republican States sort of got around being “proportional” was to assign some number of delegates to the overall winner of the State and some number of delegates to the winer of each Congressional district.

    So if a primary victor has a large enough win so that not only does he win the entire State and all the Congressional districts - the contest is really winner-take-all. If the geographical vote distribution is such that the second or third place finishers have their support largely concentrated in certain Congressional districts, then they may pick up a few delegates - making the primary “proportional”.

    It was a neat dodge around the RNC rules, since a true ‘proportional’ delegate award would roughly follow a percentage of the vote won. Now that there are only two candidates on the ballot in Virgina - Romney and Paul, with NO write-ins allowed, Virginia will in essence be a winner-take all contest.

    I am glad that Ron Paul qualified for ballot access in Virginia. If he had not qualified then there would have been NO primary at all, no voting by any Virginian - as all the 49 Virginia delegates would have been instantly awarded to Mitt Romney. This could be the only State Primary in which Ron Paul wins the first place prize to deny Romney the 49 Virginia delegates.

    dvwjr

  • Gallup Daily: Romney 29%, Gingrich 17%, Santorum 16%

    01/07/2012 10:35:27 PM PST · 31 of 36
    dvwjr to The_Reader_David

    Well, no actually. South Carolina is a semi-proportional contest, not pure winner take all as is Florida in the early rounds of primaries. The South Carolina primary awards only 25 delegates this year, with 11 delegates for the State-wide winner and 14 delegates awarded as two delegates to the winner of each of the seven Congressional districts. So it will be possible for a second place finisher to pick up a few delegates if he has strength in a few congressional districts.

    Since South Carolina and Florida both moved up their primary dates, both lost one half of their delegates. That was South Carolina 50 to 25 delegates and Florida 99 to 50 delegates.

    This means that in terms of delegates, the much larger Florida will have not more clout than Virginia. If Romney does not win Florida or Virginia - then he is about 99 votes short of the nomination...

    dvwjr

  • Palin to Cavuto: If Candidates Don’t Get Passionate about Reforms Someone Will Enter the Race

    01/04/2012 9:13:46 PM PST · 6 of 97
    dvwjr to 2ndDivisionVet

    Around June 16th, 2012 Iowa will award 25 pledged delegates and 3 unpledged delegates for a total of 28 National Convention delegates. Iowa is not winner-take-all.

    dvwjr

  • SANTORUM UP AS LAST PRECINCT REPORTS... but AP reports suddenly 9 more precincts to go?

    01/04/2012 12:41:16 AM PST · 30 of 39
    dvwjr to goldstategop; gleeaikin
    The Republican contests in States which take place before April 1st, 2012 are all proportional contests (with the exception of Florida which the RNC granted a waiver to allow winner-take-all but then Florida lost half its delegates because it moved its Primary up to January 31st, 2012) by design. This was to prevent an early wrap up of the contest as happened in 2008 with John McCain.

    Iowa and New Hamphshire are both proportionally allocated delegates. Iowa finally selects its national convention delegates at a State Convention Saturday June 16, 2012. Given the vote count with Romney winning by 8 votes the Iowa delegate break down looks somewhat as follows:

    Romney     6 delegates
    Santorum   6 delegates
    Paul       6 delegates
    Gingrich   4 delegates
    Perry      3 delegates
    Bachmann   0 delegates
    Huntsman   0 delegates
    ======================
    Pledged   25 delegates
    Unpledged  3 delegates
    =======================
    Total     28 Iowa National Convention delegates
    

    dvwjr

  • A simple HTML tag will crash 64-bit Windows 7

    12/21/2011 7:25:27 PM PST · 46 of 56
    dvwjr to UriÂ’el-2012
    Very good points all.

    Only thing that bothers me on FreeRepublic computer tech threads is the ignorance of posters about the purpose and proper function of an Operating System. The early CP/M MS-PC/DOS then Win9x and finally the WinNT family of “operating systems” have conditioned many PC users to system crashes. These crashes may have been due to direct hardware access in the early DOS days, to poorly written drivers which operated in kernel space/Ring 0 or poorly validated system calls. Microsoft is trying to clean up the kernel space/user space mess from past Win32 APIs...

