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Posts by Rockingham

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  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    07/04/2015 2:52:45 AM PDT · 313 of 313
    Rockingham to mrobisr
    The Catholic Church holds that the natural sciences are a valid set of disciplines with their own methods and authority. Ultimately though, as much as science may explain how the world works in material and scientific terms, it does not and cannot fully explain the spiritual dimension of human existence.

    Notably, science points toward the creation of the universe as stemming from a moment in time -- indeed, a moment in which not just matter but time itself were created. Philosophically and theologically, this points toward a Creator, and belief in God as the Creator is an irreducible requirement for Catholics.

    As for the creation of man, logically, it must stem from a specific moment or period in time and in some manner must involve the bringing into existence of not just man physically but also of his spiritual dimension. No matter how much science may use DNA and paleontological evidence and fashion scientifically credible explanations like evolution for when and how man physically came into existence, science still does not and cannot address how we acquired our spiritual dimension.

    Part of that spiritual dimension is that we have not just a body but also a soul that survives our physical death. In crediting miracles, angels, demons, spirits, mystic visions, visitations, and apparitions, the Catholic Church sees our spiritual dimension as richer and more of a challenge to modern atheism and materialism than what is commonly on offer from formal Protestant teaching.

    I am heartened though that individually most Protestants give great credit to prayer and things spiritual. Faithful Catholics and Protestants both know that Christ is our Lord and that His and His Father's will are at work in this world in many ways that we but dimly see and poorly understand.

  • Anyone here looking at precious metals stocks? (vanity)

    07/01/2015 7:43:24 PM PDT · 9 of 18
    Rockingham to M-cubed
    I have experienced several instances after hurricanes when electric power was out for an extended period. In those times cash was always accepted. Similarly, in Greece today, in the context of a banking crisis, cash -- in euros -- is prized above all else.

    Calling gold and silver "insurance policies" overstates their value in that they would be most suited for dire circumstances after a general collapse when cash is no longer accepted. If that ever happens though, food, water, guns, and ammo would likely often be more valuable in trade than gold and silver.

    Even better would be living in a defensible rural home with family and reliable neighbors, and a working garden, greenhouse, chickens and goats and perhaps beef, well water, a stock of gasoline, and EMP hardened off the grid solar electric power. After a general collapse, it would take a lot of gold and silver to buy that, and reliable men with guns to hold it.

  • Anyone here looking at precious metals stocks? (vanity)

    07/01/2015 5:14:09 PM PDT · 6 of 18
    Rockingham to Leaning Right
    Gold mining stocks are subject to risks and influences other than simple metal prices and supply and demand for it. Competition, interest rates, technical considerations, currency values, politics, manipulations by nation-states and large investors, and other factors all play a role and are too difficult to model and hedge for any but the best informed and well-heeled investors.

    Emotional influences -- especially your emotions -- can also affect market prices and investment strategies and decisions. For many investors, gold's emotional appeal and belief in its enduring value make for disabling effects. They lose sight of market fundamentals and basic investor maxims about cutting losses, making quick decisions, and hedging risks. They fail to take profits when they can and tend to let fear and greed get the upper hand.

    I once knew a wealthy Canadian, a retired businessman worth near a hundred million dollars who started speculating in the gold market in the late 1970s on the reasoning that the dollar was doomed to continuing decline. For a time, he did remarkably well, but then lost almost everything when the market turned against him as Reagan's economic policies took hold and the dollar rose in value. Oddly, the Canadian was a stalwart conservative who greatly admired Reagan and agreed with his policies even as he failed to reckon with the effects of their success on his speculative position in the gold market.

    The bottom line: the gold markets, including that for gold mining stocks, are especially opaque and tricky for investors. I would avoid gold and gold mining stocks, and if I did get in, I would not put more at risk than I was willing to lose. Above all, I would not fall in love with gold or become a believer if I became an investor in it or in gold mining stocks.

  • I Have a Theory and I Want Your Opinion on it.

