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Keyword: celts

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  • A Lost European Culture, Pulled From Obscurity

    11/30/2009 8:48:53 PM PST · by Borges · 46 replies · 1,681+ views
    NY Times ^ | 11/30/09 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
    Before the glory that was Greece and Rome, even before the first cities of Mesopotamia or temples along the Nile, there lived in the Lower Danube Valley and the Balkan foothills people who were ahead of their time in art, technology and long-distance trade. For 1,500 years, starting earlier than 5000 B.C., they farmed and built sizable towns, a few with as many as 2,000 dwellings. They mastered large-scale copper smelting, the new technology of the age. Their graves held an impressive array of exquisite headdresses and necklaces and, in one cemetery, the earliest major assemblage of gold artifacts to...
  • Ancient Irish musical history found in modern India

    05/15/2016 1:15:34 PM PDT · by Trumpinator · 10 replies
    business-standard.com ^ | May 15, 2016 Last Updated at 11:57 IST | Press Trust of India
    Ancient Irish musical history found in modern India Press Trust of India | Melbourne May 15, 2016 Last Updated at 11:57 IST Ancient Irish musical traditions, thought to be long dead, are alive and well in south India, according to a new study of musical horns from iron-age Ireland. The realisation that modern Indian horns are almost identical to many iron-age European artifacts shows a rich cultural link between the two regions 2,000 years ago, said PhD student Billy O Foghlu, from The Australian National University (ANU). "I was astonished to find what I thought to be dead soundscapes alive...
  • Ancient Irish musical history found in modern India

    05/14/2016 12:23:53 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 51 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | May 13, 2016 | Australian National University
    An archaeologist studying musical horns from iron-age Ireland has found musical traditions, thought to be long dead, are alive and well in south India. The realisation that modern Indian horns are almost identical to many iron-age European artefacts reveals a rich cultural link between the two regions 2,000 years ago, said PhD student Billy O Foghlu, from The Australian National University (ANU). "Archaeology is usually silent. I was astonished to find what I thought to be dead soundscapes alive and living in Kerala today," said the ANU College of Asia-Pacific student... The findings help show that Europe and India had...
  • A man’s discovery of bones under his pub could forever change what we know about the Irish

    03/21/2016 8:45:16 AM PDT · by Theoria · 46 replies
    The Washington Post ^ | 17 March 2016 | Peter Whoriskey
    Ten years ago, an Irish pub owner was clearing land for a driveway when his digging exposed an unusually large flat stone. The stone obscured a dark gap underneath. He grabbed a flashlight to peer in. "I shot the torch in and saw the gentleman, well, his skull and bones," Bertie Currie, the pub owner, said this week. The remains of three humans, in fact, were found behind McCuaig’s Bar in County Antrim, Northern Ireland. And though police were called, it was not, as it turned out, a crime scene. Instead, what Currie had stumbled over was an ancient burial...
  • Clues about human migration to Imperial Rome uncovered in 2,000-year-old cemetery

    02/16/2016 9:47:28 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | Wednesday, February 10, 2016 | PLOS
    Isotope analysis of 2000-year-old skeletons buried in Imperial Rome reveal some were migrants from the Alps or North Africa, according to a study published February 10, 2016 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Kristina Killgrove from University of West Florida, USA, and Janet Montgomery from Durham University, UK. Previous work has focused on the overall human migration patterns within the Roman Empire. To understand human migration on a more granular level, the authors of this study examined 105 skeletons buried at two Roman cemeteries during the 1st through 3rd centuries AD. They analyzed the oxygen, strontium, and carbon isotope...
  • English DNA one third Anglo-Saxon

    01/20/2016 7:49:52 AM PST · by ek_hornbeck · 54 replies
    BBC ^ | 1/20/15 | Paul Rincon
    The present-day English owe about a third of their ancestry to the Anglo-Saxons, according to a new study. Scientists sequenced genomes from 10 skeletons unearthed in eastern England and dating from the Iron Age through to the Anglo-Saxon period. Many of the Anglo-Saxon samples appeared closer to modern Dutch and Danish people than the Iron Age Britons did. The results appear in Nature Communications journal. According to historical accounts and archaeology, the Anglo-Saxons migrated to Britain from continental Europe from the 5th Century AD. They brought with them a new culture, social structure and language. Genetic studies have tackled the...
  • William Tell, Tax Rebel

    04/03/2004 11:53:24 AM PST · by -=[_Super_Secret_Agent_]=- · 15 replies · 182+ views
    Ludwig von Mises Institute ^ | march 30, 2004 | Adam Young
    The legend of William Tell, the Swiss legendary hero who symbolizes the struggle for individual and political freedom, has its origins in medieval Switzerland, in the tax rebellions that launched the Everlasting League and the defeat of an empire. Settled first by the Tene, then the Celts and then the Romans, after the empire fell Switzerland fell under the sway of the Ostrogoths, the Franks and finally Charlemagne's empire and its heirs. In the 11th century, Switzerland was divided by the conflict between the Emperor and the Papacy. The dukes and counts, abbots and bishops benefited the most from this...
  • The subterranean wonder of the Celtic Hypogeum [Italy]