    As you stated, an application should never be able to crash a properly designed privileged operating system. While Intel does a good job with maintaining the x86 and and forwarding the current and future x64 spec, as long as the Ring transition costs remain as is, Microsoft will always be tempted to let too much code run (or call) Ring 0...

    Seems one can never convince the technically ignorant because their computer company allegiances prevail over reason. This Win32 HTML kernel bug being a prime example.


    dvwjr

  • Michele Bachmann's 2nd Surge, by Jerry McGlothlin

    12/04/2011 7:49:53 PM PST · 11 of 34
    dvwjr to 2ndDivisionVet

    Except of course for James A. Garfield in 1880 who was a sitting member of the House of Representatives and a Senator-elect from the State of Ohio when elected President. He became President-elect and then President, and then dead soon thereafter.

    Quite a guy...

    dvwjr

  • BREAKING: South Carolina to hold primary on January 21 (Thank you Florida)

    10/03/2011 3:34:45 PM PDT · 36 of 41
    dvwjr to sinanju
    Originally posted by: sinanju

    "Political parties are private entities, not branches of government."


    Glad to see someone else on FreeRepublic understands this fact.

    The two major political parties made a serious mistake when the 'primary' became such an important part of party nominee selection - the major national political parties used the State general election machinery for their 'internal' primary voting process. This use of the State general election machinery and funding for the primary voting places and mechanisms came at a price, it allowed the various State governments to control the timing of the various parties primary voting and qualifications of the voter to participate in said primary elections.

    The primary was a creature of the private political parties until they all made this mistake, which even allowed the Federal government to prevent property or financial pre-conditions for primary elections with the passage of the 24th Amendment to the US Constitution. However, party self financed State-wide conventions or caucas would be a way around the various State Legislatures such as New Hampshire mandating that it MUST hold the first primary of the various States.

    The 'open' primary process on the Republican side allows any Independent, Democrat or other voters to impact the internal nominee process of the Republican Party. The use of conventions would put the financial responsibility and process control back in the hands of the Republican Party.


    dvwjr

  • Oh my: Pennsylvania weighing bill to allocate electoral votes by congressional district

    09/13/2011 7:41:06 PM PDT · 27 of 54
    dvwjr to CharlesWayneCT

    You cannot have HALF electors. The State Legislature can appoint or have a popular vote election in the State to select said electors. Since electors are actual people, called “electors”, there is no lessor division of electors than the number ONE. That at least is what the US Federal Constitution mandates.

    dvwjr

  • President Rick Perry?

    08/26/2011 1:45:52 PM PDT · 59 of 110
    dvwjr to Recovering_Democrat

    You might note that US Grant was a TWO term President, he won elections in 1868 (72.8% electoral vote) and 1872 (78.1% electoral vote).

  • Navy, air force going 'royal' once again

    08/15/2011 6:09:07 PM PDT · 18 of 22
    dvwjr to ken5050; Clive

    It is true that Canada ended up with the third largest Navy in the world at the end of WWII. However, the fact that the 1st and 2nd largest Navies (US and UK) eliminated the 3rd, 4th and 5th ranked WWII Navies (Japanese, German and Italian) might have had something to do with Canada’s naval ranking rising to number three...

    dvwjr

  • Fred Thompson to appear in Richmond on behalf of National Popular Vote initiative

    07/11/2011 12:33:57 PM PDT · 42 of 94
    dvwjr to yefragetuwrabrumuy
    Originally posted by: yefragetuwrabrumuy
    President *elected* by the Electoral College. The presidency should not be a popularity contest. Only by tradition is the first ballot for president supposed to be who the elector is chosen to represent. If no president can be chosen in the first ballot, electors become free agents.


