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Posts by willowsdale

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  • 12 Things You Need to Know About Government Unions

    08/26/2014 2:20:05 PM PDT · 1 of 3
    willowsdale
    A U.S. Supreme Court decision issued at the very end of the last term has called into question the constitutionality of laws and other public policies, now in effect in more than 20 states, that authorize the termination of public employees for refusal to pay dues or fees to an unwanted union.
  • Union Nonmembers Are 'Made Worse Off'

    09/29/2013 1:36:15 PM PDT · 6 of 6
    willowsdale to ArmstedFragg

    I never claimed that no union contracts permit higher pay for especially productive workers. I said union contracts typically do not authorize merit pay, and union officials usually won’t allow employers to go outside the contract to institute it.

    If union officials really didn’t have a problem with merit pay, they wouldn’t have lobbied hard to defeat the RAISE Act, legislation authorizing merit pay in unionized businesses without union officials’ permission, when it came before the Senate last year.

  • Union Nonmembers Are 'Made Worse Off'

    09/29/2013 8:37:45 AM PDT · 5 of 6
    willowsdale to ArmstedFragg

    I never claimed that no union contracts permit higher pay for especially productive workers. I said union contracts typically do not authorize merit pay, and union officials usually won’t allow employers to go outside the contract to institute it.

    If union officials really didn’t have a problem with merit pay, they wouldn’t have lobbied hard to defeat the RAISE Act, legislation authorizing merit pay in unionized businesses without union officials’ permission, when it came before the Senate last year.

  • Union Nonmembers Are 'Made Worse Off'

    09/29/2013 8:37:31 AM PDT · 4 of 6
    willowsdale to ArmstedFragg

    I never claimed that no union contracts permit higher pay for especially productive workers. I said union contracts typically do not authorize merit pay, and union officials usually won’t allow employers to go outside the contract to institute it.

    If union officials really didn’t have a problem with merit pay, they wouldn’t have lobbied hard to defeat the RAISE Act, legislation authorizing merit pay in unionized businesses without union officials’ permission, when it came before the Senate last year.

  • Union Nonmembers Are 'Made Worse Off'

    09/28/2013 2:34:01 PM PDT · 1 of 6
    willowsdale
    Employees who prefer not to join a union, but are nevertheless subject to a union contract as a result of Organized Labor's legal monopoly-bargaining privileges, are captive passengers, not so-called "free riders."
  • Data Indicate Forced Union Dues-Paying Factory Workers Have Far Less Job Security, Lower Wages

    08/22/2013 10:11:07 AM PDT · 1 of 8
    willowsdale
    Generally unreported news about the recent modest rebound in U.S. manufacturing employment.
  • "Freedom at the Expense of the Negro"

    08/13/2013 3:35:01 PM PDT · 1 of 5
    willowsdale
    A conservative black columnist reminds us that the NAACP once strongly opposed, with good reason, federal labor policies promoting monopolistic unionism, and argues that today the compulsory-unionism system hurts all kinds of Americans.
  • Can a Faithful Catholic Belong to a Union?

    05/02/2013 10:30:26 AM PDT · 1 of 13
    willowsdale
    "Theoretically, at least, it is possible that a Catholic who supports traditional marriage and opposes abortion could still materially cooperate with union officials who are battling the Church on these grave matters. But this could only be so if the Catholic employee had a sufficient reason for joining the union to permit the evil effects that he or she does not condone. In practice, it is hard imagine under what circumstances that might be the case."
  • Since 2009, right to work states created 4x as many jobs as forced union states

    11/10/2012 1:46:03 PM PST · 1 of 8
    willowsdale
    Ironically, it may have been the strength of job growth in the “right to work for less” states that helped President Obama get re-elected, despite his animosity to the labor laws in those states and his favoritism towards forced unionism. As we struggle to create jobs through another “jobless recovery,” maybe the president could be a little more open-minded in his second term towards the job-creating labor policies in the RTW states that have been creating jobs at four times the population-adjusted rate as the forced states. Wishful thinking….
  • Democratic Party's Big Labor Backbone