    12/20/2015 1:05:09 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Ancient Origins ^ | November 27, 2014 | M R Reese
    ...Northern Italy's Friuli-Venezia Giulia... is located in the Eastern Alps, near Slovenia, and used to be an important regional power. Today, it is a quaint town, and many tourists are attracted to it as a medieval center. Julius Caesar founded Cividale in 50 B.C. The area had already been settled by the Veneti and Celts, but it was after the destruction of Aquileia and Iulium Carnicum that the town became known as Cividale and became the principal town of Friuli. Within Cividale del Friuli is the Celtic Hypogeum -- a subterranean structure created for an unknown purpose. The Celtic Hypogeum...
  • Ohio's Stonehenge

    12/12/2006 4:26:26 PM PST · by blam · 33 replies · 1,206+ views
    Ohio.com ^ | 12-12-2006 | Bob Downing
    Ohio's StonehengeFort Ancient is largest, best preserved earthwork of its kind in America. Its purpose is not known By Bob Downing Beacon Journal staff writer A sign identifies one of the prehistoric earthworks at Fort Ancient State Memorial. Ohio law forbids walking off trail or on any mound or earthwork.OREGONIA - Fort Ancient remains a mystery. The extensive earthen mounds and walls in southwest Ohio are unlikely a fortress, although they might have been used for social gatherings and religious ceremonies and astronomical viewings. The site, atop a wooded bluff 235 feet above the Little Miami River in Warren County,...
  • Does Celtic art have links with Asia?

    10/15/2015 11:26:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | October 15, 2015 | editors
    An Oxford University-led... research team... will be looking at a group of artefacts in excavations and museum collections that are traditionally described as ‘Celtic’ because of their use of spirals, circles, interlaced designs, or swirling representations of plants or animals. One main line of enquiry is the relationship between the central European Celts and their nomadic Eurasian neighbours (often referred to as Scythians or Sarmatians), who inhabited the European end of a grassland (steppe) corridor that stretched east towards Central Asia and China... Iron Age tombs frozen in the mountains of Siberia, Mongolia, and Kazakhstan have yielded Roman glass, Chinese...
  • London - Red hair may be the genetic legacy of Neanderthals...

    01/16/2005 12:47:07 PM PST · by IGBT · 372 replies · 26,595+ views
    Planet Save.com ^ | 1/14/05 | Planet Save.com
    London - Red hair may be the genetic legacy of Neanderthals, according to a new study by British scientists. Researchers at the John Radcliffe Institute of Molecular Medicine in Oxford were quoted by The Times as saying the so-called "ginger gene" which gives people red hair, fair skin and freckles could be up to 100 000 years old. They claim that their discovery points to the gene having originated in Neanderthal man who lived in Europe for 200 000 years before Homo sapien settlers, the ancestors of modern man, arrived from Africa about 40 000 years ago. Rosalind Harding, the...
  • DNA Traces Roots Back To Stone Age

    03/25/2002 5:34:27 PM PST · by blam · 23 replies · 369+ views
    Independent (UK) ^ | 3-24-2002 | Paul Lashmar
    26 March 2002 01:46 GMT DNA traces roots back to Stone Age By Paul Lashmar 24 March 2002 Are you a Viking, Saxon, Pict, Celt, or descendant of an ancient African tribe? New DNA testing methods will enable us to trace our family tree right back to the Stone Age. Until recently, researching your ancestry meant hours of painstaking digging through fusty old files in public record offices or asking older relatives about their family memories. When the 1901 census was released online, demand was so great that the system crashed. The new scientific technique for tracing relatives allows individuals...
  • DNA shows Irish people have more complex origins than previously thought

    01/11/2014 6:13:55 AM PST · by NYer · 71 replies
    scott.net ^ | July 5, 2013 | Marie McKeown
    The blood in Irish veins is Celtic, right? Well, not exactly. Although the history many Irish people were taught at school is the history of the Irish as a Celtic race, the truth is much more complicated, and much more interesting than that ... Research done into the DNA of Irish males has shown that the old Anthropological attempts to define 'Irish' have been misguided. As late as the 1950s researchers were busy collecting data among Irish people such as hair colour and height, in order to categorise them as a 'race' and define them as different to the British....
  • British Have Changed Little Since Ice Age, Gene Study Says

