Posts by NZerFromHK

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  • Scottish independence: First referendum results declared

    09/19/2014 2:24:52 PM PDT · 257 of 265
    NZerFromHK to bd476

    Just FYI HK wants to rejoin the UK (they didn’t become independent, they became a colony of China instead)

  • Scottish independence: First referendum results declared

    09/18/2014 11:11:52 PM PDT · 203 of 265
    NZerFromHK to GeronL

    It was yes 53%. My ex-boss is from Glasgow and he said many of his own friends his generation (mid 30s) are the bedrock independentists. But that was it plus perhaps Dundee. Edinburgh is definitely unionist though.

  • Scottish independence: First referendum results declared

    09/18/2014 11:01:47 PM PDT · 200 of 265
    NZerFromHK to GeronL; WeatherGuy

    My ex-boss is a Scot and lived in Scotland until 12 years ago when in his mid 20s. He told me beforehand that Edinburgh would be heavily against independence - most are unionists there. Glasgow is different and has majority for independence.

    I think both Aberdeen and Edinburgh was 60% No.

    In fact it is the “older young” urban working class people who are independentists.

    I don’t think even 1 out of 100 FRers got British politics right.

  • The rise of Scotland the terrible

    09/13/2014 9:04:24 PM PDT · 59 of 63
    NZerFromHK to driftless2

    I was in a discussion with an ex-boss and his friends back home. My ex-boss is Scottish migrant and supports Scotland staying in the UK. While many of his friends don’t. I listed what happened to Ireland.

    It turns out that as terrible Ireland was and despite it’s at peace at last and as sort of a Celtic tiger for some years until 2009, Ireland has kind of been an impoverished Switzerland on the edge of Europe. Dublin was the second largest city of the British Empire in the 18th and 19tg centuries, they produced illustrious writers like Oscar Wilde and Uliness (sp?). Trinity College of Dublin was one of the most prestigious universities in those days.

    And now in 2014, Trinity College and the University College Ireland are languishing at about 200th in terms of best a academia in the world. Modern Ireland is only famous for U2, Ryanair, and US software industry outsourcing destination. But otherwise Ireland is as inconsequential to the world as Switzerland (really the Swiss are there to host the UN and it’s banks).

    The best, and I think it’s wildly optimistic, scenario of an independent Scotland will be it becomes the Switzerland of northwestern Europe, probably a neutral country like Switzerland and Ireland. But the price is that it, just as Switzerland and Ireland do, will be independent by pleasure of greater powers, but will not be able to withstand any pressure exerted by the bigger powers’ bullying. And just like Switzerland and Ireland, they won’t amount to much or even anything and will no longer be able to contribute immensely for the good of human race in a substabtial way like it is as part of the UK. It will be a boring far away small country you think of for 2 minutes every year.

    The more likely scenario will be endless disputes with what’s left of the UK and Norway over intellectual property rights, inheriting national debts, pressure to join EU and renew the Auld Alliance with France and because of the modern Franco-German core in the EU, Angela Merkel or whoever succeeds her as the German Chancellor will become the real person pulling the levers in Edinburgh. You then have disputes in EEZ (economic zones) in the North Sea. I note that Croatia still hasn’t resolved the EEZ with Slovenia and Italy more than 22 years after independent. Who says that Scotland won’t suffer suits filed by The UK and Noraay at the ICJ in The Hague? Also you get the issue of economic policy. This article shows that nationalisation and confiscation by thugs will be the rule of Scotland under Salmond. They will follow Hogo chavez’s or Eva peron’s economic policies. I think this means that this Scotland will increasingly become like a Belarus or Moldova basket case.

    Either way independence will aid the EU as well. I thought creepers are against it?

  • Pro-union camp ‘in chaos’ as poll puts nationalists ahead

    09/11/2014 11:01:51 PM PDT · 36 of 36
    NZerFromHK to ConservativeMind

    Oh, it’s so nice to meet you at last, Mr Fisk. I didn’t realise you were presenting such fine arguments on this thread:

    http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/comment/scottish-independence-ireland-since-1919-is-a-lesson-for-scotland-in-what-a-yes-vote-means-9727596.html

  • Pro-union camp ‘in chaos’ as poll puts nationalists ahead

    09/11/2014 3:03:52 AM PDT · 34 of 36
    NZerFromHK to ConservativeMind

    The best alternative without war would be all the micro states have becom confederations so you get little Switzerlands. Rich, inventive and self governing, but can hardly even control it’s own destiny on the international and are on the fringe in geopolitics.

    I still stand by my assertions that significant nation states from cultures not subject to local separatism ideology, such as France and Germany, will be able to exert the most influence out wards, and pick up leadership of the West by default just because they will be the “biggest dogs” left after the Anglo-Saxon world decided to commit national suicide by dividing it’s four of existence.

    Just like during the 8th century when Charlemagne as the King of Frank.

