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Posts by Elkiejg

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  • Susan Rice will not be nominated for Secretary of State

    11/18/2012 7:10:41 AM PST · 5 of 46
    Elkiejg to youngidiot

    I agree - Obummer thinks he can do whatever he wants. The other fallacy in this article is “she would be grilled under oath about....” since when has being under oath ever meant anything to this crowd. They couldn’t tell the truth if JC himself were standing in front of them.

  • Benghazigate: The Disaster That Should Have Sunk Obama -- and Still Could

    11/16/2012 7:43:40 PM PST · 3 of 68
    Elkiejg to eeriegeno

    I’d take the town clown over the ghetto thug any day........and our country would be 100% better off.

  • GOP Solution: Stick to Values, Pick Better Candidates

    11/09/2012 4:11:13 AM PST · 5 of 48
    Elkiejg to Kaslin

    I thought and still do that we had a great candidate in Sarah Palin - but she scared some of the GOP old timers, so she was thrown under the bus. I’m tired of the go along to get along mentality of the old guard - we need someone like Palin to tell it like it is. I’m a 74 yr old white woman - a minority!! and I’d support her or someone like her in a heartbeat.

  • Newt and the '10 PM Question'

    01/18/2012 4:35:05 AM PST · 12 of 39
    Elkiejg to Craftmore

    I understand your frustration - BUT - this country CANNOT afford another year of Obama. We simply have to hold our nose and vote for anybody but Obama.

  • Herman Cain's Gauntlet

    11/03/2011 7:34:02 AM PDT · 7 of 12
    Elkiejg to Savage Beast

    Savage Beast - from your mouth to G*D’s ear and people’s minds.

  • Health law ruling could be political earthquake (Supremes to hold private conference)

    11/03/2011 7:26:44 AM PDT · 3 of 19
    Elkiejg to Libloather

    This is reported in Politico????? I don’t trust anything they say anymore.

  • Cain Catches Flak, but Will It Shoot Down His Candidacy? (Real test of legitimacy lies ahead)

    11/03/2011 7:00:28 AM PDT · 10 of 18
    Elkiejg to jmaroneps37

    Not just money or Facebook “likes” are needed for Cain - internet bloggers need to find out what the Lamestream media won’t —— who is behind this attack!! My money leads right back to the imposter in the White House!!

  • Herman Cain to be interviewed on Fox - 11:20am EST

    10/31/2011 8:50:21 AM PDT · 39 of 215
    Elkiejg to NautiNurse

    “Due to the timing of this smear campaign, I suspect a desperate GOP candidate is behind this more than the Dems. #1 suspect is Ron Paul, #2 is Romney.”

    I suspect a black female democrat - follow the money — they will lead you back to a Dem.

  • Reid: Tea Party will fade away in time

    08/14/2011 9:28:55 AM PDT · 4 of 100
    Elkiejg to WKUHilltopper

    We will fade away .................... in his dreams!! He and all the evil liberals WISH we would fade away - ain’t gonna happen.

  • Sheriff: Intoxicated Woman Crashes SUV With 11 Kids Inside

    06/07/2011 12:55:32 AM PDT · 14 of 26
    Elkiejg to machogirl

    I didn’t even have to look at the picture to know she’s black and one of the welfare queens.

  • Top Ten Lessons from Weinergate

    06/07/2011 12:53:47 AM PDT · 15 of 25
    Elkiejg to vrwc54

    “They” (Lamestream media) call her “stunning”!!! I say she looks like a horse. Besides, she’s Muslim - how does a good Jewish boy get away with marrying a Muslim?

  • She gets it right, You betcha!!

    06/07/2011 12:44:59 AM PDT · 1 of 16
    Elkiejg
  • Chasing Sarah: The Boys Behind the Bus

    06/01/2011 5:36:28 AM PDT · 41 of 60
    Elkiejg to BobP

    WOW - this is a campaign poster I can fully support: Palin & West!!!!

  • Obama’s dozens of Social Security Numbers

    05/25/2011 9:28:06 AM PDT · 56 of 61
    Elkiejg to Republic

    Received this email yesterday which has a specific SS #:

    SSN number identified:
    The conspiracy widens… (Neither TruthorFiction and Snopes are addressing this, which means it usually isn’t false)

    An investigation has revealed the identity of the man whose Social Security number (SSN) has been illegally used by Obama: Jean Paul Ludwig, who was born in France in 1890, emigrated to the United States in 1924, and was assigned SSN 042-68-4425 in or about March, 1977. Ludwig lived most of his adult life in Connecticut. His SSN begins with the digits 042, which are among those reserved for Connecticut residents. Obama never lived or worked in that state, so there is no reason for his SSN to start with the digits 042.

    Now comes the best part. Ludwig spent the final months of his life in Hawaii , where he died. Conveniently, Obama’s grandmother, Madelyn Payne Dunham, worked part-time in the Probate Office in the Honolulu Hawaii Courthouse, and therefore had access to the SSNs of deceased individuals. The Social Security Administration was never informed of Ludwig’s death, and because he never received Social Security benefits there were no benefits to stop and no questions were raised. The suspicion, of course, is that Dunham, knowing her grandson was not a U.S. citizen—either because he was born in Kenya or became a citizen of Indonesia upon his adoption by Lolo Soetoro — merely scoured the probate records until she found someone who died who was not receiving Social Security benefits, and “selected” that SSN for Obama.

    Just wait until Trump gets past the birth certificate and onto the issue of Barry O’s use of a stolen SSN. You will see leftist heads exploding, because they will have no way of defending Obama.

    Although many Americans do not understand the meaning of the term “natural born citizen,” there are few who do not understand that if you are using someone else’s SSN it is a clear indication of fraud.

  • Sunday Morning Talk Show Thread 3 April 2011

    04/03/2011 5:30:01 AM PDT · 11 of 194
    Elkiejg to Alas Babylon!

    “Sens. Dingy Harry Reid, D-Nev., and Ms. Lindsey Graham, R-S.C” -— made me LOL!!

  • Nothing in politics is working like it did

    04/02/2011 3:10:47 AM PDT · 2 of 9
    Elkiejg to Scanian

    Link is bad............and I really want to read the rest!!

