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Articles Posted by Red Badger

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  • Italian police: The head of the Sicilian Mafia used 'sheep code' to communicate

    08/03/2015 12:37:45 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 11 replies
    www.businessinsider.com ^ | Aug. 3, 2015, 9:43 AM | Barbara Tasch
    The head of the Sicilian Mafia, on the run for over 20 year, has been using "sheep code" to communicate with allies, the BBC reports. Eleven men associated with mob boss Matteo Messina Denaro were arrested recently, and according to the Italian police, Denaro communicated with them by leaving bits of papers under a rock in a field near a farm in western Sicily. The communication method called "pizzini" includes writing the messages in a secret code, according to AFP. Among the men arrested during raids across Sicily on Monday, two were over 70 years old, one of them, Vito...
  • Oil sinks to six-month low amid weak data, slump in gasoline

    08/03/2015 12:31:07 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 29 replies
    ca.news.yahoo.com ^ | 08-03-2015 | By By Barani Krishnan
    NEW YORK (Reuters) - Oil sank to six-month lows on Monday with Brent crude falling below $50 a barrel on sluggish U.S. and Chinese economic data and bets for weaker gasoline consumption in the United States after tearaway demand earlier in the summer. Evidence of growing global oversupply and a stock market collapse in China, the world's largest energy consumer, have weighed on oil for weeks, leading in July to U.S. crude futures' largest monthly decline since the 2008 financial crisis. On Monday, the rout deepened as U.S. gasoline fell its most in a day in 10 months. Supply worries...
  • New polymer able to store energy at higher temperatures

    08/03/2015 12:04:54 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 3 replies
    phys.org ^ | July 30, 2015 | Bob Yirka
    Flexible polymer nanocomposite thin films for high-temperature high-voltage capacitive energy storage. Credit: Q. Li +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ A team of researchers at the Pennsylvania State University has created a new polymer that is able to store energy at higher temperatures than conventional polymers without breaking down. In their paper published in the journal Nature, the team describes how they created the polymer and why they believe it could be useful in many products. Harry Ploehn with the University of South Carolina offers a brief history of polymers created for use in electronics, in a News & Views piece in the same journal...
  • Sol-gel capacitor dielectric offers record-high energy storage

    08/03/2015 11:08:59 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 28 replies
    phys.org ^ | July 30, 2015 | by John Toon
    Samples of the new hybrid sol-gel material are shown placed on a clear plastic substrate for testing. Credit: John Toon, Georgia Tech ================================================================================================================= Using a hybrid silica sol-gel material and self-assembled monolayers of a common fatty acid, researchers have developed a new capacitor dielectric material that provides an electrical energy storage capacity rivaling certain batteries, with both a high energy density and high power density. If the material can be scaled up from laboratory samples, devices made from it could surpass traditional electrolytic capacitors for applications in electromagnetic propulsion, electric vehicles and defibrillators. Capacitors often complement batteries in these applications...
  • Caterpillar chemical turns ants into bodyguards

    08/03/2015 10:38:51 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 23 replies
    phys.org ^ | August 3, 2015 | Bob Yirka
    Arhopala japonica. Credit: Wikipedia A trio of researchers with Kobe University in Japan has found that lycaenid butterfly caterpillars of the Japanese oakblue variety, have dorsal nectary organ secretions that cause ants that eat the material to abandon their fellow ants to instead hang out with and defend the caterpillar against enemies. In their paper published in the journal Current Biology, Masaru Hojo, Naomi Pierce and Kazuki Tsuji describe their research into the relationship between the two creatures and why they believe the nature of that relationship needs to be reclassified. Scientists have studied Japanese oakblue butterflies before, noting that...
  • Gruesome Find: 100 Bodies Stuffed into Ancient House [China]

    08/03/2015 9:46:29 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 41 replies
    www.livescience.com ^ | July 27, 2015 07:07am ET | by Owen Jarus
    The 5,000-year-old house found in China was about 14 by 15 feet in size. Credit: Photo courtesy Chinese Archaeology ===================================================================================================================== The remains of 97 human bodies have been found stuffed into a small 5,000-year-old house in a prehistoric village in northeast China, researchers report in two separate studies. The bodies of juveniles, young adults and middle-age adults were packed together in the house — smaller than a modern-day squash court — before it burnt down. Anthropologists who studied the remains say a "prehistoric disaster," possibly an epidemic of some sort, killed these people. The site, whose modern-day name is "Hamin...
  • The shocking moment Dallas Cowboy Dez Bryant threw punch at his OWN teammate...

