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Keyword: cavepaintings

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  • Spain claims top spot for world’s oldest cave art (Is it a Neanderthal "painting?")

    06/15/2012 8:06:11 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    Nature ^ | 6/14/12 | Ewen Callaway
    Archaeologists say red disk that is more than 40,000 years old could have been painted by Neanderthals. [Snip... Photos at link] It’s no Mona Lisa, but a smudged red disk in northern Spain has been crowned the world’s earliest cave painting. Dated to more than 40,800 years ago, the shape was painted by some of the first modern humans to reach the Iberian Peninsula — or it may have been done by Neanderthals, residents of the Iberian peninsula for more than 200,000 years. “There is a very good chance that this is Neanderthal,” says Alistair Pike, an archaeological scientist at...
  • New dating puts cave art in the age of Neanderthals

    06/15/2012 9:26:33 AM PDT · by JoeProBono · 25 replies
    post-gazette ^ | June 15, 2012 | John Noble Wilford
    Stone Age artists were painting red disks, handprints, clublike symbols and geometric patterns on European cave walls long before previously thought, in some cases more than 40,000 years ago, scientists reported Thursday, after completing more reliable dating tests that raised a possibility that Neanderthals were the artists. A more likely situation, the researchers said, is that the art -- 50 samples from 11 caves in northwestern Spain-- was created by anatomically modern humans fairly soon after their arrival in Europe. The findings seem to put an exclamation point to a run of recent discoveries: direct evidence from fossils that Homo...
  • The writing on the wall: Symbols from the Palaeolithic

    03/22/2012 5:23:51 AM PDT · by Renfield · 6 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 3-12-2012
    In 2009, a ground-breaking study by Genevieve von Petzinger revealed that dots, lines and other geometric signs found in prehistoric European caves may be the precursor to an ancient system of written communication dating back nearly 30,000 years. Von Petzinger, with University of Victoria anthropology professor April Nowell, compiled the markings from 146 different sites in Ice Age France, making it possible to compare the signs on a larger scale than had ever previously been attempted. What made her research ‘new’ was that she was able to use a whole range of modern technology to compare inventories and digital images...
  • Famous Cave Paintings Might Not Be From Humans

    06/15/2012 8:47:02 AM PDT · by dead · 80 replies
    NPR.org ^ | June 15, 2012 | Christopher Joyce
    The famous paintings on the walls of caves in Europe mark the beginning of figurative art and a great leap forward for human culture. But now a novel method of determining the age of some of those cave paintings questions their provenance. Not that they're fakes — only that it might not have been modern humans who made them. The first European cave paintings are thought to have been made over 30,000 years ago. Most depict animals and hunters. Some of the eeriest are stencils of human hands, apparently made by blowing a spray of pigment over a hand held...
  • The Top Four Candidates for Europe's Oldest Work of Art

    05/19/2012 6:34:05 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Smithsonian 'blogs ^ | May 16, 2012 | Erin Wayman
    In 1940, a group of teenagers discovered the paintings of bison, bulls and horses adorning the walls of France's Lascaux Cave. Roughly 17,000 years old, the paintings are Europe's most famous cave art, but hardly the oldest. This week archaeologists announced finding in another cave in France art dating to about 37,000 years ago, making it a candidate for Europe's most ancient artwork. Here's a look at the new discovery and the other top contenders for the title of Europe's oldest work of art. Nerja Caves (possibly about 43,000 years ago)... by Neanderthals, the [humans] that lived in this part...
  • Archaeologists Unearth Britain's First Cave Pictures

    06/15/2003 4:12:58 PM PDT · by blam · 26 replies · 493+ views
    The Guardian (UK) ^ | 6-15-2003 | Robin McKie
    Archaeologists unearth Britain's first cave pictures Robin McKie, science editor Sunday June 15, 2003 The Observer (UK) Archaeologists have discovered 12,000-year-old engravings carved by ancient Britons in a cave in Creswell Crags, Derbyshire. The depiction of the animals - which include a pair of birds - is the first example of prehistoric cave art in Britain. The discovery - by Paul Bahn and Paul Pettitt, with Spanish colleague Sergio Ripoll - is set to trigger considerable scientific excitement, for it fills a major gap in the country's archeological record. 'If this is verified, it represents a wonderful discovery,' said Professor...
  • Britain And France In Dispute Over Cave Art

    10/16/2003 10:47:34 AM PDT · by blam · 10 replies · 717+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 10-16-2003 | Philip Delves
    Britain and France in dispute over cave art By Philip Delves Broughton in Paris (Filed: 16/10/2003) The age of the cave paintings at Chauvet, the Sistine Chapel of palaeolithic art in south eastern France, has become the subject of a war of words between British and French archaeologists. The British claim the French may have exaggerated their age by 18,000 years under official pressure to promote them as the oldest cave paintings in the world. In its final report on the paintings, released this week, a French culture ministry rejected the allegations and called the British dating methods "too slow...
  • Stone Age Code Red: Scarlet Symbols Emerge In Israeli Cave