  • Radiation and the Japanese Nuclear Reactors (Nuclear Energy Institute - NEI)

    03/14/2011 2:52:22 AM PDT · 7 of 21
    Elkiejg to blueplum

    Along with reliable sources such as the IAEA and WNN updates, there is an incredible amount of misinformation and hyperbole flying around the internet and media right now about the Fukushima nuclear reactor situation. In the BNC post Discussion Thread – Japanese nuclear reactors and the 11 March 2011 earthquake (and in the many comments that attend the top post), a lot of technical detail is provided, as well as regular updates. But what about a layman’s summary? How do most people get a grasp on what is happening, why, and what the consequences will be?
    Below I reproduce a summary on the situation prepared by Dr Josef Oehmen, a research scientist at MIT, in Boston. He is a PhD Scientist, whose father has extensive experience in Germany’s nuclear industry. This was first posted by Jason Morgan earlier this evening, and he has kindly allowed me to reproduce it here. I think it is very important that this information be widely understood.
    Please also take the time to read this: An informed public is key to acceptance of nuclear energy — it was never more relevant than now.
    ———————————
    I am writing this text (Mar 12) to give you some peace of mind regarding some of the troubles in Japan, that is the safety of Japan’s nuclear reactors. Up front, the situation is serious, but under control. And this text is long! But you will know more about nuclear power plants after reading it than all journalists on this planet put together.
    There was and will *not* be any significant release of radioactivity.
    By “significant” I mean a level of radiation of more than what you would receive on – say – a long distance flight, or drinking a glass of beer that comes from certain areas with high levels of natural background radiation.
    I have been reading every news release on the incident since the earthquake. There has not been one single (!) report that was accurate and free of errors (and part of that problem is also a weakness in the Japanese crisis communication). By “not free of errors” I do not refer to tendentious anti-nuclear journalism – that is quite normal these days. By “not free of errors” I mean blatant errors regarding physics and natural law, as well as gross misinterpretation of facts, due to an obvious lack of fundamental and basic understanding of the way nuclear reactors are build and operated. I have read a 3 page report on CNN where every single paragraph contained an error.
    We will have to cover some fundamentals, before we get into what is going on.
    Construction of the Fukushima nuclear power plants
    The plants at Fukushima are so called Boiling Water Reactors, or BWR for short. Boiling Water Reactors are similar to a pressure cooker. The nuclear fuel heats water, the water boils and creates steam, the steam then drives turbines that create the electricity, and the steam is then cooled and condensed back to water, and the water send back to be heated by the nuclear fuel. The pressure cooker operates at about 250 °C.
    The nuclear fuel is uranium oxide. Uranium oxide is a ceramic with a very high melting point of about 3000 °C. The fuel is manufactured in pellets (think little cylinders the size of Lego bricks). Those pieces are then put into a long tube made of Zircaloy with a melting point of 2200 °C, and sealed tight. The assembly is called a fuel rod. These fuel rods are then put together to form larger packages, and a number of these packages are then put into the reactor. All these packages together are referred to as “the core”.
    The Zircaloy casing is the first containment. It separates the radioactive fuel from the rest of the world.
    The core is then placed in the “pressure vessels”. That is the pressure cooker we talked about before. The pressure vessels is the second containment. This is one sturdy piece of a pot, designed to safely contain the core for temperatures several hundred °C. That covers the scenarios where cooling can be restored at some point.
    The entire “hardware” of the nuclear reactor – the pressure vessel and all pipes, pumps, coolant (water) reserves, are then encased in the third containment. The third containment is a hermetically (air tight) sealed, very thick bubble of the strongest steel. The third containment is designed, built and tested for one single purpose: To contain, indefinitely, a complete core meltdown. For that purpose, a large and thick concrete basin is cast under the pressure vessel (the second containment), which is filled with graphite, all inside the third containment. This is the so-called “core catcher”. If the core melts and the pressure vessel bursts (and eventually melts), it will catch the molten fuel and everything else. It is built in such a way that the nuclear fuel will be spread out, so it can cool down.
    This third containment is then surrounded by the reactor building. The reactor building is an outer shell that is supposed to keep the weather out, but nothing in. (this is the part that was damaged in the explosion, but more to that later).
    Fundamentals of nuclear reactions
    The uranium fuel generates heat by nuclear fission. Big uranium atoms are split into smaller atoms. That generates heat plus neutrons (one of the particles that forms an atom). When the neutron hits another uranium atom, that splits, generating more neutrons and so on. That is called the nuclear chain reaction.
    Now, just packing a lot of fuel rods next to each other would quickly lead to overheating and after about 45 minutes to a melting of the fuel rods. It is worth mentioning at this point that the nuclear fuel in a reactor can *never* cause a nuclear explosion the type of a nuclear bomb. Building a nuclear bomb is actually quite difficult (ask Iran). In Chernobyl, the explosion was caused by excessive pressure buildup, hydrogen explosion and rupture of all containments, propelling molten core material into the environment (a “dirty bomb”). Why that did not and will not happen in Japan, further below.
    In order to control the nuclear chain reaction, the reactor operators use so-called “control rods”. The control rods absorb the neutrons and kill the chain reaction instantaneously. A nuclear reactor is built in such a way, that when operating normally, you take out all the control rods. The coolant water then takes away the heat (and converts it into steam and electricity) at the same rate as the core produces it. And you have a lot of leeway around the standard operating point of 250°C.
    The challenge is that after inserting the rods and stopping the chain reaction, the core still keeps producing heat. The uranium “stopped” the chain reaction. But a number of intermediate radioactive elements are created by the uranium during its fission process, most notably Cesium and Iodine isotopes, i.e. radioactive versions of these elements that will eventually split up into smaller atoms and not be radioactive anymore. Those elements keep decaying and producing heat. Because they are not regenerated any longer from the uranium (the uranium stopped decaying after the control rods were put in), they get less and less, and so the core cools down over a matter of days, until those intermediate radioactive elements are used up.
    This residual heat is causing the headaches right now.
    So the first “type” of radioactive material is the uranium in the fuel rods, plus the intermediate radioactive elements that the uranium splits into, also inside the fuel rod (Cesium and Iodine).
    There is a second type of radioactive material created, outside the fuel rods. The big main difference up front: Those radioactive materials have a very short half-life, that means that they decay very fast and split into non-radioactive materials. By fast I mean seconds. So if these radioactive materials are released into the environment, yes, radioactivity was released, but no, it is not dangerous, at all. Why? By the time you spelled “R-A-D-I-O-N-U-C-L-I-D-E”, they will be harmless, because they will have split up into non radioactive elements. Those radioactive elements are N-16, the radioactive isotope (or version) of nitrogen (air). The others are noble gases such as Xenon. But where do they come from? When the uranium splits, it generates a neutron (see above). Most of these neutrons will hit other uranium atoms and keep the nuclear chain reaction going. But some will leave the fuel rod and hit the water molecules, or the air that is in the water. Then, a non-radioactive element can “capture” the neutron. It becomes radioactive. As described above, it will quickly (seconds) get rid again of the neutron to return to its former beautiful self.
    This second “type” of radiation is very important when we talk about the radioactivity being released into the environment later on.
    What happened at Fukushima
    I will try to summarize the main facts. The earthquake that hit Japan was 7 times more powerful than the worst earthquake the nuclear power plant was built for (the Richter scale works logarithmically; the difference between the 8.2 that the plants were built for and the 8.9 that happened is 7 times, not 0.7). So the first hooray for Japanese engineering, everything held up.
    When the earthquake hit with 8.9, the nuclear reactors all went into automatic shutdown. Within seconds after the earthquake started, the control rods had been inserted into the core and nuclear chain reaction of the uranium stopped. Now, the cooling system has to carry away the residual heat. The residual heat load is about 3% of the heat load under normal operating conditions.
    The earthquake destroyed the external power supply of the nuclear reactor. That is one of the most serious accidents for a nuclear power plant, and accordingly, a “plant black out” receives a lot of attention when designing backup systems. The power is needed to keep the coolant pumps working. Since the power plant had been shut down, it cannot produce any electricity by itself any more.
    Things were going well for an hour. One set of multiple sets of emergency Diesel power generators kicked in and provided the electricity that was needed. Then the Tsunami came, much bigger than people had expected when building the power plant (see above, factor 7). The tsunami took out all multiple sets of backup Diesel generators.
    When designing a nuclear power plant, engineers follow a philosophy called “Defense of Depth”. That means that you first build everything to withstand the worst catastrophe you can imagine, and then design the plant in such a way that it can still handle one system failure (that you thought could never happen) after the other. A tsunami taking out all backup power in one swift strike is such a scenario. The last line of defense is putting everything into the third containment (see above), that will keep everything, whatever the mess, control rods in our out, core molten or not, inside the reactor.
    When the diesel generators were gone, the reactor operators switched to emergency battery power. The batteries were designed as one of the backups to the backups, to provide power for cooling the core for 8 hours. And they did.
    Within the 8 hours, another power source had to be found and connected to the power plant. The power grid was down due to the earthquake. The diesel generators were destroyed by the tsunami. So mobile diesel generators were trucked in.
    This is where things started to go seriously wrong. The external power generators could not be connected to the power plant (the plugs did not fit). So after the batteries ran out, the residual heat could not be carried away any more.
    At this point the plant operators begin to follow emergency procedures that are in place for a “loss of cooling event”. It is again a step along the “Depth of Defense” lines. The power to the cooling systems should never have failed completely, but it did, so they “retreat” to the next line of defense. All of this, however shocking it seems to us, is part of the day-to-day training you go through as an operator, right through to managing a core meltdown.
    It was at this stage that people started to talk about core meltdown. Because at the end of the day, if cooling cannot be restored, the core will eventually melt (after hours or days), and the last line of defense, the core catcher and third containment, would come into play.
    But the goal at this stage was to manage the core while it was heating up, and ensure that the first containment (the Zircaloy tubes that contains the nuclear fuel), as well as the second containment (our pressure cooker) remain intact and operational for as long as possible, to give the engineers time to fix the cooling systems.
    Because cooling the core is such a big deal, the reactor has a number of cooling systems, each in multiple versions (the reactor water cleanup system, the decay heat removal, the reactor core isolating cooling, the standby liquid cooling system, and the emergency core cooling system). Which one failed when or did not fail is not clear at this point in time.
    So imagine our pressure cooker on the stove, heat on low, but on. The operators use whatever cooling system capacity they have to get rid of as much heat as possible, but the pressure starts building up. The priority now is to maintain integrity of the first containment (keep temperature of the fuel rods below 2200°C), as well as the second containment, the pressure cooker. In order to maintain integrity of the pressure cooker (the second containment), the pressure has to be released from time to time. Because the ability to do that in an emergency is so important, the reactor has 11 pressure release valves. The operators now started venting steam from time to time to control the pressure. The temperature at this stage was about 550°C.
    This is when the reports about “radiation leakage” starting coming in. I believe I explained above why venting the steam is theoretically the same as releasing radiation into the environment, but why it was and is not dangerous. The radioactive nitrogen as well as the noble gases do not pose a threat to human health.

