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Keyword: chicxulub

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  • How We're Finding Asteroids Before They Find Us

    04/16/2014 3:20:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Popular Science ^ | April 11, 2014 | James Vlahos
    Chelyabinsk, a large city in western Russia, was best known for producing tractors and professional hockey players until the morning of February 15, 2013, when a 19-meter-wide meteor screamed through the sky and exploded with the force of 500 kilotons of TNT. The meteor generated a fireball many times brighter than the sun, so powerful it even caused sunburns. The shock wave blew out windows and knocked residents off of their feet, injuring more than 1,200. The object was the largest to strike Earth in more than a century... Asteroids that come within 28 million miles of our planet are...
  • Geologist Wins Top Science Award (Walter Alvarez)

    03/14/2006 5:40:39 PM PST · by blam · 23 replies · 394+ views
    All Headlines News ^ | 3-6-2006 | Yvonne Lee
    Geologist Wins Top Science Award March 6, 2006 10:00 p.m. EST Yvonne Lee - All Headline News Staff Reporter Reno, Nevada (AHN) - Geologist Walter Alvarez will receive the Desert Research Institute's silver medallion and a $20,000 prize. The Associated Press reports the University of California-Berkeley scientist came up with the theory that dinosaurs were killed off when a comet or asteroid crashed into the Earth. President of the institute Stephen G. Wells says, "Until the impact theory was finally proven, Dr. Alvarez and his colleagues were regarded as heretics by the `old guard' in the field of geology." In...
  • Yale Scientists Discover the Last Living Dinosaur

    07/16/2011 4:39:22 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 130 replies
    CTV ^ | Sat Jul. 16 2011
    A fossil discovered in Montana has given new momentum to the hypothesis that dinosaurs were thriving right up until a devastating meteor hit Earth 65 million years ago, causing their extinction. Scientists from Yale University have found what is believed to be the youngest dinosaur fossil ever found, thought to be from just before the mass extinction took place. The discovery, described in a study published in the online edition of the journal Biology Letters, contradicts the theory that the dinosaurs slowly went extinct before the cosmic impact. The fossil -- a 45-centimetre horn believed to be from a triceratops...
  • The rise and rise of the flying reptiles

    07/06/2011 12:25:59 PM PDT · by decimon · 9 replies
    University of Bristol ^ | July 6, 2011 | Unknown
    Pterosaurs, flying reptiles from the time of the dinosaurs, were not driven to extinction by the birds, but in fact they continued to diversify and innovate for millions of years afterwards.A new study by Katy Prentice, done as part of her undergraduate degree (MSci in Palaeontology and Evolution) at the University of Bristol, shows that the pterosaurs evolved in a most unusual way, becoming more and more specialised through their 160 million years on Earth. The work is published today in the Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. ‘Usually, when a new group of animals or plants evolves, they quickly try out...
  • Double meteorite strike 'caused dinosaur extinction'

    08/27/2010 12:05:19 PM PDT · by decimon · 25 replies
    BBC ^ | Howard Falcon-Lang
    The dinosaurs were wiped out 65 million years ago by at least two meteorite impacts, rather than a single strike, a new study suggests.Previously, scientists had identified a huge impact crater in the Gulf of Mexico as the event that spelled doom for the dinosaurs. Now evidence for a second impact in the Ukraine has been uncovered. This raises the possibility that the Earth may have been bombarded by a whole shower of meteorites. The new findings are published in the journal Geology by a team lead by Professor David Jolley of Aberdeen University. When first proposed in 1980, the...
  • Maine Crater Related to Dino-Killer Asteroid?

    04/05/2003 9:39:18 PM PST · by SteveH · 18 replies · 493+ views
    Discovery News ^ | April 3, 2003 | Larry O'Hanlon
    Maine Crater Related to Dino-Killer Asteroid? By Larry O'Hanlon, Discovery News April 3, 2003 — The evidence is still skimpy, but there is a chance that the dino killer asteroid was not alone when it walloped the Earth 65 million years ago. A possible second crater, at least as big or bigger than the famous Chicxulub crater off Mexico's Yucatan peninsula, may have been created by a second hit moments after Chicxulub and off the coast of Maine. "It probably is a crater, but we really don't have age data," said marine geologist Dallas Abbott Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia...
  • New blow for dinosaur-killing asteroid theory

    04/27/2009 12:33:23 PM PDT · by decimon · 56 replies · 1,595+ views
    National Science Foundation ^ | Apr. 27, 2009 | Unknown
    Impact didn't lead to mass extinction 65 million years ago, geologists findThe enduringly popular theory that the Chicxulub crater holds the clue to the demise of the dinosaurs, along with some 65 percent of all species 65 million years ago, is challenged in a paper to be published in the Journal of the Geological Society on April 27, 2009. The crater, discovered in 1978 in northern Yucutan and measuring about 180 kilometers (112 miles) in diameter, records a massive extra-terrestrial impact. When spherules from the impact were found just below the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary, it was quickly identified as the...
  • Bacteria Reveal Secret Of Adaptation At Evolution Canyon

    07/27/2008 9:06:28 PM PDT · by Soliton · 20 replies · 322+ views
    Science Daily ^ | July 27, 2008
    Bacteria living on opposite sides of a canyon have evolved to cope with different temperatures by altering the make-up of their 'skin', or cell membranes. Scientists have found that bacteria change these complex and important structures to adapt to different temperatures by looking at the appearance of the bacteria as well as their genes. The researchers hope their study, published in the August issue of Microbiology, will start a new trend in research.
  • Ancient fish provides clues for future body armor