  • Pro-union camp ‘in chaos’ as poll puts nationalists ahead

    09/11/2014 2:47:55 AM PDT · 33 of 36
    NZerFromHK to ConservativeMind

    There won’t be a US or Australia or for that matter New Zealand left by then. The English speaking world will have the state of New York, the state of Chicago, the states of London, Edinburgh, Sydney, Christchurch etc. But yes, I don’t see why will be any English-speaking nation state left by the time my toddler nephew is in his last years, if Scotland does become independent after the referendum next year. And before you cheer for all the technology advances, have a read at Italy during the Middle Ages. Constant wars, strifes, shifting alliances, France and Germany and Russia meddling and interfering and often being invited by some alliances of English-speaking City States against another alliance.

    And oh, BTW yes, the English-speaking world will produce many 21st century machiavellis.

  • The United States should be nervous about the Scottish independence referendum

    09/10/2014 4:35:56 PM PDT · 72 of 88
    NZerFromHK to CodeToad; the scotsman

    This article from the Claremont Institute explains perfectly why “we like self determination” to the nth degree is a dumb idea, justified from their own nation’s founding era. And it was written back in the1780s!

    It applies equally to modern Britain as the US:

    http://www.claremont.org/basicpage/sewards-folly-or-farsightedness/#.VBDEztkazCQ

    “During the crisis of the 1780s, some Americans went so far as to question the viability of a geographically expansive Union. They pointed to the difficulty of governing such a massive territory without a despotic central government, and to the distinct interests that seemed to mark particular sections. Some in the West explored the idea of reaching an arrangement with Spain to separate from the United States. Others entertained the possibility of allowing three or four separate confederacies to emerge. Because each would have a republican form of government, they presumably could inhabit peacefully the same geopolitical space and trade to their mutual advantage. (It is difficult to find any important American political figure who explicitly made this case, but had efforts at constitutional reform failed, this might well have been the default outcome.)

    The Constitution of 1787 offered an alternative—a large, commercial and federal republic—based on the assumption that nature and the American experiment in self-government could be aligned perfectly. Anything less would be disastrous. As Publius put it:

    This country and this people seem to have been made for each other, and it appears as if it was the design of Providence, that an inheritance so proper and convenient for a band of brethren, united to each other by the strongest ties, should never be split into a number of unsocial, jealous, and alien sovereignties.

    The relations among these independent sovereignties, Publius insisted, would not be characterized by peace and commerce but by unceasing conflicts of interests and war. The struggle to control an unnaturally divided geopolitical space would override the republican instincts of the people. North America would be racked with wars, just as Europe had been for centuries.

    - See more at: http://www.claremont.org/basicpage/sewards-folly-or-farsightedness/#.VBDEztkazCQ";

  • Pro-union camp ‘in chaos’ as poll puts nationalists ahead

    09/10/2014 4:33:09 PM PDT · 28 of 36
    NZerFromHK to sinsofsolarempirefan

    This article from the Claremont Institute explains perfectly why “we like self determination” to the nth degree is a dumb idea, justified from their own nation’s founding era. And it was written back in the1780s!

    It applies equally to modern Britain as the US:

    http://www.claremont.org/basicpage/sewards-folly-or-farsightedness/#.VBDEztkazCQ

    “During the crisis of the 1780s, some Americans went so far as to question the viability of a geographically expansive Union. They pointed to the difficulty of governing such a massive territory without a despotic central government, and to the distinct interests that seemed to mark particular sections. Some in the West explored the idea of reaching an arrangement with Spain to separate from the United States. Others entertained the possibility of allowing three or four separate confederacies to emerge. Because each would have a republican form of government, they presumably could inhabit peacefully the same geopolitical space and trade to their mutual advantage. (It is difficult to find any important American political figure who explicitly made this case, but had efforts at constitutional reform failed, this might well have been the default outcome.)

    The Constitution of 1787 offered an alternative—a large, commercial and federal republic—based on the assumption that nature and the American experiment in self-government could be aligned perfectly. Anything less would be disastrous. As Publius put it:

    This country and this people seem to have been made for each other, and it appears as if it was the design of Providence, that an inheritance so proper and convenient for a band of brethren, united to each other by the strongest ties, should never be split into a number of unsocial, jealous, and alien sovereignties.

    The relations among these independent sovereignties, Publius insisted, would not be characterized by peace and commerce but by unceasing conflicts of interests and war. The struggle to control an unnaturally divided geopolitical space would override the republican instincts of the people. North America would be racked with wars, just as Europe had been for centuries.

    - See more at: http://www.claremont.org/basicpage/sewards-folly-or-farsightedness/#.VBDEztkazCQ";

  • Pro-union camp ‘in chaos’ as poll puts nationalists ahead

    09/10/2014 4:27:14 PM PDT · 27 of 36
    NZerFromHK to sinsofsolarempirefan

    I’m with you on that one. I’m neither young nor retired, but I suspect my 2 year old youngest nephew may end his days seeing the entire English-speaking world reduced to nothing but a patchwork of micro city states, all plying one against each other. Sure philosophies and technology will grow, but they will all be pawns of the greater powers. At beast they may confederate into multiple Switzerlands - prosperous yes, and self-governing yes, but very inconsequential and at the mercy of the dominant powers of the day.