    At some stage during this venting, the explosion occurred. The explosion took place outside of the third containment (our “last line of defense”), and the reactor building. Remember that the reactor building has no function in keeping the radioactivity contained. It is not entirely clear yet what has happened, but this is the likely scenario: The operators decided to vent the steam from the pressure vessel not directly into the environment, but into the space between the third containment and the reactor building (to give the radioactivity in the steam more time to subside). The problem is that at the high temperatures that the core had reached at this stage, water molecules can “disassociate” into oxygen and hydrogen – an explosive mixture. And it did explode, outside the third containment, damaging the reactor building around. It was that sort of explosion, but inside the pressure vessel (because it was badly designed and not managed properly by the operators) that lead to the explosion of Chernobyl. This was never a risk at Fukushima. The problem of hydrogen-oxygen formation is one of the biggies when you design a power plant (if you are not Soviet, that is), so the reactor is build and operated in a way it cannot happen inside the containment. It happened outside, which was not intended but a possible scenario and OK, because it did not pose a risk for the containment.
    So the pressure was under control, as steam was vented. Now, if you keep boiling your pot, the problem is that the water level will keep falling and falling. The core is covered by several meters of water in order to allow for some time to pass (hours, days) before it gets exposed. Once the rods start to be exposed at the top, the exposed parts will reach the critical temperature of 2200 °C after about 45 minutes. This is when the first containment, the Zircaloy tube, would fail.
    And this started to happen. The cooling could not be restored before there was some (very limited, but still) damage to the casing of some of the fuel. The nuclear material itself was still intact, but the surrounding Zircaloy shell had started melting. What happened now is that some of the byproducts of the uranium decay – radioactive Cesium and Iodine – started to mix with the steam. The big problem, uranium, was still under control, because the uranium oxide rods were good until 3000 °C. It is confirmed that a very small amount of Cesium and Iodine was measured in the steam that was released into the atmosphere.
    It seems this was the “go signal” for a major plan B. The small amounts of Cesium that were measured told the operators that the first containment on one of the rods somewhere was about to give. The Plan A had been to restore one of the regular cooling systems to the core. Why that failed is unclear. One plausible explanation is that the tsunami also took away / polluted all the clean water needed for the regular cooling systems.
    The water used in the cooling system is very clean, demineralized (like distilled) water. The reason to use pure water is the above mentioned activation by the neutrons from the Uranium: Pure water does not get activated much, so stays practically radioactive-free. Dirt or salt in the water will absorb the neutrons quicker, becoming more radioactive. This has no effect whatsoever on the core – it does not care what it is cooled by. But it makes life more difficult for the operators and mechanics when they have to deal with activated (i.e. slightly radioactive) water.
    But Plan A had failed – cooling systems down or additional clean water unavailable – so Plan B came into effect. This is what it looks like happened:
    In order to prevent a core meltdown, the operators started to use sea water to cool the core. I am not quite sure if they flooded our pressure cooker with it (the second containment), or if they flooded the third containment, immersing the pressure cooker. But that is not relevant for us.
    The point is that the nuclear fuel has now been cooled down. Because the chain reaction has been stopped a long time ago, there is only very little residual heat being produced now. The large amount of cooling water that has been used is sufficient to take up that heat. Because it is a lot of water, the core does not produce sufficient heat any more to produce any significant pressure. Also, boric acid has been added to the seawater. Boric acid is “liquid control rod”. Whatever decay is still going on, the Boron will capture the neutrons and further speed up the cooling down of the core.
    The plant came close to a core meltdown. Here is the worst-case scenario that was avoided: If the seawater could not have been used for treatment, the operators would have continued to vent the water steam to avoid pressure buildup. The third containment would then have been completely sealed to allow the core meltdown to happen without releasing radioactive material. After the meltdown, there would have been a waiting period for the intermediate radioactive materials to decay inside the reactor, and all radioactive particles to settle on a surface inside the containment. The cooling system would have been restored eventually, and the molten core cooled to a manageable temperature. The containment would have been cleaned up on the inside. Then a messy job of removing the molten core from the containment would have begun, packing the (now solid again) fuel bit by bit into transportation containers to be shipped to processing plants. Depending on the damage, the block of the plant would then either be repaired or dismantled.
    Now, where does that leave us?
    • The plant is safe now and will stay safe.
    • Japan is looking at an INES Level 4 Accident: Nuclear accident with local consequences. That is bad for the company that owns the plant, but not for anyone else.
    • Some radiation was released when the pressure vessel was vented. All radioactive isotopes from the activated steam have gone (decayed). A very small amount of Cesium was released, as well as Iodine. If you were sitting on top of the plants’ chimney when they were venting, you should probably give up smoking to return to your former life expectancy. The Cesium and Iodine isotopes were carried out to the sea and will never be seen again.
    • There was some limited damage to the first containment. That means that some amounts of radioactive Cesium and Iodine will also be released into the cooling water, but no Uranium or other nasty stuff (the Uranium oxide does not “dissolve” in the water). There are facilities for treating the cooling water inside the third containment. The radioactive Cesium and Iodine will be removed there and eventually stored as radioactive waste in terminal storage.
    • The seawater used as cooling water will be activated to some degree. Because the control rods are fully inserted, the Uranium chain reaction is not happening. That means the “main” nuclear reaction is not happening, thus not contributing to the activation. The intermediate radioactive materials (Cesium and Iodine) are also almost gone at this stage, because the Uranium decay was stopped a long time ago. This further reduces the activation. The bottom line is that there will be some low level of activation of the seawater, which will also be removed by the treatment facilities.
    • The seawater will then be replaced over time with the “normal” cooling water
    • The reactor core will then be dismantled and transported to a processing facility, just like during a regular fuel change.
    • Fuel rods and the entire plant will be checked for potential damage. This will take about 4-5 years.
    • The safety systems on all Japanese plants will be upgraded to withstand a 9.0 earthquake and tsunami (or worse)
    • I believe the most significant problem will be a prolonged power shortage. About half of Japan’s nuclear reactors will probably have to be inspected, reducing the nation’s power generating capacity by 15%. This will probably be covered by running gas power plants that are usually only used for peak loads to cover some of the base load as well. That will increase your electricity bill, as well as lead to potential power shortages during peak demand, in Japan.
    If you want to stay informed, please forget the usual media outlets and consult the following websites:
    http://www.world-nuclear-news.org/RS_Battle_to_stabilise_earthquake_reactors_1203111.html
    http://bravenewclimate.com/2011/03/12/japan-nuclear-earthquake/
    http://ansnuclearcafe.org/2011/03/11/media-updates-on-nuclear-power-stations-in-japan/

