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Posts by ubipetrusest

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  • Pope receives Spanish transexual, girlfriend

    01/27/2015 12:07:25 AM PST · 47 of 62
    ubipetrusest to livius

    Yes, Francis does not say what Christ said. Pope Bergoglio has no problem criticizing practicing Catholics for their fertility, while he bows to the population “experts.” He says that every child is a treasure, BUT twice in the same airplane interview (on the way back to Rome January 19), he tells how he “reproached a woman” for her “irresponsible” eighth pregnancy. Dorothy Day would have not accepted his latter statement; she defended mothers of large families in print.

    Is Dorothy Day’s remark to you quotable or published? I’ve read a lot of her writing, and she frequently criticized “luxuries”: “If I wrote to Archbishop Cooke and asked that Nativity Church be kept open, I wonder if the pastor and curates would agree. Of course, things would get stolen. If there are curtains, heavy rich red plush ones, in front of the confessionals, they might be taken home to be used as covers in the cold tenements, where too often the furnace breaks down. Or the candlesticks might disappear from the altar, to supply the light when the welfare check was used for food and the gas and electric was shut off” (”Catholic Worker,” October 1968).

  • Governor Cuomo Proposes Regulations to Have Medicaid Cover "Transgender Care and Services"

    01/26/2015 11:23:43 PM PST · 1 of 6
    ubipetrusest
    Whose interests are paramount to Andrew Cuomo? Not the general public's. NYS home owners pay a county tax that includes a sum specifically allotted to Medicaid. Why should taxpayers be forced to subsidize surgical procedures that castrate and make men eunuchs? Similarly, why should they be forced to pay for other types of physical mutilation and hormonal manipulations? Note that Governor Cuomo has also forced the same burden onto NYS insurance companies. In another bow to the Brave New World Cuomo favors, NYS will now alter official documents such as birth certificates to change the holder's biological sex. The public can comment through February 2. But where does one comment? The press release does not give this essential information, so one is left to surmise comments should be directed to Governor Cuomo's office.
  • Francis welcomes in private audience same-sex "couple": transexual "former woman" and "wife"

    01/26/2015 10:51:41 PM PST · 31 of 76
    ubipetrusest to Jack Hydrazine

    No Catholic in his right mind can defend Francis. Francis insults and puts down believing practicing Catholics (eg., “Rabbitgate”) while he embraces perverts and assists such enemies of the Church as population “experts” and Obama and Castro.

  • The Catholic Communizer Dorothy Day is up for Sainthood? Excuse me?

    10/22/2014 2:44:59 PM PDT · 1 of 24
    ubipetrusest
    This article provides a corrective view to the "popular" image of Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker (CW) movement. Biorseth starts with Carol Byrne's "The Catholic Worker Movement (1933-1980: A Critical Analysis," which shows that Day was a pacifist when it came to the free world, but lauded and praised the Communist revolution in Castro's Cuba, and also had kind words for Ho Chi Minh in North Vietnam.

    Biorseth then reconsiders "whether Marxism and its utopian ideal is predominantly evil, or predominantly stupid." He discusses his realization "that anarchy is, in fact, the state of Marx’s Communism. It is a stateless, classless, government-less, law-less, hierarchy-less, private-property-less, authority-less collectivist socio-economic order, based on the commune and communal living. The difference between an anarchist and a would-be Communist is that the anarchist wants the state of Communism right now, and the would-be Communist wants to move through stages of Socialism to eventually arrive at Communism."

    Sadly, Biorseth's claim that Day's movement has descended into militant feminism and other errors is true. CW houses have had public "Masses" celebrated by women "priests," and the CW is also "gay-friendly" in its newspaper articles and membership. "Ecumenical" for the CW includes houses that are Mennonite, Anglican, non-sectarian, interfaith, and even "queer." The last designation is for the CW Radish House, in Toronto, Canada, which states it "is committed to acts of resistance against oppression. We specifically engage with trans[gender] and queer communities and discern the ways in which all forms of oppression intersect and affect those who are most marginalized within our churches and our communities" (http://dorothydayworker.blogspot.com/2014/01/by-their-fruits-you-will-know-them.html).

  • ‘We have to judge acts’: Vatican’s Cardinal Burke dismantles ‘Who am I to judge?’

    09/16/2014 8:58:43 PM PDT · 17 of 18
    ubipetrusest to NKP_Vet; dsc

    NKP_Vet, Francis does great harm with his so-called off-the-cuff confusing and thoughtless remarks. The doctrine of the Church will not change, but many of Francis’s acts and statements undermine it.

    We call Francis a leftist because he announced at the beginning of his pontificate that he wants a church of the poor for the poor. This is reminiscent of “Christian Communists” Peter Maurin and Dorothy Day’s claim that the aim of Christianity is “to make the rich poor and the poor holy.” None of these objectives are in Scripture.

    Francis’s positive view of socialism calls to mind Day’s endorsement and glorification of Castro and the Cuban Revolution. Francis has attacked “unbridled capitalism,” the free market, and “the tyranny of money.” Adam Shaw of Fox News wrote on December 4, 2013:

    “Apart from the fact that there is no major nation practicing unfettered capitalism (like Obama, Francis loves attacking straw men) there is more real tyranny in socialist cesspools like Francis’ home of Argentina than in places where capitalism is predominant.
    “In the document [Evangelii Gaudium] he rejects the free market and calls for governments to overhaul financial systems so they attack inequality. In doing so he shows himself painfully misguided on economics, failing to see that free markets have consistently lifted the poor out of poverty, while socialism merely entrenches them in it, or kills them outright.” (http://www.foxnews.com/opinion/2013/12/04/pope-francis-is-catholic-churchs-obama-god-help-us/)

  • Finally, An Orthodox Pope?

    04/01/2014 9:38:44 PM PDT · 10 of 11
    ubipetrusest to piusv

    You’re right, and so are the other commenters who thought this post was Mundabor’s for April Fool’s Day. His latest post, http://mundabor.wordpress.com/2014/04/01/aprils-fool-2/, states:

    Yes, of course it was an April’s fool!

    Or do you think that you would be informed that the Bishop of Rome, the most Modernist tool in the land east of the Pampas, would put himself on his way to conversion on… April 1!? Really?

    What shall I say: I commend the innocence of those who have believed it. Albeit hooks and sinks also come to mind…

    I must admit: it was fun. My apologies to all those whose comments I had to hold back, lest they spoil the party too soon…

    Still, even this little joke tell us something, in fact, rather serious, and to be reflected upon with due sadness.

    We live in such disgraceful times, that a Pope expressing himself as he should is, in fact, an April’s fool joke.

    Mundabor

  • Pope Francis’ Protestant Meditation on Our Lady

    01/12/2014 10:36:53 PM PST · 85 of 89
    ubipetrusest to SpirituTuo; ebb tide; piusv

    I doubt that ebbtide has a miter to remove, but those of us who love the Blessed Virgin Mary commend him for posting this article. While many do not recognize Mary’s unique place in God’s plan—and very often they identify themselves as Protestant, agnostic, or atheistic—we know the pedestal she has been placed on is very high, and God has placed her there.