    08/03/2015 8:48:12 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 26 replies
    www.dailymail.co.uk ^ | Updated: 08:09 EST, 3 August 2015 | Staff
    Dez Bryant kept going after Dallas cornerback Tyler Patmon in a heated training camp skirmish that didn't end until quarterback Tony Romo finally stepped in and calmed his star receiver. Bryant, 26, who has a history of sideline antics that include screaming at coaches and teammates, appeared to take a swing at Patmon after the two tangled during a play in 11-on-11 work late in practice Sunday. The incident started when Patmon jarred Bryant's helmet loose during a play and Bryant responded by yanking off Patmon's helmet. Patmon, 24, threw a punch and backed away, and Bryant came back with...
  • Moroccan dies trying to reach Spain in suitcase

    08/03/2015 8:14:58 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 18 replies
    ca.news.yahoo.com ^ | 08-03-2015 | Staff
    MADRID (Reuters) - A Moroccan man suffocated while being smuggled to Spain in a suitcase stowed in the boot of a car, the Spanish government said on Monday. The 27-year-old man, whose name was not made public, was found dead after the car arrived at the port of Almeria on a ferry from Melilla, a Spanish enclave in North Africa. The car's owner, the dead man's brother, was arrested for murder, a government spokesman in the city said. The brother raised the alarm about the stowaway's condition when the ferry docked in Spain but emergency services could do nothing to...
  • MN firm reveals 110mph electric motorcycle – and will beat Harley to market

    07/31/2015 2:08:25 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 53 replies
    bringmethenews.com ^ | July 30, 2015 | By Adam Uren
    (Photo: Victory Motorcycles, website) A Minnesota company appears to have beaten Harley-Davidson to the punch by unveiling its first electric street motorcycle. Medina-based Polaris Industries, makers of Indian and Victory motorcycles, has this week revealed its “Empulse TT” high-performance sport bike, which runs without gas and has a top speed of 110mph. The Pioneer Press reports that with the Empulse appearing in Victory dealerships by the end of the year, Polaris has secured a key advantage over competitors Harley, whose Project LiveWire motorcycle won’t be brought to market until battery technology has improved enough to allow for longer driving distances....
  • US Navy will field 100 kilowatt or stronger lasers and ten shot per minute railguns by 2020

    07/31/2015 1:43:44 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 31 replies
    nextbigfuture.com ^ | 07-28-2015 | Author: Brian Wang
    The US Navy is pursuing a multi-pronged approach to fielding energy weapons by the end of the decade, with the hopes of upgrading its 30 kilowatt laser gun to 100 kw or more, and giving its electromagnetic railgun a higher repetition rate. Rear Adm. Bryant Fuller, chief engineer at Naval Sea Systems Command (NAVSEA), said in a panel presentation at the Directed Energy Summit, hosted by the Center for Strategic and Budgetary Assessments and Booz Allen Hamilton, that both follow-on technologies should be in the hands of sailors in the fleet by 2020. “Sometime in the very near future” the...
  • Vast hidden 'ocean' found under Chinese desert

    07/31/2015 1:22:24 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 53 replies
    www.ibtimes.co.uk ^ | July 30, 2015 20:30 BST | By Yasmin Kaye
    Workers digging a well for underground water are dwarfed by the sand dunes of the Taklimakan Desert, 13 September 2003, outside of Tazhong, in China's northwest Xinjiang province. ================================================================================================================== Chinese scientists have discovered what could be a huge hidden ocean underneath one of the driest places on earth, the South China Morning Post reported on 30 July. The Tarim basin in northwestern Xinjiang, China, is one of the driest places on Earth, but the vast amount of salt water concealed underneath could equal 10 times the water found in all five of the Great Lakes in the US. "This is...
  • 'Extinct' fly spotted in Devon 150 years after last sighting

    07/31/2015 1:09:43 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 21 replies
    www.ibtimes.co.uk ^ | July 31, 2015 14:22 BST | By Sean Martin
    Raphium pectinatum fly was last seen 150 years ago in Surrey(Rob Wolton / Devon Wildlife Trust) ====================================================================================================================== A fly that was thought to have been extinct for more than 150 years has been spotted in Devon. The Raphium pectinatum fly was last officially noted 150 years back in Surrey on 19 July 1868. The green metallic-looking species was thought to have died out shortly after this but naturalist Rob Wolton, a member of the Devon Fly Group and the Dipterists Forum, said he spotted one alive and well in the Devon Wildlife Old Sludge Beds, a wetland reserve on the...
  • Python Eats Porcupine, Regrets It Later (Here's Why)

