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Keyword: celts

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  • Two Underrated Peoples

    05/02/2015 2:13:23 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 21 replies
    American Thinker ^ | May 2, 2015 | Mike Konrad
    In looking over the history of the past 500 years, four nations stand out for having completely and massively altered world civilization in a way that no others have, before or after: England, Spain, France, and Portugal. No other empires even come close. The Muslim conquests were landbound except for island hopping. Chinese and Mongolian conquests were landbound. Even in ancient times, Greek, Roman, and Persian conquests were essentially land operations, except for river fording. Yes, they all had navies, but were not defined by them. What separates the English, French, Portuguese, and Spanish was that these nations had vast...
  • South Iceland Cave Made before Settlement

    04/20/2015 1:42:26 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Iceland Review ^ | April 17, 2015 | Eyglo Svala Arnarsdottir
    Archaeologist Kristján Ahronson has concluded that Kverkarhellir, a manmade cave between waterfall Seljalandsfoss and farm Seljaland in South Iceland, was partly created around 800 AD, before the settlement of Iceland, which, according to sources, began in 874... “Kverkahellir, along with Seljalandshellir, is remarkable as it is part of a number of cave sites in southern Iceland, manngerðir hellar [‘manmade caves’], that are marked by cross sculpture.” ... Ahronson would not state that theories that the crosses may have been made by papar, monks from the British Isles who were said to have lived in Iceland before the Norse settlers, may...
  • DNA study shows that Celts are not a unique genetic group

    03/19/2015 8:39:02 AM PDT · by ek_hornbeck · 53 replies
    BBC ^ | 3/18/15 | Pallab Ghosh
    A DNA study of Britons has shown that genetically there is not a unique Celtic group of people in the UK. According to the data, those of Celtic ancestry in Scotland and Cornwall are more similar to the English than they are to other Celtic groups. The study also describes distinct genetic differences across the UK, which reflect regional identities. And it shows that the invading Anglo Saxons did not wipe out the Britons of 1,500 years ago, but mixed with them. Published in the Journal Nature, the findings emerge from a detailed DNA analysis of 2,000 mostly middle-aged Caucasian...
  • Y Chromosomes Rewrite British History

    06/24/2003 10:33:30 AM PDT · by blam · 91 replies · 5,152+ views
    Nature ^ | 6-19-2003 | Hannah Hoag
    Y chromosomes rewrite British historyAnglo-Saxons' genetic stamp weaker than historians suspected 19 June 2003 HANNAH HOAG Some Scottish men's Y's are remarkably similar to those of southern England. © GettyImages A new survey of Y chromosomes in the British Isles suggests that the Anglo-Saxons failed to leave as much of a genetic stamp on the UK as history books imply1. Romans, Anglo-Saxons, Danes, Vikings and Normans invaded Britain repeatedly between 50 BC and AD 1050. Many historians ascribe much of the British ancestry to the Anglo-Saxons because their written legacy overshadows that of the Celts. But the Y chromosomes of...
  • Archaeologists uncover royal Celtic burial site in small French town

    03/08/2015 9:40:21 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 5 replies
    France 24 ^ | March 5, 2015 | Joseph Bamat
    The cauldron is finely decorated with designs and figures, including the head of the Greek god Achelous.France’s National Archaeological Research Institute (Inrap) on Wednesday revealed the discovery of an ancient grave site, probably that of a Celtic prince, which is helping shed light on trade between some of Europe’s earliest civilizations. Archaeologists uncovered the tomb dating from the fifth century BC in an industrial zone in the small town of Lavau, in France’s Champagne region. Inrap, which routinely scours construction sites in order to find and preserve the country’s archaeological heritage, began excavating at Lavau site in October 2014....
  • Ancient tomb of Celtic prince found in France

    03/05/2015 6:35:29 PM PST · by DeaconBenjamin · 19 replies
    The Local (France) ^ | 05 Mar 2015 08:21 GMT+01:00
    An "exceptional" tomb from the fifth century BC, likely that of a Celtic prince, has been unearthed in a small French town, shedding light on Iron Age European trade, researchers said Wednesday. The grave, crammed with Greek and possibly Etruscan artefacts, was discovered in a business zone on the outskirts of Lavau in France's Champagne region, said the National Archaeological Research Institute, Inrap. A team from the institute has been excavating the site since October last year, and have dated it to the end of the First Iron Age -- a period characterised by the widespread use of the metal....
  • Unraveling the Nature and Identity of the Green Man