    10/10/2012 7:13:24 AM PDT · 1 of 3
    willowsdale
    Right to Work president rebuts the Obama Administration's pro-forced unionism propaganda.
  • Quote quibbles aside, teacher unions don't look after kids

    06/21/2012 6:18:15 PM PDT · 1 of 4
    willowsdale
    It's reasonable to argue that a famous cynical quote often attributed to the late teacher union chief Al Shanker is inadequately sourced. But there's no doubt Shanker cynically concocted a now-pervasive school compensation system that hurts schoolchildren and talented, conscientious teachers alike.
  • Union Boss Bargaining Hurts America's Most Productive Workers

    05/11/2012 10:11:15 AM PDT · 1 of 2
    willowsdale
  • A One-Sided 'Right' to Unionize?!

    04/09/2012 11:10:11 AM PDT · 1 of 5
    willowsdale
  • Right to Work Has Worked

    04/02/2012 8:50:37 AM PDT · 1 of 1
    willowsdale
  • Indiana Rejects Big Labor, Becomes Right-to-Work State

    02/04/2012 6:48:04 AM PST · 1 of 22
    willowsdale
  • Indiana gets right-to-work just in time

    02/03/2012 4:01:24 PM PST · 1 of 5
    willowsdale
  • Big Labor Wages War Against Ohio's Private Sector

    10/24/2011 8:09:17 AM PDT · 6 of 9
    willowsdale to BonRad
    Sorry about that, BonRad. Here's the whole thing: Over the past four decades, the share of Ohio private-sector employees' pay that is consumed by the Buckeye state's heavily unionized state and local government workforce payroll costs has soared dramatically. U.S. Commerce Department's Bureau of Economic Analysis data show Ohio's state and local government employee compensation (including wages, salaries, benefits and bonuses) amounted to 11.2 percent of all compensation for private-sector employees in 1970. By 1990, the number had soared to 14.6 percent. Last year alone, total state and local compensation rose 7.7 percent, to $29.4 billion — or 17.3 percent of total compensation for private-sector employees. Ohioans' government employee spending burden grew vastly over the past 40 years even as the state's constituencies for several key services furnished by state and local employees shrank as a share of the total population. For example, in 1970, 26.4 percent of Ohio residents were K-12 school-aged (5-17 years-old). By 2010, just 17.4 percent of Ohio residents were in the same age bracket. As of 2010, 46.2 percent of the Buckeye state's public employees were laboring under a contract negotiated by union officials wielding monopoly bargaining power. By comparison, just 9 percent of Ohio's private-sector employees were unionized. Ohio is far from the only state in which business employees and employers are increasingly overburdened by a Big Labor-dominated government sector. But Ohio's private sector is having an especially hard time. While private employer expenditures for employee compensation increased by an inflation-adjusted 4.3 percent from 2000-2010 nationwide, Ohio businesses spent 6.6 percent less on employee compensation in 2010 than they had in 2000. Ohio is one of just five states with negative private-sector compensation growth over the past decade. All five of these economic laggards have something in common: They lack a right-to-work law protecting employees' freedom to refuse to join or pay dues or fees to an unwanted union, without being fired as a consequence. In fact, 13 of the 14 states with the lowest 2000-2010 private-sector compensation growth don't have right-to-work laws. In the 22 states that have right-to-work laws in effect, real private employee compensation over the same period grew by an aggregate 11.3 percent — two-and-a-half times as much as the national average. Meanwhile, private-sector employees in 20 of the 22 right-to-work states experienced compensation growth above the national average. The best news Ohio business employees and employers have had in many years was the passage into law this spring of Senate Bill 5, a government reform package that includes provisions protecting the right to work for all state and local public employees. It also reduces the scope of government union officials' monopoly-bargaining privileges in several other ways. While a full-fledged right-to-work law would do much more to get Ohio back on track, Senate Bill 5 marks a significant step in the right direction. Nearly half of the forced dues-paying employees in Ohio are government workers. A huge chunk of the loot Big Labor rakes in from such workers goes into electioneering and lobbying efforts in support of union officials' tax-spend-and-regulate agenda — greatly impeding private-sector job and income growth. Over the course of the next few years, Senate Bill 5 can begin undoing the damage Big Labor has wrought on Ohio over the years — if union officials' ongoing, multimillion-dollar, forced dues-fueled campaign to overturn it is first thwarted. A few months ago, union strategists successfully collected the number of signed petitions needed to block implementation of Senate Bill 5 and put their forced-dues reinstatement referendum, known as Issue 2, before voters on Nov. 8. For Senate Bill 5 to take effect and become permanent law, a majority of Ohio voters must vote yes on Issue 2. Ohioans overwhelmingly support the principle that no one should be denied a job, or lose a job, because he or she refuses to pay dues or fees to an unwanted union. They also understand that in a state where, real private-sector compensation has fallen by 6.6 percent over the past decade, but real state and local government compensation has increased by 11.8 percent, something must be done to restore the balance. Nevertheless, Issue 2 is in serious danger of being defeated if enough voters are confused by Big Labor propaganda that falsely implies Senate Bill 5 would slash school and public-safety budgets. If this fear campaign succeeds, independent-minded public servants' hopes of regaining their freedom to refuse to join or bankroll a union will be dashed. And Ohio's already beleaguered private sector will sink deeper into the mire.



















































