Posts by Swordmaker

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  • 25 Things You Can Do On iOS 8 That You Couldn't Do On iOS 7

    09/20/2014 1:48:29 AM PDT · 19 of 19
    Swordmaker to gunsequalfreedom
    Headline should be 25 things you can do on iOS 8 that you could do on an Android two years ago.

    You could do some of these things on Android with apps. . . as you could with apps on iOS, but not integrated into the OS. . . nor as smoothly.

  • 25 Things You Can Do On iOS 8 That You Couldn't Do On iOS 7

    09/20/2014 1:45:33 AM PDT · 18 of 19
    Swordmaker to PieterCasparzen
    Carefully, carefully analyze the paragraph about government and backdoors and you’ll see the loopholes possible.

    Possible - we’ll not know until we see what secret “national security” court orders they have been handed.

    Not to single out Tim or Apple.

    Publicly-held, and many privately-held big businesses, and government, and academia, all work for new world order.

    My you are a cynic. Sometimes a cigar is just a cigar. . . and sometimes a company is just telling the truth.

    I have read the that paragraph, but you also have to understand the technology and how it is used. The owners of the devices encrypt their data to 128 bit encryption with a key only they have. Apple does NOT have this key. To decrypt such a cypher by brute force using a supercomputer of circa 2012, it has been calculated that it would take quite a bit of time. By the time it was completed, I am certain the data would be useless. How much time?

    "'DES' is part of a symmetric cryptographic algorithm with a key size of 56 bits that has been cracked in the past using brute force attack. As shown above, even with a supercomputer, it would take 1 billion billion years to crack the 128-bit AES key using brute force attack."EE Times, How secure is AES against brute force attacks?

    Supercomputers may have gotten faster and more powerful in the two years since that article was written, but not that much better that they can improve significantly on that time factor. . . nor has anyone come up with a miraculous algorithm to solve such an encryption by finessing it.

    Apple, not having your personal key, cannot decrypt data with a key it does not have. Even a backdoor will not help. Therefore, when your data is uploaded to iCloud it is already 128 bit encrypted. Apple anonymizes it and then further encrypts it with 256 bit encryption for storage for which they DO have the key.

    When you request data from your iCloud account it is decrypted back to the 128 bit level and returned to your device where YOU can decrypt it back to usable format using your key.

    The only thing they can provide to the government are data that YOU are a customer, for how long, your phone number and your primary and alternate email addresses (three things they most likely already have), and when you've accessed your account, possibly the size of your database, and they may be compelled to hand over your encrypted 128 bit data which Apple has but cannot decrypt, for whatever it is worth. . . but not what is in it. Good luck to the government agency in its attempt to decipher it.

    Contrary to myth, the CIA and the NSA are also constrained by the same laws of computer science that hamstring everyone else. i.e. their supercomputer capacity would STILL take a billion billion years to crack the cypher.

    Similarly, FileVault on a Mac encrypts the data on any drive you choose to use it on to a similar level of encryption. Without your password, it is not, at our current level of technology, breakable.

    Among the data that Apple devices routinely encrypt before sending them to iCloud are:

    • Photos
    • Documents in the Cloud
    • Calendars
    • Contacts
    • iCloud Keychain
    • Backup
    • Bookmarks
    • Reminders
    • Find My iPhone
    • Find My Friends
    • iCloud Mail and Notes (encrypted in transit)
    if you choose to read something else into these very plainly written statements that Apple has referenced in their corporate financial documents under penalty of Sarbanes-Oxley, then you'll believe nothing in any document that has to be released under penalty of perjury and draconian penalties. The letter Tim Cook wrote and released, being from an officer of a publicly traded company also falls under Sarbanes-Oxley Act of 2002 and if it found to be false, Cook lays himself open to prison time of up to 20 years and personal fines of up to $10 million. He will have made statements of material fact that could adversely impact the value of both the company and the stock. I am certain that Apple's legal beagles went over these statements before they were released. in the seven years between 2002 and 2007 over 1600 corporate executives were prosecuted under Sarbanes-Oxley, and $1 billion dollars in fines were levied. It is not a toothless law.