    07/28/2008 6:34:54 AM PDT · by Soliton · 7 replies · 93+ views
    China View ^ | 7/28/2008
    A suit of armor first worn by an African fish almost 100 million years ago to withstand ancient carnivores is today providing clues to engineers designing body armor for soldiers of the future. The armor of the fish, Polypterus senegalus, is so effective because it is a composite of several materials lined up in a certain way, the engineers state in a their analysis detailed in the July 27 issue of the journal Nature Materials. "Such fundamental knowledge holds great potential for the development of improved biologically inspired structural materials," said lead MIT researcher Christine Ortiz, "for example soldier, first-responder...
  • Dinosaurs ran out of stamina in the evolutionary race

    07/23/2008 4:06:14 PM PDT · by Soliton · 16 replies · 212+ views
    The Scotsman ^ | Wednesday, 23rd July 2008
    DINOSAURS were running out of evolutionary steam during their last 50 million years on Earth, scientists have learned. The reptiles were left behind in the "Cretaceous Terrestrial Revolution", 100 million years ago, that saw the massive proliferation of vegetation and many animals. While flowering plants, lizards, snakes, birds and mammals all evolved swiftly, dinosaurs plodded behind. A short time later, they were extinct. Researchers made the discovery after using computer programs to produce a "super-tree" of dinosaur lineages. The results showed the most likely pattern of evolution for 440 of the 600 known species of dinosaur. The findings, published in...
  • Death in the deep: Volcanoes blamed for mass extinction

    07/16/2008 11:35:55 AM PDT · by decimon · 27 replies · 158+ views
    AFP ^ | Jul 16, 2008 | Unknown
    PARIS (AFP) - Ninety-three million years ago, Earth was a reshuffled jigsaw of continents, a hothouse where the average temperature was nearly twice that of today. Palm trees grew in what would be Alaska, large reptiles roamed in northern Canada and the ice-free Arctic Ocean warmed to the equivalent of a tepid swimming pool. So our planet was balmy -- but hardly a biological paradise, for it was whacked by a mass die-out. The depths of the ocean suddenly became starved of oxygen, wiping out swathes of marine life.
  • The Origin and Extinction of Species

    07/25/2008 2:26:42 PM PDT · by Soliton · 63 replies · 114+ views
    The American Chronicle ^ | July 25, 2008 | Darrell Williams
    Understanding the origin and extinction of species is of paramount importance to our own existence and survival. Unfortunately, the vast majority of humans understand neither. About 90% of humankind professes to adhere to a religious philosophy that has absolutely no interest or concern in understanding the most fundamental ecological relationships that exist in nature. Human failure to respect this relationship has resulted in human failure in our own stewardship of our own planet.
  • Dinosaur supertree unveils evolution secrets

    07/23/2008 6:52:40 AM PDT · by Soliton · 12 replies · 106+ views
    In The News ^ | 23 Jul 2008
    A dinosaur 'supertree' has been created that provides the most comprehensive picture ever produced of how dinosaurs evolved. The tree shows the most likely pattern of evolution for 440 of the 600 known species of dinosaur and allows scientists to look for unusual patterns across the whole range of dinosaurs for the first time. A study published today in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B claims the picture challenges opinions on how quickly dinosaurs expanded during the last 50 million years of their existence. It has long been debated whether dinosaurs were part of the 'terrestrial revolution' that...
  • Gas-belching volcanoes may have killed dinosaurs

    03/20/2008 1:49:58 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 68 replies · 875+ views
    Reuters on Yahoo ^ | 3/20/08 | Ben Hirschler
    LONDON (Reuters) - Gas-belching volcanoes may be to blame for a series of mass extinctions over the last 545 million years, including that of the dinosaurs, new evidence suggested on Thursday. A series of eruptions that formed the Deccan Traps in what is now India pumped huge amounts of sulfur into the atmosphere 65 million years ago, with likely devastating repercussions for the Earth's climate, scientists said. Gigantic eruptions, forming so-called "flood basalts," are one of two leading explanations for a series of mass extinctions that have killed off species periodically throughout history. The other theory involves asteroid impacts --...
  • Asteroid Breakup May Have Doomed Dinosaurs

    09/05/2007 11:55:02 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 44 replies · 1,261+ views
    It’s a disaster scenario that Hollywood has picked up on (think Deep Impact). An incoming object menaces the Earth. Scientists try to destroy it with nuclear weapons, but the horrified populace soon discovers that the blast has simply broken the object into pieces, each with the potential to wreak havoc planet-wide. Now we learn that an impact between two asteroids causing a similar crack-up may have resulted in the cataclysmic event some 65 million years ago that destroyed the dinosaurs. Researchers from Southwest Research Institute and Charles University (Prague) have been studying the asteroid (298) Baptistina, combining their observations with...
  • Report questions role of Mexico crater in mass extinction

    03/01/2004 3:54:21 PM PST · by yonif · 13 replies · 453+ views
    WQAD ^ | March 1, 2004 | AP
    Washington-AP -- New research casts doubt on the theory that a single asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs. Scientists have often pointed to a crater in Mexico as the asteroid's impact point. But Princeton University researchers say the impact that caused the crater occurred 300-thousand years before the dinosaurs were wiped out 65 (m) million years ago. A report appears in this week's online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. At least one scientist doubts the group's findings. Richard Norris of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography says the Princeton researchers were working with incorrect site data.