    I have resolved now to encourage my nephew and any kids I may have to start learning German. kind of expect the West to be led by some Franco-German combination. We will be back to the early Middle Ages with the Frankish Empire leading the “West” and Charlemagne etc., and Britain was just a patchwork of micro fiefdoms constantly at war.

  • The United States should be nervous about the Scottish independence referendum

    09/10/2014 12:43:30 PM PDT · 69 of 88
    NZerFromHK to the scotsman; familyop

    Unfortunately the scotsman, facts don’t matter here, only feelings. “ I have my great-great-great grandfather from SCOTLAND! Plus I watched Bravwheart so my guy feeling must be true!”

  • The United States should be nervous about the Scottish independence referendum

    09/10/2014 12:23:31 PM PDT · 63 of 88
    NZerFromHK to familyop

    Don’t think you have presented an argument at all, just an empty emotional plea.

    I guess I better go learning German now. As the English-speaking world gets embroiled in self destruction, session ism, wars, and putting against one another, what happens next is that Germany will become the undisputed leader from the West.

    (disclaimer: I have no ties with Scitland in family at all, but worked for a guy who is a scot, and what he told me about his beliefs etc would make me believe what the American conservative sympathisers of Scottish session ism on this board are engaging in wishful thinking and got the politics wrong by 250 years)

  • Pro-union camp ‘in chaos’ as poll puts nationalists ahead

    09/10/2014 4:39:54 AM PDT · 25 of 36
    NZerFromHK to ConservativeMind; sinsofsolarempirefan

    My former boss at work is a migrant from Scotland. He is in his mid to late 30s now, and lived and grew up in Scotland until 25. His verdict on your analysis ConservativeMind is:

    “fantasic fantasy and full of wishful thinking”

    He said that you have conveniently ignored that nationalists in Scotland have nothing in common with historic William Wallace and Scottish Enlighenment. The last person the modern day Scottish nationalists like is Adam Smith. You will find, he says, they are a combination between leftism and nationalism. And my ex-boss is someone who’s probably more on the RINO scale than bona fide conservative.

    I don’t really have any personal interest in this debate, but your claim that:

    “The socialist Scotland would quickly turn more conservative, having run out of Other People’s Money (OPM).”

    you are basing this on your American assumption. The Scottish people never thinks like that. What will happen is that they will beg the IMF and Brussels (the EU) to bail them out. The consequence is that Angela Merkel will be the unofficial boss of Alex Salmond in no time.

    “Especially since your name implies you enjoy thinking strategically.”

    Strategically what happens is that the UKIP will quick point their energy in devouring the independent Scotland, and likewise Alex Salmond will spend his time warring with England. With that prospect I can tell you that it is time to learn German if you are aiming to be a “somebody” in international business and global leadership, because the English-speaking world’s dominant influence will want quickly, and the baton of the entire West’s leadership will pass on to Germany unoppoosed.

    Guten Tag. Sprechen Sie Deutsche?

  • America's Growing Interest in Soccer/The World Cup a Sign of 'Moral Decay', claims Ann Coulter

    06/28/2014 1:42:52 PM PDT · 159 of 162
    NZerFromHK to the scotsman

    Oh, we do say soccer is “un-kiwi” and doesn’t fit the rugged Kiwi outdoor rugged national characters.

  • America's Growing Interest in Soccer/The World Cup a Sign of 'Moral Decay', claims Ann Coulter

    06/27/2014 4:16:55 PM PDT · 136 of 162
    NZerFromHK to Doctor 2Brains

    I have known New Zealand anti-American leftists make the same comments that soccer is boring, and “in-Kiwi”, so well you are siding with the anti-American leftists on this. ;-)

  • America's Growing Interest in Soccer/The World Cup a Sign of 'Moral Decay', claims Ann Coulter

    06/27/2014 4:12:41 PM PDT · 135 of 162
    NZerFromHK to sphinx; sevinufnine

    See my post 133, I thought Coulter is being tongue in cheek. I have read exactly same thing from John Roughan at the NewZealand Herald and tran Kiwi for Anerican specifics is the same article. Except a rough an doesn’t like the US and doesn’t particularly care for Americans, particularly American conservatives.

  • America's Growing Interest in Soccer/The World Cup a Sign of 'Moral Decay', claims Ann Coulter

    06/27/2014 4:05:45 PM PDT · 134 of 162
    NZerFromHK to Steve_Seattle

    I don’t know anything about American soccer fans’ culture or soccer mums, but British soccer fans make American American football fans in the States look like primary school boy choirs in comparison.

    Anyway, I thought from my British-influenced habit of reading between the lines, that Coulter is.being tongue in cheek and baiting her political opponents here. It’s not an article to be taken seriously at face value.

  • America's Growing Interest in Soccer/The World Cup a Sign of 'Moral Decay', claims Ann Coulter

    06/27/2014 4:01:56 PM PDT · 133 of 162
    NZerFromHK to sevinufnine

    Well it sounds exactly the same reasons I have heard from Other New Zealanders who don’t care for soccer. This is from John Roughan:

    http://m.nzherald.co.nz/opinion/news/article.cfm?c_id=466&objectid=11273595

    “Football (still doesn’t sound right) is not a New Zealand game. It doesn’t suit us. We don’t do delicate footwork. We don’t kick the ball back to our own goal if we can help it. We don’t drop to the grass and writhe in agony at the slightest bodily contact, and we certainly don’t run about with our shirt raised to expose a sparrow chest in ecstasy that we have scored.”