  • USS Ronald Reagan Moved After Detecting Radioactive Plume (Took 1 Months Radiation in 1 Hour)

    03/14/2011 2:50:46 AM PDT · 10 of 185
    Elkiejg to buccaneer81

    Along with reliable sources such as the IAEA and WNN updates, there is an incredible amount of misinformation and hyperbole flying around the internet and media right now about the Fukushima nuclear reactor situation. In the BNC post Discussion Thread – Japanese nuclear reactors and the 11 March 2011 earthquake (and in the many comments that attend the top post), a lot of technical detail is provided, as well as regular updates. But what about a layman’s summary? How do most people get a grasp on what is happening, why, and what the consequences will be?
    Below I reproduce a summary on the situation prepared by Dr Josef Oehmen, a research scientist at MIT, in Boston. He is a PhD Scientist, whose father has extensive experience in Germany’s nuclear industry. This was first posted by Jason Morgan earlier this evening, and he has kindly allowed me to reproduce it here. I think it is very important that this information be widely understood.
    Please also take the time to read this: An informed public is key to acceptance of nuclear energy — it was never more relevant than now.
    ———————————
    I am writing this text (Mar 12) to give you some peace of mind regarding some of the troubles in Japan, that is the safety of Japan’s nuclear reactors. Up front, the situation is serious, but under control. And this text is long! But you will know more about nuclear power plants after reading it than all journalists on this planet put together.
    There was and will *not* be any significant release of radioactivity.
    By “significant” I mean a level of radiation of more than what you would receive on – say – a long distance flight, or drinking a glass of beer that comes from certain areas with high levels of natural background radiation.
    I have been reading every news release on the incident since the earthquake. There has not been one single (!) report that was accurate and free of errors (and part of that problem is also a weakness in the Japanese crisis communication). By “not free of errors” I do not refer to tendentious anti-nuclear journalism – that is quite normal these days. By “not free of errors” I mean blatant errors regarding physics and natural law, as well as gross misinterpretation of facts, due to an obvious lack of fundamental and basic understanding of the way nuclear reactors are build and operated. I have read a 3 page report on CNN where every single paragraph contained an error.
    We will have to cover some fundamentals, before we get into what is going on.
    Construction of the Fukushima nuclear power plants
    The plants at Fukushima are so called Boiling Water Reactors, or BWR for short. Boiling Water Reactors are similar to a pressure cooker. The nuclear fuel heats water, the water boils and creates steam, the steam then drives turbines that create the electricity, and the steam is then cooled and condensed back to water, and the water send back to be heated by the nuclear fuel. The pressure cooker operates at about 250 °C.
    The nuclear fuel is uranium oxide. Uranium oxide is a ceramic with a very high melting point of about 3000 °C. The fuel is manufactured in pellets (think little cylinders the size of Lego bricks). Those pieces are then put into a long tube made of Zircaloy with a melting point of 2200 °C, and sealed tight. The assembly is called a fuel rod. These fuel rods are then put together to form larger packages, and a number of these packages are then put into the reactor. All these packages together are referred to as “the core”.
    The Zircaloy casing is the first containment. It separates the radioactive fuel from the rest of the world.
    The core is then placed in the “pressure vessels”. That is the pressure cooker we talked about before. The pressure vessels is the second containment. This is one sturdy piece of a pot, designed to safely contain the core for temperatures several hundred °C. That covers the scenarios where cooling can be restored at some point.
    The entire “hardware” of the nuclear reactor – the pressure vessel and all pipes, pumps, coolant (water) reserves, are then encased in the third containment. The third containment is a hermetically (air tight) sealed, very thick bubble of the strongest steel. The third containment is designed, built and tested for one single purpose: To contain, indefinitely, a complete core meltdown. For that purpose, a large and thick concrete basin is cast under the pressure vessel (the second containment), which is filled with graphite, all inside the third containment. This is the so-called “core catcher”. If the core melts and the pressure vessel bursts (and eventually melts), it will catch the molten fuel and everything else. It is built in such a way that the nuclear fuel will be spread out, so it can cool down.
    This third containment is then surrounded by the reactor building. The reactor building is an outer shell that is supposed to keep the weather out, but nothing in. (this is the part that was damaged in the explosion, but more to that later).
    Fundamentals of nuclear reactions
    The uranium fuel generates heat by nuclear fission. Big uranium atoms are split into smaller atoms. That generates heat plus neutrons (one of the particles that forms an atom). When the neutron hits another uranium atom, that splits, generating more neutrons and so on. That is called the nuclear chain reaction.
    Now, just packing a lot of fuel rods next to each other would quickly lead to overheating and after about 45 minutes to a melting of the fuel rods. It is worth mentioning at this point that the nuclear fuel in a reactor can *never* cause a nuclear explosion the type of a nuclear bomb. Building a nuclear bomb is actually quite difficult (ask Iran). In Chernobyl, the explosion was caused by excessive pressure buildup, hydrogen explosion and rupture of all containments, propelling molten core material into the environment (a “dirty bomb”). Why that did not and will not happen in Japan, further below.
    In order to control the nuclear chain reaction, the reactor operators use so-called “control rods”. The control rods absorb the neutrons and kill the chain reaction instantaneously. A nuclear reactor is built in such a way, that when operating normally, you take out all the control rods. The coolant water then takes away the heat (and converts it into steam and electricity) at the same rate as the core produces it. And you have a lot of leeway around the standard operating point of 250°C.
    The challenge is that after inserting the rods and stopping the chain reaction, the core still keeps producing heat. The uranium “stopped” the chain reaction. But a number of intermediate radioactive elements are created by the uranium during its fission process, most notably Cesium and Iodine isotopes, i.e. radioactive versions of these elements that will eventually split up into smaller atoms and not be radioactive anymore. Those elements keep decaying and producing heat. Because they are not regenerated any longer from the uranium (the uranium stopped decaying after the control rods were put in), they get less and less, and so the core cools down over a matter of days, until those intermediate radioactive elements are used up.