    This is not something that a corporation would lightly obfuscate or leave "loopholes" in their plainly written statements, where someone could come back and file lawsuits when their data is subpoenaed and the company releases data they said they could not, proving that statement a lie. That is exactly what is meant when it was mentioned in their audited Financial Statement about a potential liability relating to privacy statements. The statements must be truthful and accurately followed.

    On the other hand, most data the government is after is intercepted by the NSA at the carrier level. . . where it is not heavily encrypted. Phone conversations, texting, and emails in the clear are mined. Google reads customer's emails and mines everything it get's it grubby mitts on, and converts that data to its proprietary data. Google believes that data belongs to Google and the government therefore can subpoena it from its "owner" . . . which, now, is not you, but Google. You are not Google's customer but rather, Google's product, its inventory, subject to subpoena and seizure. Since Apple never asserts ownership over the data, you own it, and custody remains with you. YOU are the custodian of your data. It does make a legal difference which Apple has been arguing, along with the Electronic Frontier Foundation.

  • 25 Things You Can Do On iOS 8 That You Couldn't Do On iOS 7

    09/20/2014 12:09:10 AM PDT · 11 of 19
    Swordmaker to fwdude
  • 25 Things You Can Do On iOS 8 That You Couldn't Do On iOS 7

    09/20/2014 12:06:09 AM PDT · 10 of 19
    Swordmaker to fwdude
    Unprecedented data mining?

    Uh, no. You're thinking of another company: Google. Not Apple.

    Read this statement from CEO Tim Cook of Apple, made this last week:

    A message from Tim Cook about Apple’s commitment to your privacy.

    At Apple, your trust means everything to us. That’s why we respect your privacy and protect it with strong encryption, plus strict policies that govern how all data is handled.

    Security and privacy are fundamental to the design of all our hardware, software, and services, including iCloud and new services like Apple Pay. And we continue to make improvements. Two-step verification, which we encourage all our customers to use, in addition to protecting your Apple ID account information, now also protects all of the data you store and keep up to date with iCloud.

    We believe in telling you up front exactly what’s going to happen to your personal information and asking for your permission before you share it with us. And if you change your mind later, we make it easy to stop sharing with us. Every Apple product is designed around those principles. When we do ask to use your data, it’s to provide you with a better user experience.

    We’re publishing this website to explain how we handle your personal information, what we do and don’t collect, and why. We’re going to make sure you get updates here about privacy at Apple at least once a year and whenever there are significant changes to our policies.

    A few years ago, users of Internet services began to realize that when an online service is free, you’re not the customer. You’re the product. But at Apple, we believe a great customer experience shouldn’t come at the expense of your privacy.

    Our business model is very straightforward: We sell great products. We don’t build a profile based on your email content or web browsing habits to sell to advertisers. We don’t “monetize” the information you store on your iPhone or in iCloud. And we don’t read your email or your messages to get information to market to you. Our software and services are designed to make our devices better. Plain and simple.

    One very small part of our business does serve advertisers, and that’s iAd. We built an advertising network because some app developers depend on that business model, and we want to support them as well as a free iTunes Radio service. iAd sticks to the same privacy policy that applies to every other Apple product. It doesn’t get data from Health and HomeKit, Maps, Siri, iMessage, your call history, or any iCloud service like Contacts or Mail, and you can always just opt out altogether.

    Finally, I want to be absolutely clear that we have never worked with any government agency from any country to create a backdoor in any of our products or services. We have also never allowed access to our servers. And we never will.

    Our commitment to protecting your privacy comes from a deep respect for our customers. We know that your trust doesn’t come easy. That’s why we have and always will work as hard as we can to earn and keep it.

    Tim

  • 25 Things You Can Do On iOS 8 That You Couldn't Do On iOS 7

    09/19/2014 11:40:07 PM PDT · 8 of 19
    Swordmaker to Berlin_Freeper; ~Kim4VRWC's~; 1234; Abundy; Action-America; acoulterfan; AFreeBird; Airwinger; ...
    25 things you can do in iOS 8 you could not do in iOS 7 PING!


    Apple iOS 8 Ping!

    If you want on or off the Mac Ping List, Freepmail me. http://www.worldwidehippies.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/Obama_Howdy_Doodat.jpg

  • Diamond Mines in Canada

    09/19/2014 1:40:30 AM PDT · 16 of 22
    Swordmaker to Paladin2
    Is gem quality different from commercial or would that be industrial?