    11/08/2003 9:33:41 AM PST · by blam · 21 replies · 498+ views
    Science News ^ | 11-8-2003 | Bruce Bower
    Stone Age Code Red: Scarlet symbols emerge in Israeli cave Bruce Bower The Qafzeh Cave in Israel contains skeletal remains of modern Homo sapiens that are more than 90,000 years old, as well as more-recent signs of human occupation. Investigators now say that red ocher found in Qafzeh Cave's oldest sections supports the controversial theory that symbolic thinking, a hallmark of modern-day human thought, arose deep in the Stone Age. HUE CLUE. An ancient lump of red ocher excavated at Qafzeh Cave contains evidence of scraping by stone implements. G. Laron, Inst. of Archaeology/Hebrew Univ. Archaeologists traditionally have held that...
  • Cave Colours Reveal Mental Leap

    12/11/2003 12:33:44 PM PST · by blam · 27 replies · 407+ views
    BBC ^ | 12-11-2003 | Dr David Whitehouse
    Cave colours reveal mental leap By Dr David Whitehouse BBC News Online science editor Ochre-stained rocks have been found in the cave Red-stained bones dug up in a cave in Israel are prompting researchers to speculate that symbolic thought emerged much earlier than they had believed. Symbolic thought - the ability to let one thing represent another - was a giant leap in human evolution. It was a mental ability that allowed sophisticated language and maths. New excavations show that a red colour made from ochre was used in burials 100,000 years ago, much earlier than other examples of colour...
  • Ancient Engravings Found In Somerset Cave

    02/08/2005 5:29:13 PM PST · by blam · 13 replies · 645+ views
    Ancient engravings found in Somerset cave [07 February 2005] Two members of the University of Bristol Spelaeological Society have discovered an engraving in a cave in the Mendip Hills, Somerset, which may be at least 10,000 years old. Graham Mullan and Linda Wilson, who have spent much of the last ten years studying Palaeolithic cave art, recently began a systematic search of caves in southern Britain in the belief that such works in this country would not simply be confined to those found at Creswell Crags, Nottinghamshire. The first results of this study are a series of inscribed crosses found...
  • Cave Paintings Reveal Ice Age Artists

    12/07/2005 3:11:11 PM PST · by blam · 14 replies · 800+ views
    The Times (UK) ^ | 12-7-2005 | Norman Hammond
    December 07, 2005 Cave paintings reveal Ice Age artists By Norman Hammond, Archaeology Correspondent BRITAIN’S first cave art is more than 12,800 years old, scientific testing has shown. Engravings of a deer and other creatures at Creswell Crags, in Derbyshire, have proved to be genuine Ice Age creations, and not modern fakes, as some had feared. The engravings were found in 2003 at two caves, Church Hole and Robin Hood’s Cave, which lie close together in the Creswell gorge. Palaeolithic occupation deposits dating to the last Ice Age were excavated there in 1875-76, but the art remained unnoticed. Although the...
  • Megafauna cave painting could be 40,000 years old

    05/31/2010 1:31:34 AM PDT · by Palter · 24 replies · 717+ views
    ABC ^ | 31 May 2010 | Emma Masters
    Scientists say an Aboriginal rock art depiction of an extinct giant bird could be Australia's oldest painting. The red ochre painting, which depicts two emu-like birds with their necks outstretched, could date back to the earliest days of settlement on the continent. It was rediscovered at the centre of the Arnhem Land plateau about two years ago, but archaeologists first visited the site a fortnight ago. A palaeontologist has confirmed the animals depicted are the megafauna species Genyornis. Archaeologist Ben Gunn said the giant birds became extinct more than 40,000 years ago. "The details on this painting indicate that it...
  • Magnificence on Cave Walls

    01/25/2010 9:46:02 AM PST · by Palter · 11 replies · 827+ views
    WSJ ^ | 23 Jan 2010 | MICHAEL FITZGERALD
    Inanke's prehistoric paintings are a celebration of life The trail to the great cave of Inanke in southern Zimbabwe begins confidently with arrows painted on bare patches of granite and soon vanishes into four miles of often pathless wandering through fields of shoulder-high grass, dense scrub forests and formidable thorn bushes. Without the direction of our guide, the archaeologist Paul Hubbard, our group would never have found this cave containing some of the most magnificent prehistoric paintings in the world. But reach the approximately 30-foot-long frieze of intricately varied paintings and you will find it free of the man-made barriers,...
  • Maha group finds cave paintings in Satpura ranges[India]