    07/31/2015 1:02:46 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 11 replies
    www.livescience.com ^ | June 26, 2015 02:33pm ET | Elizabeth Palermo, Associate Editor
    Ever wonder what might happen if a python ate a porcupine? Well, wonder no more. One of these giant snakes — which kill prey by suffocating it and then consuming it whole — recently dined on a porcupine and didn't live to brag about it. On June 14, a cyclist riding along one of the mountain bike trails at the Lake Eland Game Reserve in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa, spotted a very engorged snake. The cyclist snapped a few photos of the gluttonous python and posted them to social media, where they quickly attracted the attention of locals who wanted to...
  • 2000-Year-Old Cat Paw Prints Discovered on Tile

    07/31/2015 12:45:07 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 47 replies
    news.discovery.com ^ | Jul 30, 2015 01:26 PM ET | by Rossella Lorenzi
    The cat paw print on the Roman roof tile. David Rice ================================================================================================================== Paw prints made by a cat 2,000 years ago have been found on a Roman roof tile kept at a museum in south west England. Dug up in Gloucester in 1969, the tile fragment had long lain unnoticed at Gloucester City Museum. Only recently, a researcher spotted the cat’s paw on the tile while going through the finds from the 1969 archaeological excavation. “At that time the archaeologists seem to have been more interested in digging things up than looking at what they found,” David Rice, curator at...
  • Everglades Python May Be Second-Largest Ever in Florida

    07/31/2015 12:40:39 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 15 replies
    news.discovery.com ^ | Jul 30, 2015 12:25 PM ET | Staff via CBS Miami
    This python, captured in Shark Valley, in Everglades National Park, may be the second-largest python ever caught in Florida. USGS ======================================================================================================================== A python researcher working in Everglades National Park has captured what may be the second-largest Burmese python in the state of Florida, CBS Miami reports. The snake was captured on July 9 in the park's Shark Valley and was documented at 18 feet 3 inches long. It's just 4 inches shy of the state's record 18 foot 7 inch python caught in Miami-Dade, CBS notes. Whether it's indeed the second-largest, officially, remains unclear, due to differences in record-keeping in...
  • Hold the phone, Central! Cellphone radiation can cause cancer: study

    07/31/2015 11:03:32 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 23 replies
    www.nydailynews.com ^ | Wednesday, July 29, 2015, 4:38 PM | BY Meredith Engel
    The scientists were right — your cell phone can give you cancer. There have long been whispers of a cancer connection from your cell — and a new study backs up the claims. "These data are a clear sign of the real risks this kind of radiation poses for human health," study author Igor Yakymenko said. Yakymenko’s meta-study — basically a study of hundreds of other studies — reveals many findings of previous researchers into how radiofrequency from your phone can damage DNA. That damage can add up over time and cause a variety of health problems, like cancer, headaches,...
  • Suntory Plans Space-Aged Whisky

    07/31/2015 10:43:17 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 15 replies
    WSJ ^ | Jul 31, 2015 | By Jun Hongo
    Not content with having the best whisky in the world, Suntory Holdings Ltd. plans to take its whisky out of this world and into space. The Japanese brewing and distilling company said this week it would send a total of six samples of its whiskies and other alcoholic beverages to the International Space Station, where they will be kept for at least a year to study the effect zero gravity has on aging. According to a spokesman at the company, the samples, which will be carried in glass flasks, will include both a 21-year-old single malt and a beverage that...
  • Astronomers find star with three super-Earths

    07/31/2015 10:02:33 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 29 replies
    phys.org ^ | July 30, 2015 | Staff
    This artist's rendition released by NASA on July 30, 2015 shows one possible appearance for the planet HD 219134b ======================================================================================================================== Astronomers said Thursday they had found a planetary system with three super-Earths orbiting a bright, dwarf star—one of them likely a volcanic world of molten rock. The four-planet system had been hiding out in the M-shaped, northern hemisphere constellation Cassiopeia, "just" 21 light years from Earth, a team reported in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics. It comprises four planets—one giant and three super-Earths orbiting a star dubbed HD219134. Super-Earths have a mass higher than Earth's but are lighter than gas...
  • Snail as Big as a Tennis Shoe Running Amok in Florida