    The article states that Canada's diamond mines produce 3% of the world's gem quality diamonds by quantity, but 11% by value because of their quality.

  • The First Esau Prophecy and ISlam...The Bible and ISlam pt 4

    09/19/2014 1:23:12 AM PDT · 17 of 36
    Swordmaker to ansel12
    Bigfoot is Muslim?

    Nah, he's the Golum. . . or a remnant of the Giants who lived in the Earrh.

  • Ars Technica reviews iOS 8: ‘Transformative’

    09/19/2014 12:49:11 AM PDT · 14 of 15
    Swordmaker to Elle Bee
    and still no way to dump all of the old email from my phone ... Ha .

    I do wish the had a "delete all" option, but I imagine that there's negative repercussions if someone uses it and then says "Oops!" and wants the mail back. Apple seems to have opted for the safer mode of requiring users to do individual "by choice" deletion of each email to avoid such accidental deletion of important documents.

    With iOS 8, deletion of single emails easier. A single swipe right to left will send an email to the Trash. It no longer require selection, then tap. A single step process instead of a two step. That makes it much simpler.

    I usually have my email accounts echoed on my iMac. I handle dumping large numbers of spam du jour email on the iMac where it is easy to group, select, mark as spam, and then send to Nevernever Land. With the ease of iCloud syncing, anything done to the email on the IMac will be mirrored on all my iOS devices.

  • Ars Technica reviews iOS 8: ‘Transformative’

    09/19/2014 12:29:52 AM PDT · 13 of 15
    Swordmaker to MediaMole
    IMHO, battery life on my iPhone 5 is noticeably worse than it was on IOS7. Looks like something they will fix in 8.0.1.

    I’m sitting here, watching the battery monitor drop by 1 percent every 5 minutes as I use it.

    Battery life issues seem to be endemic to .0 releases.

    Odd. On my iPad Air, I was observing yesterday it seemed slightly better. In fact, mine is sitting at 55% right now, when normally, after a day of normal usage, it'd be close to 15% by now. I've noticed the screen brightness is more adaptable to ambient light than I've ever seen it before, adjusting the brightness and contrast in response much more quickly and more frequently than ever before.

    The iBook app now switches to a "night" view in low light conditions automatically. . . and I wonder how many other apps are similarly switching. It seems, at least on my iPad Air, to be saving battery quite well. Perhaps other iOS devices may not be working so well with this "improved" functionality?

    On the other hand, the Ars Technica thurough review reported their tests showed virtually no differences on their various test models of iOS devices between iOS 7 and iOS 8. Go figure.

    I did have some issues with FR website links being non-operational just after my upgrade. Everything became copacetic after a cold restart. . . But I did my cold restart before I had a chance to see if I might also have had any battery draining issues at the same time. Cold restarts is what the Genius Bar recommends as a first step that sometimes handles battery issues on new version upgrades, so I'd suggest that. Let me know if it works.

  • Ars Technica reviews iOS 8: ‘Transformative’

    09/18/2014 6:15:30 PM PDT · 10 of 15
    Swordmaker to Not gonna take it anymore
    Swordmaker, I upgraded to IOS 8 today and my iPhone 5s is running very hot. Is this normal?

    No, it's not. Before panicking, try this quick fix that takes care of most upgrade problems. Do a complete cold restart. Here is the best procedure. First, quit all background apps. . . then do a cold start by holding down the home button and the off/on button simultaneously for ten second until the iPhone is forced into shut down. Then press the on button for a normal start-up, if the hot condition contnues, make an appointment with the Genius Bar at the nearest Apple Store.

  • The number of websites has burst above one billion . . . And still counting

    09/18/2014 1:40:03 PM PDT · 13 of 13
    Swordmaker to minnesota_bound

    Yeah, they tried to sell it to me . . . not interested. $10,000. Seriously?

  • Louisiana Loses Its Boot (Interesting Pictures)

    09/18/2014 1:34:42 PM PDT · 45 of 67
    Swordmaker to blam

    The one on the right is the politically correct Globull Warming map of Lose-siana. . .