    07/01/2015 6:32:14 AM PDT · 83 of 95
    Rockingham to nikos1121
    Wrong. The polls showing Hillary to be a strong candidate are no doubt accurate. Especially after two terms with the Democrats in power, most voters lack reliable systematic knowledge about candidates, politics, public policy, and current events. They instead vote based on vague perceptions, preferences, and arguments that they pick up from the general political and cultural environment as shaped by the news media and other liberal mechanisms of influence. Functionally, this means that many conservatives are so badly informed that they easily end up preferring a liberal Democrat.

    When pressed, most Hillary supporters say and believe that that she is a strong leader with experience, that it is time for a woman president, and that the Republican candidate -- whomever it will be -- is unacceptable for one reason or another. Note that the general tenor of the strength and experience arguments in favor of Hillary is such that they appeal to uninformed but instinctively conservative voters.

    For a Republican to win the Presidency in such circumstances requires, among other things, luck, a favorable political environment based on issues and events, an appealing candidate, and a good campaign that generates a late campaign season surge that breaks through the news media's programming and liberal influence and engages voter attention in favor of the GOP candidate.

    The last two Republican Presidential candidates to do that and take the presidency from the Democrats -- Richard Nixon and Ronald Reagan -- had sharply divergent personalities but were shrewd political veterans who benefitted from a bad economy, social turmoil at home, and worries over national security and the country's standing overseas. Both also recognized that to win the required electoral votes, they needed to energize the GOP base, romance away some Democratic voters, and win the swing vote -- all at the same time. In the context of today, the difficulty of doing that can be expressed by a simple number: that Hillary Clinton, for all her faults and weaknesses, polls strongly.

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/30/2015 7:33:37 PM PDT · 229 of 313
    Rockingham to MHGinTN

    You put on the table perhaps the most disputed theological issue between Catholics and Protestants. I decline to get drawn into a bottomless swamp of disputation over the nature of the Catholic Eucharist.

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/30/2015 6:46:31 PM PDT · 225 of 313
    Rockingham to MHGinTN

    Not until you have referred to it. To my Catholic sensibility, it is an obsolete Old Testament admonition embedded in a larger passage about ritual sacrifices.

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/30/2015 4:55:41 PM PDT · 222 of 313
    Rockingham to MHGinTN

    Yes, I am familiar with the Catholic Catechism.

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/30/2015 4:54:31 PM PDT · 221 of 313
    Rockingham to editor-surveyor

    As I pointed out, not just the Catholic church but the Adventists — and no doubt others — have the same view of the passage from Isaiah. What sect or church supports your view?

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/30/2015 2:39:34 PM PDT · 200 of 313
    Rockingham to editor-surveyor

    The distinction you offer is of little consequence in that the passage has God calling on human reason as guide leading toward faith. Again, I suggest that this supports teachings that faith and reason are meant to be allies, not adversaries, and that even those without faith may nevertheless distinguish good and evil.

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/29/2015 8:02:01 PM PDT · 195 of 313
    Rockingham to editor-surveyor

    Too bad that you were not there to help the poor wretches responsible for the King James version of Scripture, who translated Isaiah as “Come now, and let us reason together, saith the Lord . . .” And, my request still stands: can you cite any recognized experts who have the same view of Isaiah as you do?

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/29/2015 4:40:31 PM PDT · 184 of 313
    Rockingham to CynicalBear

    No, I am staying right where I am.

  • [Vanity]Request Input on Dealing with Difficulty Returning a Purchase To Home Depot

    06/29/2015 3:58:04 PM PDT · 20 of 61
    Rockingham to Roos_Girl
    You need to settle on a goal as to what you want HD to do. Then you need to make a written demand by letter on the store manager, district manager, and relevant corporate department.

    Your demand letter should be a model of accuracy and brevity while stating the pertinent facts. It would be useful to include photos of the shed as installed, with photos showing that the opening with a measuring tape is less than claimed. Look for and include anything that shows the false claimed dimension of the shed opening in writing, such as packaging on the box, advertising, or a printout from the HD website.

