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Keyword: catastrophism

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  • Study: Radiocarbon Dating Inaccurate in the Holy Land

    The analysis was made by comparing Jordanian juniper trees that grew between roughly 1600 and 1910 A.D., according to the researchers... The researchers results indicated that, like in many other parts of the globe, the growing season fluctuates enough to tilt the results. Thus, the traditional Carbon-14 calibration curve for the Northern Hemisphere is not entirely accurate for southern Jordan, Israel and Egypt. The offset averages about 19 years, the researchers said... The paper contends that massive timeline restructuring could be in the offing, for events both major and minor. “Although, overall, the Carbon-14 offset identified here produces what may...
  • Mysterious Mars rock formation has explosive explanation

    06/18/2018 10:27:05 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 2 replies
    CNET ^ | June 18, 2018 9:31 AM PDT | Amanda Kooser /
    The Medusae Fossae Formation rises near the equator of Mars. The soft rock has been carved by wind erosion into a collection of ridges, valleys and striking mesas. It's massive. It's strange. And scientists are now tracing its origin to explosive volcanic activity in Mars' deep past. NASA has referred to Medusae Fossae as "an enigmatic pile of eroding sediments." UFO enthusiasts once spotted what they believed to be a UFO there, which is mainly a testament to the exotic shapes formed in the wind-blasted area. A study published in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Planets now traces Medusae Fossae...
  • Man set foot in Ice-Age Tibet

    06/14/2018 12:22:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    CNN Hong Kong ^ | April 17, 2002 | Nick Easen
    Fossilized hand and footprints have revealed that mankind lived on the Tibetan plateau at the height of the Ice Age -- 16,000 years earlier than anyone previously thought. The 19 fossilized signs of life have also cast doubt on the theory that the plateau was fully covered by a glacier one kilometer thick at that time. The 20,000 year-old prints, 85 kilometers (53 miles) from Lhasa, predates any archaeological evidence on the plateau and suggests that man may have migrated to the "roof of the world" extremely early on. At the arid and frigid site, 4,200 meters above sea level,...
  • 4,300-year-old statue head depicts mystery pharaoh

    09/11/2017 12:08:04 PM PDT · by ETL · 53 replies
    LiveScience, via FoxNews/Science ^ | Sept 05, 2017 | Owen Jarus Live Science Contributor
    A sculpture of an unknown Egyptian pharaoh's head, found at the ancient city of Hazor in Israel, dates back around 4,300 years, to a time when Egyptians were building pyramids. The sculpture was smashed apart around 3,300 years ago, possibly after an Israeli force led by Joshua destroyed the city, researchers have found. Researchers said the sculpture, excavated and reconstructed in 1995 and discussed in the recently published book "Hazor VII: The 1990-2012 Excavations, the Bronze Age" (Israel Exploration Society, 2017), leaves them with a number of questions: Which pharaoh does it show? Why was it transported to Hazor? And...
  • Ancient Greenland was much warmer than previously thought

    06/11/2018 4:13:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 49 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | June 4, 2018 | Northwestern University
    Although researchers have long known that the last two interglacial periods experienced warming in the Arctic... Just beyond the northwest edge of the vast Greenland Ice Sheet, Northwestern University researchers have discovered lake mud that beat tough odds by surviving the last ice age. The mud, and remains of common flies nestled within it, record two interglacial periods in northwest Greenland. Although researchers have long known these two periods -- the early Holocene and Last Interglacial -- experienced warming in the Arctic due to changes in Earth's orbit, the mix of fly species preserved from these times shows that Greenland...
  • Chasing Signs of Life, Curiosity Rover Discovers Organic Building Blocks on Mars

    06/07/2018 11:23:51 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 42 replies
    www.popularmechanics.com ^ | Jun 7, 2018 | By Jay Bennett
    The robot, which has been exploring Mars for almost six years, discovered new organic compounds and cycles of methane that could point to life on Mars. _____________________________________________________________________________ Since 2012, the Curiosity rover has been exploring Mars near a place called Mount Sharp. The robot has found chemical traces that could indicate this place was watery billions of years ago—and could have supported life. NASA can't say whether there ever was life on Mars, but new evidence reinforces the idea that Mars was habitable. NASA's flagship Mars rover, Curiosity, has been combing the surface of Mars for signs of life for...
  • Days on Earth Are Getting Longer, Thanks to the Moon

    06/06/2018 11:11:59 AM PDT · by ETL · 61 replies
    Space.com ^ | June 5, 2018 | Samantha Mathewson, Space.com Contributor
    Days on Earth are getting longer as the moon slowly moves farther away from us, new research shows.  The moon is about 4.5 billion years old and resides some 239,000 miles (385,000 kilometers) away from Earth, on average. However, due to tidal forces between our planet and the moon, the natural satellite slowly spirals away from Earth at a rate of about 1.5 inches (3.82 centimeters) per year, causing our planet to rotate more slowly around its axis.  Using a new statistical method called astrochronology, astronomers peered into Earth's deep geologic past and reconstructed the planet's history. This work revealed...
  • No Need for Planet Nine? Small Objects' Gravity Could Explain Weird Orbits