  • Apple rolls out iOS 8 to iPhone, iPad users: Here's how to get it

    09/18/2014 12:15:25 PM PDT · 36 of 37
    Swordmaker to kevkrom
    * Really, though, most of the above is low-impact. There will be a WiFi patch soon, I presume, and the real “oomph” of iOS 8 comes from Continuity and Extensions, the former is waiting on Yosemite and the latter has only a few examples out there so far, and none that I’ve really played with yet.

    Have you tried a full cold restart? I had a few little problems after the install and restart, but they all disappeared after a cold restart. . . So far.

  • Apple rolls out iOS 8 to iPhone, iPad users: Here's how to get it

    09/18/2014 12:05:09 PM PDT · 35 of 37
    Swordmaker to RandallFlagg
    Found another issue.
    When my iPhone is vertical, the power level and time is on top. When it’s in landscape, the power level and time is gone. I don’t like that .

    I think it's a feature, not an issue. It gives more usable screen in landscape mode. It's easy to turn the phone to check power level if you want. I prefer that.

  • The number of websites has burst above one billion . . . And still counting

    09/18/2014 3:21:58 AM PDT · 5 of 13
    Swordmaker to Jim Robinson; John Robinson

    This also means that FreeRepublic is literally “One in a Billion!”

    Of course we always new the value of this website!

  • The number of websites has burst above one billion . . . And still counting

    09/18/2014 3:19:17 AM PDT · 4 of 13
    Swordmaker to Swordmaker

    Assuming you could type a URL in five second and it took another five seconds to load the website, and spent ten seconds looking at the site, you could visit all one billion websites in a mere 500 years or so. . .

  • The number of websites has burst above one billion . . . And still counting

    09/18/2014 3:13:09 AM PDT · 2 of 13
    Swordmaker to ~Kim4VRWC's~; 1234; Abundy; Action-America; acoulterfan; AFreeBird; Airwinger; Aliska; altair; ...

    Non-Apple specific Ping. . . the Internet surpasses 1 BILLION WEBSITES! That’s one website for every seven or so people! Who says the Internet is crowded?

  • The number of websites has burst above one billion . . . And still counting

    09/18/2014 3:10:35 AM PDT · 1 of 13
    Swordmaker
  • Apple rolls out iOS 8 to iPhone, iPad users: Here's how to get it

    09/18/2014 3:00:00 AM PDT · 29 of 37
    Swordmaker to circlecity
    Every time Apple upgrades its OS I lose another gig of storage space on my Ipad.

    Sad to say, that's about what you lose this time too. But some apps become unnecessary. Apple has apparently licensed Shazam and it's incorporated into SIRI, so you can delete Shazam if you have that app.

  • Ars Technica reviews iOS 8: ‘Transformative’

    09/18/2014 2:10:44 AM PDT · 4 of 15
    Swordmaker to MDLION

    I think one area is this:

    iCloud Drive keeps the concept of application-specific folders for data, but it allows users (and other applications) to see the filesystem and access data stored in multiple app folders. People who don’t care to know where their files are can continue to ignore it, but power users are going to be able to manage data like they’ve wanted to since iCloud was introduced.

    In iOS 8, you’ll be given the opportunity to upgrade from standard iCloud to iCloud Drive once you sign into your account, but you should tread lightly here—converting your account to use iCloud Drive is a one-time deal and it can’t be reversed. iOS 8 still supports “Documents & Data” sync, the old-style iCloud syncing method that will continue to work with Mavericks and older iOS versions. If you still use Macs running OS X 10.9 and you want to sync data between them, don’t turn iCloud Drive on. If you’ve upgraded to the Yosemite Public Beta and are using it exclusively or if you’re from the Future and Yosemite is already out, turn it on. If you only use devices that run iOS 8, turn it on. Just don’t click through those upgrade prompts without thinking about it first.

  • Ars Technica reviews iOS 8: ‘Transformative’

    09/18/2014 1:09:29 AM PDT · 2 of 15
    Swordmaker to ~Kim4VRWC's~; 1234; Abundy; Action-America; acoulterfan; AFreeBird; Airwinger; Aliska; altair; ...
    Very comprehensive review of all the changes in IOS 8 —PING!


    Apple IOS 8 Ping!