    Except that 1. Rough an is about as far from Ann Coulter’s politics as you get, I know a few guys who adore Obama and are Green Party supporters, 2. Rough an doesn’t like or particularly care about the Yanks, and 3. Roughan especially doesn’t care about American conservatives in particular.

    Either Ann Coulter is really ranting, but more likely with my British-like habit of reading between the lines she was being tongue in cheek in writing this. The English love writing this type of stuff just to bait their political opponents. Just like John Roughan.

  • Hague: Israel losing support in UK over settlements

    05/24/2013 6:31:36 PM PDT · 38 of 40
    NZerFromHK to the scotsman; montag813

    I disagree. My experience with British migrants in NZ whether they are evangelical Christians of various stripes, social activists of the leftist stripe, or non-political work contacts, all have a rather unfavourable opinion of Jews in general and the State of Israel in particular. The only exception is a couple in their 70s who would have had memories of the 1940s and the Holocaust. The majority people come from all walks if life everywhere in the British Isles, and only a minority are from Fleet Street like circles, and have views from the Greens to the right-wing of the Tories.

    I can’t remember how many times I’ve heard from these guys the Jews control the US foreign policies, how powerful the Jews are, how Americans in general bend over backwards towards their own Jews, how the Jews are rather still looking their eyes towards Israel, how poor those Palestinians suffered at the hands if the Israeli Jews. Even many Kiwis find their rhetoric excessive.

  • Anglican Chruchmanship

    05/17/2011 5:01:43 AM PDT · 20 of 20
    NZerFromHK to Huber

    Sorry to bump an ancient thread, but it is an interesting thread. I believe there is also a Low Church Evangelical wing that is typified by:

    1. Calvinist (4- or 5-point) theology
    2. Minimal liturgy because most of these liturgies are unhelpful in believers growing in relationship in Christ. It is virtually identical to Reformed Baptist or modern Presbyterian service.
    3. The clergy wears casual dress (not even suits)
    4. They look to John Piper, John MacArthur in teachings.
    5. The key to define being Anglican is the 39 Articles, which is decidedly Reformed in teachings.
    6. Ethos: To Make Christ Known, Bible studies, Christianity Explored, Sovereign Grace Music, Stuart Townend and Kristyn Getty.
    7. Shrine Church: Sydney Diocese, where Philip Jensen or John Stott or J.I. Packer, All Souls Church London, Oak Hill College, Reformed movement in the Church of England.
    8. Non-charismatic and against the seeker sensitive/Purpose Driven/Emergent movements.

  • Gordon Brown resigns as UK prime minister [It's official / on his way to the Queen]

    05/12/2010 6:31:12 PM PDT · 105 of 106
    NZerFromHK to Vanders9; US Navy Vet

    Actually, Oliver Cromwell is a great man from hindsight and what Britain had after the Glorious Revolution is in fact a more reasonable version of Cromwell’s Commonwealth government. Without his rule, Britain would not have had transitioned to representative constitutional monarchy that smoothly, and it would have been highly likely to have its own version of the French Revolution somewhere down the line.

  • David Cameron’s first words: “Above all, rebuilding responsibility in our country” (video)

    05/11/2010 11:51:35 PM PDT · 13 of 21
    NZerFromHK to BillyBoy

    I agree, in other words, Cameron is the Edward Heath of the 21st century.

  • David Cameron’s first words: “Above all, rebuilding responsibility in our country” (video)

    05/11/2010 11:45:57 PM PDT · 12 of 21
    NZerFromHK to dfwgator; BillyBoy; pissant

    I would not be that optimistic when it comes to Cameron. Billyboy is probably right to say this is like the return of Rockefeller Republican type. In his first speech he said something like this:


    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/politics/election_2010/8676405.stm

    “And a guide for that society, that those who can, should, and those who can’t, we will always help. I want to make sure that my government always looks after the elderly, the frail, the poorest in our country.”

    “We must take everyone through with us on some of the difficult decisions we have ahead. Above all, it will be a government that is built on some clear values: values of freedom, values of fairness and values of responsibility.”


    This goes far beyond of what Stephen Harper will ever say. And news pundits say this is the classic Conservative Party’s left-wing faction would say.

  • How English taxpayers will pay the price of a loser's coalition of Scottish and Welsh

    05/11/2010 11:05:18 PM PDT · 41 of 43
    NZerFromHK to McGavin999

    My boss at work is a fresh immigrant from Scotland (came to NZ from Scotland about 7 years ago). Believe it or not, I remember when I mentioned the beliefs of most Scottish-descent Americans and how a disproportionate are hard conservatives, he face turned very white - probably horrified by the thoughts of right-wing leaning Scottish-Americans.

    And he is already not a particularly socialist type of person - for one thing, he doesn’t believe in man-made global warming. Imagine what other Scots in Scotland actually believe.