    07/31/2015 8:43:50 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 98 replies
    news.discovery.com ^ | Jul 31, 2015 09:30 AM ET | by Kerry Sheridan
    The giant African land snail is causing problems for Floridians. Wikimedia Commons/Sonel.SA ========================================================================================================================= Florida plant detectives are on the trail of a slippery foe, an invasive African land snail that is wily, potentially infectious, and can grow as big as a tennis shoe. Play Video 8 Animals That Can Regrow Their Body Parts While humans are working on robotic arms and new limb technology, some animals can regrow their limbs on their own. How do they do this? DCI In the four years since Giant African Snails were discovered in Miami, they have slowly but surely spread to new territory,...
  • Magnetic Pulses Might Provide Long-Lasting Tinnitus Relief: No, It Will Not Suck Your Brain Out

    07/31/2015 8:29:21 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 26 replies
    www.techtimes.com ^ | July 20, 7:51 AM | By Ted Ranosa
    A new study conducted by researchers from the Oregon Health & Science University and the Veterans Affairs Portland Medical Center suggests that a transcranial magnetic stimulation system typically used for depression treatment could also help alleviate the debilitating effects of a condition known as tinnitus. ===================================================================================================================== Tinnitus is a debilitating condition wherein an individual often hears a ringing or clicking sound even though there are no external sources of the sound present. It currently affects an estimated 45 million people, mostly veteran soldiers, living in the United States, according to the American Tinnitus Association (ATA), and a proven cure for...
  • Thailand Bans Foreigners' Use of Surrogates in Midst of Gay Dads Case

    07/30/2015 2:05:13 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 26 replies
    www.aleteia.org ^ | July 31, 2015 | John Burger
    America and Spanish man claim Thai woman reneged when she found out their status In the midst of an ugly battle in which two homosexual men are trying to bring a girl out of Thailand to rear her in Spain, the Southeast Asian country is proceeding to ban foreigners’ use of surrogate mothers there. The gay fathers’ case is one of several contentious cases, albeit the highest profile, that has led to the legislative action. Fusion gave some of the background: A child born in Thailand by surrogate last year was left behind after he was born with Down’s syndrome....
  • Teammate Reveals Something BIG About Tim Tebow’s Future That Will ‘Shock A Lot Of People’

    07/30/2015 10:59:26 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 32 replies
    www.westernjournalism.com ^ | July 30, 2015 at 9:06am | Norvell Rose
    Fighting hard to resurrect his NFL career, the Christian quarterback... Without explanation or elaboration, a sports writer for the CBS affiliate in the City of Brotherly Love called Tim Tebow “the most polarizing Philadelphia Eagle” in an article that goes on to share the surprising opinion of one of Tebow’s teammates who claims the quarterback’s play will “shock a lot of people.” Of course, one can imagine what writer Andrew Porter may have had in mind when offering that “most polarizing comment” about Tebow — the NFL player’s proudly promoted Christianity as well as the trepidation of a lot of...
  • 'Golden jackals' of East Africa are actually 'golden wolves'

    07/30/2015 10:32:37 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 5 replies
    phys.org ^ | 07-30-2015 | Provided by: Cell Press
    A golden jackal (Canis anthus) from Serengeti National Park, Tanzania. Based on genomic results, the researchers suggest this animal be referred to as the African golden wolf, which is distinct from the Eurasian golden jackal (Canis aureus). Credit: D. Gordon E. Robertson ======================================================================================================================= Despite their remarkably similar appearance, the "golden jackals" of East Africa and Eurasia are actually two entirely different species. The discovery, based on DNA evidence and reported in the Cell Press journal Current Biology on July 30, increases the overall biodiversity of the Canidae—the group including dogs, wolves, foxes, and jackals—from 35 living species to 36. "This...
  • Researchers resurrect ancient viruses in hopes of improving gene therapy

    07/30/2015 10:20:42 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 30 replies
    phys.org ^ | July 30, 2015 | Provided by: Cell Press
    Researchers have recreated the evolutionary lineage of adeno-associated viruses (AAVs) to reconstruct an ancient viral particle that is highly effective at delivering gene therapies targeting the liver, muscle, and retina. This approach, published July 30 in Cell Reports, could be used to design a new class of genetic drugs that are safer and more potent than those currently available. "Our novel methodology allows us to understand better the intricate structure of viruses and how different properties arose throughout evolution," says senior study author Luk H. Vandenberghe of Harvard Medical School. "We believe our findings will teach us how complex biological...
  • Salt water for lamp designed to serve people without electricity