    This residual heat is causing the headaches right now.
    So the first “type” of radioactive material is the uranium in the fuel rods, plus the intermediate radioactive elements that the uranium splits into, also inside the fuel rod (Cesium and Iodine).
    There is a second type of radioactive material created, outside the fuel rods. The big main difference up front: Those radioactive materials have a very short half-life, that means that they decay very fast and split into non-radioactive materials. By fast I mean seconds. So if these radioactive materials are released into the environment, yes, radioactivity was released, but no, it is not dangerous, at all. Why? By the time you spelled “R-A-D-I-O-N-U-C-L-I-D-E”, they will be harmless, because they will have split up into non radioactive elements. Those radioactive elements are N-16, the radioactive isotope (or version) of nitrogen (air). The others are noble gases such as Xenon. But where do they come from? When the uranium splits, it generates a neutron (see above). Most of these neutrons will hit other uranium atoms and keep the nuclear chain reaction going. But some will leave the fuel rod and hit the water molecules, or the air that is in the water. Then, a non-radioactive element can “capture” the neutron. It becomes radioactive. As described above, it will quickly (seconds) get rid again of the neutron to return to its former beautiful self.
    This second “type” of radiation is very important when we talk about the radioactivity being released into the environment later on.
    What happened at Fukushima
    I will try to summarize the main facts. The earthquake that hit Japan was 7 times more powerful than the worst earthquake the nuclear power plant was built for (the Richter scale works logarithmically; the difference between the 8.2 that the plants were built for and the 8.9 that happened is 7 times, not 0.7). So the first hooray for Japanese engineering, everything held up.
    When the earthquake hit with 8.9, the nuclear reactors all went into automatic shutdown. Within seconds after the earthquake started, the control rods had been inserted into the core and nuclear chain reaction of the uranium stopped. Now, the cooling system has to carry away the residual heat. The residual heat load is about 3% of the heat load under normal operating conditions.
    The earthquake destroyed the external power supply of the nuclear reactor. That is one of the most serious accidents for a nuclear power plant, and accordingly, a “plant black out” receives a lot of attention when designing backup systems. The power is needed to keep the coolant pumps working. Since the power plant had been shut down, it cannot produce any electricity by itself any more.
    Things were going well for an hour. One set of multiple sets of emergency Diesel power generators kicked in and provided the electricity that was needed. Then the Tsunami came, much bigger than people had expected when building the power plant (see above, factor 7). The tsunami took out all multiple sets of backup Diesel generators.
    When designing a nuclear power plant, engineers follow a philosophy called “Defense of Depth”. That means that you first build everything to withstand the worst catastrophe you can imagine, and then design the plant in such a way that it can still handle one system failure (that you thought could never happen) after the other. A tsunami taking out all backup power in one swift strike is such a scenario. The last line of defense is putting everything into the third containment (see above), that will keep everything, whatever the mess, control rods in our out, core molten or not, inside the reactor.
    When the diesel generators were gone, the reactor operators switched to emergency battery power. The batteries were designed as one of the backups to the backups, to provide power for cooling the core for 8 hours. And they did.
    Within the 8 hours, another power source had to be found and connected to the power plant. The power grid was down due to the earthquake. The diesel generators were destroyed by the tsunami. So mobile diesel generators were trucked in.
    This is where things started to go seriously wrong. The external power generators could not be connected to the power plant (the plugs did not fit). So after the batteries ran out, the residual heat could not be carried away any more.
    At this point the plant operators begin to follow emergency procedures that are in place for a “loss of cooling event”. It is again a step along the “Depth of Defense” lines. The power to the cooling systems should never have failed completely, but it did, so they “retreat” to the next line of defense. All of this, however shocking it seems to us, is part of the day-to-day training you go through as an operator, right through to managing a core meltdown.
    It was at this stage that people started to talk about core meltdown. Because at the end of the day, if cooling cannot be restored, the core will eventually melt (after hours or days), and the last line of defense, the core catcher and third containment, would come into play.
    But the goal at this stage was to manage the core while it was heating up, and ensure that the first containment (the Zircaloy tubes that contains the nuclear fuel), as well as the second containment (our pressure cooker) remain intact and operational for as long as possible, to give the engineers time to fix the cooling systems.
    Because cooling the core is such a big deal, the reactor has a number of cooling systems, each in multiple versions (the reactor water cleanup system, the decay heat removal, the reactor core isolating cooling, the standby liquid cooling system, and the emergency core cooling system). Which one failed when or did not fail is not clear at this point in time.
    So imagine our pressure cooker on the stove, heat on low, but on. The operators use whatever cooling system capacity they have to get rid of as much heat as possible, but the pressure starts building up. The priority now is to maintain integrity of the first containment (keep temperature of the fuel rods below 2200°C), as well as the second containment, the pressure cooker. In order to maintain integrity of the pressure cooker (the second containment), the pressure has to be released from time to time. Because the ability to do that in an emergency is so important, the reactor has 11 pressure release valves. The operators now started venting steam from time to time to control the pressure. The temperature at this stage was about 550°C.
    This is when the reports about “radiation leakage” starting coming in. I believe I explained above why venting the steam is theoretically the same as releasing radiation into the environment, but why it was and is not dangerous. The radioactive nitrogen as well as the noble gases do not pose a threat to human health.