    12/03/2009 7:09:40 AM PST · by BGHater · 6 replies · 487+ views
    Sakaal Times ^ | 30 Nov 2009 | Sakaal Times
    MUMBAI: A group of naturalists from Amravati districts has discovered a set of 17 unique cave paintings in the nature-rich Satpura range of Madhya Pradesh – which opens up new avenues of research as this art form are believed to be of Paleolithic period. The group call themselves, ‘Hope’, and has been working since the last six years on this project. The group include scientist Dr V T Ingole, wildlife writer PS Hirurkar, Padmakar Lad, Shirishkumar Patil, Dnyaneswar Damahe and Manohar Khode. They are a group of nature and bird lovers, and luckily chanced upon these unique paintings. Ingole said...
  • Prehistoric cave paintings took up to 20,000 years to complete

    10/04/2008 6:50:29 PM PDT · by BGHater · 50 replies · 1,049+ views
    Telegraph ^ | 05 Oct 2008 | Telegraph
    It may have taken Michelangelo four long years to paint his fresco on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel,but his earliest predecessors spent considerably longer perfecting their own masterpieces. Scientists have discovered that prehistoric cave paintings took up to 20,000 years to complete. Rather than being created in one session, as archaeologists previously thought, many of the works discovered across Europe were produced over hundreds of generations who added to, refreshed and painted over the original pieces of art. Until now it has been extremely difficult to pinpoint when prehistoric cave paintings and carvings were created, but a pioneering technique...
  • Were Cavemen Painting For Their Gods?

    03/06/2005 3:20:58 PM PST · by blam · 45 replies · 4,470+ views
    Were cavemen painting for their gods? (Filed: 23/02/2005) The meaning of Ice Age art has been endlessly debated, but evidence is increasing that some was religiously motivated, says Paul Bahn At least 70,000 years ago, our ancestors began to adorn their bodies with beads, pendants and perhaps tattoos; by 35,000 years ago, they had begun to paint and engrave animals, people and abstract motifs on cave walls, like those in Lascaux, France, and Altamira in Spain. They sculpted voluptuous figurines in ivory or stone, such as the Venus of Willendorf. Underestimating art: 35,000 years ago, our ancestors began painting representations...
  • Macro-Etymology: Paleosigns [writing 20,000 years ago?]

    05/19/2005 11:00:18 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies · 782+ views
    Macro-Etymology Website ^ | prior to May 20, 2005 | the webmasters thereof
    Examples of (a) Upper Paleolithic signs, and characters in three of the early written languages which resemble the Paleolithic marks: (b) Indus Valley signs, (c) Greek (western branch), (d) Runic... Correlation of the symbols found accompanying Magdalenian cave art with symbols from other ancient cultures shows a nearly-complete match, after Forbes and Crowder, "The Problem of Franco-Cantabrian Abstract Signs: Agenda for a New Approach." World Archaeology 10 (1979): 350-66... These illustrations show (a) the collection of symbols that accompany the Magdalenian cave art in France, from 20,000 years ago or less, and characters in three of the early written languages...
  • Ice Age Cave Art Preserved

    07/29/2007 10:24:22 PM PDT · by blam · 23 replies · 754+ views
    BBC ^ | 7-29-2007 | BBC
    Ice Age cave art site preserved The art was probably made by Ice Age hunter-gatherers Work to protect and preserve an Ice Age site in Derbyshire has been completed. The project at the Ice Age cave art centre at Creswell Crags was funded by the East Midlands Development Agency and the county council. It included building new scree banks to show how the gorge would have looked about 10 to 50,000 years ago. A county council spokesperson said archaeologists were consulted during the preservation project to ensure the site's natural beauty was not spoiled. 'Unique site' A £200,000 bridleway, which...
  • Science Shows Cave Art Developed Early

    10/03/2001 12:16:47 PM PDT · by blam · 118 replies · 4,616+ views
    BBC ^ | 10-3-2001
    Wednesday, 3 October, 2001, 18:00 GMT 19:00 UK Science shows cave art developed early Chauvet cave paintings depict horses and other animals By BBC News Online science editor Dr David Whitehouse A new dating of spectacular prehistoric cave paintings reveals them to be much older than previously thought. Carbon isotope analysis of charcoal used in pictures of horses at Chauvet, south-central France, show that they are 30,000 years old, a discovery that should prompt a rethink about the development of art. The remarkable Chauvet drawings were discovered in 1994 when potholers stumbled upon a narrow entrance to several underground chambers ...
  • Bear DNA is clue to age of Chauvet cave art

    04/19/2011 8:30:29 PM PDT · by Palter · 8 replies
    NewScientist ^ | 19 April 2011 | Michael Marshall
    Exploring a gorge in south-east France in 1994 for prehistoric artefacts, Jean-Marie Chauvet hit the jackpot. After squeezing through a narrow passage, he found himself in a hidden cavern, the walls of which were covered with paintings of animals. But dating the beautiful images - which featured in Werner Herzog's recent documentary film Cave of Forgotten Dreams - has led to an ugly spat between archaeologists. Could the bones of cave bears settle the debate? Within a year of Chauvet's discovery, radiocarbon dating suggested the images were between 30,000 and 32,000 years old, making them almost twice the age of...