    07/29/2015 1:49:02 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 57 replies
    phys.org ^ | 07-27-2015 | by Nancy Owano
    A startup team calls their work a product. They also call it a social movement. Many people in the over-7,000 islands in the Philippines lack access to electricity .The startup would like to make a difference. Their main ingredient is salt. Their product is a lamp that takes two tablespoons of salt and a glass of water in order to work. This is from the Sustainable Alternative Lighting, or SALt Corp. This is a startup focused on delivering a cost effective, environmentally safe lamp that runs on salt water. Their lamp could be an alternative to kerosene/battery powered lamps and...
  • No, German Scientists Have Not Confirmed the “Impossible” EMDrive

    07/29/2015 10:27:45 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 35 replies
    io9.com ^ | 7/28/15 10:40am | George Dvorsky
    Two German researchers claim they have produced measurable amounts of thrust using a copy of NASA’s controversial EMDrive. It’s a result that has many people talking, but don’t plan your trip to the to the Alpha Centauri system just yet—the experts we spoke with are all highly skeptical of the study and its findings. As reported in Hacked, the details of the new study are being presented this week by Martin Tajmar, a professor and chair for Space Systems at the Dresden University of Technology, and co-author G. Fiedler, at the American Institute for Aeronautics and Astronautics’ Propulsion and Energy...
  • Strange 'conehead' skeleton unearthed at Russia's Stonehenge:

    07/29/2015 6:21:12 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 63 replies
    www.dailymail.co.uk ^ | Updated: 15:18 EST, 27 July 2015 | Sarah Griffiths
    Elongated head was bound in tribal tradition 2,000 years ago Skeleton with long skull was unearthed in Arkaim, central Russia It's thought to belong to a woman living almost 2,000 years ago Her skull is elongated because it was bound out of tribal tradition Arkaim is known as Russia's Stonehenge because it may have been used by ancient people to study the stars, like the British site A skeleton with an unusual-shaped skull has been unearthed on a site known as Russia's Stonehenge. When images of the remains were first published, UFO enthusiasts rushed to claim they were proof that...
  • French teen finds 560,000 year-old tooth (Update)

    07/28/2015 12:23:38 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 25 replies
    A 16-year-old French volunteer archaeologist has found an adult tooth dating back around 560,000 years in southwestern France, in what researchers hailed as a "major discovery" Tuesday. "A large adult tooth—we can't say if it was from a male or female—was found during excavations of soil we know to be between 550,000 and 580,000 years old, because we used different dating methods," paleoanthropologist Amelie Viallet told AFP. "This is a major discovery because we have very few human fossils from this period in Europe," she said. The tooth was found in the Arago cave near the village of Tautavel, one...
  • Cilantro from Mexico suspected in intestinal parasite outbreak

    07/28/2015 6:39:42 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 21 replies
    www.kcbd.com ^ | Updated: Jul 27, 2015 6:03 PM CST | By KCBD Staff
    LUBBOCK, TX (KCBD) - An intestinal parasite outbreak that has been causing illness all across the state of Texas may have been caused by cilantro from the Puebla area of Mexico. The Texas Department of State Health Services has received reports of 205 cases caused by the parasite Cyclospora, including one here in Lubbock. An import alert from the FDA says, "The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and state public health officials have identified annually recurring outbreaks (in 2012, 2013, and 2014) of cyclosporiasis in the United States which have been associated with fresh cilantro from the state...
  • Feces explosion in Mexican cilantro fields sparks partial import ban

    07/27/2015 1:15:19 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 217 replies
    national.suntimes.com ^ | Posted: 07/27/2015, 12:35pm | By Chad Merda
    There’s more than just cilantro in the growing fields in Mexico, and that’s caused the Food and Drug Administration to institute a partial import ban on it through August. The move comes after health officials found human feces and toilet paper in growing fields, which have been linked to hundreds of intestinal illnesses dating back to 2012. The FDA will focus on product coming from Puebla, and all of it will need to be manually inspected and certified before being allowed into the U.S. Cilantro from other parts of the country will need to have documentation proving it did not...
  • Researchers predict material with record-setting melting point [4,400 kelvins / 7,460°F]

    07/27/2015 10:36:43 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 45 replies
    phys.org ^ | 07-27-2015 | by Kevin Stacey & Provided by: Brown University
    Using powerful computer simulations, researchers from Brown University have identified a material with a higher melting point than any known substance. The computations, described in the journal Physical Review B (Rapid Communications), showed that a material made with just the right amounts of hafnium, nitrogen, and carbon would have a melting point of more than 4,400 kelvins (7,460 degrees Fahrenheit). That's about two-thirds the temperature at the surface of the sun, and 200 kelvins higher than the highest melting point ever recorded experimentally. The experimental record-holder is a substance made from the elements hafnium, tantalum, and carbon (Hf-Ta-C). But these...
  • Young scientist discovers magnetic material unnecessary to create spin current