  • How English taxpayers will pay the price of a loser's coalition of Scottish and Welsh

    05/11/2010 6:04:13 PM PDT · 39 of 43
    NZerFromHK to sinsofsolarempirefan

    I think anything can happen. From what I have seen at work, the Scots could be pretty pragmatic and skeptical when needed, but they are also very empty-headed and emotional when it comes to talks about nationhood and symbolism. I believe they are capable of being that reckless to go for the Jacobite monarch if Scotland does become independent.

    Of course, we in the Commonwealth needs to prepare for the worst. “Who will be our head of state” may not be a mere academic exercise.

  • How English taxpayers will pay the price of a loser's coalition of Scottish and Welsh

    05/11/2010 6:00:01 PM PDT · 38 of 43
    NZerFromHK to muawiyah; McGavin999

    Apparently yes. There was a study a couple of years ago that even though New Zealand looks very longing to Britain and the English culture, in fact Scottish blood is the most widespread among European (white) New Zealanders. Not only Otago, but even “archtypically English” regions like Canterbury have majority Scottish descent.

    And interestingly, the Scottish descent New Zealanders don’t really want to pick fights against real English-descent New Zealanders. In Canada, the Scottish-descent call themselves English Canadians. And also notice they are fanatically monarchist and are not that fond of the French in Quebec in terms of Quebec nationalism - it is strange considering the historical Auld Alliance between Scotland and France, and Scotland today probably copies a lot of French socialism here and there.

  • How English taxpayers will pay the price of a loser's coalition of Scottish and Welsh

    05/11/2010 12:54:41 PM PDT · 29 of 43
    NZerFromHK to C19fan; NorthOf45; Loyalist; Clive; naturalman1975; Aussie Dasher; the scotsman; ...

    Ping!

    Another issue not one has mentioned yet is the impact of the break-up of the United Kingdom will have on the Commonwealth. All the big 3 “Old Commonwealth” countries are to some degree set that the monarchy is to the the current monarch of the United Kingdom, even though the legal clauses state the institution is already repatriated. To some extent the Anglo-Celtic or English Canadian identity in each of the 3 countries is shaped by the common national identity of the United Kingdom on the countries’ early history as British, not English or Scottish or Irish individually, colonies. For example, in English-speaking Canada I don’t see the Scottish-descent Canadians really trying to pick up fights with English-descent Canadians, and they are proud of being English Canadians.

    If the United Kingdom breaks up and independent Scotland continues to recognize Elizabeth II it is not that bad. But having seen Scottish Nationalists close hand, it wouldn’t surprise me they would decide to make a scene to publicly humiliate England as much as they can by wanting Franz Duke of Bavaria, the current Jacobite claimant, as the new King of Scotland. I wonder who would be the head of state in this case when the United Kingdom no longer exists?

    A second thing is constitutionally speaking, the 3 countries all have the foundation based on the British nation, not to mention national identity, which I believe is particularly acute in the case of Canada as a country founded by two peoples, British on English Canada and French on French Canada. Does this need to be changed to 3 or more founding peoples if the original UK breaks up?

    It may be a good start point to a conversation I suppose, and anyone could share their take?

  • How English taxpayers will pay the price of a loser's coalition of Scottish and Welsh

    05/11/2010 12:27:36 PM PDT · 28 of 43
    NZerFromHK to the scotsman; sinsofsolarempirefan; agere_contra

    Not that true. My boss at work is from Scotland around Glasgow, of my own age group, grew up in Thatcherite Britain and now in early to mid 30’s, and he is a pretty hardline Scottish nationalist. He told me the Nats have more support than Unionists over all of Scotland now.

    And he is quite an interesting mix politically speaking - pretty centralist average folk on the street and very much dependent on media report. Doesn’t like British Labour but like Australian Labor, absolutely hates Thatcher, a big fan of Obama and Reagan ironically speaking. I gauge he is probably a middle of the road Scot.

  • Ottawa should start encouraging U.S. firms to move here (Canucks say Obama destroying USA)

    05/09/2010 11:09:17 PM PDT · 48 of 49
    NZerFromHK to Canadian Outrage; NorthOf45

    It seems to me something interesting is being developed in Canada. The other day I also read a news that Canada is pondering whether to restore the title “Canadian Navy” and even “Royal Canadian Navy” to the Canadian Forces Maritime Command, which was originally changed in 1968 under Saint Trudeau.

    Other developments like about a possible move to abolish gun registry, and even calls to allow private elective surgery, and a reading about Conservatives’ advances in rural Quebec, all point to a gradual de-Trudeauization of Canada. I wonder whether it has something to do with Obama becoming the US president? Or because Saint Trudeau has been dead for a while now? Or some otehr factors?

  • Decision to nix (Toronto) Pride funding a ‘slap in the face’

    05/09/2010 10:52:56 PM PDT · 11 of 11
    NZerFromHK to Loyalist

    I found it ironic such a parade is held in Toronto, of all places. The city used to call itself “Toronto the Good” and was a bastion of social conservatism not that long ago.