    01/28/2015 5:53:57 PM PST · by Reverend Saltine · 24 replies
    Ancient-Origins.net ^ | January 28, 2015 | Ryan Stone
    An enigma spanning thousands of years, the Green Man is a symbol of mysterious origin and history. Permeating various religious faiths and cultures, the Green Man has survived countless transformations and cultural diversities, enduring in the same relative physical form to this day. Although specifics about his beginnings and his worship are not fully known, due in large part to how far back and to what initial cultures he can be traced to, it is a testament to the widespread reach of his character that he is still remembered and worshipped to this day. The Green Man is most highly...
  • 120-114 BC: The Cimbrian flood and the following Cimbrian war 113-101 BC

    12/14/2014 12:59:31 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    climate4you ^ | before 2014 | unattributed
    The Cimbrian flood (or Cymbrian flood) was a large-scale incursion of the North Sea in the region of the Jutland peninsula (Denmark) in the period 120 to 114 BC, resulting in a permanent change of coastline with much land lost. The flood was caused by one or several very strong storm(s). A high number of people living in the affected area of Jutland drowned, and the flooding apparently set off a migration of the Cimbri tribes previously settled there (Lamb 1991)... The Cimbri were a tribe from Northern Europe, who, together with the Proto-Germanic Teutones and the Ambrones threatened the...
  • Ancient Celtic offshore Banking [update to 2012 story]

    12/07/2014 7:21:52 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Guernsey Donkey ^ | August 22, 2014 | Robert
    In June 2012 metal detectorists Reg Mead and Richard Miles uncovered a hoard of a staggering 70,000 late Iron Age and Roman coins. They were searching in Grouville in Jersey when they came across their incredible find that has since turned out to be the largest hoard ever found in the island. The Hoard The coins, which had fused into one solid mass, were found using a deep-scanning metal detector. They were searching the area after Reg and Richard had uncovered a smaller hoard of 120 coins the previous year. As soon as they realised the size of their find,...
  • Metal Detector Hobbyists Find Rare Heap Of Celtic Coins

    07/01/2012 4:57:12 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 26 replies
    NPR ^ | 6/30/2012
    June 30, 2012 For more than 30 years, Richard Miles and Reg Mead scoured the fields of their native Jersey with metal detectors, hoping to one day come across an ancient coin or two. Earlier this week, the detector beeped and they found the world's largest-ever stash of Celtic coins. Host Scott Simon speaks with Reg Mead about their find. Copyright © 2012 National Public Radio®. For personal, noncommercial use only. See Terms of Use. For other uses, prior permission required. SCOTT SIMON, HOST: Reg Mead and Richard Miles began to scour a field on their home island of Jersey...
  • Ancient graffiti proves Spain's Irish links

    07/26/2014 1:35:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    The Local ^ | July 22, 2014 | Alex Dunham
    An ancient inscription discovered on a 14th century church in Spain's Galicia region has been identified as Gaelic; the first written evidence of the northern region’s Irish and Scottish heritage. For centuries it has gone unnoticed, weathered by Galicia’s incessant drizzle but still visible to those with an eagle-eye. On one of the granite walls of Santiago church in the small town of Betanzos, a small previously unintelligible inscription five metres above ground kept historians and epigraphists, or people who study ancient inscriptions, baffled for decades. Researchers working for a private association called the Gaelaico Project now believe they've finally...
  • French archaeologists discover an exceptional Gallic chariot tomb at Warcq in France

    07/04/2014 8:35:24 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Art Daily ^ | Friday, July 4, 2014 | unattributed
    A combined team composed of archaeologists from the Ardennes departmental archaeology unit and from Inrap is currently excavating a Gallic aristocratic tomb at Warcq (Ardennes)... This type of aristocratic tomb emerges in the 7th century B.C. – during the first Iron Age – and ends with the end of the Gallic period. The oldest chariots have four wheels (like that found at Vix), while those from the second Iron Age have only two. The deceased person – who could be male or female – was generally inhumed on the chariot, which was an object of prestige and a symbol of...
  • Spanish documents suggest Irish arrived in America before Columbus

    05/14/2014 10:36:21 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 54 replies
    Irish Central ^ | May 13, 2014 04:12 AM | Kerry O’Shea
    While Christopher Columbus is generally credited with having discovered America in 1492, a 1521 Spanish report provides inklings of evidence that there were, in fact, Irish people settled in America prior to Columbus’ journey. […] In 1520, Peter Martyr d’Anghiera, a historian and professor, was appointed by Carlos V to be chronicler for the new Council of the Indies. Though Martyr died in 1526, his report, founded on several weeks of interviews, was published posthumously in a book named De Orbe Novo (About the New World). […] While interviewing Spanish colonists, Martyr took note of their vicious treatment of Chicora...
  • Ancient Celtic / Scottish Viking sites in New Zealand!(?)