    07/24/2015 10:52:34 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 18 replies
    http://phys.org ^ | July 24, 2015 | by Carla Reiter & Provided by: Argonne National Laboratory
    Typically when referring to electrical current, an image of electrons moving through a metallic wire is conjured. Using the spin Seebeck effect (SSE), it is possible to create a current of pure spin (a quantum property of electrons related to its magnetic moment) in magnetic insulators. However, this work demonstrates that the SSE is not limited to magnetic insulators but also occurs in a class of materials known as paramagnets. Since magnetic moments within paramagnets do not interact with each other like in conventional ferromagnets, and thus do not hold their magnetization when an external magnetic field is removed, this...
  • Mammoths killed by abrupt climate change

    07/24/2015 10:12:25 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 75 replies
    http://phys.org ^ | July 23, 2015 | Provided by: University of Adelaide
    This image shows mammoth vertebrae in ice, Yukon Territory, Canada. Credit: Photo Kieren Mitchell, University of Adelaide ******************************************************************************************************************************************************************************************* New research has revealed abrupt warming, that closely resembles the rapid man-made warming occurring today, has repeatedly played a key role in mass extinction events of large animals, the megafauna, in Earth's past. Using advances in analysing ancient DNA, radiocarbon dating and other geologic records an international team led by researchers from the University of Adelaide and the University of New South Wales (Australia) have revealed that short, rapid warming events, known as interstadials, recorded during the last ice age or Pleistocene...
  • A DNA Search for the First Americans Links Amazon Groups to Indigenous Australians

    07/24/2015 6:56:41 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 20 replies
    www.smithsonianmag.com ^ | July 21, 2015 | By Helen Thompson
    The new genetic analysis takes aim at the theory that just one founding group settled the Americas =========================================================================================================== Brazil's Surui people, like the man pictured above, share ancestry with indigenous Australians, new evidence suggests. (PAULO WHITAKER/Reuters/Corbis) ==================================================================================================================== More than 15,000 years ago, humans began crossing a land bridge called Beringia that connected their native home in Eurasia to modern-day Alaska. Who knows what the journey entailed or what motivated them to leave, but once they arrived, they spread southward across the Americas. The prevailing theory is that the first Americans arrived in a single wave, and all Native American populations...
  • Testing shows using microwaves to propel a craft into space might work

    07/23/2015 12:10:47 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 28 replies
    =============================================================================================== A team of researchers at Colorado based Escape Dynamics is reporting that initial tests indicate that it might really be possible to launch space-planes into space using microwaves sent from the ground, to allow for a single stage spacecraft. If the idea pans out, the cost savings for sending satellites (or perhaps humans) into orbit could be considerable. Today's rockets are all based on the same idea, a multi-stage rocket is used, each part filled with propellant that pushes the rocket into space as the propellant is burned. It is a really expensive way to go because the propellant...
  • Experts warn Floridians to steer clear of armadillos to avoid leprosy exposure

    07/21/2015 2:07:23 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 36 replies
    www.actionnewsjax.com ^ | 07-21-2015 | By Amanda Warford
    JACKSONVILLE, Fla. — Leprosy cases in Florida are higher than normal and experts are blaming armadillos. Nine cases have been reported across Florida so far this year. On average, the state only sees 10 cases for the entire year. Action News spoke to a trapper who said he takes extra precautions because of this danger. Armadillos are very common all over Florida, and most of them live in the woods. But others could live near your home, and we learned that puts you and your family at risk. “We catch more armadillos than we do any other species,” said wildlife...
  • Asteroid worth £3 TRILLION in precious metals set to pass Earth on Sunday

    07/17/2015 1:58:36 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 60 replies
    www.dailymail.co.uk ^ | Updated: 11:50 EST, 17 July 2015 | By Jack Millner
    An asteroid worth a potential £3.5 trillion ($5.4 trillion) is due to pass by Earth on Sunday, and you can watch it live from 11pm UK time (6.30pm ET). Asteroid 2011 UW-158's fly-by will be streamed live on the internet from an observatory in the Canary Islands. The space rock has attracted the attention of asteroid mining company Planetary Resources, because it is thought to have a 100 million ton core of platinum that the company might one day want to exploit. Asteroid 2011 UW-158 will pass within 1.5 million miles (2.4 million km) from Earth on Sunday - 30...
  • Quiet that ringing in the brain: New drug promises relief from epilepsy and tinnitus...