    07/26/2005 8:41:38 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies · 705+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | July 19, 2005 | James Owen
    "There's been a lot of arguing over the last ten years, but it's now more or less agreed that about 80 percent of Britons' genes come from hunter-gatherers who came in immediately after the Ice Age," Miles said... New evidence for the genetic ancestry of modern Britons comes from analysis of blood groups, oxygen traces in teeth, and DNA samples taken from skeletal remains... The most visible British genetic marker is red hair, he added. The writer Tacitus noted the Romans' surprise at how common it was when they arrived 2,000 years ago. "It's something that foreign observers have often...
  • Two Underrated Peoples

    05/02/2015 2:13:23 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 21 replies
    American Thinker ^ | May 2, 2015 | Mike Konrad
    In looking over the history of the past 500 years, four nations stand out for having completely and massively altered world civilization in a way that no others have, before or after: England, Spain, France, and Portugal. No other empires even come close. The Muslim conquests were landbound except for island hopping. Chinese and Mongolian conquests were landbound. Even in ancient times, Greek, Roman, and Persian conquests were essentially land operations, except for river fording. Yes, they all had navies, but were not defined by them. What separates the English, French, Portuguese, and Spanish was that these nations had vast...
  • South Iceland Cave Made before Settlement

    04/20/2015 1:42:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Iceland Review ^ | April 17, 2015 | Eyglo Svala Arnarsdottir
    Archaeologist Kristján Ahronson has concluded that Kverkarhellir, a manmade cave between waterfall Seljalandsfoss and farm Seljaland in South Iceland, was partly created around 800 AD, before the settlement of Iceland, which, according to sources, began in 874... “Kverkahellir, along with Seljalandshellir, is remarkable as it is part of a number of cave sites in southern Iceland, manngerđir hellar [‘manmade caves’], that are marked by cross sculpture.” ... Ahronson would not state that theories that the crosses may have been made by papar, monks from the British Isles who were said to have lived in Iceland before the Norse settlers, may...
  • DNA study shows that Celts are not a unique genetic group

    03/19/2015 8:39:02 AM PDT · by ek_hornbeck · 53 replies
    BBC ^ | 3/18/15 | Pallab Ghosh
    A DNA study of Britons has shown that genetically there is not a unique Celtic group of people in the UK. According to the data, those of Celtic ancestry in Scotland and Cornwall are more similar to the English than they are to other Celtic groups. The study also describes distinct genetic differences across the UK, which reflect regional identities. And it shows that the invading Anglo Saxons did not wipe out the Britons of 1,500 years ago, but mixed with them. Published in the Journal Nature, the findings emerge from a detailed DNA analysis of 2,000 mostly middle-aged Caucasian...
  • Y Chromosomes Rewrite British History

    06/24/2003 10:33:30 AM PDT · by blam · 91 replies · 5,152+ views
    Nature ^ | 6-19-2003 | Hannah Hoag
    Y chromosomes rewrite British historyAnglo-Saxons' genetic stamp weaker than historians suspected 19 June 2003 HANNAH HOAG Some Scottish men's Y's are remarkably similar to those of southern England. © GettyImages A new survey of Y chromosomes in the British Isles suggests that the Anglo-Saxons failed to leave as much of a genetic stamp on the UK as history books imply1. Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Danes, Vikings and Normans invaded Britain repeatedly between 50 BC and AD 1050. Many historians ascribe much of the British ancestry to the Anglo-Saxons because their written legacy overshadows that of the Celts. But the Y chromosomes of...
  • Archaeologists uncover royal Celtic burial site in small French town

    03/08/2015 9:40:21 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 5 replies
    France 24 ^ | March 5, 2015 | Joseph Bamat
    The cauldron is finely decorated with designs and figures, including the head of the Greek god Achelous.France’s National Archaeological Research Institute (Inrap) on Wednesday revealed the discovery of an ancient grave site, probably that of a Celtic prince, which is helping shed light on trade between some of Europe’s earliest civilizations. Archaeologists uncovered the tomb dating from the fifth century BC in an industrial zone in the small town of Lavau, in France’s Champagne region. Inrap, which routinely scours construction sites in order to find and preserve the country’s archaeological heritage, began excavating at Lavau site in October 2014....
  • Ancient tomb of Celtic prince found in France

    03/05/2015 6:35:29 PM PST · by DeaconBenjamin · 19 replies
    The Local (France) ^ | 05 Mar 2015 08:21 GMT+01:00
    An "exceptional" tomb from the fifth century BC, likely that of a Celtic prince, has been unearthed in a small French town, shedding light on Iron Age European trade, researchers said Wednesday. The grave, crammed with Greek and possibly Etruscan artefacts, was discovered in a business zone on the outskirts of Lavau in France's Champagne region, said the National Archaeological Research Institute, Inrap. A team from the institute has been excavating the site since October last year, and have dated it to the end of the First Iron Age -- a period characterised by the widespread use of the metal....