    06/05/2018 12:03:18 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 36 replies
    Space.com ^ | Nola Taylor Redd,
    The Kuiper Belt, the region immediately beyond Neptune, harbors TNOs of many sizes. The largest is Pluto, which was discovered more than 60 years before any of the others. Some TNOs are "detached objects," which orbit so far from the sun that they're not appreciably affected by the gravity of Neptune or any other known planet. Perhaps the most famous of these is Sedna, which takes 11,400 years to make a single orbit and never comes closer to the sun than 20 times farther out than Pluto. In 2016, astronomers Konstantin Batygin and Mike Brown announced that a distant undiscovered...
  • The Greenhouse Gas Effect Is A Scientific Impossibility

    05/30/2018 3:12:03 PM PDT · by PROCON · 59 replies
    principia-scientific.org ^ | May 29, 2018 | Herb Rose
    The greenhouse gas theory( GHGT) is a theory claiming that certain gas molecules in the atmosphere are inhibiting the Earth from transmitting heat into space. There is great debate about what role different gases play in heating and cooling and the accuracy of certain assumptions of data. It turns out that these arguments are irrelevant because the basic assumption of the theory is wrong and based on ignorance of science. Every object with a temperature above absolute zero radiates energy and every object absorbs radiated energy. Any movement of an atom creates a disturbance in the electromagnetic field that transmits...
  • Tiny asteroid discovered Saturday disintegrates over Africa

    06/04/2018 8:37:59 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 21 replies
    phys.org ^ | June 4, 2018 | by Dc Agle, JPL/NASA
    A boulder-sized asteroid designated 2018 LA was discovered Saturday morning, June 2, and was determined to be on a collision course with Earth, with impact just hours away. Because it was very faint, the asteroid was estimated to be only about 6 feet (2 meters) across, which is small enough that it was expected to safely disintegrate in Earth's atmosphere. Saturday's asteroid was first discovered by the NASA-funded Catalina Sky Survey, located near Tucson and operated by the University of Arizona. Although there was not enough tracking data to make precise predictions ahead of time, a swath of possible locations...
  • Ancient ashes reveal details of huge volcano

    06/04/2018 9:55:30 AM PDT · by BBell · 18 replies
    Archaeologists have discovered ashes from one of the biggest ever volcanic eruptions in recorded history. Excavations in Turkey’s ancient city of Smyrna, now located in Izmir, have revealed details from a Minoan eruption that took place some 3,600 years ago. Smyrna was established about 5,000 years ago by the Greek tribe of Aeolians and later inhabited by Ionians. It was mostly abandoned after it was captured by the Anatolian kingdom of Lydia in the 6th century B.C. Archaeologists say the ashes will tell them a lot about the history. “Now that we have identified those ashes with a more extensive...
  • WATCH - Meteorite falls in North West (Botswana)

    06/03/2018 3:14:58 PM PDT · by BBell · 16 replies
    https://www.ofm.co.za ^ | 6/3/18 | JOSCA HUMAN
    A local farmer near Ottosdal in North West has shared CCTV footage of what appears to be a meteorite hitting the earth at 18:49 Saturday night. According to a member of a neighbourhood watch, who shared the video with OFM News on social media, they were doing night patrol in the area of Hartbeesfontein when they received reports from Klerksdorp, approximately 30 kilometres away. People reportedly saw ‘a light’ falling from the sky and initially thought it was an aeroplane. He told OFM News that everyone came together and started searching, but shortly thereafter received the CCTV footage from Barend...
  • Mycenaean findings: Gigantic 1250 BC building project in northern Copais

    03/25/2018 11:35:03 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    TornosNews ^ | Wednesday, March 21, 2018 | unattributed
    The results of the survey are particularly encouraging, as they brought to light new facts about the Middle Helladic and Early Mycenaean background of the settlements developed on the northern margin of the lake. In addition, the finding, with stratigraphic data, that the fortified settlements in the hills of Agios Ioannis and Aghia Marina have a phase of fortification, rehousing and abandonment chronologically analogous to the acropolis of Gla, ie around the middle of the 13th century BC, a milestone of the problems of the socio-political hierarchical relations of the Mycenaean northeastern coppaid field, as well as of the Orchomenos-Glas...
  • Navarino Environmental Observatory: Drought ended Mycenaean era in ancient Greece