    While the Electors have always technically been 'free agents' after their election, the Electors for President and Vice-President ONLY get to vote ONCE in their respective State capitols. There is and never has been multiple voting "rounds" for the Electors. Given the 12th Amendment, if the Electors do not provide a majority to any candidate, only the top three vote getters of the Electors for President go to the House of Representatives. Therefore, only the House of Representatives gets to vote (potentially) multiple times to select a President. The Senate gets a choice of the top two Vice-Presidential vote getters of the Electors in the same manner.


    dvwjr

  • Rep. Scott Garrett (R-NJ): Bill Limiting Military Action in Libya is Unconstitutional

    06/24/2011 4:45:16 PM PDT · 60 of 97
    dvwjr to Anitius Severinus Boethius; 353FMG
    Originally posted by: Anitius Severinus Boethius
    "We have only declared war 5 times."


    I think it was 11 times that a Declaration of War was issued by the Congress, not just five...

     1.) 1812  War of 1812          - Great Britain
     2.) 1846  Mexican-American War - Mexico
     3.) 1898  Spanish-American War - Spain
     4.) 1917  WWI                  - Germany
     5.) 1917  WWI                  - Austria-Hungary
     6.) 1941  WWII                 - Japan
     7.) 1941  WWII                 - Germany
     8.) 1941  WWII                 - Italy
     9.) 1942  WWII                 - Bulgaria
    10.) 1942  WWII                 - Hungary
    11.) 1942  WWII                 - Romania 
    

    And just to forstall the, "see it was only five wars" - a declaration of War is against a specific nation-state. The Congress did not declare World War II, it delared war against six nation-states, three of them six months after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor on December 7th, 1941.

    Please notice that the United States Congress did not declare War on Finland, which was allied with Nazi Germany against the Soviet Union during WWII. I guess that the Congress still remembered the Soviet Union's attack on Finland in November of 1939.


    dvwjr

  • Spider bite causes four hour erection

    03/08/2011 7:27:19 PM PST · 110 of 159
    dvwjr to Red Badger
    Bite me!


    dvwjr
  • China bars English words in all publications

    12/25/2010 11:15:35 PM PST · 62 of 64
    dvwjr to Pinkbell

    The Chinese seem pretty “Gung Ho” about removing English words from their language...

    dvwjr

  • Bush vs Gore 10 years later

    12/23/2010 3:57:13 AM PST · 11 of 11
    dvwjr to Krankor; big black dog

    No offense, but you really did not go to bed that night with the Networks (including FOX) calling the election for Al Gore. You may think you did, but you did not do so.

    The networks did call Florida for Gore before the Florida panhandle voting locations closed at 8:00pm EST, which made it look bad for Bush, but had retracted the Florida ‘call’ for Gore by around 10pm. At around 2:30am FOX, followed by the other networks called Florida and hence the Election for Bush. Two hours later at 4:30am the networks retracted their call for Bush back to ‘too close to call’. By then many of the viewing public still awake were convinced that Bush had won a legitimate victory.

    Gore never did get a network ‘call’ that he was the winner of the 2000 Presidential elections...

    dvwjr

  • Snub for Obamas as Royal sources reveal they will not be invited to Prince William's wedding

    12/17/2010 1:05:11 AM PST · 103 of 109
    dvwjr to rod1; Nachum
    But how ever will Prince William start a DVD collection if he doesn’t give the Obamas an invite?


    No love of the British monarchy here, but Obama's gift of DVDs to the UK Prime Minister shows the Democrats as the cheap bastards that they have always been...

    A Republican President would have sent Blurays...

    dvwjr

  • What Did It All Mean? (McCain says Tea Party midterm victories "revolt" and "not a revolution")

    11/21/2010 5:27:32 PM PST · 18 of 60
    dvwjr to JRandomFreeper

    McCain was never a fighter pilot. During his Naval Aviation career, he was an attack pilot, he was shot down in a light attack aircraft, the A-4 Skyhawk. Back in the 1960s, Naval Aviators who were Fighter pilots were a different breed.

    dvwjr

  • Limbaugh Plays “Ding-Dong the Witch is Dead” in Honor of the End of Speaker Nancy Pelosi – Audio