    If you want on or off the Mac Ping List, Freepmail me.

  • Ars Technica reviews iOS 8: ‘Transformative’

    09/18/2014 1:07:39 AM PDT · 1 of 15
    Swordmaker
  • Apple rolls out iOS 8 to iPhone, iPad users: Here's how to get it

    09/18/2014 12:59:10 AM PDT · 28 of 37
    Swordmaker to All

    I just found another issue. . . iOS 8 is about 740 MB larger after install than iOS 7. So, if you got a lot of photos, movies, apps, and have your 16G near full, you’ll have to delete some.

    On an iPad, the hit is about 1.08GB.

  • Apple releases OS X Mavericks 10.9.5 with Safari 7.0.6

    09/17/2014 10:42:36 PM PDT · 14 of 20
    Swordmaker to All

    Everything in iOS seem kopacetic after the restart. So far, I’m not finding any problems with the upgrade with OS X 9.5.

  • Apple releases OS X Mavericks 10.9.5 with Safari 7.0.6

    09/17/2014 9:47:04 PM PDT · 12 of 20
    Swordmaker to All

    Ok, on restart, the keyboard has reappeard in Atomic browser. . . For now. Off to check Safari functionality. . .

  • Apple releases OS X Mavericks 10.9.5 with Safari 7.0.6

    09/17/2014 9:45:19 PM PDT · 11 of 20
    Swordmaker to All

    Ok, tested system after cold restart. . . Safari is now behaving with FreeRepublic. So, after upgrading, and going through the activation steps, do a full cold restart, don’t just start using your iOS device. I think you’ll then be ok.

  • Apple releases OS X Mavericks 10.9.5 with Safari 7.0.6

    09/17/2014 9:38:54 PM PDT · 10 of 20
    Swordmaker to Swordmaker

    Ok, on restart, the keyboard has reappeard in Atomic browser. . . For now. Off to check Safari functionality. . .

  • Apple releases OS X Mavericks 10.9.5 with Safari 7.0.6

    09/17/2014 9:33:54 PM PDT · 9 of 20
    Swordmaker to ~Kim4VRWC's~; 1234; Abundy; Action-America; acoulterfan; AFreeBird; Airwinger; Aliska; altair; ...

    I just ran into a GLITCH with iOS 8 and FREEREPUBLIC! My Safari on FR will not link to articles on FR, or to outside ararticles on the homepage. Sidebar navigation doesn’t seem to work either.

    Has anyone else who has upgradedto iOS 8 run into any problems?

    Another glitch I run into is that the keyboard disappears using atomic browser to enter text. Which is what I’m using right now to post this which is somewhat awkward so I’m having to dictate this.

    I recommend not upgrading until Apple solves these glitches.

  • Apple releases OS X Mavericks 10.9.5 with Safari 7.0.6

    09/17/2014 6:44:16 PM PDT · 2 of 20
    Swordmaker to ~Kim4VRWC's~; 1234; Abundy; Action-America; acoulterfan; AFreeBird; Airwinger; Aliska; altair; ...
    Apple releases update to OSX 9 Mavericks and Safari 7.0 —PING!


    Apple Mavericks and Safari UpDate Ping!

    If you want on or off the Mac Ping List, Freepmail me.

  • Apple releases OS X Mavericks 10.9.5 with Safari 7.0.6

    09/17/2014 6:42:18 PM PDT · 1 of 20
    Swordmaker
  • Apple rolls out iOS 8 to iPhone, iPad users: Here's how to get it

    09/17/2014 6:39:36 PM PDT · 21 of 37
    Swordmaker to conservatism_IS_compassion; ~Kim4VRWC's~; 1234; Abundy; Action-America; acoulterfan; AFreeBird; ...
    IOS 8 released today. . . I am using it to post this right now. Amazing new features in the editing of text. —PING!


    Apple iOS8 UpDate Ping!

    If you want on or off the Mac Ping List, Freepmail me.

  • A US Court Threw Out VirnetX's $368 Million Patent Infringement Award Against Apple

    09/17/2014 2:07:47 AM PDT · 4 of 8
    Swordmaker to Swordmaker

    Double damn, auto correct also changed “FaceTime” to “Facebook” LOL!