    Mary, with her singular nature “could possibly have had thoughts of anguish, discouragement, and other emotions,” as SpirituTuo states. For the Pope to suggest she could have thought, “Lies, I was deceived!” is going too far. Mary did not suffer from the effects of original sin; how could she think that GOD had lied to or deceived her? As has already been pointed out, her life was founded on trust of God.

    Pope Francis is often inexact in his phrasing. His conjecture is unbelievable when applied to the Blessed Virgin Mary. Once again—as he so often does—Francis has put his foot in his mouth. The subject of his sermon is the spiritual necessity of silence in our lives. His speculations on Mary’s thoughts are distracting as well as distressing.

    Francis ends by referring to Pope John Paul II’s statement (there are no quotation marks to indicate Francis is quoting and not paraphrasing): “But she, with her silence, hid the mystery that she did not understand and with this silence allowed for this mystery to grow and blossom in hope.” Perhaps Francis should have followed her example!

    Mother of Our Savior, Mother of Good Counsel, Virgin Most Prudent, Seat of Wisdom, Cause of Our Joy, pray for us.

  • Pope : "No such thing as innocent gossip" when we speak ill of others we are "homicidal Christians"

    11/14/2013 4:48:54 PM PST · 64 of 64
    ubipetrusest to markomalley

    Pope Francis says that the Catechism states, “these persons must not be marginalized because of this; they must be integrated in society.” Is it unreasonable to expect the Pope to quote the Catechism accurately? His statement—which he attributes to the Catechism—has a different twist and comments on the issues of marginalization and social acceptance of homosexuality. This “quotation” is not from the Catechism, as your quotation reveals.

  • Jewish leaders express “shock” over SSPX decision to host Nazi funeral

    10/18/2013 3:53:16 PM PDT · 69 of 70
    ubipetrusest to Mrs. Don-o

    After how many years of the truth about the evils of abortion and contraception not being preached in Catholic churches, we now also have a woman showing up for an abortion brandishing rosary beads and criticizing a prolifer who reminded her of Catholic teaching against abortion, as reported on the blog “California Catholic Daily.” Just a few days ago, the following post appeared on youtube: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kLW6uI7EAxk. The narrator describes the rosary beads dangling from the windshield of the mom who had dropped off her daughter for an abortion. The narrator asks for prayers for the young woman, who left the clinic in an ambulance for the local hospital’s emergency room.

  • Rome debates funeral for Nazi war criminal (Roman Vicariate says "No")

    10/18/2013 3:46:28 PM PDT · 31 of 33
    ubipetrusest to marron; Mrs. Don-o

    Two citations that state Priebke was repentant:

    http://www.lagazzettadelmezzogiorno.it/english/priebke-met-victims-families-says-lawyer-no662006

    Priebke ‘met victims’ families’, says lawyer
    Says ‘not true’ that war criminal never repented
    (see related stories) (ANSA) - Rome, October 17 - Erich Priebke’s lawyer said Thursday that it was “not true” that the Nazi war criminal did not repent before he died aged 100 last week.
    He said that the former SS officer had met “in private form” some of the victims of the 1944 massacre of 335 Roman men and boys, including 75 Jews, that he was involved in.

    http://www.haaretz.com/jewish-world/jewish-world-news/1.552563

    Pertinent quotation:

    Priebke spent nearly 50 years as a fugitive before being extradited to Italy from Argentina in 1995 to stand trial for the 1944 massacre. He died in the Rome home of his lawyer, Paolo Giachini, where he had been serving his life term under house arrest.
    Giachini has said he merely wanted a Catholic funeral for his client, whom he said had confessed his sins and been absolved.

  • NY Archdiocese Health Plan Has Covered Birth Control, Abortion for Over a Decade

    06/17/2013 4:53:46 PM PDT · 25 of 25
    ubipetrusest to Cicero

    Here is the statement issued by the Archdiocese of New York, as posted at the Archdiocese’s site: “Joseph Zwilling, Director of Communications for the Archdiocese of New York, released the following statement today, May 27, 2013.

    “Today’s New York Times story, “Archdiocese Pays for Health Plan That Covers Birth Control,” incorrectly equates the health care benefits of the members of Union 1199 – including those 1199 employees at Catholic facilities – with the Health and Human Services mandate that improperly attempts to define the Church’s religious ministry and could force religious employers to violate their conscience. The Constitution and other provisions of federal law prohibit the government from imposing the mandate on the Archdiocese. A labor union is not subject to the same constraints as the federal government in this regard, and so the fact that 1199 requires these benefits as part of its plan does not excuse the government’s violation of the Archdiocese’s federal rights.
    What the 1199 health plan and the HHS mandate share is that the Archdiocese has objected to the dilemma of choosing between providing health care to employees or violating its sincere religious beliefs in both instances. ArchCare did not exist at the time the contract with 1199 was finalized. When ArchCare was formed, it inherited this situation and objected to these services being included in the 1199 health plan. However, ArchCare had no other option but to pay into the fund which administers the union members’ benefits “under protest” to continue to offer insurance to its union workers and remain in the health care field in New York. Similarly, the Archdiocese has attempted to negotiate with the Administration, advocated for a change in legislation in the Congress, and filed a lawsuit last May objecting to the HHS mandate. In all cases where the health insurance benefit plan is under the control of the Archdiocese, including for all non-union ArchCare employees, contraceptive care services are not provided.” (www.archny.org/news-events/news-press-releases/?i=29417)

    This specious reply neglects to point out that these “contraceptive” services include aabortion.The NY Times article states that “The Archdiocese of New York has previously acknowledged that some local Catholic institutions offer health insurance plans that include contraceptive drugs to comply with state law; now, it is also acknowledging that the archdiocese’s own money is used to pay for a union health plan that covers contraception and even abortion for workers at its affiliated nursing homes and clinics.” (http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/27/nyregion/new-york-archdiocese-reluctantly-paying-for-birth-control.html?_r=0)

    What a lesson in hypocrisy. How shameful that a successor of the apostles—Cardinal Dolan—puts social welfare before the sanctity of life as he proudly wears his “seamless garment” and acts as an enabler and apologist for the Democratic Party and other pro-abortion groups; for more details, see http://dorothydayworker.blogspot.com/2013/03/the-faith-takes-licking-his-eminence.html.

  • More Objective Reality (Cardinal Bergoglio celebrating a "youth Mass" complete with puppets)

    04/06/2013 10:56:08 AM PDT · 44 of 47
    ubipetrusest to Arthur McGowan; E. Pluribus Unum

    Canon law expert and advisor Edward Peters blogs at http://canonlawblog.wordpress.com/ and disagrees in his latest posts with your claim that “whatever the Pope does in the liturgy is correct, by definition.”

    You posted before the Pope’s washing of the feet of women and non-Catholics in violation of canon law. Peters goes into the questions this action raises. I believe a Papal visit after the usual liturgical ceremony in a church would have been as effective a gesture of concern. Similarly, in regard to the 2011 Mass of Cardinal Bergoglio, why dilute the worship of Christ by turning the Mass into a spectacle with balloons, banners, puppets, and birds flying off? Why not have the rally before of after the Mass?