    04/11/2006 9:19:16 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies · 524+ views
    Remains of a typical Scottish/Celtic homestead. (from 12th Century New Zealand?) A modern native NZ Scottish/Celt surveys the ruins. Drystone walls have been pushed out and over. The typical hearthstone, the rock for the family's patron saint, the rock on which the dwellings protective God would have sat, and others are all still in traditional and recogniseable positions. Other such remains abound. This site is now difficult to reach by sea and little known. The original boat access is much changed and boat access is best achieved from an adjacent bay. It is also in the vicinity of a...
  • Seven centuries of ploughing in Ede: Dutch Celtic fields used continuously for centuries

    03/21/2014 5:48:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    University of Groningen ^ | March 14, 2014 | Stijn Arnoldussen
    Archaeological excavations have finally answered the question regarding the age and development of the mysterious prehistoric fields enclosed by earthen ridges known as ‘Celtic fields’. Using Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL), a technique that dates the last exposure to light or heat sources of quartz minerals, archaeologist Stijn Arnoldussen from the University of Groningen managed to determine that these banks around the later prehistoric field plots were constructed more than 3100 years ago and remained in use for hundreds of years thereafter... The Celtic field complex targeted by the Groningen Institute of Archaeology at Lunteren measured at least 210 hectares in...
  • The Fantasy and Folklore of All Hallows

    10/31/2013 6:13:05 PM PDT · by Borges · 15 replies
    Library of Congress ^ | 1982 | Jack Santino
    Halloween had its beginnings in an ancient, pre-Christian Celtic festival of the dead. The Celtic peoples, who were once found all over Europe, divided the year by four major holidays. According to their calendar, the year began on a day corresponding to November 1st on our present calendar. The date marked the beginning of winter. Since they were pastoral people, it was a time when cattle and sheep had to be moved to closer pastures and all livestock had to be secured for the winter months. Crops were harvested and stored. The date marked both an ending and a beginning...
  • 'Roman' roads were actually built by the Celts, new book claims

    10/13/2013 4:02:10 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 38 replies
    Telegraph (UK) ^ | Sunday, October 13, 2013 | Hayley Dixon
    The findings of Graham Robb, a biographer and historian, bring into question two millennia of thinking about Iron Age Britain and Europe and the stereotyped image of Celts as barbarous, superstitious tribes... "They had their own road system on which the Romans later based theirs," Mr Robb said, adding that the roads were built in Britain from around the 1st Century BC. "It has often been wondered how the Romans managed to build the Fosse Way, which goes from Exeter to Lincoln. They must have known what the finishing point would be, but they didn't conquer that part of Britain...
  • Blood of the Irish: DNA Proves Ancestry of the People of Ireland

    07/13/2013 11:17:17 AM PDT · by Renfield · 91 replies
    Blood of the Irish The Blood in Irish veins is Celtic, right? Well, not exactly. Although the history many Irish people were taught at school is the history of the Irish as a Celtic race, the truth is much more complicated, and much more interesting than that ...Research done into the DNA of Irish males has shown that the old Anthropological attempts to define 'Irish' have been misguided. As late as the 1950s researchers were busy collecting data among Irish people such as hair colour and height, in order to categorise them as a 'race' and define them as...
  • Archeologists revise image of ancient Celts

    06/17/2013 7:16:28 PM PDT · by Islander7 · 50 replies
    DW ^ | 1-19-2013 | Richard A. Fuchs
    The Celts were long considered a barbaric and violent society. But new findings from a 2,600-year-old grave in Germany suggest the ancient people were much more sophisticated than previously thought. The little Bettelbühl stream on the Danube River was completely unknown, except to local residents. But that changed in the summer of 2010 when a spectacular discovery was made just next to the creek. Not far from the Heuneburg, the site of an early Celtic settlement, researchers stumbled upon the elaborate grave of a Celtic princess. In addition to gold and amber, they found a subterranean burial chamber fitted with...
  • A History of Celtic Britain (1of4) -- Age of Iron