  • British taxpayers ordered to bail out euro

    05/09/2010 6:47:41 PM PDT · 38 of 39
    NZerFromHK to sinsofsolarempirefan

    Hey, you people from the Mother Country owe us Kiwis a lot when you betrayed us to join the EEC in 1973. We haven’t collected your debts to us yet.

    ;-)

  • London 1802

    05/07/2010 5:30:41 PM PDT · 19 of 26
    NZerFromHK to Clive

    Don’t worry, we in the Commonwealth will probably see the writing on the wall. It is the Mother Country itself who can’t.

  • Horse-trading begins amid messy UK election results

    05/07/2010 2:30:46 PM PDT · 38 of 40
    NZerFromHK to devere; Nonstatist

    You can try the run-off system of voting, which is the method used in electing Australia’s federal House of Representatives ( == US House of Representatives). The method is that you choose the ones from the list below:

    A. Constitutional Party candidate
    B. Democratic Party candidate
    C. Family First Party candidtate
    D. Green Party candidate
    E. Libertarian Party candidate
    F. Republican Party candidtate
    G. Social Democratic Party candidtate

    On the ballot paper you don’t simply tick or cross for your preferred candidate. You have to rank 1 to 7 for the list above, 1 most preferred, 7 least. For example, as a conservative you will write 1 next to Constitutional Party candidtate, 2 next to Republican, 3 next to Libertarian, 4 next to Democratic Party, 5 next to Social Democratic Party, 6 next to Green Party, and 7 next to Family First Party etc.

    When the ballots are counted, all the 1’s would be distributed to the 7 candidates. The candidate with least number of votes will be eliminated and the votes are distributed according to the second choice preference on each ballot casted for that candidate. The process goes on until you are left with only two candidates. The one with most vote wins.

  • Liberal Democrat leader says he’ll back Tories in British election

    05/07/2010 2:21:41 PM PDT · 12 of 13
    NZerFromHK to Clive

    If I recall correctly, there are still some English Canadians across the political spectrum that more monarchists and try to hold onto the British-colonial era institutional symbolism (monarchy, etc) as Canada’s national identity. In fact I have seen some far-left socialists who don’t blush when shouting “God save the Queen!” - the chief motivation is that they are deeply uncomfortable with the concept of a British-less North American-based Canadian national identity. I also notice coincidentally Ontario, in particular, seems to be far more monarchist than other Old Commonwealth countries and even the Mother Country itself.

    How are these people’s reception to the idea of the United Kingdom breaking up and Scotland independence? Thanks.

  • Horse-trading begins amid messy UK election results

    05/07/2010 1:57:56 PM PDT · 36 of 40
    NZerFromHK to iowamark; frogjerk

    In fact, a Briton commented on this election that this time round, there are de facto 3 Labour Parties campaigning together. Yes, the Conservative Party still has Thatcherism but they are not in much influence these days i.e. those in core positions are more disciples of Edward Heath/Richard Nixon.

  • Exit Polls: Conservatives Win Most Seats In UK Election, But Fall Short Of A Majority

    05/06/2010 6:44:30 PM PDT · 64 of 73
    NZerFromHK to RinaseaofDs

    The Unionists have passed into history. I don’t think anyone alive that was born after 1970 would consider themselves, let alone support, a Unionist.

  • Exit Polls: Conservatives Win Most Seats In UK Election, But Fall Short Of A Majority

    05/06/2010 6:42:21 PM PDT · 63 of 73
    NZerFromHK to mrsixpack36

    They were the free market party from the 18th to late 19th centuries - it was called the Liberal Party and was one of the two major British political parties in the British history at the time. They gradually became more left-leaning, reflecting the general shift of liberalism to the 20th century interventionist type by 1914. For example, they were calling for free trade in 1832, but talked a lot about welfare protection and trade tariffs by 1914. With the rise of the Labour Party the Liberals have become eclipsed in power and became a minority party.

    But still even today the Liberal Democrats is still a little to the right of Labour Party on economic policies. But otherwise they are even more pacifist and intellectually-multiculturalist than the Labour Party.

  • Bubble bursts for Lib Dems

    05/05/2010 11:37:18 PM PDT · 26 of 26
    NZerFromHK to SmokingJoe; o2bfree

    A Briton who is of Chinese-Indonesian origin and a very prominent current affairs commentator in Hong Kong, is saying that effectively there is no party of Thatcherism this time round. All 3 parties are Labour Parties.

  • (Mark Steyn) THIS SEPTIC ISLE

    05/05/2010 11:28:02 PM PDT · 47 of 53
    NZerFromHK to RightOnTheLeftCoast; naturalman1975

    I guess the people who would really follow the example set by the Royal Family would be either:

    1. the elderly i.e. the generation which still lived through rather than simply studied the days when Britain was an imperial power, or

    2. those who come from the public school and prestigious universities like Oxbridge or Imperial College. This point is supplied by a New Zealand monarchist who also happens to be a social democrat (!). He does explicitly say that “middle Britons” from provincial places have lots of hatreds towards Traditions including the monarchy and do not see eye to eye with the Old Commonwealth countries (Canada, Australia, NZ), but the Oxbridge and public school-educated upper classes still harbour some respect towards the Royal Family. Coincidentially he feels the Commonwealth people are far more similar to the British middle/upper elite classes than “middle Britons”.