    Your demand letter should conclude not just with a demand as to what you want -- ideally, a set money figure, such as the price of the shed -- but also a reasonable deadline and a lawyerish phrase like "Govern yourself accordingly."

    That may work, at least to get a counter-offer. Ultimately, you may well have to sue HD in small claims court.

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/29/2015 3:12:21 PM PDT · 176 of 313
    Rockingham to CynicalBear
    That does not address my point because arguing over the meaning of a single isolated word does not engage the specific Bible passage. Why does that matter?

    Consider what the Seventh Day Adventists -- who are not known as slackers when it comes to Scriptural strictness -- have to say about faith and reason and the passage from Isaiah that I cited:

    Use of reason

    Some today—both Christians and non-Christians—place faith and reason in opposition to one another. But this is not the biblical view. Isaiah 1:18 declares, “Come now, and let us reason together,' says the Lord." Unless we reason as we read, we will fail to understand what we're reading. A passage from Nehemiah shows that the need to engage the Word with our intellect is nothing new.

    After 70 years of captivity in Babylon, many of the brave souls who returned to rebuild Jerusalem had not heard or read the Scriptures. So a group of priests "read from the Book of the Law of God, making it clear and giving the meaning so that the people could understand what was being read" (Nehemiah 8:8; emphasis added). Paul exhorted Timothy to "be diligent, . . . accurately handling the word of truth" (2 Timothy 2:15,NASB). Note that "accurately handling the word of truth" requires diligence, and diligence includes careful reasoning.

    COME LET US REASON.

    And if one follows the link and reads the rest of the web page, it is clear that Adventists -- yes, even Adventists -- are like Catholics in urging that reading Scripture correctly requires attention to cultural and historical context, the logical context, reason, perspective, and a balancing of evidence.

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/29/2015 1:58:59 PM PDT · 166 of 313
    Rockingham to CynicalBear

    You are not an authority or expert in ancient Hebrew and Greek, and you decline to cite to any. Do you have anything other than your say so to offer?

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/29/2015 1:09:10 PM PDT · 157 of 313
    Rockingham to CynicalBear

    Do you have any proof of this, or are we to accept it as fact based on your say so, drawn from whatever cramped and sectarian authority that you regard as binding on you?

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/29/2015 8:37:03 AM PDT · 144 of 313
    Rockingham to CynicalBear

    Not being fluent in ancient Greek and Hebrew, I rely on people who are — just as you do.

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/28/2015 8:26:51 PM PDT · 140 of 313
    Rockingham to editor-surveyor

    Do you mean that Christians should have Saturday as the Sabbath, like the Seventh-day Adventists?

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/28/2015 5:17:38 PM PDT · 135 of 313
    Rockingham to editor-surveyor

    Would you read or give any credit to the works of Protestant leaders like Martin Luther, John Calvin, and Jonathan Edwards? Or would you reject them too as peddlers of non-apostolic works that attempt to supplement Scripture?

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/28/2015 4:21:19 PM PDT · 133 of 313
    Rockingham to editor-surveyor
    Surely there is benefit to deep learning in Scripture and in the culture and history of the era, and that being so, it is worth consulting those who are knowledgeable. In addition, some theological controversies get settled, and experience helps to reveal both error and truth. Over twenty centuries or so, that provides a substantial basis for Christian theology. Or at least that is the Catholic view.

    The fundamentalist Protestant view though has every person read Scripture and interpret and apply it for themselves. This makes for dozens of Protestant sects with an endless variety of teachings and a susceptibility to odd doctrines and enthusiasms.

    Moreover, fundamentalist hostility to reason and science leads to the discredit of Christianity and its estrangement from large areas of modern life, especially from the educated elites who apply reason and science on a routine basis.

    In contrast, Catholic teaching sees natural law as engraved by God on every human soul. That natural law enables human reason to discern good from evil, truth from lies. This natural law is complemented and made whole by divine law as known to us through revelation, Scripture, and Christ's life and teachings.

    From this perspective, human reason can draw upon natural law to amplify what Scripture teaches. Thus reason, when properly employed, bolsters Christian faith and practice. Indeed, natural law and the capacity to discern good and evil helps open pagan hearts to Christian teaching.