    06/03/2018 10:51:01 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    TornosNews.gr ^ | Tuesday, May 15, 2018 | unattributed
    The reasons for the end of the Mycenaean culture have been hotly debated among scholars. At present, there is no satisfactory explanation for the collapse of the Mycenaean palace systems. The two most common theories are population movement and internal conflict. The first attributes the destruction of Mycenaean sites to invaders. The hypothesis of a Dorian invasion, known as such in Ancient Greek tradition, that led to the end of Mycenaean Greece, is supported by sporadic archaeological evidence such as new types of burials, in particular cist graves, and the use of a new dialect of Greek, the Doric one....
  • New Discoveries from Puma Punku

    05/29/2018 3:43:48 PM PDT · by wildbill · 29 replies
    Ancient Origens ^ | o5/22/2018 | Hugh Newman
    Destruction at Tiwanaku and Puma Punku Both sites look like they have been hit with a tidal wave or some other kind of cataclysm. The stones, some weighing up to 80 tons, are scattered around both sites, and often embedded within the mud. Some excavation has been done there, most recently at the Kantatalita Temple at Tiwanaku, and Puma Punku , where they have now revealed that it is a great platform pyramid, similar, but much larger than Tiwanaku’s Akapana Pyramid. The massive pyramid would have once touched the edge of Lake Titicaca . However, the legendary lake is now...
  • In 1.3 Million Years, Our Solar System Will Contain Two Stars

    05/28/2018 5:16:16 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 69 replies
    Science News Reporter ^ | March 25, 2018 | unattributed
    ...nearest stellar neighbor, the Alpha Centauri system, is located about four light years away. While that's not very distant in cosmic terms, it's wide enough for our solar system to not be influenced by these alien stars. But in about 1.3 million years, a star named Gliese 710, which is about 60 percent as massive as the Sun, is projected to interrupt the Sun's hermitude by crashing right on through the far-flung reaches of the solar system. While astronomers have been aware of this stellar meetup for years, new observations from the European Space Agency's Gaia satellite, released on Thursday,...
  • Spectacular collision of suns will create new star in night sky in 2022

    01/06/2017 10:13:34 AM PST · by Red Badger · 26 replies
    www.telegraph.co.uk ^ | 6 January 2017 • 4:15pm | Sarah Knapton, Science Editor
    At the beginning of the 3rd century civil war raged in Britain as the Roman emperor Septimius Severus sought to quell unrest in the north. But unknown to the fighting cohorts and Caledonian tribes, high above their heads two stars were coming together in a huge cataclysmic explosion. Now 1800 years later the light from that collision will finally arrive on Earth creating a new star in the night sky - dubbed the ‘Boom Star - in an incredibly rare event which is usually only spotted through telescopes. Before their meeting the two stars were too dim to be seen...
  • Did a Planetary Society citizen scientist help find one of Earth’s biggest impact craters?

    07/03/2017 12:22:01 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 18 replies
    Planetary Society ^ | 6/12/17 | Jason Davis
    Did a Planetary Society citizen scientist help find one of Earth’s biggest impact craters? About 66 million years ago, a 10-kilometer-wide hunk of rock smashed into Earth near what is now Mexico's Yucatán Peninsula.The impact created a global dust cloud that snuffed out the sunlight, leading to the demise of 80 percent of Earth's plants and animals—including most of the dinosaurs. A 200-kilometer-wide crater buried near the city of Chicxulub is all that's left. It's ground zero for one of the world's most notable extinction events.But throughout Earth's history, there have actually been five major extinction events. The largest of...
  • Asteroid strike made 'instant Himalayas'

    11/18/2016 9:20:25 PM PST · by MtnClimber · 30 replies
    BBC ^ | 18 Nov, 2916 | Jonathan Amos BBC Science Correspondent
    Scientists say they can now describe in detail how the asteroid that wiped out the dinosaurs produced its huge crater. The reconstruction of the event 66 million years ago was made possible by drilling into the remnant bowl and analysing its rocks. These show how the space impactor made the hard surface of the planet slosh back and forth like a fluid. At one stage, a mountain higher than Everest was thrown up before collapsing back into a smaller range of peaks. "And this all happens on the scale of minutes, which is quite amazing," Prof Joanna Morgan from Imperial...
  • Earth's Shifting Crust Linked to Climate Change, Scientists Propose

    05/23/2018 11:12:27 AM PDT · by Oldeconomybuyer · 61 replies
    EcoWatch ^ | May 23, 2018 | By Tim Radford
    Movements of the earth's crust may mean that global warming driven by greenhouse gases from power stations and vehicle exhausts isn't the only threat to life the world faces. About 700 million years ago, global temperatures fell so low that glaciers may have reached the equator. Snowball Earth may have all but extinguished life on the planet. But the only life at the time was microbial and dispersed in the oceans. The planet survived: volcanic eruptions may have darkened the ice and pumped more carbon dioxide and steam into the atmosphere, and the world warmed again. But, say two Texan...