    07/17/2015 12:47:46 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 57 replies
    www.eurekalert.org ^ | 23-Jun-2015 | University of Connecticut
    FULL TITLE: Quiet that ringing in the brain: New drug promises relief from epilepsy and tinnitus with fewer side effects =================================================================================================== A new drug may treat epilepsy and prevent tinnitus by selectively affecting potassium channels in the brain, UConn neurophysiologist Anastasios Tzingounis and colleagues report in the 10 June Journal of Neuroscience. Epilepsy and tinnitus are both caused by overly excitable nerve cells. Healthy nerves have a built-in system that slams on the brakes when they get too excited. But in some people this braking system doesn't work, and the nerves run amok, signaling so much that the brain gets...
  • Graedons' Pharmacy | Could biotin tame tinnitus?

    07/17/2015 12:20:45 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 47 replies
    www.bradenton.com ^ | July 14, 2015 | By JOE and TERESA GRAEDON
    Q: I wanted to share my experience with tinnitus. It's not incapacitating, but it is annoying. I found something that helps by serendipity. My wife has hair loss. She takes levothyroxine (Synthroid) and liothyronine (Cytomel) because her thyroid was removed via radiation. She also takes biotin to lessen her hair loss. I'm bald on top, but I thought I'd see if biotin would help grow new hair. It didn't. What DID happen with the very first dose was total elimination of my tinnitus! A few hours after I take the biotin, the tinnitus returns, but at a much lower intensity....
  • Study shows relief for tinnitus, debilitating ringing in ears

    07/17/2015 12:11:24 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 23 replies
    www.oregonlive.com ^ | 07/16/2015 | By Lynne Terry
    Robert Folmer of the Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center gave people with chronic tinnitus transcranial magnetic stimulation as part of a study. Participants found their symptoms decreased by about a third. (Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center ) ================================================================================================= Imagine dealing with stresses of every day, juggling the demands of family life and deadlines at work, with a constant ringing in your ears? That's just what millions of Americans who suffer from tinnitus face. Hope could be on the way. New research by the Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center and Oregon Health & Science University found that a noninvasive technique involving...
  • Stop Everything: There’s a New Seaweed That Tastes Like Bacon and Is Better for You Than Kale

    07/16/2015 12:05:35 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 88 replies
    Time ^ | 07-16-2015 | Helen Regan
    Dulse seaweed: a new variety, when cooked, reportedly tastes like bacon ============================================================================================= The world's most perfect food may have just arrived! Researchers from Oregon State University’s Hatfield Marine Science Center say they’ve created and patented a new type of seaweed that has the potential to be sold commercially as the next big superfood. The reason? It tastes just like bacon, they claim. The bizarre but tasty creation is actually a new strain of red marine algae called dulse that is packed full of minerals and protein and looks like red lettuce. Dulse normally grows in the wild along the Pacific...
  • The USDA Doesn’t Want Us to Eat Lungs [HAGGIS BAN]

    07/16/2015 10:02:23 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 42 replies
    munchies.vice.com ^ | July 3, 2014 / 10:22 am | By Baylen Linnekin
    Earlier this week, USDA secretary Tom Vilsack met in Washington with representatives from the British government. Atop the list of issues UK environment secretary Owen Paterson was to bring up in his meeting with Vilsack is the continuing US ban on the sale of authentic Scottish haggis. Haggis, Scotland’s national dish, has been unavailable in the United States since 1971, when the USDA issued a succinct rule: “Livestock lungs shall not be saved for use as human food.” But sheep lungs are a key ingredient in haggis. The reasoning behind the USDA’s ban on lungs is generally couched in terms...
  • 10 Rotten Foods You Are Used To Eating

    07/16/2015 8:28:52 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 70 replies
    www.minq.com ^ | 07-15-2015 | Staff
    While we're taught that food that smells rotten should be thrown away, there are actually many foods that you eat whenever they've just started rotting. Of course, it's not pleasant to call these foods rotten, so we refer to them in different ways instead. Cheese Making cheese comes down to your ability to control rot. This is because milk is treated with bacteria and enzymes causing it to curdle. The curdles are then cut, formed and ripened into cheese. Stinkheads Another native Alaskan delicacy is what's known as stinkheads. These are King Salmon heads that have either been buried in...
  • AP-GfK Poll: Clinton's standing falls among Democrats [39%!]