    I find it an extraordinary and distressing contradiction that a fundamentalist Protestant missionary would appeal to reason and natural law to convert pagans in loincloths in a jungle, but Protestant fundamentalists at home in the developed world harshly scorn human reason as having anything worthwhile for Christian faith.

    Is it any wonder that Christianity is failing in the West when it today rejects reason and science, which are the basis for some of the highest accomplishments of Christian civilization?

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/28/2015 2:10:53 PM PDT · 130 of 313
    Rockingham to editor-surveyor
    Differences over the meaning of passages in the Bible often divide not just Catholics and Protestants but Protestants themselves. Indeed, I have heard some unusually sharp words exchanged between faithful, goodhearted members of Protestant Bible study groups over such issues.

    Given such differences, it makes sense to consult learned authorities, from early Church fathers to modern experts. When pressed, most Protestants accept such an approach, but they decline to admit that the Catholic Church or any church should develop a body of consistent doctrine and teaching.

    The result is a theological shallowness to American Protestantism and its reduction of Christianity to a set of lifestyle constraints and recommendations for better living. This leaves room for odd bits like the Prosperity Gospel and the Left Behind series to enjoy runs of popular enthusiasm among the Protestant faithful.

    Meanwhile, Catholicism is experiencing its own crisis in the developed world due to clerical misconduct and widespread apostasy, with internal divisions between modernist thinking and traditional, Bible based Christian faith. And the entire developed world based on science and reason finds itself under assault by enemies ancient and modern, declining in population, and with a diminished and cramped view of the future and of the nature of humanity itself.

    Call it a Catholic fantasy, but I think that the leading nations of the world need to be evangelized by Christians both Catholic and Protestant, putting their differences aside in Christian brotherhood. To accomplish that requires not just that Protestants and Catholics make peace, but that Protestants develop coherent theological doctrines and make peace with reason and science.

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/28/2015 1:12:58 PM PDT · 129 of 313
    Rockingham to CynicalBear

    Just what sort of reason do you suppose man is capable of except human reason?

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/28/2015 1:05:49 PM PDT · 126 of 313
    Rockingham to CynicalBear

    You are trying to vary Scripture in order to dismiss passages that conflict with your views. And of course you are appealing to reason in support of your interpretation.

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/28/2015 12:15:25 PM PDT · 121 of 313
    Rockingham to CynicalBear

    I think that we have identified the fundamental and unbridgeable point of difference in our views. You adamantly reject any role for reason in matters of Christian faith, while the Catholic tradition that I follow embraces reason as a means for understanding Scripture and the Christian faith.

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/28/2015 12:03:15 PM PDT · 120 of 313
    Rockingham to mrobisr

    With recent advances in DNA technologies, evolution is so well-proven by science as a biological process that opponents rarely dispute it except in regard to human beings. In that regard, our essential attribute that distinguishes us from animals — the human soul — cannot be explained by science and must be reserved to religion. By way of explanation, Catholics are not obliged to adhere to Papal encyclicals on evolution or climate change since they were not delivered ex cathedra, meaning with the full authority of the Papacy.

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/27/2015 2:06:42 PM PDT · 88 of 313
    Rockingham to CynicalBear
    Yet consider Isaiah 1:18-19: "Come now, and let us reason together," Says the LORD, "Though your sins are as scarlet, They will be as white as snow; Though they are red like crimson, They will be like wool. "If you consent and obey, You will eat the best of the land . . ."

    Read fairly, these and other passages demonstrate God's call for us to exercise our capacity for reason.

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/27/2015 11:17:00 AM PDT · 81 of 313
    Rockingham to CynicalBear

    And so it happens that there are Christians who expand the authority of Scripture beyond its proper scope and who then end up endorsing slavery and denying evolution. As it happens, in addition to Scripture, God also provides us with reason and the capacity to learn from experience. Why should these be denied any role in matters of faith and moral reasoning?

