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Keyword: chicxulub

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  • It's Official: An Asteroid Wiped Out the Dinosaurs

    03/05/2010 5:46:05 AM PST · by jilliane · 96 replies · 1,368+ views
    Reuters ^ | 03/05/2010 | Kate Kelland
    A giant asteroid smashing into Earth is the only plausible explanation for the extinction of the dinosaurs, a global scientific team said on Thursday, hoping to settle a row that has divided experts for decades.
  • It's official: An asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs

    03/04/2010 1:37:39 PM PST · by Free ThinkerNY · 123 replies · 1,893+ views
    Reuters ^ | March 4, 2010
    LONDON (Reuters) - A giant asteroid smashing into Earth is the only plausible explanation for the extinction of the dinosaurs, a global scientific team said on Thursday, hoping to settle a row that has divided experts for decades. A panel of 41 scientists from across the world reviewed 20 years' worth of research to try to confirm the cause of the so-called Cretaceous-Tertiary (KT) extinction, which created a "hellish environment" around 65 million years ago and wiped out more than half of all species on the planet. Scientific opinion was split over whether the extinction was caused by an asteroid...
  • Expert: Volcanoes in Today's India Wiped Out Dinos

    05/07/2009 12:50:26 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 7 replies · 2,026+ views
    Volcanoes that erupted in India about 65 million years ago were instrumental in the extinction of dinosaurs, according to new research. For the last thirty years scientists have believed a giant meteorite that struck Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula was responsible for the mass extinction of dinosaurs, the Daily Telegraph reported on Wednesday. But now Gerta Keller, a geologist at Princeton University, New Jersey, says fossilised traces of plants and animals dug out of low lying hills at El Penon in northeast Mexico show this event happened 300,000 years after the dinosaurs disappeared. Keller suggests that the massive volcanic eruptions at the...
  • Bang goes that theory: Dinosaur extinction 'occurred 300,000 years AFTER asteroid impact'

    04/27/2009 4:35:51 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 16 replies · 1,024+ views
    dailymail.co.uk ^ | April 27, 2009 | Daily Mail Reporter
    The popular theory that dinosaurs were wiped out by an asteroid 65million years ago has been challenged. It was believed the Chicxulub crater in Mexico was the 'smoking gun' of the mass extinction event. Molten droplets from the ancient asteroid impact were found just below the Cretaceous-Tertiary boundary - a geological layer of sediment linked with the extinction. But soil samples from the 112-mile wide crater show the impact predates the disappearance of the dinosaurs by about 300,000 years. The latest research has been published in the Journal of the Geological Society. Study author Professor Gerta Keller from Princeton University...
  • NEW EVIDENCE THAT VOLCANOS KILLED THE DINOSAURS -

    09/15/2003 8:48:14 PM PDT · by UnklGene · 60 replies · 4,705+ views
    Red Nova ^ | September 15, 2003
    September 15, 2003 Could an enormous volcanic eruption have killed the dinosaurs? Cardiff University -- The extinction of the dinosaurs -– thought to be caused by an asteroid impact some 65 million years ago –- was more likely to have been caused by a 'mantle plume' -– a huge volcanic eruption from deep within the earth's mantle, the region between the crust and the core of the earth. This theory, already supported by a significant body of geologists and palaeontologists, is strengthened by new evidence to be presented at an international conference at Cardiff University on 11-12 September. Research by...
  • Dinosaurs' climate shifted too, reports show

    09/25/2006 4:15:43 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 28 replies · 830+ views
    Indiana University ^ | 23-Sep-2006 | David Bricker
    Caption: IU Bloomington geochemist Simon Brassell (right), Penn State sedimentologist Michael Arthur (middle), and Tohoku Univ. sedimentologist Harumasa Kano (left) inspect an ancient shale aboard the JOIDES Resolution research vessel. BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- Ancient rocks from the bottom of the Pacific Ocean suggest dramatic climate changes during the dinosaur-dominated Mesozoic Era, a time once thought to have been monotonously hot and humid. In this month's Geology, scientists from Indiana University Bloomington and the Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research present new evidence that ocean surface temperatures varied as much as 6 degrees Celsius (about 11 degrees Fahrenheit) during the...
  • Cosmic Collision May Have Created Hawaii