    07/16/2015 6:27:00 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 16 replies
    apnews.myway.com ^ | Jul 16, 7:59 AM (ET) | By LISA LERER and EMILY SWANSON
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Hillary Rodham Clinton's standing is falling among Democrats, and voters view her as less decisive and inspiring than when she launched her presidential campaign just three months ago, according to a new Associated Press-GfK poll. The survey offers a series of warning signs for the leading Democratic candidate. Most troubling, perhaps, for her prospects are questions about her compassion for average Americans, a quality that fueled President Barack Obama's two White House victories. Just 39 percent of all Americans have a favorable view of Clinton, compared to nearly half who say they have a negative opinion...
  • Report: Vets' disability claims ended up in shred bins

    07/16/2015 6:23:42 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 13 replies
    www.militarytimes.com | 7:05 p.m. EDT July 15, 2015 | By Leo Shane III, Staff write
    Link Only..................... http://www.militarytimes.com/story/veterans/2015/07/15/ig-report-la-shred-bins-disability-claims-va-veterans-affairs-los-angeles/30197103/
  • 50 million year old sperm cells found in fossilized cocoon

    07/15/2015 2:23:53 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 13 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | July 15, 2015 | Bob Yirka
    Diagram illustrating the inferred mode of fossilization of microorganisms in clitellate cocoons, exemplified by a common medicinal leech (reproductive stages modified from Sims). (a) Two leeches mate; (b) a cocoon is secreted from the clitellum; (c) eggs and sperm are released into the cocoon before the animal retracts and eventually deposits the sealed cocoon on a suitable substrate (d). Insets depict enlargements of the inner cocoon-wall surface showing how spermatozoa and microbes become encased in the solidifying inner cocoon wall. Credit: Biology Letters, DOI: 10.1098/rsbl.2015.0431 ============================================================================================= (Phys.org)—A small team of researchers with members from institutions in Sweden, Argentina and Italy,...
  • Jupiter twin discovered around solar twin

    07/15/2015 1:51:26 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 8 replies
    Phys. Org ^ | 07-15-15 | Provided by: ESO
    Artist's impression showing a newly discovered Jupiter twin gas giant orbiting the solar twin star, HIP 11915. The planet is of a very similar mass to Jupiter and orbits at the same distance from its star as Jupiter does from the Sun. This, together with HIP 11915's Sun-like composition, hints at the possibility of the system of planets orbiting HIP 11915 bearing a resemblance to our own Solar System, with smaller rocky planets orbiting closer to the host star. Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser ============================================================================================ Astronomers have used the ESO 3.6-metre telescope to identify a planet just like Jupiter orbiting at the...
  • Police: Woman Blames Obama For Counterfeiting Money

    07/15/2015 10:37:16 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 38 replies
    washington.cbslocal.com ^ | July 14, 2015 12:45 PM | Staff
    KINGSPORT, Tenn. (CBSDC) – A woman reportedly told police she was counterfeiting money because she read online that President Barack Obama created a new law stating that people can start printing their own money. The Times News reports Pamela Downs tried to use a counterfeit $5 bill at a local grocery store in Kingsport, Tennessee, on Sunday. Police say that counterfeit bill was printed on computer paper and that each side had been glued together. According to the Times News, Downs told the officer she received the money from a gas station a few days prior, but that she never...
  • Pluto and Charon Shine in False Color

    07/15/2015 10:01:33 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 31 replies
    NASA ^ | 07-14-2015 | STAFF - Editor: Tricia Talbert
    New Horizons has obtained impressive new images of Pluto and its large moon Charon that highlight their compositional diversity. These are not actual color images of Pluto and Charon—they are shown here in exaggerated colors that make it easy to note the differences in surface material and features on each planetary body. The images were obtained using three of the color filters of the “Ralph” instrument on July 13 at 3:38 am EDT. New Horizons has seven science instruments on board the spacecraft—including “Ralph” and “Alice”, whose names are a throwback to the “Honeymooners,” a popular 1950s sitcom. “These images...
  • More precise estimate of Avogadro's number to help redefine kilogram

    07/14/2015 12:08:59 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 31 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | July 14, 2015 | Provided by: American Institute of Physics
    The number of atoms in this silicon sphere is known given or taken 20 atoms each 10^9. The atom distance was measured by the X-ray interferometer on the left. Credit: Enrico Massa and Carlo Sasso ================================================================================================ An ongoing international effort to redefine the kilogram by 2018 has been helped by recent efforts from a team researchers from Italy, Japan and Germany to correlate two of the most precise measurements of Avogadro's number and obtain one averaged value that can be used for future calculations. Their results are published this week in the Journal of Physical and Chemical Reference Data. Avogadro's...