    10/10/2012 8:25:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    BBC via YouTube ^ | July 22, 2011 | Uploaded by PIETRASZE
    A History of Celtic Britain (1of4) -- Age of Iron
  • Two men using metal detectors discover hoard of 50,000 Iron Age Celtic coins

    07/03/2012 3:04:55 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 29 replies
    IO9 ^ | July 3, 2012 | George Dvorsky
    those metal detecTwo men using metal detectors discover hoard of 50,000 Iron Age Celtic coins Great news for all you hopeful amateur metal detectorists: Two men, who'd been searching the same field for nearly 30 years, have stumbled upon the largest hoard of Iron Age coins ever discovered in northern Europe. Inspired by legends that a local farmer once discovered silver coins on his land, the men unearthed the congealed chunk of 50,000 silver and gold coins after following a trail of pieces — that turned out not to be related to the cache. Reg Mead and Richard Miles found...
  • Scandinavian Ancestry -- Tracing Roots to Azerbaijan

    12/15/2001 2:43:28 PM PST · by spycatcher · 55 replies · 3,406+ views
    Azerbaijan International ^ | Summer 2000 | Thor Heyerdahl
        Summer 2000 (8.2) Scandinavian Ancestry Tracing Roots to Azerbaijan by Thor Heyerdahl Above: Thor Heyerdahl with Peruvian children who still construct traditional boats made of reeds, the principle material that enabled early migrations on trans-oceanic voyages. Courtesy: Thor Heyerdahl. Archeologist and historian Thor Heyerdahl, 85, has visited Azerbaijan on several occasions during the past two decades. Each time, he garners more evidence to prove his tantalizing theory - that Scandinavian ancestry can be traced to the region now known as Azerbaijan. Heyerdahl first began forming this hypothesis after visiting Gobustan, an ancient cave dwelling found 30 miles ...
  • What the Romans didn't do for us

    06/10/2011 8:23:09 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 74 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Wednesday, March 16, 2011 | Mike Pitts
    The route had long been known as a lost Roman road... dig director Tim Malim noticed that the road had twice been rebuilt, and knew its history could be dated using a technique that tells you when buried mineral grains were last exposed to sunlight. The unexpected result was a more than 80% chance that the last surface had been laid before the Roman invasion in AD43. Wood in the foundation was radiocarbon-dated to the second century BC, sealing the road's pre-Roman origin. And Malim thinks a huge post that stood in 1500BC close to the crest of the hill...
  • Scientists Trace Violent Death Of Iron Age Man

    03/29/2011 4:18:27 PM PDT · by Renfield · 41 replies
    ArchNews ^ | 3-28-2011
    An Iron Age man whose skull and brain was unearthed during excavations at the University of York was the victim of a gruesome ritual killing, according to new research. Scientists say that fractures and marks on the bones suggest the man, who was aged between 26 and 45, died most probably from hanging, after which he was carefully decapitated and his head was then buried on its own. Archaeologists discovered the remains in 2008 in one of a series of Iron Age pits on the site of the University’s £750 million campus expansion at Heslington East. Brain material was still...
  • Michelle Obama Depicted As Chubby And Greedy In Republican Cartoon [Picts]

    02/16/2011 8:52:51 AM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 36 replies · 1+ views
    Hip-Hop Wired News ^ | February 15, 2011 | Sha Stimuli
    Michelle Obama Cartoon: First Lady Drawn As Fat, Binging On Burgers. Presidential First Lady, Michelle Obama has been pegged as a gluttonous, portly hypocrite in a cartoon drawing posted on Biggovernment.com One year ago, Mrs. Obama initiated her "Let's Move!" campaign to thwart childhood obesity by stressing the importance of activity and nutritious eating in young adults. The problem is she has been caught on camera more than once eating foods that contradict her movement. Couple that with the recent revealing of the fatty foods served at The White House's Super Bowl party and Conservatives are having a field day...
  • Reviving the taste of an Iron Age beer [ancient Celtic malt beverage]

    01/18/2011 6:27:27 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    Science News ^ | Friday, January 14th, 2011 | Bruce Bower
    At the Celtic site, barley was soaked in the specially constructed ditches until it sprouted, Stika proposes. Grains were then dried by lighting fires at the ends of the ditches, giving the malt a smoky taste and a darkened color. Lactic acid bacteria stimulated by slow drying of soaked grains, a well-known phenomenon, added sourness to the brew. Unlike modern beers that are flavored with flowers of the hop plant, the Eberdingen-Hochdorf brew probably contained spices such as mugwort, carrot seeds or henbane, in Stika's opinion. Beer makers are known to have used these additives by medieval times. Excavations at...
  • Rare Discovery of Intact Tomb: German Archeologists Uncover Celtic Treasure