    At some stage during this venting, the explosion occurred. The explosion took place outside of the third containment (our “last line of defense”), and the reactor building. Remember that the reactor building has no function in keeping the radioactivity contained. It is not entirely clear yet what has happened, but this is the likely scenario: The operators decided to vent the steam from the pressure vessel not directly into the environment, but into the space between the third containment and the reactor building (to give the radioactivity in the steam more time to subside). The problem is that at the high temperatures that the core had reached at this stage, water molecules can “disassociate” into oxygen and hydrogen – an explosive mixture. And it did explode, outside the third containment, damaging the reactor building around. It was that sort of explosion, but inside the pressure vessel (because it was badly designed and not managed properly by the operators) that lead to the explosion of Chernobyl. This was never a risk at Fukushima. The problem of hydrogen-oxygen formation is one of the biggies when you design a power plant (if you are not Soviet, that is), so the reactor is build and operated in a way it cannot happen inside the containment. It happened outside, which was not intended but a possible scenario and OK, because it did not pose a risk for the containment.
    So the pressure was under control, as steam was vented. Now, if you keep boiling your pot, the problem is that the water level will keep falling and falling. The core is covered by several meters of water in order to allow for some time to pass (hours, days) before it gets exposed. Once the rods start to be exposed at the top, the exposed parts will reach the critical temperature of 2200 °C after about 45 minutes. This is when the first containment, the Zircaloy tube, would fail.
    And this started to happen. The cooling could not be restored before there was some (very limited, but still) damage to the casing of some of the fuel. The nuclear material itself was still intact, but the surrounding Zircaloy shell had started melting. What happened now is that some of the byproducts of the uranium decay – radioactive Cesium and Iodine – started to mix with the steam. The big problem, uranium, was still under control, because the uranium oxide rods were good until 3000 °C. It is confirmed that a very small amount of Cesium and Iodine was measured in the steam that was released into the atmosphere.
    It seems this was the “go signal” for a major plan B. The small amounts of Cesium that were measured told the operators that the first containment on one of the rods somewhere was about to give. The Plan A had been to restore one of the regular cooling systems to the core. Why that failed is unclear. One plausible explanation is that the tsunami also took away / polluted all the clean water needed for the regular cooling systems.
    The water used in the cooling system is very clean, demineralized (like distilled) water. The reason to use pure water is the above mentioned activation by the neutrons from the Uranium: Pure water does not get activated much, so stays practically radioactive-free. Dirt or salt in the water will absorb the neutrons quicker, becoming more radioactive. This has no effect whatsoever on the core – it does not care what it is cooled by. But it makes life more difficult for the operators and mechanics when they have to deal with activated (i.e. slightly radioactive) water.
    But Plan A had failed – cooling systems down or additional clean water unavailable – so Plan B came into effect. This is what it looks like happened:
    In order to prevent a core meltdown, the operators started to use sea water to cool the core. I am not quite sure if they flooded our pressure cooker with it (the second containment), or if they flooded the third containment, immersing the pressure cooker. But that is not relevant for us.
    The point is that the nuclear fuel has now been cooled down. Because the chain reaction has been stopped a long time ago, there is only very little residual heat being produced now. The large amount of cooling water that has been used is sufficient to take up that heat. Because it is a lot of water, the core does not produce sufficient heat any more to produce any significant pressure. Also, boric acid has been added to the seawater. Boric acid is “liquid control rod”. Whatever decay is still going on, the Boron will capture the neutrons and further speed up the cooling down of the core.
    The plant came close to a core meltdown. Here is the worst-case scenario that was avoided: If the seawater could not have been used for treatment, the operators would have continued to vent the water steam to avoid pressure buildup. The third containment would then have been completely sealed to allow the core meltdown to happen without releasing radioactive material. After the meltdown, there would have been a waiting period for the intermediate radioactive materials to decay inside the reactor, and all radioactive particles to settle on a surface inside the containment. The cooling system would have been restored eventually, and the molten core cooled to a manageable temperature. The containment would have been cleaned up on the inside. Then a messy job of removing the molten core from the containment would have begun, packing the (now solid again) fuel bit by bit into transportation containers to be shipped to processing plants. Depending on the damage, the block of the plant would then either be repaired or dismantled.
    Now, where does that leave us?
    • The plant is safe now and will stay safe.
    • Japan is looking at an INES Level 4 Accident: Nuclear accident with local consequences. That is bad for the company that owns the plant, but not for anyone else.
    • Some radiation was released when the pressure vessel was vented. All radioactive isotopes from the activated steam have gone (decayed). A very small amount of Cesium was released, as well as Iodine. If you were sitting on top of the plants’ chimney when they were venting, you should probably give up smoking to return to your former life expectancy. The Cesium and Iodine isotopes were carried out to the sea and will never be seen again.
    • There was some limited damage to the first containment. That means that some amounts of radioactive Cesium and Iodine will also be released into the cooling water, but no Uranium or other nasty stuff (the Uranium oxide does not “dissolve” in the water). There are facilities for treating the cooling water inside the third containment. The radioactive Cesium and Iodine will be removed there and eventually stored as radioactive waste in terminal storage.
    • The seawater used as cooling water will be activated to some degree. Because the control rods are fully inserted, the Uranium chain reaction is not happening. That means the “main” nuclear reaction is not happening, thus not contributing to the activation. The intermediate radioactive materials (Cesium and Iodine) are also almost gone at this stage, because the Uranium decay was stopped a long time ago. This further reduces the activation. The bottom line is that there will be some low level of activation of the seawater, which will also be removed by the treatment facilities.
    • The seawater will then be replaced over time with the “normal” cooling water
    • The reactor core will then be dismantled and transported to a processing facility, just like during a regular fuel change.
    • Fuel rods and the entire plant will be checked for potential damage. This will take about 4-5 years.
    • The safety systems on all Japanese plants will be upgraded to withstand a 9.0 earthquake and tsunami (or worse)
    • I believe the most significant problem will be a prolonged power shortage. About half of Japan’s nuclear reactors will probably have to be inspected, reducing the nation’s power generating capacity by 15%. This will probably be covered by running gas power plants that are usually only used for peak loads to cover some of the base load as well. That will increase your electricity bill, as well as lead to potential power shortages during peak demand, in Japan.
    If you want to stay informed, please forget the usual media outlets and consult the following websites:
    http://www.world-nuclear-news.org/RS_Battle_to_stabilise_earthquake_reactors_1203111.html
    http://bravenewclimate.com/2011/03/12/japan-nuclear-earthquake/
    http://ansnuclearcafe.org/2011/03/11/media-updates-on-nuclear-power-stations-in-japan/

  • Al Jazeera in Talks With Comcast, Time Warner

    03/02/2011 12:51:52 PM PST · 2 of 25
    Elkiejg to jimbo123

    I’m pretty sure we already have it in Central Florida on Comcast.

  • Legal concerns clouded Newt Gingrich event [he's still running]

    03/02/2011 12:50:04 PM PST · 3 of 21
    Elkiejg to Hawk720

    I think Newt is brilliant -—— but -—— he should not run for President - way too much baggage. We need a STRONG CONSERVATIVE.

  • Haridopolos flip-flops, sides with Gov. Rick Scott on rejecting rail dollars

    02/20/2011 9:11:21 AM PST · 37 of 40
    Elkiejg to Matchett-PI

    Here’s an email sent to Nelson from my husband - we’re FL residents.

    Senator Nelson,

    I received you email regarding the Governor’s action to stop the High Speed Rail (HSR) project.

    First, you should know that I spent my working career in the planning, design and implementation of public transportation projects with the majority of the time spent on rail projects. My forty-plus years of experience encompasses both domestic and foreign projects.

    My initial comment on your email is you have not listed the primary purpose and justification for a transport project (transit or roadway). The primary purpose of any transportation project must be to satisfy a travel need and the solution should be sized to resolve the transportation issues. The justifications you listed in your email are more attuned to development projects. And, even so, your research on the number of jobs the project would create (and, I assume it only refers to the development phase since the number is grossly overstated when the project gets to the operations phase) are not Florida jobs. In fact, most of the jobs are not even domestic. If you review the previous studies, going back to the Fluor proposal, you will find that all proposals have relied primarily on foreign products and foreign technology.