    02/20/2004 7:50:03 PM PST · by Mike Darancette · 32 replies · 228+ views
    SPACE.com ^ | 01 August 2001 | Michael Paine
    It's bad enough when, every few million years, an asteroid rocks our planet. It's worse if the impact triggers regional or global volcanic activity, which is not only hazardous to nearby plants and animals but can choke Earth's atmosphere with deadly gases for months or years. But there's also a possible bright side, like the birth of nice places like Hawaii. For more than three decades, scientists have explored the question of whether an asteroid impact could cause significant volcanic eruptions, hot spots that spring up out of nowhere and create new landforms or rearrange old ones. The process might...
  • Far More Than A Meteor Killed Dinos, Evidence Suggests

    10/25/2006 3:33:16 PM PDT · by blam · 95 replies · 2,818+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 10-24-2006 | GSA
    Source: Geological Society of America Date: October 24, 2006 Far More Than A Meteor Killed Dinos, Evidence Suggests There's growing evidence that the dinosaurs and most their contemporaries were not wiped out by the famed Chicxulub meteor impact, according to a paleontologist who says multiple meteor impacts, massive volcanism in India, and climate changes culminated in the end of the Cretaceous Period. Cottonmouth Creek waterfall over the event deposit with reworked Chicxulub impact spherules. The original Chicxulub ejecta layer was discovered in a yellow clay layer 45 cm below the base of the event deposit. The yellow clay represents a...
  • BIG BANG IN ANTARCTICA -- KILLER CRATER FOUND UNDER ICE

    06/01/2006 2:26:58 PM PDT · by PatrickHenry · 253 replies · 6,436+ views
    Ohio State University ^ | 01 June 2006 | Staff (press release)
    Ancient mega-catastrophe paved way for the dinosaurs, spawned Australian continent. Planetary scientists have found evidence of a meteor impact much larger and earlier than the one that killed the dinosaurs -- an impact that they believe caused the biggest mass extinction in Earth's history.The 300-mile-wide crater lies hidden more than a mile beneath the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. And the gravity measurements that reveal its existence suggest that it could date back about 250 million years -- the time of the Permian-Triassic extinction, when almost all animal life on Earth died out.Its size and location -- in the Wilkes Land...
  • The Deep Roots of Catastrophe

    03/25/2014 7:35:35 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Newswise ^ | University of Utah
    ...disaster is “not imminent,” he adds, “This is the type of mechanism that may generate massive plume eruptions, but on the timescale of 100 million to 200 million years from now. So don’t cancel your cruises.”... Hotspot plume supervolcano eruptions like those during the past 2 million years at Wyoming’s Yellowstone caldera, which covered North America with volcanic ash.Gargantuan flood basalt eruptions that created “large igneous provinces” like the Pacific Northwest’s Columbia River basalts 17 million to 15 million years ago, India’s Deccan Traps some 65 million years ago and the Pacific’s huge Ontong Java Plateau basalts, which buried an...
  • Volcano Theory of Dino Die-Off Gets New Support

    11/07/2007 4:47:01 AM PST · by Renfield · 9 replies · 456+ views
    National Geographic ^ | 11/05/07 | Richard A. Lovett
    A series of gargantuan volcanic eruptions may have ended at nearly the same time that the dinosaurs went extinct, a new study shows. The find bolsters a controversial theory that massive volcanism contributed to the global catastrophe known as the K-T extinction, which wiped out the dinosaurs and many of Earth's other organisms 65 million years ago. Gerta Keller, a Princeton University paleontologist, presented the new research last week at a meeting of the Geological Society of America in Denver, Colorado. She found that underwater portions of the ancient lava flows, known as the Deccan Traps, contained marine fossils only...
  • Volcanic Eruptions, Not Meteor, May Have Killed The Dinosaurs

    10/31/2007 3:08:40 PM PDT · by blam · 25 replies · 232+ views
    Science Daily ^ | 10-30-2007 | Geological Society of America.
    Volcanic Eruptions, Not Meteor, May Have Killed The DinosaursRajahmundry Quarry. Keller's crucial link between the eruption and the mass extinction comes in the form of microscopic marine fossils that are known to have evolved immediately after the mysterious mass extinction event. The same telltale fossilized planktonic foraminifera were found at Rajahmundry near the Bay of Bengal, about 1000 kilometers from the center of the Deccan Traps near Mumbai. (Credit: Photo courtesy Gerta Keller) ScienceDaily (Oct. 30, 2007) — A series of monumental volcanic eruptions in India may have killed the dinosaurs 65 million years ago, not a meteor impact in...
  • Chicxulub Didnt Do It All By Itself