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/27/2015 10:05:00 AM PDT · 73 of 313
    Rockingham to BipolarBob

    As I posted to CynicalBear, Scripture is sometimes unclear or equivocal, our understanding of it may be inadequate or defective, and it does not definitively answer all human questions. Therefore we must often turn to human experience and reason in matters of faith. Fundamentalist, sola scripture Protestants reject that view and thus find themselves on problematic territory when it comes to science and reason, even moral reasoning.

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/27/2015 9:57:10 AM PDT · 72 of 313
    Rockingham to RnMomof7

    So, in your view, the Catholic Church is merely pretending to its adherents and to the public at large to have a soft interpretation of anathema, while secretly holding to a severe original meaning of anathema as used at the Council of Trent? Have I stated the matter accurately?

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/27/2015 9:49:23 AM PDT · 71 of 313
    Rockingham to CynicalBear

    Scripture is sometimes unclear or equivocal, our understanding of it may be inadequate or defective, and it does not answer all questions. Therefore we must often turn to human experience and reason in matters of faith. Fundamentalist, sola scripture Protestants reject that view and thus find themselves on problematic territory when it comes to science and reason, even moral reasoning.

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/26/2015 9:06:48 PM PDT · 57 of 313
    Rockingham to BipolarBob

    So, Scripture alone matters, and the early Church Fathers and their writings are to be disregarded, as well as reason and the accumulated wisdom and experience of the Church. Yet isn’t it “adding to Scripture” to contrive such a foundational doctrine and claim that it is drawn from Scripture? Indeed, the passage at issue seems better interpreted to mean not to vary Scripture than as a command that Scripture alone may be consulted. Thus sola Scriptura is not really Scriptural but more a doctrinal contrivance that expresses Protestant anticlericalism.

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/26/2015 7:45:19 PM PDT · 55 of 313
    Rockingham to BipolarBob

    Catholics do not add to or subtract from scripture, but they do recognize sources of authority in addition to scripture.

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/26/2015 7:32:45 PM PDT · 51 of 313
    Rockingham to BipolarBob

    You seem averse to Catholics being, well, Catholic in going beyond scripture to shape their faith and practice. I get that sola scriptura is a foundational principle for contemporary Protestant fundamentalism, but I fail to see why you should regard it as binding on Catholics.

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/26/2015 7:12:58 PM PDT · 50 of 313
    Rockingham to RnMomof7

    You are mistaken as to what anathema means. It is a form of excommunication based on adherence to false doctrines.

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/26/2015 5:47:46 PM PDT · 46 of 313
    Rockingham to RnMomof7

    You caught us. The Pope and his Catholic followers are just pretending, even in the reconciliation with the Lutherans and the many other ecumennical gestures, meetings, and pronouncements of recent decades. We are secretly training and building up our caches of swords, shields, crossbows, and chain mail, our casks of holy water and holy oil, and refurbishing our cherished torture instruments. Soon, soon, when the Vatican’s armies begin to march and put Protestants to the sword and rack in obedience to the Council of Trent, you will be able to claim vindication.

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/26/2015 5:32:27 PM PDT · 45 of 313
    Rockingham to BipolarBob
    And when the hour was come, he sat down, and the twelve apostles with him. And he said to them: I have desired to eat this pasch with you, before I suffer. For I say to you, that from this time I will not eat it, till it be fulfilled in the kingdom of God. And having taken the chalice, he gave thanks, and said: Take, and divide it among you: For I say to you, that I will not drink of the fruit of the vine, till the kingdom of God come. And taking bread, he gave thanks, and brake; and gave to them, saying: This is my body, which is given for you. Do this for a commemoration of me. In like manner the chalice also, after he had supped, saying: This is the chalice, the new testament in my blood, which shall be shed for you.

    (Matthew 26:26-30; Mark 14:22-26; 1 Corinthians 11:17-34)

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/26/2015 5:26:18 PM PDT · 44 of 313
    Rockingham to CynicalBear

    And what of Protestant churches that diverge from your own sect? Or of the Jews? I surmise that your stock of condemnatory terms would be greatly taxed by any such accounting — with little concern as to how Christ would view such expressions.