  • A US Court Threw Out VirnetX's $368 Million Patent Infringement Award Against Apple

    09/17/2014 2:04:47 AM PDT · 3 of 8
    Swordmaker to Swordmaker

    Damn autocorrect. Make that VirnetX. . .

  • A US Court Threw Out VirnetX's $368 Million Patent Infringement Award Against Apple

    09/17/2014 2:03:15 AM PDT · 2 of 8
    Swordmaker to SueRae; ~Kim4VRWC's~; 1234; Abundy; Action-America; acoulterfan; AFreeBird; Airwinger; Aliska; ...
    US Appeals Court tosses $368 million VirtextX patent infringement judgement on Facebook against Apple, returns it to lower court— PING!


    Apple Patent Infringement partial win Ping!

    If you want on or off the Mac Ping List, Freepmail me. http://www.worldwidehippies.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/Obama_Howdy_Doodat.jpg

  • A US Court Threw Out VirnetX's $368 Million Patent Infringement Award Against Apple

    09/17/2014 1:58:45 AM PDT · 1 of 8
    Swordmaker
  • iPhone TECHIES NEEDED: Unlocked and SIM Free

    09/15/2014 11:23:36 AM PDT · 76 of 81
    Swordmaker to Enlightened1
    As for the finger print part. If you ever served in the U.S. military or been arrested, then the FBI already has your finger prints. LOL! So I wouldn't worry too much about that.

    The fingerprint doesn't go to Apple. It never leaves your iPhone and as a matter of fact, it's not even stored as an image in the iPhone. The image is converted to a hash. Each time your finger or fingers touch the sensor the hash is re-computed and compared against the hash. If there is a match witching a certain range, you get in, if no, you don't. But there is no way the fingerprint is sent anywhere.

  • iPhone TECHIES NEEDED: Unlocked and SIM Free

    09/15/2014 11:05:42 AM PDT · 75 of 81
    Swordmaker to Not gonna take it anymore
    Swordmaker do you think that iPhone 5s will support Apple Pay in the future? I really like the size and weight of the iPhone 5s and hope I don’t have to upgrade to 6 any time soon.

    I've been considering that question since last night. . . and I've come to the conclusion that it cannot for two reasons.

    1. No encrypted Secure Element storage chip.
    2. No NFC radio.

    Without these, the system cannot work.

  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- 62 Kilometers above Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    09/15/2014 2:39:53 AM PDT · 13 of 16
    Swordmaker to Prospero

    Dark as coal. Not a dirty snowball. No ice.

  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- 62 Kilometers above Comet Churyumov-Gerasimenko

    09/15/2014 2:37:45 AM PDT · 12 of 16
    Swordmaker to beebuster2000
    would a bottle rocket ignite or does it need oxygen?

    It would fire.

  • iPhone TECHIES NEEDED: Unlocked and SIM Free

    09/15/2014 2:36:31 AM PDT · 58 of 81
    Swordmaker to minnesota_bound; This Just In
    You can buy an app called PDAnet to connect the phone to your computer. I can install PDAnet without needing to jailbreak it. Apple blocks the install unless you jailbreak. http://www.junefabrics.com/iphone/index.php

    That's unnecessary now. Built-in system WIFI Tethering is included on all modern iPhones since iOS 7 was released a couple of years ago and does not require carrier permission.

  • iPhone TECHIES NEEDED: Unlocked and SIM Free

    09/15/2014 2:25:57 AM PDT · 57 of 81
    Swordmaker to This Just In

    If you are at all interested in ApplePay, get the iPhone 5s. The 5C will not be supported. No fingerprint pad. . . and I’m not even certain about the 5s. The 5s is more secure, but if you’re not going for the ApplePay, you might consider a used iPhone 5, basically the same. Metal case, though.

  • iPhone TECHIES NEEDED: Unlocked and SIM Free

    09/15/2014 2:21:31 AM PDT · 56 of 81
    Swordmaker to This Just In
    Thanks, Ramius. I use an iPad as well an iPod for those you listed.

    The iPhone can be a mobile WIFI hotspot for your iPad, or your WIFI on a laptop, sharing data bandwidth. Works great.