    10/17/2014 11:40:09 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 24 replies
    Geology Times ^ | 10/10/2014 | Staff
    Geoscientists now overwhelmingly agree that a single large asteroid or comet impact, such as Chicxulub in the Yucatan peninsula of Mexico, could not have been the sole cause of the end-Cretaceous mass extinction. Instead, new research in both planetary/space science and multiple earth-science specialties reveals that concomitant volcanic activity and the associated climate and environmental changes were significant contributing factors in four of the five major mass extinctions in Earth history.
  • New, tighter timeline confirms ancient volcanism aligned with dinosaurs' extinction

    12/19/2014 11:42:56 AM PST · by Red Badger · 26 replies
    www.sciencedaily.com ^ | December 18, 2014 | Source: Princeton University
    A definitive geological timeline shows that a series of massive volcanic explosions 66 million years ago spewed enormous amounts of climate-altering gases into the atmosphere immediately before and during the extinction event that claimed Earth's non-avian dinosaurs, according to new research from Princeton University. A primeval volcanic range in western India known as the Deccan Traps, which were once three times larger than France, began its main phase of eruptions roughly 250,000 years before the Cretaceous-Paleogene, or K-Pg, extinction event, the researchers report in the journal Science. For the next 750,000 years, the volcanoes unleashed more than 1.1 million cubic...
  • Earth's Volcanism Linked To Meteorite Impacts

    12/13/2002 8:36:39 AM PST · by blam · 34 replies · 1,459+ views
    New Scientist ^ | 12-13-2002 | Kate Ravilious
    Earth's volcanism linked to meteorite impacts 14:31 13 December 02 Exclusive from New Scientist Print EditionSpace rocks are blamed for violent eruptions (Image: GETTY) Large meteorite impacts may not just throw up huge dust clouds but also punch right through the Earth's crust, triggering gigantic volcanic eruptions. The idea is controversial, but evidence is mounting that the Earth's geology has largely been driven by such events. This would also explain why our planet has so few impact crater remnants. Counting the number of asteroids we see in the sky suggests that over the past 250 million years, Earth should have...
  • Did Dinosaur-Killing Asteroid Trigger Largest Lava Flows on Earth?

    05/11/2015 1:22:51 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    Astrobiology ^ | May 1, 2015 | University of California, Berkeley
    The asteroid that slammed into the ocean off Mexico 66 million years ago and killed off the dinosaurs probably rang the Earth like a bell, triggering volcanic eruptions around the globe that may have contributed to the devastation, according to a team of University of California, Berkeley, geophysicists. Specifically, the researchers argue that the impact likely triggered most of the immense eruptions of lava in India known as the Deccan Traps, explaining the "uncomfortably close" coincidence between the Deccan Traps eruptions and the impact, which has always cast doubt on the theory that the asteroid was the sole cause of...
  • Rapid short-term cooling following the Chicxulub impact at the Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary

    05/19/2014 4:31:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    PNAS.org ^ | approved April 11, 2014 | Johan Vellekoop et al
    Here, for the first time (to our knowledge), we are able to demonstrate unambiguously that the impact at the Cretaceous–Paleogene boundary (K–Pg, ∼66 Mya) was followed by a so-called “impact winter.” This impact winter was the result of the injection of large amounts of dust and aerosols into the stratosphere and significantly reduced incoming solar radiation for decades. Therefore, this phase will have been a key contributory element in the extinctions of many biological clades, including the dinosaurs. The K–Pg boundary impact presents a unique event in Earth history because it caused global change at an unparalleled rate. This detailed...
  • How We're Finding Asteroids Before They Find Us

    04/16/2014 3:20:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Popular Science ^ | April 11, 2014 | James Vlahos
    Chelyabinsk, a large city in western Russia, was best known for producing tractors and professional hockey players until the morning of February 15, 2013, when a 19-meter-wide meteor screamed through the sky and exploded with the force of 500 kilotons of TNT. The meteor generated a fireball many times brighter than the sun, so powerful it even caused sunburns. The shock wave blew out windows and knocked residents off of their feet, injuring more than 1,200. The object was the largest to strike Earth in more than a century... Asteroids that come within 28 million miles of our planet are...
  • Geologist Wins Top Science Award (Walter Alvarez)