  • (Mark Steyn) THIS SEPTIC ISLE

    05/05/2010 6:36:49 PM PDT · 46 of 53
    NZerFromHK to NonValueAdded; agere_contra; Winniesboy
    That sounds right. I'm a frequent visitor to a Chinese-language news blog site written by a Briton in HK, Martin Oei. A comment that I read from a HK Chinese residing in the United Kingdom is: 正所謂一膠還有一膠硬, 英國本土年輕一代*的國際視野 == 0 << endl; 他們以ignorance為榮! *不論白人,印巴裔,BBC or 中東裔 "There is something even more ridiculous: here in Britain, the international horizon of the younger generation* == 0 << endl; They are in fact proud of being ignorant! *Whether they are whites, Indian/Pakistani, BBC (British Born Chinese), or Middle Eastern"
  • (Mark Steyn) THIS SEPTIC ISLE

    05/05/2010 6:22:55 PM PDT · 45 of 53
    NZerFromHK to Rummyfan
    "Is the United Kingdom finished?" I'm afraid the answer is very likely a yes. This is the latest post from a Briton who leans towards Chris Patten type of moderate Conservative. (He is a liberal Catholic of Indonesian-Chinese origin, and usually resides in HK). Sorry that it is in Chinese. When even people like such, who are not really that conservative on the American political spectrum, says there is nothing conservative among the current British political parties, you know the country is in trouble: http://martinoei.wordpress.com/2010/05/04/當選民面對三個都係工黨果陣/ 當選民面對三個都係工黨果陣 英國路透:Party leaders experience people’s power in action 作為一個保守主義者,當你聽到保守黨主席金馬倫(我決定不用甘民樂這個膠到無朋友的譯法,都不知是否工黨整蠱佢),都支持「生活工資」(Living Wages)呢個比最低工資更左一籌嘅理念果陣,更印證小弟所講,我依家只係喺三個工黨之間是但揀一個,喺經濟政策上,無真正嘅保守黨俾我揀。 Translation: When voters face 3 Labour Parties Reuters: Party leaders experience people’s power in action As a conservative, when you see even the Conservative Party leader David Cameron (金馬倫) (I refuse to use the official Chinese translation (甘民樂) as it is absolutely comically insulting [Note: Cantonese slang homophone] translation, and perhaps it must be a trick by the Labour Party in power] supports the concept of living wages which is even more left-leaning than the minimum wage, it confirms my view that nowadays the Conservative Party is just a slightly more conservative version of the Labour Party. In other words, I'm forced to choose between three Labour Parties instead of one, and on economic policy area, there is no real Conservative Party for me to choose.
  • Should NZ be Australia's 7th state?

    04/08/2010 12:29:55 PM PDT · 25 of 27
    NZerFromHK to Loyalist; myknowledge; Oztrich Boy; Track9; Aussiebabe

    Speaking as a New Zealander this can’t be worse than governed by the unaccountable MPs based in Wellington.

    I would recommend everyone to try sourcing the book “Absolute Power” by Ian Wishart, and he has proposed a hypothesis that all the three “Old Commonwealth” countries including New Zealand, Australia, and Canada have illegal government because these countries became independent by virtue of passing acts of parliament proclaiming independence without an immediate dismissal and re-election of the parliament.

    I have included long excerpts from Wishart’s Investigate magazine website for the reference information on why the current NZ government is constitutionally illegal.


    http://www.investigatemagazine.com/april00queen.htm

    ...the 1986 Constitution Act was, in legal reality, New
    Zealand’s “Declaration of Independence”. In
    other words if independence didn’t come during the moment we joined the League of Nations in 1920, then it was definitely 1986.

    Why? Because the 1986 Act is what Cooke describes as “legal fiction” – a polite way of saying that the Act claims to do one thing but actually achieves another. Specifically, it claims a role for the Queen that she did not previously have. Now this may sound like a minor technicality but when you are dealing with something as fundamental as a Constitution and someone like the Queen, technicalities take on a whole new significance.

    “Then s 15(1) states that the Parliament of New Zealand ‘continues to have full power to make laws’ – without, however, specifying any source of that power,” says Cooke. It is almost as if the Parliament of New Zealand declared itself the supreme being, acting through the Queen of New Zealand.

    “If the issue were purely a legal one,” continues Cooke, “there would be much to be said for the solution that…the 1986 Act has, deliberately, cut off from United Kingdom roots for the future; and that the head of State that is and the Parliament that is, according to the language of the 1986 Act, have a paramount existence which the ‘full power to make laws’ cannot legally touch.”

    ...

    The question that is not answered by Cooke, or other jurists, is whether the New Zealand Parliament had any legitimate authority to alter the Constitution without seeking a public mandate by way of referendum, and again this raises the question of whether New Zealanders are truly free, or whether we are second class citizens with fewer rights than American citizens.

    It also raises the question, again, of whether the current Government is illegal, by virtue of the fact that an unlawfully constituted government cannot simply legislate itself into lawful existence.