    12/29/2010 7:07:14 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies · 29+ views
    Spiegel ^ | Wednesday, December 29, 2010 | cro -- with wire reports
    Archeologists in Germany have discovered a 2,600-year-old Celtic tomb containing ornate jewellery of gold and amber. They say the grave is unusually well preserved and should provide important insights into early Celtic culture... The subterranean chamber measuring four by five meters was uncovered near the prehistoric Heuneburg hill fort near the town of Herbertingen in south-western Germany. Its contents including the oak floor of the room are unusually well preserved. The find is a "milestone for the reconstruction of the social history of the Celts," archeologist Dirk Krausse, the director of the dig, said on Tuesday. The intact oak should...
  • The fall of Phaethon: a Greco-Roman geomyth preserves the memory of a meteorite impact in Bavaria

    10/19/2010 3:53:11 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Antiquity ^ | v84 n324 | Rappengluck et al (seven authors, full list below)
    Arguing from a critical reading of the text, and scientific evidence on the ground, the authors show that the myth of Phaethon -- the delinquent celestial charioteer -- remembers the impact of a massive meteorite that hit the Chiemgau region in Bavaria between 2000 and 428 BC. Keywords: Bronze Age, Phaethon, Ovid, meteorite, Celts, myth Access this article (PDF File).
  • Ancient Britain Had Apartheid-Like Society, Study Suggests

    07/28/2009 1:25:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 56 replies · 2,229+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | July 21, 2006 | Kate Ravilious
    When Anglo-Saxons first arrived in Britain 1,600 years ago, they created an apartheid-like society that oppressed the native Britons and wiped out almost all of the British gene pool, according to a new study. By treating Britons like slaves and imposing strict rules, the small band of Anglo-Saxons -- who had come from what is now Germany, Denmark, and the Netherlands -- quickly dominated the country, leaving a legacy of Germanic genes and the English language, both of which still dominate Britain today. The new theory helps explain historical, archaeological, and genetic evidence that until now had seemed contradictory, including...
  • On The Presence Of Non-Chinese At Anyang

    08/16/2006 9:16:37 AM PDT · by blam · 70 replies · 10,821+ views
    Sino-Platonic Papers ^ | 4-2004 | Kim Haynes
    On the Presence of Non-Chinese at Anyang by Kim Hayes It has now become clear that finds of chariot remains, metal knives and axes of northern provenance, and bronze mirrors of western provenance in the tombs of Anyang indicate that the Shang had at least indirect contact with people who were familiar with these things. Who were these people? Where did they live? When did they arrive? Following the discovery of the Tarim Mummies, we now know that the population of the earliest attested cultures of what is present-day Xinjiang were of northwestern or western derivation. According to the craniometric...
  • Roman era reveals expenses claims

    06/08/2009 6:57:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies · 451+ views
    BBC ^ | Friday, May 29, 2009 | unattributed
    Writing tablets uncovered near Hadrian's Wall detail hundreds of expenses claimed by Roman officials... Five of the translated tablets contain 111 lines detailing entertainment claims at the Roman camp of Vindolanda. The items include ears of grain, hobnails for boots, bread, cereals, hides and pigs. The wooden writing tablets - which date from the 2nd Century - were discovered at Vindolanda, the Roman encampment near Hadrian's Wall in 1973... Professor Tony Birley, who translated the tablets, said they detail hundreds of expense claims and "lavish parties" held for officers... The wooden tablets, which are held at the British Museum in...
  • Genetic Survey Reveals Hidden Celts Of England

    12/06/2001 6:35:33 AM PST · by blam · 265 replies · 14,233+ views
    The Sunday Times (UK) ^ | 12-02-2001 | John Elliott/Tom Robbins
    SUNDAY DECEMBER 02 2001 Genetic survey reveals hidden Celts of England JOHN ELLIOTT AND TOM ROBBINS THE Celts of Scotland and Wales are not as unique as some of them like to think. New research has revealed that the majority of Britons living in the south of England share the same DNA as their Celtic counterparts. The findings, based on the DNA analysis of more than 2,000 people, poses the strongest challenge yet to the conventional historical view that the ancient Britons were forced out of most of England by hordes of Anglo-Saxon invaders. It suggests that far from being ...
  • Peoples Of Britain