  • This week went from Rino collaborators to the Republicís death knell(Tell me Iím wrong, PLEASE)

    06/26/2015 3:44:51 PM PDT · 57 of 59
    Rockingham to Voice of Reason1
    The news media and the educational complex remain extraordinarily powerful in fashioning and attaching such labels. In the coming years though, that power will continue to erode due to technology and cost considerations.

    In many large state universities, freshman and sophomore classes are now heavily tilted toward attendance online and on demand instead of attendance in person. As state finances become ever more burdened by public employee pension obligations, state funding of education will inevitably be under pressure. Within ten years a distinctively large slice of higher education will be delivered online to students who reside at home.

    As comprehensive knowledge and skills testing validates that method of higher education, going away to college will become the domain of affluent and indulgent parents and limited to perhaps a final year or two. Competition between colleges and universities will force a trimming back of weak instructors and bad courses. The culture defining power of higher education will inevitably wane, reliant as it is on having student on campus and away from home.

    As for the news media, the continuing decline of newspapers and network evening news will further weaken the power of the news media to set the agenda and terms of debate. Within an election cycle or two, a Republican Presidential candidate will take the Obama approach of treating the news media as dispensable and get away with it. When that happens, their power will be decisively diminished.

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/26/2015 2:42:03 PM PDT · 29 of 313
    Rockingham to CynicalBear
    The Catholic teaching of the assumption of Mary into heaven is based on the belief that, as the Mother of Christ, Mary was protected from the bodily corruption of death. In addition, well-documented Marian apparitions have deeply influenced Catholic doctrines in regard to Mary, especially appearances at Lourdes, Fatima, and Guadeloupe.

    The ritual practices and vessels that you disparage originated with the Jews and are described in the Old Testament. Recognition of and veneration of saints is based on proof of a life of heroic Christian virtue and of miracles credibly attributed to them after their death.

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/26/2015 2:42:03 PM PDT · 28 of 313
    Rockingham to CynicalBear
    The Catholic teaching of the assumption of Mary into heaven is based on the belief that, as the Mother of Christ, Mary was protected from the bodily corruption of death. In addition, well-documented Marian apparitions have deeply influenced Catholic doctrines in regard to Mary, especially appearances at Lourdes, Fatima, and Guadeloupe.

    The ritual practices and vessels that you disparage originated with the Jews and are described in the Old Testament. Recognition of and veneration of saints is based on proof of a life of heroic Christian virtue and of miracles credibly attributed to them after their death.

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/26/2015 2:10:45 PM PDT · 21 of 313
    Rockingham to BipolarBob

    A Christian Sunday liturgy with a ritual re-enactment of the Last Supper dates from the earliest days of Christianity. The practice of the Apostles thus illuminates the bare words of the New Testament.

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/26/2015 11:31:08 AM PDT · 13 of 313
    Rockingham to rwa265

    Thank you.

  • Why I'm Still Catholic (And Why Other People Aren't)

    06/26/2015 10:56:10 AM PDT · 9 of 313
    Rockingham to CynicalBear
    In spiritual and theological terms, the Catholic Mass is a re-enactment of the Last Supper -- which I trust also appears in your Protestant Bible, no matter the denomination. Similarly, the details of Catholic doctrine and teachings are grounded in specific passages of scripture. That Protestants interpret such passages differently does not make Catholics or Protestants into pagans.

    Modern Catholic teaching regards Protestants as errant on specific points of doctrine but as Christians nonetheless and due good will from Catholics as fellow believers in Christ. As a Catholic, I have known many Protestants of admirable faith and virtue and have attended Protestant services that fully manifested the spirit of Christianity. On the whole, I think it unlikely that Christ would endorse his followers being hostile and condemnatory toward each other based on reasonably disputable points of doctrine.