    03/14/2006 5:40:39 PM PST · by blam · 23 replies · 394+ views
    All Headlines News ^ | 3-6-2006 | Yvonne Lee
    Geologist Wins Top Science Award March 6, 2006 10:00 p.m. EST Yvonne Lee - All Headline News Staff Reporter Reno, Nevada (AHN) - Geologist Walter Alvarez will receive the Desert Research Institute's silver medallion and a $20,000 prize. The Associated Press reports the University of California-Berkeley scientist came up with the theory that dinosaurs were killed off when a comet or asteroid crashed into the Earth. President of the institute Stephen G. Wells says, "Until the impact theory was finally proven, Dr. Alvarez and his colleagues were regarded as heretics by the `old guard' in the field of geology." In...
  • Yale Scientists Discover the Last Living Dinosaur

    07/16/2011 4:39:22 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 130 replies
    CTV ^ | Sat Jul. 16 2011
    A fossil discovered in Montana has given new momentum to the hypothesis that dinosaurs were thriving right up until a devastating meteor hit Earth 65 million years ago, causing their extinction. Scientists from Yale University have found what is believed to be the youngest dinosaur fossil ever found, thought to be from just before the mass extinction took place. The discovery, described in a study published in the online edition of the journal Biology Letters, contradicts the theory that the dinosaurs slowly went extinct before the cosmic impact. The fossil -- a 45-centimetre horn believed to be from a triceratops...
  • The rise and rise of the flying reptiles

    07/06/2011 12:25:59 PM PDT · by decimon · 9 replies
    University of Bristol ^ | July 6, 2011 | Unknown
    Pterosaurs, flying reptiles from the time of the dinosaurs, were not driven to extinction by the birds, but in fact they continued to diversify and innovate for millions of years afterwards.A new study by Katy Prentice, done as part of her undergraduate degree (MSci in Palaeontology and Evolution) at the University of Bristol, shows that the pterosaurs evolved in a most unusual way, becoming more and more specialised through their 160 million years on Earth. The work is published today in the Journal of Systematic Palaeontology. ‘Usually, when a new group of animals or plants evolves, they quickly try out...
  • Double meteorite strike 'caused dinosaur extinction'

    08/27/2010 12:05:19 PM PDT · by decimon · 25 replies
    BBC ^ | Howard Falcon-Lang
    The dinosaurs were wiped out 65 million years ago by at least two meteorite impacts, rather than a single strike, a new study suggests.Previously, scientists had identified a huge impact crater in the Gulf of Mexico as the event that spelled doom for the dinosaurs. Now evidence for a second impact in the Ukraine has been uncovered. This raises the possibility that the Earth may have been bombarded by a whole shower of meteorites. The new findings are published in the journal Geology by a team lead by Professor David Jolley of Aberdeen University. When first proposed in 1980, the...
  • Maine Crater Related to Dino-Killer Asteroid?

    04/05/2003 9:39:18 PM PST · by SteveH · 19 replies · 493+ views
    Discovery News ^ | April 3, 2003 | Larry O'Hanlon
    Maine Crater Related to Dino-Killer Asteroid? By Larry O'Hanlon, Discovery News April 3, 2003 — The evidence is still skimpy, but there is a chance that the dino killer asteroid was not alone when it walloped the Earth 65 million years ago. A possible second crater, at least as big or bigger than the famous Chicxulub crater off Mexico's Yucatan peninsula, may have been created by a second hit moments after Chicxulub and off the coast of Maine. "It probably is a crater, but we really don't have age data," said marine geologist Dallas Abbott Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory at Columbia...
  • New blow for dinosaur-killing asteroid theory

    04/27/2009 12:33:23 PM PDT · by decimon · 56 replies · 1,595+ views
    National Science Foundation ^ | Apr. 27, 2009 | Unknown
    Impact didn't lead to mass extinction 65 million years ago, geologists findThe enduringly popular theory that the Chicxulub crater holds the clue to the demise of the dinosaurs, along with some 65 percent of all species 65 million years ago, is challenged in a paper to be published in the Journal of the Geological Society on April 27, 2009. The crater, discovered in 1978 in northern Yucutan and measuring about 180 kilometers (112 miles) in diameter, records a massive extra-terrestrial impact. When spherules from the impact were found just below the Cretaceous-Tertiary (K-T) boundary, it was quickly identified as the...
  • Bacteria Reveal Secret Of Adaptation At Evolution Canyon