    Thanks to E. Pluribus Unum for posting this for discussion. Vatican II allowed the liturgy to become politicized. We need to restore the dignity and focus of the Mass as the repetition of Christ’s sacrifice for us.

  • Kermit Gosnell Drugged Women Having Abortions, Left Them for Hours

    04/02/2013 6:55:06 PM PDT · 9 of 9
    ubipetrusest to vikzilla

    Makes one shudder to think what New York State is in for if Governor Andrew Cuomo manages to inflict the most liberal abortion law in the nation on us. New York City is already the abortion capital of the US.

  • Sigh: Biden Receives Communion Again [at Dolan's Cathedral]

    03/27/2013 7:09:22 AM PDT · 37 of 41
    ubipetrusest to old and tired

    Maybe he’s both, but he’s shrewd. It’s becoming clearer how His Eminence can champion the cause of Dorothy Day. She also paid lip service to the Commandments and teachings of the Church while she decried “sexual immorality” and sacrilegious communions at Catholic Worker farms but did nothing. She proclaimed publicly that she would obey if ordered by legitimate Church authorities to change her paper’s name even after she had refused to do so. Similarly, Dolan’s behavior violates Canon 915, so his praise of Day’s “prophetic disobedience” is no surprise. As Day was, His Eminence is a wearer of the “seamless garment” when it comes to life issues. Carol Byrne’s “The Catholic Worker Movement (1933-1980): A Critical Analysis” documents Day’s many deficiencies, which Cardinal Dolan shares and celebrates.

    We need an Archbishop of New York who is not a “cheesehead”; who follows Canon 915; who recognizes the priority of abortion over immigration and prison issues; and who faces the fact that things are going bad in his Archdiocese, which has the dishonor of being the abortion capital of the US.

  • Dorothy Day: Anarcho-Capitalist, Perhaps

    02/28/2013 7:41:36 AM PST · 13 of 13
    ubipetrusest to Salvation

    Salvation, If you read Day’s writings in the “Catholic Worker” (CW), you will see that she castigates the US for implementing “compulsory” programs, while she praises the communes and “social advances” in Castro’s Cuba and Mao’s China.

    The first two paragaphs of Day’s statement in your post are what elicited the following comment on the inconsistency of her thought:

    Even the best of political thinkers can have a lapse in consistency. Doesn’t it seem strange to you that [Day] would oppose Social Security on the grounds that it relied upon force and then praise a violent revolution [in Cuba] that expropriated people by force?
    It tells me that we don’t really have a consistent thinker here. I think the reality is that she wanted an outcome, a certain kind of society, and was sympathetic to whomever she believed had obtained it or was on the way to obtaining it. If I had the opportunity, I would point out the massive inconsistency in rejecting “force and compulsion” when it comes to something relatively mild like Social Security while remaining ethically uncritical of something like the Cuban Revolution. (Bonchamps, “Dorothy Day Anarcho-Communist, Perhaps”—comment by Bonchamps)

    As a self-proclaimed “revolutionary” (CW, April 1953; January 1970), Day may have been sorely disappointed at successful attempts to save the US economy. She believed that “revolution” would come to the US and “hoped” it would not be violent (”Beyond Politics,” CW, November 1949). She also declared: “In this country too the final solution will be the commune but how it will be brought about is in God’s hands. He may permit a bloody revolution” (CW, March 1959).

    When Day presented herself as a distributionist, she remained an anarchist and wrote:

    The Catholic Worker ... recommends a study of Kropotkin’s “Fields, Factories and Workshops,” of Martin Buber’s “Paths in Utopia.”
    Proudhon wrote in 1864—”Anarchy is a form of government or constitution in which the principle of authority, police institutions, restrictive or repressive measures, bureaucracy, Taxation, etc., are reduced to their simplest terms.” “Less representation and more self-government.” (CW, March 1959)

    Proudhon is famous for asserting “Property is theft” and Day agreed (CW, December 1971). Kropotkin believed in the use of force to redistribute wealth—as did Day, who wrote:

    Fortunately, the Papal States were wrested from the Church in the last century, but there is still the problem of investment of papal funds. It is always a cheering thought to me that if we have good will and are still unable to find remedies for the economic abuses of our time, in our family, our parish, and the mighty church as a whole, God will take matters in hand and do the job for us.
    When I saw the Garibaldi mountains in British Columbia.... I said a prayer for his soul and blessed him for being the instrument of so mighty a work of God. May God use us!” (CW, July-August 1969).

    Another of Day’s heroes was Saul Alinsky (CW, May 1966).
    Please also see my comments to Mrs. Don-o on Day’s favorable view of Communist societies and Communists. Dr.Carol Byrne documents these facts in her essential “The Catholic Worker Movement (1933-1980): A Critical Analysis,” published in 2010.

    The more one reads Day’s writings, the clearer it is that she was neither an “anarcho-capitalist” nor a simple distributionist, and her claims have to be examined closely.

  • Dorothy Day: Anarcho-Capitalist, Perhaps

    02/27/2013 8:18:05 AM PST · 12 of 13
    ubipetrusest to Mrs. Don-o

    Mrs. Don-o, Unlike you, I fault Dorothy Day for asserting that such acts of destruction and violence are motivated by any kind of “love”—lust for power, hatred for other human beings would be more appropriate designations. This claim puts Day’s practice of propaganda before her recognition of reality. Similarly, “pacifist” Day wrote of the guerrilla Colombian priest Camilo Torres and of Castro’s henchman Che Guevara:

    The attraction is strong, because both men literally laid down their lives for their brothers. “Greater love hath no man than this.”
    “Let me say, at the risk of seeming ridiculous, that the true revolutionary is guided by great feelings of love.” Che Guevara wrote this, and he is quoted by Chicano youth in “El Grito Del Norte.” (”Catholic Worker,” [CW], May 1970)

    Day also declared: “During the Franco-Prussian war, Bernadette considered the Prussians the servants of God. . . . How many Christians think of Hitler or Stalin in this way, as ‘the servant of God’” (”Our Stand,” CW, June 1940).

    If you have “read almost everything she wrote that’s in print,” how can you claim that Day making Castro a hero was merely a response to the “New York Times”?

    After Pope John XXIII excommunicated Castro in January 1962, Day showed her “respect” for the Holy Father by visiting Cuba later in the year and then writing several articles (CW,September-December 1962) in which she could not “condone” Castro’s bloody means, but had to praise the “social advances” that resulted. She also claimed that the clergy exiled from Cuba left voluntarily, and were not expelled by Castro.

    As for Day not “aligning” herself with such dictators, this is disproven by her frequent praise in the CW for Mao, Ho Chi Minh, Castro, and Lenin. Dr. Carol Byrne’s 2010 “The Catholic Worker Movement (1933-1980): A Critical Analysis” is essential reading and documents these claims, and the complete Supplementary Notes for her book are available at “Dorothy Day Another Way.”