  • This week went from Rino collaborators to the Republicís death knell(Tell me Iím wrong, PLEASE)

    06/26/2015 10:35:03 AM PDT · 38 of 59
    Rockingham to Voice of Reason1
    You are on the mark. As a rule, the most unequal and cruel societies in the world are the ones run by Leftists who proclaim their dedication to equality and justice. Characteristically, when Leftists run things, state power is enhanced and those running the state -- the Leftists -- readily convert their power into the ownership and exclusive use of the best that can be had in such places.

    Thus, in poor and long-suffering Cuba, Fidel and Raul Castro are billionaires with complete control of their country and a vast secret police and many prisons to assure their security and the permanence of their rule. Yet the Left and the news media in the US treats them as heroic figures who preside over a society that is better and more just than the United States.

  • This week went from Rino collaborators to the Republicís death knell(Tell me Iím wrong, PLEASE)

    06/26/2015 9:38:21 AM PDT · 27 of 59
    Rockingham to Voice of Reason1
    Major defeats inevitably tempt us to despair, but despair is foolish in times of defeat just as is excessive celebration and confidence in times of victory. Ultimately, conservative principles endure and rise again after defeat because those principles are grounded in lasting truths about human nature.

    In addition, political matters are subject to changes of fortune as reaction sets in to the effects of bad policies. Thus Jimmy Carter and an era of economic decline and perilous retreat during the Cold War led to the election of Ronald Reagan and an extraordinary roll back of the burdens of taxation and government, a renewal of the American economy, and victory in the Cold War.

    In simple terms, as bad as things are, we are but a few good elections away from reversing defeats into victories and setting a new course for the country.

  • Clarence Thomas attacked his colleagues for saving a law aimed at desegregating America

    06/25/2015 10:07:31 AM PDT · 16 of 36
    Rockingham to tacticalogic

    All too true.

  • Clarence Thomas attacked his colleagues for saving a law aimed at desegregating America

    06/25/2015 9:53:43 AM PDT · 6 of 36
    Rockingham to SeekAndFind

    Really, since Thomas is married to a white woman, can it really be said that he favors segregation?

  • Art Bell returns in one month (30 more days today)

    06/20/2015 3:54:18 PM PDT · 55 of 88
    Rockingham to Joe 6-pack

    I have long suspected that JC was a comic doing a church lady sort of bit that he hoped to use in his career but eventually abandoned when it became clear that the character was too odd and unlikeable to be commercially appealing.

  • Art Bell returns in one month (30 more days today)

    06/20/2015 3:40:55 PM PDT · 50 of 88
    Rockingham to LostInBayport

    Don’t forget Mel of Mel’s Hole fame, and the serious-minded guests like Michio Kaku and Malachi Martin. Bell got me through many nights of insomnia.

  • The hard-to-swallow truth about vitamin pills

    06/20/2015 1:32:31 PM PDT · 20 of 39
    Rockingham to rickmichaels
    The original research article, which I read online, is focused on the use of vitamins for cancer prevention and therefore ignores other reasons to take vitamin and mineral supplements.

    Some vitamin deficiencies are dangerously common, especially vitamins B-12 and D, as are deficiencies in micronutrients like essential fatty acids. In addition, common digestive disorders like celiac disease, non-celiac gluten sensitivity, Crohn's disease, and IBS and IBD, all tend to cause significant nutritional deficiencies that require vitamin and mineral supplementation.

    Finally, common illnesses and drugs like statins and antacids can impair nutritional uptake and metabolism, while in other instances, supplements can help prevent or treat an illness. What doctor these days does not recommend supplementary Vitamin D and fish oil for older patients?

    Nevertheless, as to cancer, there is valid cause for concern in that it seems that taking anti-oxidant supplements to excess may spur cancer by weakening the body's use of oxidative reactions in the immune response against cancerous cells. Moreover, Vitamin A spurs cell growth and may therefore directly aid the development and progression of some forms of cancer.

  • Is it illegal to purchase a gun for an ex-con in SC?

    06/18/2015 3:38:47 PM PDT · 22 of 28
    Rockingham to WakeUpAndVote

    It is illegal to act as a straw buyer to purchase a gun on someone else’s behalf, even for someone who is not a felon. It is also illegal to provide a gun to a convicted felon.