    08/28/2007 9:02:50 PM PDT · by blam · 25 replies · 1,513+ views
    BBC ^ | Dr Simon James
    Peoples of Britain By Dr Simon James Did the Celts exist? Simon James asks just who were the Britons - and did the Celts ever really exist? Uncover the fascinating ethnic and cultural history of the peoples of Briton, and assess the impact of the many invaders of Britain's shores. Introduction The story of early Britain has traditionally been told in terms of waves of invaders displacing or annihilating their predecessors. Archaeology suggests that this picture is fundamentally wrong. For over 10,000 years people have been moving into - and out of - Britain, sometimes in substantial numbers, yet there...
  • English tell Scots to go for independence

    11/27/2006 1:37:37 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 92 replies · 2,095+ views
    The Scotsman ^ | 11/26/06 | Brian Brady
    ALMOST two-thirds of English voters want full independence for Scotland, a dramatic new poll revealed last night. A clear majority on both sides of the Border are in favour of Scotland breaking away from the United Kingdom, according to the survey by ICM. It finds that 59% of English voters want Scotland to go it alone, while independence is backed by 52% of Scots. There is also strong support in both nations for England breaking away completely from Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland - backed by 48% in England and 45% in Scotland. Meanwhile, 68% of English voters and 58%...
  • Half a million Britons set for DNA disease quest

    08/21/2006 4:44:56 PM PDT · by Pharmboy · 11 replies · 505+ views
    Reuters via Yahoo! ^ | 8-21-06 | Ben Hirschler
    A project to collect DNA samples from half a million Britons to unpick the genetic basis of killer diseases including cancer got the go-ahead on Tuesday, marking the start of the world's biggest medical experiment. A team of international scientific and medical experts said the success of a local three-month pilot phase, involving 3,800 participants around Manchester, meant the UK Biobank project could now be rolled out nationwide from the end of 2006. Over the next four years, blood and urine samples will be collected from volunteers aged 40 to 69, to help scientists unravel the genetic foundations of common...
  • We're nearly all Celts under the skin [In Great Britain]

    09/23/2006 10:33:58 AM PDT · by Torie · 134 replies · 3,445+ views
    The Scotsman ^ | September 21, 2006 | IAN JOHNSTON
    We're nearly all Celts under the skin IAN JOHNSTON SCIENCE CORRESPONDENT A MAJOR genetic study of the population of Britain appears to have put an end to the idea of the "Celtic fringe" of Scotland, Ireland and Wales. Instead, a research team at Oxford University has found the majority of Britons are Celts descended from Spanish tribes who began arriving about 7,000 years ago. Even in England, about 64 per cent of people are descended from these Celts, outnumbering the descendants of Anglo- Saxons by about three to one. The proportion of Celts is only slightly higher in Scotland, at...
  • Origin Of The Celts - Caucasian, Not European

    08/20/2006 5:01:46 PM PDT · by blam · 41 replies · 1,818+ views
    Origin of the Celts - Caucasian, not European The Celts are Circaesir from Circaesya, who lived on the Sea of Grass in what is now west Kazakhstan until late in the second millennium B.C. They were by their own definition a linguistic group, but now they are a culture. Contrary to popular belief, they had nothing to do with European inhabitants known to archaeologists as the 'Beaker folk' and 'Battle Axe people'. The 'Urnfield people' farther east were Circaesir, and obviously related to the Celts. Their descendants integrated with Celts in central Europe. Tradition suggests that the Celts left the...
  • Redheads have more sex

    08/16/2006 4:53:42 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 141 replies · 2,866+ views
    Ananova ^ | 8-15-06 | Anon
    Blondes may have more fun but redheads have more sex, according to new research in Germany. The study by Hamburg Sex Researcher Professor Dr Werner Habermehl looked at the sex lives of hundreds of German women and compared them with their hair colour. He said: "The sex lives of women with red hair were clearly more active than those with other hair colour, with more partners and having sex more often than the average. The research shows that the fiery redhead certainly lives up to her reputation." He added that women who dyed their hair red from another colour were...
  • The Men of the North