    07/27/2008 9:06:28 PM PDT · by Soliton · 20 replies · 322+ views
    Science Daily ^ | July 27, 2008
    Bacteria living on opposite sides of a canyon have evolved to cope with different temperatures by altering the make-up of their 'skin', or cell membranes. Scientists have found that bacteria change these complex and important structures to adapt to different temperatures by looking at the appearance of the bacteria as well as their genes. The researchers hope their study, published in the August issue of Microbiology, will start a new trend in research.
  • Ancient fish provides clues for future body armor

    07/28/2008 6:34:54 AM PDT · by Soliton · 7 replies · 93+ views
    China View ^ | 7/28/2008
    A suit of armor first worn by an African fish almost 100 million years ago to withstand ancient carnivores is today providing clues to engineers designing body armor for soldiers of the future. The armor of the fish, Polypterus senegalus, is so effective because it is a composite of several materials lined up in a certain way, the engineers state in a their analysis detailed in the July 27 issue of the journal Nature Materials. "Such fundamental knowledge holds great potential for the development of improved biologically inspired structural materials," said lead MIT researcher Christine Ortiz, "for example soldier, first-responder...
  • Dinosaurs ran out of stamina in the evolutionary race

    07/23/2008 4:06:14 PM PDT · by Soliton · 16 replies · 212+ views
    The Scotsman ^ | Wednesday, 23rd July 2008
    DINOSAURS were running out of evolutionary steam during their last 50 million years on Earth, scientists have learned. The reptiles were left behind in the "Cretaceous Terrestrial Revolution", 100 million years ago, that saw the massive proliferation of vegetation and many animals. While flowering plants, lizards, snakes, birds and mammals all evolved swiftly, dinosaurs plodded behind. A short time later, they were extinct. Researchers made the discovery after using computer programs to produce a "super-tree" of dinosaur lineages. The results showed the most likely pattern of evolution for 440 of the 600 known species of dinosaur. The findings, published in...
  • Death in the deep: Volcanoes blamed for mass extinction

    07/16/2008 11:35:55 AM PDT · by decimon · 27 replies · 158+ views
    AFP ^ | Jul 16, 2008 | Unknown
    PARIS (AFP) - Ninety-three million years ago, Earth was a reshuffled jigsaw of continents, a hothouse where the average temperature was nearly twice that of today. Palm trees grew in what would be Alaska, large reptiles roamed in northern Canada and the ice-free Arctic Ocean warmed to the equivalent of a tepid swimming pool. So our planet was balmy -- but hardly a biological paradise, for it was whacked by a mass die-out. The depths of the ocean suddenly became starved of oxygen, wiping out swathes of marine life.
  • The Origin and Extinction of Species

    07/25/2008 2:26:42 PM PDT · by Soliton · 63 replies · 114+ views
    The American Chronicle ^ | July 25, 2008 | Darrell Williams
    Understanding the origin and extinction of species is of paramount importance to our own existence and survival. Unfortunately, the vast majority of humans understand neither. About 90% of humankind professes to adhere to a religious philosophy that has absolutely no interest or concern in understanding the most fundamental ecological relationships that exist in nature. Human failure to respect this relationship has resulted in human failure in our own stewardship of our own planet.
  • Dinosaur supertree unveils evolution secrets

    07/23/2008 6:52:40 AM PDT · by Soliton · 12 replies · 106+ views
    In The News ^ | 23 Jul 2008
    A dinosaur 'supertree' has been created that provides the most comprehensive picture ever produced of how dinosaurs evolved. The tree shows the most likely pattern of evolution for 440 of the 600 known species of dinosaur and allows scientists to look for unusual patterns across the whole range of dinosaurs for the first time. A study published today in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B claims the picture challenges opinions on how quickly dinosaurs expanded during the last 50 million years of their existence. It has long been debated whether dinosaurs were part of the 'terrestrial revolution' that...
  • Gas-belching volcanoes may have killed dinosaurs

    03/20/2008 1:49:58 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 68 replies · 875+ views
    Reuters on Yahoo ^ | 3/20/08 | Ben Hirschler
    LONDON (Reuters) - Gas-belching volcanoes may be to blame for a series of mass extinctions over the last 545 million years, including that of the dinosaurs, new evidence suggested on Thursday. A series of eruptions that formed the Deccan Traps in what is now India pumped huge amounts of sulfur into the atmosphere 65 million years ago, with likely devastating repercussions for the Earth's climate, scientists said. Gigantic eruptions, forming so-called "flood basalts," are one of two leading explanations for a series of mass extinctions that have killed off species periodically throughout history. The other theory involves asteroid impacts --...
  • Asteroid Breakup May Have Doomed Dinosaurs