    Such accolades and Day’s praise of prominent US Communists Anna Louise Strong, Mike Gold, Rayna Prohme, and Gurley Flynn are in stark contrast to her criticism of the ex-Communist Louis Budenz. In addition Day was an invited observer at the Communist Party USA Convention (CW, March 1957). She also sympathized greatly with the Party’s trials, as the following “message” she sent to the Communist newspaper “The Daily Worker,” shows:

    We at the Catholic Worker express our sympathy to The Daily Worker in the eviction they have suffered even though their beliefs are contrary to our own. Freedom of the press is a concept fundamental to Jeffersonians and libertarians and freedom in general is essentially a religious concept. The Smith Act itself shows that our country is so superficially religious that it is not willing to take the risk and consequences of a faith in freedom and man’s use of it. (In a lighter vein), if we only had the space and could be truly charitable and hospitable we would offer the use of our offices and even of our mailing list, since the bureaucrats have confiscated yours, and we are sure that we would risk nothing in such a gesture but achieve a healthful clarification of thought. Yours for a green and peaceful revolution.
    The editors The Catholic Worker. D.D.
    P.S. Seriously speaking, since it has been called to our attention that the faithful are forbidden to read Marxist writings, we withdraw our facetious offer of our mailing list. (”The Daily Worker Case,” CW, April 1956)

    Day certainly had a strange “theory and practice” of “the Gospels, the Works of Mercy.” May we be preserved from the “sanctity” of Dorothy Day.

  • Dorothy Day: Anarcho-Capitalist, Perhaps

    02/26/2013 5:04:48 PM PST · 10 of 13
    ubipetrusest to Mrs. Don-o

    You’re welcome, Mrs. Don-o. Anyone could call Dorothy Day a fool, but one wonders if she can be called a fool for Christ. As for Day being set “against the man with the gun,” she praised bloody dictators such as Castro, stating that although she could not “condone” the means that brought about his victory, she endorsed his “social advances” (”Catholic Worker” [CW], September-December 1962). She had similar praise for Ho Chi Minh and declared, “If we had had the privilege of giving hospitality to a Ho Chi Minh, with what respect and interest we would have served him, as a man of vision, as a patriot, a rebel against foreign invaders” (CW, January 1970).

    One wonders how accurately Day “instructed the ignorant”—one of the spiritual works of mercy—when she insisted:

    Mao-tse-Tung. . . . Karl Marx . . . .Lenin . . . . These men were animated by the love of brother and this we must believe though their ends meant the seizure of power, and the building of mighty armies, the compulsion of concentration camps, the forced labor and torture and killing of tens of thousands, even millions. (CW, May 1951)

    Day seems to have cultivated the ability—mentioned in Matthew 23:24—to strain at gnats and swallow camels.

  • Dorothy Day: Anarcho-Capitalist, Perhaps

    02/25/2013 6:57:42 AM PST · 1 of 13
    ubipetrusest
    This article has had 112 comments so far, and the discussion remains open. The comments and the responses are very instructive, particularly in regard to distributism, papal encyclicals, Robespierre and the French Revolution, and Dorothy Day and the Catholic Worker.

    The comment "One wonders if Day's distributism is socialism in disguise"--rather than "capitalism"--evoked the following reply from the author, Bonchamps:

    "Even the best of political thinkers can have a lapse in consistency. Doesn’t it seem strange to you that [Day] would oppose Social Security on the grounds that it relied upon force and then praise a violent revolution [in Cuba] that expropriated people by force?

    It tells me that we don’t really have a consistent thinker here. I think the reality is that she wanted an outcome, a certain kind of society, and was sympathetic to whomever she believed had obtained it or was on the way to obtaining it. If I had the opportunity, I would point out the massive inconsistency in rejecting “force and compulsion” when it comes to something relatively mild like Social Security while remaining ethically uncritical of something like the Cuban Revolution.

    I would hope that she would see that social justice is meaningless without justice due to individuals, justice which is denied through totalitarian collectivism."

    This exchange occurs about midway, as the posts of Bonchamps and others continue to raise new points in a discussion that is well worth reading!

  • "To Hell With It" - Dorothy Day (Kinda interesting article from the *bad* NCR)

    02/16/2013 7:50:08 PM PST · 31 of 31
    ubipetrusest to what's up

    I agree that Day never abandoned her Communist beliefs, and most of those supporting her cause—which was introduced with a denial of this key fact—still will not admit the error.Day remained unrepentant, just like “Hanoi Jane” Fonda, who richly deserves that title. “Moscow Mary” was Day’s. Thanks for your posts.

  • Pope’s Possible Successor Promotes Marxist for Sainthood

    02/16/2013 7:39:08 PM PST · 37 of 37
    ubipetrusest to Little Ray

    Thanks, it will be good to to check more of Kipling’s poems.

  • Pope’s Possible Successor Promotes Marxist for Sainthood

    02/16/2013 7:37:09 PM PST · 36 of 37
    ubipetrusest to Syncro

    Birds of a feather!

  • Pope’s Possible Successor Promotes Marxist for Sainthood

    02/14/2013 7:20:27 AM PST · 34 of 37
    ubipetrusest to Little Ray

    Seems like it. “The God of the Copybook Headings” is pertinent. I doubt Dorothy Day or Cardinal Dolan would appreciate Rudyard Kipling’s poem—it has such wisdom in even the few stanzas below:

    When the Cambrian measures were forming, They promised perpetual peace.
    They swore, if we gave them our weapons, that the wars of the tribes would cease.
    But when we disarmed They sold us and delivered us bound to our foe,
    And the Gods of the Copybook Headings said: “Stick to the Devil you know.”

    On the first Feminian Sandstones we were promised the Fuller Life
    (Which started by loving our neighbour and ended by loving his wife)
    Till our women had no more children and the men lost reason and faith,
    And the Gods of the Copybook Headings said: “The Wages of Sin is Death.”

    In the Carboniferous Epoch we were promised abundance for all,
    By robbing selected Peter to pay for collective Paul;
    But, though we had plenty of money, there was nothing our money could buy,
    And the Gods of the Copybook Headings said: “If you don’t work you die.”

  • Pope’s Possible Successor Promotes Marxist for Sainthood

    02/14/2013 7:02:53 AM PST · 33 of 37
    ubipetrusest to jaz.357

    What would Fr. Guido Sarducci say? Perhaps, “No good tree bears bad fruit, nor does a bad tree bear good fruit. Each tree is recognized by its own fruit. People do not pick figs from thornbushes, or grapes from briers. The good man brings good things out of the good stored up in his heart, and the evil man brings evil things out of the evil stored up in his heart. For out of the overflow of his heart his mouth speaks.” — Luke 6:43-45.

    Thanks for sharing. LOL.

  • Pope’s Possible Successor Promotes Marxist for Sainthood

    02/14/2013 6:53:14 AM PST · 32 of 37
    ubipetrusest to Mach9

    Thank you for noticing! “Where Peter is, there is the Church,” or “Ubi Petrus [est], ibi Ecclesia.”