    The most significant deficiency in the project is the lack of ridership. I have personally reviewed the ridership estimates over the several studies and I have yet to see a credible forecast that would justify the expenditure. Under the best of circumstances, the potential forecast market for the service in its design year is about 5,000 trips per day – a far cry from reaching a threshold value for an expenditure of the magnitude proposed.

    A major prerequisite for an intercity HSR project is an adequate local public transport system at the major termini. Neither Lynx nor HART has the investment in place or the plan to get the investment in place to meet that requirement. Hence, in my opinion, the investment focus needs to be in the urban areas (Lakeland, too) in order for a HSR project to even be considered in the future.

    As an aside, I have been an admirer and supporter of John Mica and his efforts to get high quality transit service into the Orlando area. And, I support his commuter rail project as an element of that plan. It is unfortunate that the light rail project was not carried to completion – it would have been even more valuable to the public transport system of the area. It is these types of projects that should be receiving moneys.

  • Palin: America out of step with Reagan's values

    02/06/2011 3:38:43 AM PST · 2 of 12
    Elkiejg to Cincinatus' Wife

    I salute you Sarah - thanks for saying what we think and taking the hits for us from the LIEberals.

  • How Bam could still pull off 2012

    12/28/2010 3:49:36 AM PST · 8 of 33
    Elkiejg to LibLieSlayer

    Thanks LLS - your assessment of Barrone being an inside the Beltway thinker are right on target. What “they” still don’t realize is the great American giant has been awakened -— we no longer need them to tell us what to think or do.

  • How Bam could still pull off 2012

    12/28/2010 3:46:47 AM PST · 7 of 33
    Elkiejg to Scanian

    I usually agree with “most” of Barone’s assessments - he’s far smarter than I about politics.........but.......this time I don’t agree with him at all. He claims “most Americans like Obama” that he’s likable. Not true Barone, a LOT of us despise him and what he’s trying very hard to do to our country. AND the color of his skin has nothing to do with it - I wouldn’t like nor trust him if he was white, red or purple. The man hates America and it shows.

  • Scandals Dogged Richardson's Terms (NM-his hand in every pocket)

    12/27/2010 10:01:04 AM PST · 10 of 17
    Elkiejg to Elkiejg

    CORRECTION - post about Hillary resigning is on BritebartTV.com.

  • Scandals Dogged Richardson's Terms (NM-his hand in every pocket)

    12/27/2010 9:54:39 AM PST · 7 of 17
    Elkiejg to ridesthemiles

    Just saw a post on GatePundit that Hillary is resigning as Sec State and Richardson will take over. If true, his trip overseas recently makes more sense. Anyone know if this is true?

  • McCain: A Third Party Will Rise If We Don't Listen to America (Fat Lady is Warming Up for GOP)

    12/12/2010 7:37:28 AM PST · 3 of 50
    Elkiejg to broken_arrow1

    I know that loading up bills with unrelated pork has been the norm for years - and that’s what’s gotten us in this financial mess. Why not a novel idea.............the bills will only be for ONE item with no hidden costs going to anything else!!!

    And while they’re reforming the way to do business - how about really cutting the cost of government by either getting rid of useless agencies like Dept. of Education or DEP, etc., etc. If not shutting them down entirely - at least cut in half.

  • Pro-WikiLeaks cyber army gains strength; thousands join DDoS attacks

    12/09/2010 2:40:21 PM PST · 3 of 45
    Elkiejg to fightinJAG

    I just tried Amazon and got right on. As far as I’m concerned the hackers deserve jail also.

  • A List of all U.S. Senate Incumbents Up for Reelection in 2012 (Vanity)

    11/14/2010 6:05:12 AM PST · 21 of 58
    Elkiejg to Perdogg

    Olympia Snowe of Maine - should be a GONER!!

  • Who paid for Pelosi party?

    11/11/2010 3:18:27 AM PST · 16 of 30
    Elkiejg to Prince of Space

    You found him - .gov lists his wife as Stacy.

  • (Lying Media Whore) Joe Wilson reacts to Bush memoirs

    11/09/2010 4:48:00 AM PST · 4 of 33
    Elkiejg to NCBraveheart

    “Hollyweird has even made a movie about this non-issue with Sean Penn.”

    Oh goodie - another movie I can skip and save money!!!

  • Live Coverage - Obama in Mumbai

    11/06/2010 3:45:31 AM PDT · 72 of 288
    Elkiejg to greenhornet68

    Oh Gee - I missed Bambi’s speech!!! But I did check the TV link and saw the headline that India was not impressed with him ................ WELCOME TO OUR WORLD!!

    Agree with all - Michelle MaBelle looks like a 1940’s maid. I’m not surprised because she’s really fashion challenged. I especially like her look when she wears those big wide belts up under her boobies!! Very shart!!

  • Florida Case Puts Focus on Issue of Absentee Ballot Fraud

    10/04/2010 10:35:45 AM PDT · 6 of 19
    Elkiejg to Elle Bee

    I live in FL and serve as Clerk for one of our districts in Brevard County. I can tell you they run a tight ship in Brevard, but there are missed mistakes. And yes, we have some snow birds who vote both north and south. As much as some don’t want it, I think a National Voter Card would be useful and if we really want to stamp out double voting fraud, have a national data base set up like the states do. If you’re voted, the system shows it!!

  • Dismantling America (8/17/10)

    08/17/2010 4:46:31 AM PDT · 2 of 12
    Elkiejg to Elkiejg

    Dr. Sowell hits it out of the park again. Wake Up America - we are on the brink of destruction.

  • Dismantling America (8/17/10)

    08/17/2010 4:44:40 AM PDT · 1 of 12
    Elkiejg
  • "Ground Zero" Mosque is a Mistake

    08/09/2010 5:13:09 AM PDT · 6 of 14
    Elkiejg to Kaslin

    The bottom line with this whole Mosque situation is.......Hey Islam - when we can build a church or synagogue in Mecca, then you can build your Mosque at Ground Zero.

  • All in the Chicago Family

    08/09/2010 5:00:26 AM PDT · 2 of 5
    Elkiejg to SJackson

    Welcome to Chicago thug, gutter-style politics — except now they’re coming from our White House and the IMPOSTOR.

  • Michelle, Sasha Obama bask in attention at Spain’s seaside after sightseeing

    08/07/2010 9:12:13 AM PDT · 37 of 59
    Elkiejg to Reagan69

    thanks for posting this picture - you just have to feel so damn sorry for the SS guys, if I were them, I’d HATE my job and think about moving on to something else.

  • Rush Limbaugh: Fox 'caved' on Shirley Sherrod

    07/23/2010 6:54:09 AM PDT · 2 of 34
    Elkiejg to Responsibility2nd

    Who is Ted Baxter?

  • MARINE STUNS A TEA PARTY WITH THE FOURTH VERSE OF THE STAR SPANGLED BANNER

    06/06/2010 6:12:41 AM PDT · 12 of 52
    Elkiejg to all the best

    He does a tremendous job and I just love how the people started standing in respect of our National Anthem.