    11/05/2010 1:50:47 AM PDT · 12 of 12
    dvwjr to Buckeye Battle Cry

    Unfortunately no. He won with 61% of the vote. Someday he will lose. :-)

    dvwjr

  • [Vanity]Historical records of party swings - please point to

    11/04/2010 4:58:34 PM PDT · 17 of 19
    dvwjr to dvwjr

    Typo on the Republican, it was 302, not including one ‘Independent’ Republican.

    dvwjr

  • [Vanity]Historical records of party swings - please point to

    11/04/2010 4:56:19 PM PDT · 16 of 19
    dvwjr to Retired Greyhound

    I think the maximum number of Democrats in the House happened in the 75th Congress (1937-1939) with the composition of the House as follows:

    Democrats - 334
    Republicans - 88
    Progressive - 8
    DFL - 5

    The Republican maximum count in the House was 300 Representatives in the 67th Congress (1921-1923).

    dvwjr

  • Limbaugh Plays “Ding-Dong the Witch is Dead” in Honor of the End of Speaker Nancy Pelosi – Audio

    11/03/2010 6:40:11 PM PDT · 10 of 12
    dvwjr to Buckeye Battle Cry
    I am glad you listed all the positives of the nation-wide Republican victory on Tuesday. Too many worry about not winning 10 Senate seats to take the US Senate. Let McConnnell and the other establishment Republicans remain in the minority until 2012 when they 'get their minds right'. The perks of running the Senate can come later.

    There might be a chance in 2012 to take enough Senate seats to get to 60, the filibuster proof majority so as to be able to send Bills to a (hopefully) Republican President. There are 22 Democrat and 12 Republican Senate seats up for grabs in 2012. The Republicans do not have to 'run the table' to get to 60 Senate seats in 2012. Such a victory would give the Republicans something that they have never had since cloture was defined in Senate Rules during the 65th Congress in 1917 - a filibuster proof Senate, which the Democrats have enjoyed seven times since 1917.

    The other big event that most seem to miss is that in a re-apportionment and re-districiting year the Republican Party has never been stronger at the State Legislature and Gubernatorial level since the 1920s! With this advantage and the current number of House seats (when finalized) House the Republicans should be able to control the House until 2020. Does not mean they will not lose House seats, but that the Republican House Majority should not get 'washed away' even in down elections - just as the Democrats maintained House control from 1955 to 1995.

    Good year here in Virginia. Came close in my 11th Congressional District - have to wait for overseas ballots but Fimian may fall a few hunderd votes short... However, these 2010 Federal and State elections have finally ended the last vestiges of the 140 year-old post-Reconstruction "Democrat Solid South" with the Republican State-wide triumps in the Governors and Legislative races throughout the South.


    dvwjr

  • Europe 'dismayed' as midterms highlight Obama's struggles

    10/28/2010 2:20:34 PM PDT · 47 of 52
    dvwjr to Lonesome in Massachussets; kittymyrib
    Actually, it happened in 1966 when France wanted all US Armed Forces out of French soil since France was exiting NATO. When LBJ ordered his Secretary of State, Dean Rusk to do the following:

    "LBJ stood by this presidential command. Rusk later brought it directly to De Gaulle, following his brief as to how the US would honor the French demand. Did the French in fact insist upon the removal of ALL American troops from French soil - to include the thousands buried across the country who had given their lives so France could again live in freedom? In Rusk's autobiography, he records that De Gaulle, embarrassed, did not reply."


    dvwjr

  • GOP's Griffith Pulls Even with 15-Term Incumbent Democrat Boucher [VA-9]

    10/27/2010 1:50:37 PM PDT · 12 of 13
    dvwjr to randita

    Governors of the Commonwealth of Virginia are restricted to one term. The last Governor to have two non-consecutive terms was Mills Godwin the 60th (Democrat) (1966-1970) and the 62nd (Republican) (1974-1978).

    dvwjr

  • Japan, worried by China, may boost submarine fleet

    10/27/2010 7:37:29 AM PDT · 5 of 9
    dvwjr to ejonesie22

    Don’t forget the 4 converted OHIO class SSGNs...

    dvwjr