    07/14/2006 2:26:16 AM PDT · by PghBaldy · 5 replies · 390+ views
    The Gates of Vienna ^ | July 12 | Baron Bodissey
    For the tens of thousands of years of the Würm glaciation, Paleolithic hunting tribes lived at the southern edge of the ice fields in Europe and Asia. About 10,000 years ago, as the last of the glaciers receded, some groups chose to follow the retreating ice northwards. While their cousins in the warmer regions to the south were smelting metal, these hardy tribes were knapping flint. While the southerners were inventing agriculture, slavery, and the ziggurat, the northerners were hunting large game in the chilly grasslands and forests of Central Asia and Northern Europe.
  • Galicians (Vanity)

    06/03/2006 3:55:57 PM PDT · by Ptarmigan · 11 replies · 468+ views
    In the land of Spain in the Iberian Peninsula, there are groups of people who speak a language similar to Portguese called the Galicians. Galicians live in northwestern part of Spain, known as the "land of the 1000 rivers". It is one of Spain's official language besides Spanish and are refered as Gallegos. Galcians have migrated to other parts of Spain and Latin America. Galicians have their own autonomous region in Spain, like the Basque people. Galicians originally were Celtic people who migrated from the Pyrenees Mountain. The tribe called Galleci was established in northwestern part of Spain. Then around...
  • Boadicea May Have Had Her Chips On Site Of McDonald's

    05/24/2006 8:59:01 PM PDT · by blam · 74 replies · 1,808+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 5-25-2006 | Nick Britten
    Boadicea may have had her chips on site of McDonald's By Nick Britten (Filed: 25/05/2006) Archaeologists believe they may have found the final battle site for the warrior queen Boadicea - on the site of a McDonald's restaurant. Having spent her life in fierce resistance to one empire - the Romans - her last stand is thought to have been overshadowed by another one, this time corporate. Having found ancient artefacts where new houses and flats are due to be built, experts have now asked the local authority to allow a full excavation of the area. Little is known about...
  • Italy owes wine legacy to Celts, history buffs say

    04/24/2006 8:55:46 AM PDT · by sully777 · 19 replies · 626+ views
    Reuters ^ | Fri Apr 21, 2006 9:04am ET | by Svetlana Kovalyova
    ROBBIO, Italy (Reuters) - Wine conjures up the image of cultured drinkers sipping their way delicately through a full-bodied vintage. But for two history buffs with a passion for the tipple, northern Italy has the barbarians to thank for its long wine-making tradition. Luca Sormani, from Como, and Fulvio Pescarolo, from the tiny town of Robbio near Milan, have traced the region's wine culture all the way back to its Celtic roots and have started making it according to ancient methods. Celtic tribes from farther north -- known to the Romans as "Barbari" -- conquered northern parts of Italy about...
  • Italy owes wine legacy to Celts, history buffs say

    04/22/2006 7:56:23 PM PDT · by Pharmboy · 130 replies · 1,635+ views
    Reuters via Wash. Post ^ | April 21, 2006 | Svetlana Kovalyova
    ROBBIO, Italy (Reuters) - Wine conjures up the image of cultured drinkers sipping their way delicately through a full-bodied vintage. But for two history buffs with a passion for the tipple, northern Italy has the barbarians to thank for its long wine-making tradition. Luca Sormani, from Como, and Fulvio Pescarolo, from the tiny town of Robbio near Milan, have traced the region's wine culture all the way back to its Celtic roots and have started making it according to ancient methods. Celtic tribes from farther north -- known to the Romans as "Barbari" -- conquered northern parts of Italy about...
  • Patrick: The Good, the Bad, and the Misinformed

    03/17/2006 7:29:51 AM PST · by NYer · 4 replies · 663+ views
    Catholic Exchange ^ | March 17, 2006 | Mary Biever
    Today, some would call Patrick intolerant or bigoted. He was. He would have flunked a class on How to Win Friends and Influence People. Imagine how he would have reacted to diversity training. If he were ministering today, he might refer to Christians as “the Good,” the Druid gods as “the Bad,” and those who believed in the pagan gods as “the Misinformed.” The Druids didn’t like his message. They arrested him several times, but he was always freed to preach another day. During his 30 years as a missionary to the Irish, Patrick spoke out against what he...
  • Czech Archaeologists Excavate Ancient Greek Town Flattened By Bohemian Celts