  • Big Labor Wages War Against Ohio's Private Sector

    10/24/2011 7:03:31 AM PDT · 1 of 9
    willowsdale
    Will a multi-million dollar propaganda blitz, financed primarily by workers' forced union dues, kill hopes for a revival of Ohio's private-sector job and income growth this November 8?
  • Labor Unions Prolonged the Depression

    10/28/2008 7:14:05 AM PDT · 1 of 8
    willowsdale
    The U.S. Supreme Court's surprise April 1937 decision to uphold the Wagner Act was a principal cause of the "depression within a depression" that commenced in August that year. Will Barack Obama and Congressional Big Labor Democrats repeat this sorry history?
  • Obama Online Campaign Facilitating Fraud

    10/24/2008 8:46:52 AM PDT · 5 of 5
    willowsdale to Edgerunner

    It is totally outrageous that the Obama campaign has, by all appearances, failed to abide by basic ethical principles that any small business worth its salt would abide by.

    The McCain campaign ought to make a great deal of this. Any man who heads a campaign that deliberately disables software that would otherwise screen out potentially illegal and fraudulent contributions certainly cannot be trusted to run the national economy. I think most Independents and even many Democrats will understand this

  • BarackObama.com's Lax Security Opens Door to Online Donor Fraud

    10/24/2008 8:44:25 AM PDT · 1 of 9
    willowsdale
    This deserves the widest possible airing.
  • Jersey undergoing 'brain gain' despite drop in population

    09/17/2008 12:31:29 PM PDT · 32 of 37
    willowsdale to Clemenza

    Gov. Corzine and his propagandists have a lot of moxie. U.S. Census Bureau data show that, nationwide, the number of college graduates aged 25 and up increased by 19% between 2000 and 2006.

    The increase isn’t primarily due to immigrants from abroad: It’s due to the fact that people who were 25-30 years old in 2006 were far more apt to have college degrees than were people who were say, 50 and older, but these 25-30 year olds weren’t part of the mix in 2000.

    In New Jersey alone, the number of college educated people increased by just a little over 16%. The increase was actually far less than the national average, and it reflects the fact that, on balance, the college educated are migrating out of the Garden State, just like people without college degrees are.

    The whole “study” relies on people not being aware of the substantial nationwide increase in the number of college-educated people.