  • Live Thread: Obama Nominates Elena Kagan to Supreme Court (10 a.m. EDT 5/10/10)

    05/10/2010 6:45:29 AM PDT · 3 of 164
    Elkiejg to kristinn

    Here’s a post from Powerlineblog on Kagan:

    President Obama will reportedly announce the appointment of Solicitor General Elena Kagan to the Supreme Court today. I don’t know much about Kagan, but the little I do know raises a question in my mind about what kind of justice she will be.

    As Dean of Harvard Law School, Kagan had to deal with the issue of compliance with the Solomon Amendment. Under the Solomon Amendment, universities receiving federal funding are required to allow the armed services to recruit on campus like other employers. It is a law that shouldn’t be necessary.

    Harvard Law School was one of many prominent law schools that chose to violate the Solomon Amendment, citing the military’s don’t ask/don’t tell policy. The don’t ask/don’t tell policy is not just a whim of the armed forces. It is also the law of the land, but don’t tell law school deans about it. They have to worry about matters closer to home, like their own schools’ so-called nondiscrimination policies against hosting recruiters for employers that don’t toe the line on homosexual rights.

    When the Department of Defense sent Harvard a notice that it intended to enforce the Solomon Amendment, Kagan announced that she would adhere to what I call the Yale Doctrine, in honor of the statement made by then-Yale Law Dean Anthony Kronman at the time:

    We would never put at risk the overwhelmingly large financial interests of the University in federal funding. We have a point of principle to defend, but we will not defend this—at the expense of programs vital to the University and the world at large.

    Dean Kronman paid a backhanded tribute to the “money talks” impetus behind the Solomon Amendment. Thus the Yale Doctrine: We take your money for the good of the world.

    But neither Yale nor Harvard let it go at that. They both supported FAIR v Rumsfeld, the lawsuit opposing the Solomon Amendment.

    Yale and others argued that the Solomon Amendment was unconstitutional. I thought that the legal merits of the FAIR lawsuit rivaled those of obesity lawsuits brought by overweight consumers against fast food outlets. A divided panel of the Third Circuit Court of Appeals held in favor of the plaintiffs, however, finding it likely that the Solomon Amendment unconstitutionally infringed the law school’s First Amendment rights.

    When the Supreme Court accepted the Department of Defense’s appeal from the Third Circuit decision, Kagan got on board. She was one of 40 Harvard Law School professors who signed a friend-of-the-court brief written by Walter Dellinger supporting the FAIR plaintiffs.

    In the brief Dellinger argued that the Solomon Amendment applied only to schools that specifically prohibited military access on campus, not to schools’ whose policies simply had the (allegedly) incidental effect of doing so. Dellinger distinguished the law schools’ contemporary anti-discrimination policies from Vietnam-era academic anti-military policies.

    Dellinger’s argument based on the language of the Solomon Amendment was, to say the least, strained, and the Supreme Court gave it the back of its hand in the Court’s 9-0 opinion upholding the Solomon Amendment. Even Justice Stevens rejected it.

    Here we have Kagan herself, as Dean of the Harvard Law School, signing off on a brief making an argument so far out that not a single member of the Supreme Court found it worthy of adherence. This would seem to provide some evidence for the proposition that Kagan’s views lie somewhere outside the mainstream of Supreme Court jurisprudence.

    Perhaps the institutional imperatives to which she gave voice as dean of the Harvard Law School overrode her common sense. For other reasons, Kagan has noted she didn’t write the brief; she merely signed it.

    Kagan’s side decisively lost the FAIR case in the Supreme Court. I wrote while the case was pending in the Supreme Court that some lawsuits deserve a fate worse than failure. While decent military recruiters suffered the rudeness of their purported betters at Yale Law School and elsewhere in silence, the armed services of the United States were (and are) actively defending the freedom of those schools from peril. The rank ingratitude of those who should know better is a disgrace that deserves to be widely recognized as such.

  • Foreign Policy Trifecta

    04/23/2010 11:19:12 AM PDT · 1 of 3
    Elkiejg
    Words cannot begin to express my disgust and hatred - yes hatred - for this impostor. And race has nothing to do with it - I wouldn't care if he were purple. What he's doing to this wonderful country is criminal.
  • THE FUTURE OF FOX NEWS

    03/17/2010 8:45:23 PM PDT · 13 of 65
    Elkiejg to butterdezillion

    butterdezillion - all excellent suggestions. Any chance you can contact Breitbart and Rush with your thoughts?

  • Reid Remarks Intensify Spat With High-Court Conservatives

    03/11/2010 8:03:17 AM PST · 48 of 67
    Elkiejg to GOP_Lady
    "majority leader strongly backed President Barack Obama's push for legislation requiring corporations to disclose their political spending and imposing other regulations."

    Does this include the SEIU and other unions that support the RATS?

  • Not the American Way

    03/06/2010 4:22:10 AM PST · 1 of 14
    Elkiejg
    100% correct assessment of the PRETENDER.
  • Exclusive: Unknown DOJ Lawyers Identified

    03/03/2010 12:59:34 PM PST · 4 of 15
    Elkiejg to Free ThinkerNY

    I would contend that Obama himself “advocates for terror suspects” when he bows and scraps before Muslim leaders and tells them how great they are and how terrible America while he’s giving the finger to our loyal allies. IMPEACHMENT is the answer to this pretender.

  • Sunday Morning Talk Show Thread 21 February 2010

    02/21/2010 5:11:28 AM PST · 11 of 430
    Elkiejg to Alas Babylon!

    What a lineup —— think I’ll go back to bed!!

  • US Marines Airdropped Into Taliban-Held Territory

    02/19/2010 2:06:42 AM PST · 4 of 18
    Elkiejg to Berlin_Freeper

    G*D Speed to our Marines - but I wish rather than inserting them in the midst of these heathens, they’d just drop a gigantic bomb and be done with the whole mess.

  • Pelosi’s Taxpayer-Funded Liquor Tab (Almost $1,000 a week!)

    01/31/2010 1:16:30 AM PST · 29 of 41
    Elkiejg to DemforBush

    It’s not just booze we’re paying for. See below from Gateway Pundit - http://gatewaypundit.firstthings.com/

    Taxpayers are not just paying for Pelosi’s expensive booze and food, they’re paying for the military to play taxi with her kids and grand kids, too.

    “Pelosi One” seats 200 and can fly nonstop from Washington to San Francisco.

    Doug Ross reported on the latest t*rd to float to the surface in the Pelosi swamp.
    Apparently, the Speaker has been using the US military to taxi her kids and grand kids across the country without any US Representatives even on board. The cost of each flight is up to $18,000 per hour.

    Using Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) requests, Judicial Watch uncovered thousands of pages of travel documents related to House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s use of military aircraft.

    What hasn’t been revealed so far is that military aircraft are being used to shuttle Pelosi’s kids and grandkids between DC and San Francisco without any Congressional representatives even onboard! Put simply, the United States Air Force is serving as a multi-billion dollar chauffeur- and baby-sitting service for Nancy Pelosi’s kids and grandkids — presumably because commercial travel is beneath the families of the autocrats.

    Truly. She feels your pain.

  • Taliban Leader 'Killed In US Drone Attack'

    01/31/2010 1:05:22 AM PST · 5 of 43
    Elkiejg to rdl6989

    YEAH!!!