  • Pope’s Possible Successor Promotes Marxist for Sainthood

    02/12/2013 12:40:47 PM PST · 26 of 37
    ubipetrusest to Mrs. Don-o; newberger; Biggirl

    Saying it doesn’t make it so, Mrs. Don-O. You write: “Dorothy Day’s economic justice ideals were the polar opposite of Communism. Communism stands for Total State Power subsuming and replacing every other institution: family, church, the entirety of civil society. Personalism eschews State power to support voluntary poverty as a basis for voluntary charity.”

    If only this were correct. Day never lost her admiration for the economic and social policies of Communist states, although she did leave atheism behind and could not “condone” the violence that achieved these “reforms.” She attempted to create a “Christian communism.” After Pius XII”s “Decree Against Communism” was published, Day declared herself “an ex-Communist,” stating: “Certainly we disagree with the Communist Party, as we disagree with other political parties who are trying to maintain the American way of life. We don’t think it’s worth maintaining. We and the Communists have a common idea that something else is necessary, some other vision of society must be held up to be worked for.” (”Beyond Politics,” “Catholic Worker” [CW,] November 1949). In the same article she wrote: “[Communists] believe, of course, that violence will come. (So do we when it comes down to it, and we are praying it won’t.) They believe that it will be forced upon the workers by the class struggle which is going on all around us now. . . . Class war is a fact and one does not need to advocate it. The Communists point to it as forced upon them, and say that when it comes they will take part in it, and in their plans they want to prepare the ground, and win as many as possible to their point of view and for their side. And where will we be on that day?”

    When Pope John XXIII excommunicated Fidel Castro in January 1962, Day traveled a few months later to Cuba and then wrote several articles on the “social advances” achieved there (CW, September 1962-February 1963). She praised farming communes in Red China. She believed in a compulsory form of “voluntary poverty,” as the aim of the CW is—in her own words—”to MAKE the rich poor and the poor holy” (capitals added).

    She consistently attacked “Holy Mother the State” in non-Communist societies such as the US, but accepted her daughter Tamar receiving $360 a month for her children and “something for herself” from the State of Vermont after Tamar and her husband separated (Day notes this in her diary, “The Duty of Delight,” 2011, p.325). Day’s economic theories do not seem to apply to everyday nuclear families not living in communal arrangements. (By the way, she never gave an equivalent term for Marxist countries—Unholy Father Soviet?)

    Sadly, Tamar and children also fell away from the Faith, and Day writes in 1967 of being the only one attending Christmas Mass (”Duty of Delight,” p. 427).

    Your claim that Day was not a “political theorist” gave me my laugh of the day. She studied Kropotkin as a college student, and then Peter Maurin broadened her knowledge of his works, as she reveals in “From Union Square to Rome” and “The Long Loneliness.” One need only read her CW columns to see how aware she was of movements within the Communist Party and who was who. She often did not bother to inform readers of the details about her Communist friends. She was also an admirer of Saul Alinsky (CW, May 1966) and endorsed his call for a massive public authority similar to the TVA to be set up: “He envisages something like the Tennessee Valley Authority with the use of the billions to build villages, schools, hospitals, roads, and all else needed.”

    Most of the articles on Day’s cause are long on praise for her love of the poor, and short on her unchanged Marxist views and other facts. The answer to Day’s fitness is found in her own writings. A “softer, gentler” Dorothy is being fabricated by her admirers (and thankfully is being questioned in the “Comments” to the articles). For example, CW Brian Terrell questioned the veracity of, and publicized his inability to find one of Day’s statements. For your and his information, here is the statement and its source: “Our problems stem from our acceptance of this filthy, rotten system” (Dorothy Day, from a public speech, “Women on War,” Daniela Gioseffi, ed., 1988, pp. 103, 371).

    Similarly, Robert Ellsberg— editor of the CW under Day’s tutelage for five years and now editor of her Selected Writings, Selected Letters, and Diary (cited above)—claims that the matter of the CW changing its name was “not raised again” after Day wrote a conciliatory letter to the New York Chancery (”Duty of Delight,” p. 169). However, CWs Michael Harrington, Ammon Hennacy, and Jim Forest stated that the issue recurred (Carol Byrne, “The Catholic Worker Movement (1933-1980): A Critical Analysis,” 2010, pp. 206-208).

    In addition to the homespun quotes you propose, more quotes of Dorothy Day are available at http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Dorothy_Day and at http://dorothydayworker.blogspot.com/2012/10/sayings-and-writings-by-dorothy-day.html

  • Pope’s Possible Successor Promotes Marxist for Sainthood

    02/12/2013 9:09:16 AM PST · 19 of 37
    ubipetrusest to savagesusie; Campion; JFoobar; et al

    The odds are small, but Dolan’s name has been included in the first round of media possibilities for Pope, or as campion would rightly say, “impossibilities.”

    I couldn’t agree with you more, savagesusie; the corruption of the US Church—and its failure to preach the truth—led to the election of a modern-day Herod as President of the USA. This infidelity has also enabled the cause of the great Communizer Dorothy Day to be treated as legitimate! You speak of the link between Marxism and sexual immorality, and the latter was a recurring problem at the CW farms, one that Day enabled.

    The “Catholic Worker” has as much “right” to its name as the “National Catholic Reporter.” If only Cardinal Spellman had not retreated when Day repeatedly refused to remove “Catholic” from the paper’s name. God bless Bishop Finn for standing firm.

    Cardinal Dolan would be a poor choice for Pope. While trying to do good, he has unwisely aided and abetted enemies of the Church, such as Big Brother Obama and the rabidly pro-abortion and pro-gay marriage NY City Council Speaker, declared lesbian and “Catholic” Christine Quinn. Quinn had a great a photo op as she handed out free turkeys with Dolan in November 2011. Seven months later Quinn had the photo on her desk for show-and-tell and stated: “He is a leading religious, but more significantly a leading civic and public figure who has a lot of influence in this city in a lot of ways. The way he uses that influence around immigration issues, around poverty issues are ones that I often agree with, and often will ask for his help with. How he uses that influence around choice and women’s issues and LGBT issues are not ones that I agree with. And he knows that. And we’ve had those conversations. But I don’t think it’s useful for me to shut down communication with anybody ever” (”As City’s Political Heat Rises, Quinn Treads Carefully, Confidently,” “Gay City News,” June 21, 2012, http://gaycitynews.com/as-citys-political-heat-rises-quinn-treads-carefully-confidently/).