    Constitutional expert Peter Oliver talks of the 1986 Act as a “disguised revolution…which passed unnoticed. On this view the New Zealand Constitution can only be self-seeded, and the powers of the New Zealand Parliament self-proclaimed”.

    Up until 1986, for argument’s sake, New Zealand was still a British colony, owing full allegiance to the British Crown. But in 1986 there was a sovereignty transfer. It should have gone to the people, but in a curious overnight law change, the New Zealand Parliament, comprising both Labour and National, declared itself sovereign.

    In other words, while we were sleeping, there was a revolution and New Zealand politicians crowned themselves King, effectively providing themselves with unlimited and unchallengeable powers to regulate the lives of the voters.


    http://www.investigatemagazine.com/pdf%27s/marsec21.pdf

    (read the article on page 50 to 55)

  • Gordon Brown’s cry of impotence [GORDON BROWN STANDS NAKED: Headlines to ponder]

    03/06/2010 10:12:15 PM PST · 18 of 18
    NZerFromHK to Albion Wilde; Tax-chick

    Thanks for the ping as well. I notice Steyn has long been banished from press pages in the United Kingdom. And 99.99% of Britons, even the most conservative ones, had dismissed him as being “too overgeneralising and scare-mongering” etc etc.

    When a chronically ill patient refuses the necessary drastic lifestyle change prescriptions but is instead looking for some extra placebo, it may be the right time to prepare for the obituary.

    And in this case, the patient is the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

  • New Zealanders favor new national flag

    02/22/2010 1:08:04 AM PST · 29 of 29
    NZerFromHK to naturalman1975

    The way I see it, NZ tends to have a more British/European political culture that the talking/pundit class can move things regardless of what the public wants, and once something has become a fait accompali by a enacted through a simple majority vote in Parliament in Wellington, ordinary New Zealanders will never bother to unroll them.

    The chance is that Australia will probably keep the current national flag in 5 years’ time, while the NZ flag will probably belong to the museum by then just from observing how the “conservative” Prime Minister John Key has done so far in power. I don’t demand anyone less than another Ronald Reagan in government, but it would be nice if we get a John Howard. Instead, we have got another Jim Bolger and a rerun of the 1990s unprincipled and welfareist National government.

  • New Zealanders favor new national flag

    02/21/2010 10:55:54 PM PST · 27 of 29
    NZerFromHK to naturalman1975; DieHard the Hunter; shaggy eel

    Ping! Would you like to make any comments?

  • Pope Benedict XVI: we must all go green to save the planet

    02/21/2010 10:53:35 PM PST · 125 of 125
    NZerFromHK to shaggy eel

    LOL, long time no see shaggy. I thought you were somewhat a “have no religion” person?

    Anyway, I wholeheartedly agree with you. Although you must now be like us, one of those Bible-thumping “ignorant” Left Behind-reading Jesusland folks!

  • Pope Benedict XVI: we must all go green to save the planet

    02/21/2010 10:52:47 PM PST · 124 of 125
    NZerFromHK to shaggy eel

    LOL, long time no see shaggy. I thought you were somewhat a “have no religion” person?

    Anyway, I wholeheartedly agree with you. Although you must now be like us, one of those Bible-thumping “ignorant” Left Behind-reading Jesusland folks!

  • I’ll miss Pauline Hanson

    02/19/2010 11:40:47 AM PST · 18 of 18
    NZerFromHK to sinsofsolarempirefan

    A whole lot of them are anti-Chinese Communist Hongkongers - British nationals who were born in British Hong Kong, but have no British Citizenship due to British colonial-era nationality laws, and which China recognizes them as its citizens as well. The goal of the site is to campaign for restoration of full BC-status for Hongkongers born in Hong Kong during British colonial-era, and neither particularly pro-EU or whatever. (For example, I support that goal, although I’m no fan of the EU myself)

    A couple are Britons who are sympathetic to the full BC-status restoration there, but again they are not particularly political on other areas.

    (Note: any contents of post may be cross-posted on britishhongkong.com’s discussion forum’s English-language section)

  • I’ll miss Pauline Hanson

    02/18/2010 11:58:19 PM PST · 16 of 18
    NZerFromHK to sinsofsolarempirefan

    I have probably frequented far too much of sites like www.britishhongkong.com , and it is full of Britons who are full of praise of the EU and the UK Guardian.

  • I’ll miss Pauline Hanson

    02/17/2010 10:18:22 AM PST · 13 of 18
    NZerFromHK to myknowledge

    From what little I know about British politics, Hanson will find that she has dropped out of the frying pan, and only finding herself landing onto the naked fire. She will find the average Britons really way more left-wing than the Australian counterparts (just notice they are on average, just a notch below New Zealand Labour and Green party hacks, on the left-wing scale). I don’t support much of her politics because she is more like Pat Buchanan than Ronald Reagan. But from what I gauge of Britons’ cold-shouldering of Mark Steyn’s articles when compared with Australian reactions to his writings, I guess she will find herself very, very lonely when in Britain.

    It will be a miracle if she finds herself she hasn’t been assaulted by some Guardian-reading hacks in, say, 18 months’ time. And these Guardian-reading hacks would all have British-sounding lastnames and just as “white” as her.