    09/24/2005 6:50:32 PM PDT · by blam · 17 replies · 804+ views
    Radio Czech ^ | 9-23-2005
    Czech archaeologists excavate Ancient Greek town flattened by Bohemian Celts [20-09-2005] By Pavla Horakova Listen 16kb/s ~ 32kb/s For twelve years, Czech archaeologists have been helping their Bulgarian colleagues in the excavations of an Ancient Greek market town in central Bulgaria. The twelve years of work has yielded valuable results, including a hoard of coins, and discovered a surprising connection between the ancient town and the Czech Lands. PistirosThe river port of Pistiros was founded in the 5th century BC by a local Thracian ruler. From the excavations we know that wine from Greece was imported to the town in...
  • Gettin’ Our Scots-Irish Up

    11/15/2004 4:21:18 PM PST · by neverdem · 66 replies · 1,672+ views
    NRO ^ | November 15, 2004 | Mackubin T. Owens
    E-mail Author Author Archive Send to a Friend <% printurl = Request.ServerVariables("URL")%> Print Version November 15, 2004, 8:24 a.m. Gettin&#8217; Our Scots-Irish UpCountry music reflects America&#8217;s spirit. I am fortunate to have been given the opportunity to review Jim Webb's magnificent new book, Born Fighting: How the Scots-Irish Shaped America, for NRODT. It is a wonderful social history of an individualistic, stubborn, rebellious people responsible for creating America's strongest cultural force. A particularly powerful component of this culture is country music. Webb calls country music "a uniquely American phenomenon," a "hypnotic and emotionally powerful musical style" that evolved from...
  • Etruscan Engineering and Agricultural Achievements: The Ancient City of Spina

    08/17/2004 9:05:30 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies · 1,553+ views
    The Mysterious Etruscans ^ | Last modified on Tue, 17-Aug-2004 15:36:27 GMT | editors
    Over the centuries the belief lingered on that here had been a great, wealthy, powerful commercial city that dominated the mouth of the Po and the shores of the Adriatic, a city of luxury and splendor, a kind of ancestor and predecessor of Venice, founded more than a thousand years later. Classical scholars also knew about Spina, for ancient literary sources indicated that there must once have existed a thriving maritime trading settlement of great economic importance, until the Celtic invasion of the Po valley destroyed it... The final key to its ultimate discovery came from aerial photography. Some...
  • Myth of the Hunter-Gatherer

    08/13/2004 12:07:48 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies · 846+ views
    Archaeology ^ | September/October 1999 Volume 52 Number 5 | Kenneth M. Ames
    On September 19, 1997, the New York Times announced the discovery of a group of earthen mounds in northeastern Louisiana. The site, known as Watson Brake, includes 11 mounds 26 feet high linked by low ridges into an oval 916 feet long. What is remarkable about this massive complex is that it was built around 3400 B.C., more than 3,000 years before the development of farming communities in eastern North America, by hunter-gatherers, at least partly mobile, who visited the site each spring and summer to fish, hunt, and collect freshwater mussels... Social complexity cannot exist unless I it...
  • Tribes Fail To Halt Study Of Ancient Skeleton (Kennewick Man)

    01/09/2003 8:58:39 PM PST · by blam · 15 replies · 536+ views
    Oregonian ^ | 1-9-2003 | Richard L. Hill
    Tribes fail to halt study of ancient skeleton 01/09/03 RICHARD L. HILL Four Northwest tribes lost another round in federal court Wednesday in their effort to halt a scientific study of the ancient skeleton called Kennewick Man.U.S. Magistrate John Jelderks in Portland rejected the tribes' request to delay the study until the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals can hear the legal dispute. In August, Jelderks ruled that eight anthropologists who sued the federal government could proceed to study the 9,300-year-old remains. The Nez Perce, Umatilla, Colville and Yakama tribes appealed his decision and later asked Jelderks to delay the...
  • Ogham alphabet

    07/27/2004 11:34:30 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies · 772+ views
    Glossemata Genealogicæ ^ | The Alphabetary Heraldic
    Ogham inscriptions : [600 bc] primitive inscriptions of the old Q-Celt (600 bc) or the newer P-Celt (400 bc) that survive in the British Isles. We have a total of approximately 375 Ogham inscriptions. Ireland has some 316 Ogham inscriptions, Wales has 40 inscriptions, and the Isle of Man has 10 inscriptions. One inscription survived at Silchester in southern England, and a few Pictish Ogham inscriptions have been found in Scotland, as far north as the Shetland Islands. Ogham script often runs upward, in a vertical manner, for it was originally written as notches on wooden staves. Oghams :...