  • Pope’s Possible Successor Promotes Marxist for Sainthood

    02/12/2013 8:25:29 AM PST · 18 of 37
    ubipetrusest to Biggirl

    No, her writings and actions show that she never gave up her “radical” beliefs, but sought to create a “Christian Communism” in the Catholic Church. She maintained friendships and working relationships with prominent US Communists Elizabeth Gurley Flynn, who was one of the US Party’s founders and later its Chair; Mike Gold, “Daily Worker” columnist and author of the “proletariat” novel “Jews Without Money,” which she praised to “CW” readers; and Anna Louise Strong, her fellow journalist and propagandist, who received a state funeral in Moscow. Day was an invited “observer” at the 16th Annual Convention of the Communist Party USA, although the press was excluded. Day praised “Papa Marx” and Lenin, who she wrote “went about doing good,” in the April 1948 “CW.” She defended the guilty Rosenbergs and Black Panther Bobby Seale; she recommended Saul Alinsky’s books and praised his efforts in the May 1966 “CW.” (Perhaps Cardinal Dolan needs to take time to read the “CW.”)

    Day was also called “Moscow Mary,” an epithet based on her actions: “I have spoken at Carnegie Hall against the Smith and McCarron acts, with Communists and fellow travellers; others of us have walked on picket lines protesting the payment of income tax and lastly there have been four days of picketing the Spanish consulate in New York in protest against the executions of the five Spanish trade unionists. These last demonstrations were headed by Norman Thomas, the highly respected Socialist, and included the aid of the I. W. W., Catholics, the Independent Socialist League and others. I assume the Communists were not invited” (”CW,” April 1952). For more details, see Carol Byrne’s “The Catholic Worker Movement (1933-1980): A Critical Analysis” and her “Complete Supplementary Notes,” available at “Dorothy Day Another Way.”

  • Pope’s Possible Successor Promotes Marxist for Sainthood

    02/12/2013 7:47:53 AM PST · 17 of 37
    ubipetrusest to Mach9

    Yes, and Dorothy Day’s mishmash of Catholic devotional and doctrinal language with the Marxist terms she used throughout her life—the masses, the workers, the bourgeois, the class war are some of the most frequent—has contributed greatly to the mess.

  • Pope’s Possible Successor Promotes Marxist for Sainthood

    02/12/2013 7:45:46 AM PST · 16 of 37
    ubipetrusest to newberger

    For Dorothy Day “distributism” meant that property should be “distributed” equitably, transferred from those who have “too much” to those who have “too little”—no wonder Obama called Day one the “great social reformers” at the 2012 National Prayer Breakfast. Carol Byrne, in “The Catholic Worker [CW] Movement (1933-1980): A Critical Analysis” (2010, p. 198) states: “Clearly, Day was only interested in what she termed ‘the communal aspect of property.’ As far as dwellings were concerned, Day advocated OCCUPANCY rather than private ownership. She accepted Kropotkin’s idea of the ‘right’ of needy people to enter family homes and occupy spare rooms in them.” In the November 1964 “CW,” Day declared: “It seems to me that anything that threatens money or property, anything that aims at a more equitable distribution of this world’s goods, has always been called communism. I like the word myself; it makes me think of the communism of the religious orders.” In the July-August 1969 “CW,” Day had more to say: “’The more property becomes common—the more it becomes holy.’... But to do away with private property is a mortal sin in our system.... Certainly the Catholic [religious communities] have always profited by an increase of land and wealth so that persecution has come over and over again. The corporate wealth is then taken away, but later accumulates again. Fortunately, the Papal States were wrested from the Church in the last century, but there is still the problem of investment of papal funds. It is always a cheering thought to me that if we have good will and are still unable to find remedies for the economic abuses of our time, in our family, our parish, and the mighty church as a whole, God will take matters in hand and do the job for us. When I saw the Garibaldi mountains in British Columbia . . . I said a prayer for his soul and blessed him for being the instrument of so mighty a work of God. May God use us!”

  • Pope’s Possible Successor Promotes Marxist for Sainthood

    02/11/2013 8:25:43 PM PST · 1 of 37
    ubipetrusest
    In his letter, Senator Black also notes Day's "favorable writings regarding Lenin, Castro, Mao, and Ho Chi Minh. As you well know, each of the above dictators ordered the execution of Catholic priests among the millions of other Christians murdered by these regimes.” Kincaid also cites author Carol Byrne's documented research confirming that Day “supported the policies of hostile foreign powers operating ... against her own country, the USA.... Nor could she in principle bring herself to condemn the social and economic ideals of Marxism.” Still, Cardinal Dolan remains devoted to Day and, in the words of the "New York Times," has "embraced" her cause with striking zeal."
  • MS State Rep Kills Fetal Heartbeat, Personhood Bills

    02/06/2013 4:15:30 PM PST · 6 of 12
    ubipetrusest to shhrubbery!

    Many people are not aware—and most practitioners do not point out—that the IUD works by preventing a newly conceived human from being implanted in the womb. This is a very early “silent abortion.” The birth control pill has several actions, which contribute to its efficiency. It is intended to (1) suppress ovulation, and (2) thicken the cervical mucus. When the the first two actions fail, the pill (3) prevents the implantation of a newly conceived human in the uterus. These actions are described in the “PDR,” as well in popular writings such as “The Birth Control Pill: Abortifacient and Contraceptive,” by William F. Colliton, Jr., M.D., which is available online at http://uffl.org/vol10/colliton10.pdf.

  • "To Hell With It" - Dorothy Day (Kinda interesting article from the *bad* NCR)

    02/06/2013 3:54:14 PM PST · 29 of 31
    ubipetrusest to Mrs. Don-o

    In closing, I note that again you shift from the subject (Day) to others. As “what’s up” remarked in post 14, “You seem to be missing the point.” Your comments confuse the issue. For example, it’s nice to know you believe (post 11) the wage system is “not immoral” or “condemned”—it’s too bad that neither Day nor Peter Maurin would share your view.

    As Carol Byrne points out in “Complete Supplementary Notes to ‘The Catholic Worker [CW} Movement (1933-1980): A Critical Analysis,’’ for page 152:

    Day stated that “Peter shocked people by calling for an ‘abolition of the wage system’” in CW May 1953.In CW April 1963, Day quoted Peter Maurin who reiterated the expression “fire the bosses” and also “Work not Wages”, “Labour is not a commodity to be bought and sold”.

    Byrne’s notes can be read online at “Dorothy Day Another Way.”

  • "To Hell With It" - Dorothy Day (Kinda interesting article from the *bad* NCR)

    02/06/2013 1:44:02 PM PST · 28 of 31
    ubipetrusest to Mrs. Don-o

    Yes,I do pray and will continue to pray for the millions starved to death and executed brutally by the Communists who Day idolized. May they rest in peace.

  • Gandhi and Guns: The Mahatma Championed Right to Bear Arms

    02/05/2013 12:15:37 PM PST · 1 of 2
    ubipetrusest
    Who'd have thought Gandhi believed people had the right to defend themselves with guns! This article reveals Gandhi's stand against gun control and draws parallels with the situation today in the US.
  • "To Hell With It" - Dorothy Day (Kinda interesting article from the *bad* NCR)

    02/05/2013 12:15:07 PM PST · 25 of 31
    ubipetrusest to Mrs. Don-o

    Dear me, you have not responded to the issues in my post, just stated obvious things—about baptism, not judging someone’s interior state, who may convert—that are not being questioned.