  • iPhone TECHIES NEEDED: Unlocked and SIM Free

    09/15/2014 2:19:11 AM PDT · 55 of 81
    Swordmaker to smokingfrog
    CDMA vs. GSM: What’s the Difference?

    Two basic technologies in mobile phones, CDMA and GSM represent a gap you can’t cross.

    The latest iPhones 5 and above have radios for both. No difference. I believe it works with nine different standards around the world.

  • Air Show Math

    09/14/2014 9:14:41 PM PDT · 21 of 73
    Swordmaker to rey

    How much of a jet engine’s thrust is needed to overcome drag.

  • The Sci-Fi Book Classics You Need to Read Before You Die

    09/14/2014 2:48:28 AM PDT · 200 of 200
    Swordmaker to All

    The Great Time Machine Hoax, by Keith Laumer.

    A Trace of Memory, also by Laumer.

  • The Sci-Fi Book Classics You Need to Read Before You Die

    09/14/2014 2:46:17 AM PDT · 199 of 200
    Swordmaker to BlueLancer

    The Door Into Summer, by Robert A. Heinlein. I think it may be my favorite book by him.

  • The Sci-Fi Book Classics You Need to Read Before You Die

    09/14/2014 2:42:34 AM PDT · 198 of 200
    Swordmaker to 10mm
    TRIPLANETARY, first book of "Doc" Smith's Lensman series available for free at Project Gutenberg. Most of his other early books available for free as well. Enjoy.

    I went looking for them again on my Macbook Air after posting and downloaded all six in the series as PDFs then emailed them to myself and installed them on my iPad iBook. Happy am I.

  • The Sci-Fi Book Classics You Need to Read Before You Die

    09/12/2014 9:49:37 PM PDT · 157 of 200
    Swordmaker to King Moonracer
    E.E. Doc Smith and his Lensman series. A classic!!!!

    "Doc" Smith, with the Skylark of Space series, a series which he started writing in 1917 with his co-Author, Mrs. Lee Hawkins Darby, was the first Scientifiction (yes, that's what it was called back then) that escaped from the confines of the solar system and went to explore the stars. He was a true pioneer.

    This is quite a coincidence, but just two days ago, I found E.E. "Doc" Smith's "Skylark of Spac,e" "Skylark III," "Skylark of Valeron," and "Skylark DuQuayne" on iBooks in reprint ebooks for very reasonable prices, along with "Spacehounds of the I.P.C." and "The Galaxy Primes," all books I last read more than fifty years ago. Alas, I could not find any of the wonderful Lensman series, which was what I was looking for. I have a First Edition Grey Lensman hardback copy I found in a military surplus store fifty years ago. I really want to reread them.

    There were a lot of reprints of the Stephen Goldin "Doc" Smith postmortem "collaborations" in which Goldin took Smith's unwritten story ideas and, in my opinion, incompetently wrote them up as novels.

    There were, however, some novels I had never seen that were pure E.E. "Doc" Smith available for download! . . . whee! Yay!

  • The Sapphire Industry Just Wasn't Ready For The New iPhone

    09/11/2014 12:28:42 AM PDT · 18 of 24
    Swordmaker to Moonman62
    Man made sapphires used for jewelry are sometimes given a coating of diamond to make them more durable and give them a better appearance. Sapphire is better than what they use now for displays, but it will still scratch.

    I think you have that upside down and backwards. Certain simulated diamonds are coated with sapphire to strengthen the surface to both prevent scratches and to improve surface reflectivity. DiamondNexus simulant stones have a Mohs hardness of 8.4, and a dispersion and refraction almost exactly the same as a diamond. That softness means there are a lot of materials that could potentially scratch the stone. To harden the surface and prevent scratches, it's coated with clear synthetic sapphire.

  • The Sapphire Industry Just Wasn't Ready For The New iPhone

    09/11/2014 12:12:49 AM PDT · 17 of 24
    Swordmaker to SeekAndFind; ~Kim4VRWC's~; 1234; Abundy; Action-America; acoulterfan; AFreeBird; Airwinger; ...
    Oh SNAP! No sapphire iPhone screens! PING!


    No Apple Sapphire Screen Ping!

    If you want on or off the Mac Ping List, Freepmail me. http://www.worldwidehippies.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/04/Obama_Howdy_Doodat.jpg