    If you read what Dorothy Day wrote, you might discover that her “transformation” from Marxism was incomplete. Would that you had read Day’s diary (”The Duty of Delight,” 2011, p. 43), where she notes that her Russian friend Helen Iswolsky “has said I was too kind to the Communists in my book [”From Union Square to Rome”] and the attitude taken by our opponents is that we do not realize what they are capable of.” Years later Day wrote about “what they are capable of”: “These men were animated by the love of brother and this we must believe though their ends meant the seizure of power, and the building of mighty armies, the compulsion of concentration camps, the forced labor and torture and killing of tens of thousands, even millions”(”Catholic Worker” [CW], May 1951).

    Similarly, Day’s co-worker Tom Cornell in “Voices from the Catholic Worker” (1993, p. 78) states that Day did not like Baroness Catherine de Hueck Doherty’s “lapses into anti-Sovietism at all.” The Baroness was the Russian emigre who founded Madonna House in Combermere, Ontario, and is a Servant of God.

    True, Day prayed for the salvation of her prominent Communist friends Rayna Proehme, Mike Gold, Anna Louise Strong, and Elizabeth Gurley Flynn throughout her life. She also praised their support of the Soviet Union (and overlooked their efforts to foment violent revolution) repeatedly in the CW, often without identifying their positions in the Party. For example, Gurley Flynn was one of the three founders of the USA Communist Party and became its head. Both she and Proehme received state funerals in Moscow.

    Day’s praise of the political stands of these committed Communist friends should not be a surprise, given her remark that “When people are standing up for our present rotten system, they are being worse than Communists, it seems to me” (”Duty of Delight,” p. 98) and her treating Lenin, “who had nowhere to lay his head,” and “Papa Marx” as secular saints in the April 1948 CW.

    Having posted this “kinda [confusing] article from the *bad* NCR”—which is now publicly identified as a “non-Catholic” publication by Bishop Finn, in whose jurisdiction it is—please rest serenely as you await the required miracles for the canonization of the woman one blogger calls “Dotty Day.”

  • Author Carol Byrne Warns of Socialism in the Roman Catholic Church

    01/30/2013 8:44:12 AM PST · 18 of 18
    ubipetrusest to surroundedbyblue

    Yes, that is THE problem, and the advocates of Day’s cause, from Cardinal O’Connor to Cardinal Dolan, have from the beginning denied that her involvement and commitment to Marxism continued after her conversion. In a front-page article in the May 1951 “Catholic Worker” wrote of Marx, Lenin, and Mao Tse-Tung: “These men were animated by the love of brother and this we must believe though their ends meant the seizure of power, and the building of mighty armies, the compulsion of concentration camps, the forced labor and torture and killing of tens of thousands, even millions.”
    Let us pray that God will protect us from such “love” and let us pray for the millions killed or starved to death by the Communists—chillingly documented in “The Black Book of Communism,” by Stephane Courtois et al. (1999).

  • Author Carol Byrne Warns of Socialism in the Roman Catholic Church

    01/30/2013 7:35:19 AM PST · 15 of 18
    ubipetrusest to I want the USA back

    Too true, and they indulge in name calling to discourage examination of the issues in the light of the Faith.

  • Author Carol Byrne Warns of Socialism in the Roman Catholic Church

    01/30/2013 7:35:19 AM PST · 14 of 18
    ubipetrusest to RBStealth

    Well, you seem to be a person of few words, substituting personal attacks for argument. Thank you for posting the link to Dr. Byrne’s comments on distributism. Sadly, Catholic distributists too often are unaware or overlook the fact that Day never gave up her Marxist views on property (Byrne, “The Catholic Worker Movement (1933-1980): A Critical Analysis,” 2010, pp. 188-203).
    A few months after Pius XII’s “Decree Against Communism,” Day called herself “an ex-Communist” (”Catholic Worker” [CW], November 1949). But she continued to collaborate with the Communist Party for the rest of her life. For example,she attended the the 16th Annual Communist Party Convention (conveniently held at its Greenwich Village headquarters; Day could walk there). She wrote: “certainly from any point of view, it was a privilege to be invited to attend as an observer. The Press had been excluded” (CW, March 1957).

    Day believed in “private” property, with the provision that its possession be regulated by those who did not own it; and she favored “communes,” praising those in Communist China. In the July/August 1969 CW, she wrote: “’The more property becomes common—the more it becomes holy.’... But to do away with private property is a mortal sin in our system.... Fortunately, the Papal States were wrested from the Church in the last century, but there is still the problem of investment of papal funds. It is always a cheering thought to me that if we have good will and are still unable to find remedies for the economic abuses of our time, in our family, our parish, and the mighty church as a whole, God will take matters in hand and do the job for us. When I saw the Garibaldi mountains in British Columbia . . . I said a prayer for his soul and blessed him for being the instrument of so mighty a work of God.” In the October/November 1979 CW she expanded: “[Peter Maurin] told us of Proudhon, who wrote ‘A Philosophy of Poverty,’ to which Marx answered with his ‘Poverty of Philosophy,’ and Proudhon’s own answer, ‘Property is Theft.’ It was Peter’s criticism of present day capitalism. He quoted Eric Gill, ‘Property is proper to man,’ and, in combating the machine, he spoke of tools as extensions of the hand, and the necessity of people to have the responsibility of ownership of their tools, of their means of producing.”

  • Author Carol Byrne Warns of Socialism in the Roman Catholic Church

    01/29/2013 5:44:31 PM PST · 11 of 18
    ubipetrusest to RBStealth

    You seem in a great hurry to defame Byrne’s book, which you admit you have not read. Unlike the noteless William D. Miller 1982 biography “Dorothy Day” and Jim Forest’s similarly undocumented biographies of Day, Byrne’s work does provide citations in the “Endnotes” as well as in her expanded “Complete Supplementary Notes on “The Catholic Worker Movement (1933:1980): A Critical Analysis,” available at “Dorothy Day Another Way,” http://dorothydayworker.blogspot.com/2012/06/not-to-be-missed-complete-supplementary.html

    As for “diverging from the Pope and the Catholic Church,” Day did so with her pacifism in World War II, her misinterpretation of the Mystical Body as including everyone “because there is no time with God,” and faulty exegesis and misquotes of Scripture and papal encyclicals.

    Both Day and Maurin stated that the aim of the Catholic Worker is “to make the rich poor and the poor holy.” Funny, but in over 50 years of reading Scripture, I never been able to find that.

  • Author Carol Byrne Warns of Socialism in the Roman Catholic Church

    01/29/2013 7:27:26 AM PST · 1 of 18
    ubipetrusest
    In this exclusive interview, Cliff Kincaid speaks with author Carol Byrne, whose "book has been seen as a 'wake-up call' not only for modern Catholics, but also for American citizens." Dr. Byrne first explains how the Bishops' vote on Day was not "unanimous" and how the erroneous claim started. She describes the leftist anti-Catholic organizations supported by the Catholic Campaign for Human Development. She identifies three well-known "conservative" Catholics who support Day's cause. Finally, Dr. Byrne advises what Catholics can and should do about the process of making Dorothy Day a saint. Also available at the same site--and pertinent to the debate--is the letter sent to Benedict XVI by Virginia State Senator Richard Black on Day's cause.
  • Bishop: National Catholic Reporter undermines Church teaching

    01/27/2013 1:59:53 PM PST · 11 of 11
    ubipetrusest to Campion

    Nyer, thanks for posting this great news. The National (Non) Catholic Reporter identified for what it is. And thanks, Campion, for pointing out that is the main issue!

  • "To Hell With It" - Dorothy Day (Kinda interesting article from the *bad* NCR)

    01/26/2013 9:21:21 PM PST · 23 of 31
    ubipetrusest to Mrs. Don-o

    1)You claim that Day “forced austerities on nobody except herself.” Perhaps you are unaware of the famous “retreat” embraced by Day and given by Fr. John J. Hugo at the Catholic Worker many times (Carol Byrne, “The Catholic Worker Movement(1933-1980): A Critical Analysis,” 2010, pp. 232-238). The retreat—which urged austerities on the laity with no loopholes—did little good, according to longtime Catholic Worker Stanley Vishnewski in “Wings of the Dawn”(1984, pp.208-215). Day’s daughter Tamar had austerities forced on her and detested the retreat. The retreat was so controversial Hugo was “silenced” and the retreat called “Jansenistic in tendency” (William D. Miller, “Dorothy Day,” 1982, p. 340). When Day died, Fr. Hugo was to say the mass, but the funeral mass was said by then-Fr. Geoffrey Gneuhs, the CW chaplain, because Day’s daughter Tamar refused to attend with Hugo (R. G. Riegle, “Dorothy Day: Portraits by Those Who Knew Her,” 2003, p. 184,note 2). Day herself reneged in later life—the retreat inveighed against listening to the radio and having linoleum—and reports in her diary listening to radio and watching television programs (pp. 647, 650, 659) and accepting half a bottle of port (p. 658).
    2) As for Day’s “authority, which she had by example only,” Day’s co-workers would disagree. CW Tom Cornell said, “[We] Let everyone know that if they talked to reporters, that would be against Dorothy’s will, which is tantamount to saying good-bye. (We had no redress, no committees or any of that shit. If you’re out, you’re out)” (R. Riegle Troester, ed., “Voices From the Catholic Worker,” 1993, p. 40). Similarly, Michael Harrington stated that Day was the head of the CW, and after people engaged in a discussion, she did what she wanted (Maurice Isserman, “The Other American: The Untold Life of Michael Harrington,” 2000, p. 73).
    Dear me, you may feel “she is as good as bread,” but some who read her diary feel the need of a stiff drink!

  • The Way of Love: Dorothy Day and the American Right

    01/26/2013 7:15:13 PM PST · 16 of 16
    ubipetrusest to cvq3842

    A more complete view of Dorothy Day is now available in Carol Byrne’s 2010 book, “The Catholic Worker Movement (1933-1980): A Critical Analysis” and at the blog “Dorothy Day Another Way,” which has the “Complete Supplementary Notes” to Dr. Byrne’s book—an entry that makes fascinating reading.

  • "To Hell With It" - Dorothy Day (Kinda interesting article from the *bad* NCR)

    01/26/2013 7:14:52 PM PST · 21 of 31
    ubipetrusest to what's up

    As you observe, Augustine rejected Manichaeism. However, Day continued to associate with and present an unrealistic and sanitized account of those whose lives resembled her bohemian past. She tolerated and enabled sexual immorality at the Catholic Worker farms. When I visited Tivoli in 1971 I was puzzled and confused by the things I observed, and naively thought Dorothy must not be aware of the goings-on, such as a couple living together without benefit of clergy. But her diary (”The Duty of Delight,” 2011) reveals that she knew what was happening (pp. 419, 454), decided to sell the farm (p. 486), and then took 10 years to do so (p. 675).
    In addition, Day allowed Ammon Hennacy to remain a “Catholic” Worker (he had become Catholic because Dorothy was Catholic) after he married outside the Catholic Church. Ironically, Joan Thomas, Ammon’s second wife, met him at the CW after Day had told her, “Oh, you must meet Ammon. He knows all about fasting. And he likes pretty girls”; Thomas found this “an extremely puzzling remark for a bona fide Christian woman” to make (Joan Thomas,”The Years of Grief and Laughter,” 1974, p. 7). Day eulogized him in “Ammon Hennacy: Non-Church’ Christian” (CW,February 1970).

  • "To Hell With It" - Dorothy Day (Kinda interesting article from the *bad* NCR)

    01/26/2013 2:59:07 PM PST · 20 of 31
    ubipetrusest to what's up

    Yes,Dorothy Day called herself a “propagandist” and an “agitator.” She insisted that the early Christians’ and religious orders’ cooperative efforts were a form of “Catholic Communism.” She declared more than forty years after becoming a Catholic: “Fortunately, the Papal States were wrested from the Church in the last century, but there is still the problem of investment of papal funds. It is always a cheering thought to me that if we have good will and are still unable to find remedies for the economic abuses of our time, in our family, our parish, and the mighty church as a whole, God will take matters in hand and do the job for us. When I saw the Garibaldi mountains in British Columbia ... I said a prayer for his soul and blessed him for being the instrument of so mighty a work of God. May God use us!” (”Hutterite Communities,” “Catholic Worker” [CW], July-August 1969).
    Despite Cardinal O’Connor’s claim that she left behind her Communist friends and beliefs, she did neither. She told Robert Coles (not “Cole”) that in her youth, most of her friends were “Communists and Socialists. (I think I called them radical friends in the section of ‘The Long Loneliness’ where I discuss my Chicago days.)” (Robert Coles, “Dorothy Day: A Radical Devotion,” 1987, p. 27). On April 9, 1959 she wrote, “My work in the labor field, and with the radical group was very much in accord with my conscience—that is why I still love them all” (”All the Way to Heaven: Selected Letters of Dorothy Day,” 2010, p. 252). She maintained a lifelong friendship with Elizabeth Gurley Flynn, who became the head of the Communist Party USA. In her diary (”The Duty of Delight,” 2011) Day notes on December 23, 1958: “visited Gurley Flynn and her sister who has been ill” (p. 248). In her September 16, 1964 diary entry, Day wrote: “Dreamed last night of writing speech for Gurley Flynn’s memorial service at Community Church next Tues. They called me up about it and I told them I would write a letter” (p. 361). Day’s letter praising Flynn was read publicly at the memorial service by CW Tom Cornell, and also published in the November 1964 CW as “Red Roses for Her.” Flynn had already had a State funeral in Moscow’s Red Square with Khrushchev present, as Carol Byrne notes in her essential “The Catholic Worker Movement (1933-1980): A Critical Analysis,” (2010, p. 6). Day also maintained a lifelong friendship with Mike Gold, a former “radical” boyfriend who became a columnist in “The Daily Worker.” For more details, see Carol Byrne’s book and its “Complete Supplementary Notes.” These notes are available at the blog “Dorothy Day Another Way.”