    09/05/2007 11:55:02 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 46 replies · 1,261+ views
    It’s a disaster scenario that Hollywood has picked up on (think Deep Impact). An incoming object menaces the Earth. Scientists try to destroy it with nuclear weapons, but the horrified populace soon discovers that the blast has simply broken the object into pieces, each with the potential to wreak havoc planet-wide. Now we learn that an impact between two asteroids causing a similar crack-up may have resulted in the cataclysmic event some 65 million years ago that destroyed the dinosaurs. Researchers from Southwest Research Institute and Charles University (Prague) have been studying the asteroid (298) Baptistina, combining their observations with...
  • Asteroid Theory of Dinosaur Extinction Questioned

    03/01/2004 8:54:16 PM PST · by anymouse · 7 replies · 807+ views
    Reuters ^ | Mon Mar 1, 2004 | Maggie Fox
    Scientists probing a vast crater off Mexico's Yucatan peninsula questioned a popular theory about dinosaurs on Monday, saying the collision that formed the crater happened too far back in time to have caused their extinction by itself. Much evidence points to the idea that an asteroid or comet gouged the Earth around 65 million years ago, triggering volcanic and climate changes that eventually wiped out the dinosaurs. When the huge, mostly underwater crater was found off Yucatan, it seemed the perfect candidate. "Since the early 1990s the Chicxulub crater on Yucatan, Mexico, has been hailed as the smoking gun that...
  • Dinosaur impact theory challenged

    03/01/2004 7:13:19 PM PST · by Indy Pendance · 26 replies · 761+ views
    BBC ^ | 3-1-04 | Paul Rincon
    Scientists may have destroyed the well-established theory that a single, massive asteroid strike killed off the dinosaurs 65 million years ago. New data suggests the Chicxulub crater in Mexico, supposedly created by the collision, predates the extinction of the dinosaurs by about 300,000 years. The controversy over what killed the dinosaurs may run and run The authors say this impact did not wipe out the creatures, rather two or more collisions could have been responsible. The report is published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. An international group of scientists led by Professor Gerta Keller, of Princeton University,...
  • Report questions role of Mexico crater in mass extinction

    03/01/2004 3:54:21 PM PST · by yonif · 14 replies · 453+ views
    WQAD ^ | March 1, 2004 | AP
    Washington-AP -- New research casts doubt on the theory that a single asteroid wiped out the dinosaurs. Scientists have often pointed to a crater in Mexico as the asteroid's impact point. But Princeton University researchers say the impact that caused the crater occurred 300-thousand years before the dinosaurs were wiped out 65 (m) million years ago. A report appears in this week's online edition of Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. At least one scientist doubts the group's findings. Richard Norris of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography says the Princeton researchers were working with incorrect site data.
  • Study: Dinosaurs Died Within Hours After Asteroid Hit

    07/08/2004 12:29:19 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 210 replies · 7,213+ views
    According to new research led by a University of Colorado at Boulder geophysicist, a giant asteroid that hit the coast of Mexico 65 million years ago probably incinerated all the large dinosaurs that were alive at the time in only a few hours, and only those organisms already sheltered in burrows or in water were left alive. The six-mile-in-diameter asteroid is thought to have hit Chicxulub in the Yucatan, striking with the energy of 100 million megatons of TNT, said chief author and Researcher Doug Robertson of the department of geological sciences and the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental...
  • Giant Crater Found [in Antarctica]: Tied to Worst Mass Extinction Ever [Permo-Triassic]

    06/02/2006 11:44:43 AM PDT · by cogitator · 127 replies · 3,229+ views
    SPACE.com ^ | June 2, 2006 | Robert Roy Britt
    An apparent crater as big as Ohio has been found in Antarctica. Scientists think it was carved by a space rock that caused the greatest mass extinction on Earth, 250 million years ago. The crater, buried beneath a half-mile of ice and discovered by some serious airborne and satellite sleuthing, is more than twice as big as the one involved in the demise of the dinosaurs. The crater's location, in the Wilkes Land region of East Antarctica, south of Australia, suggests it might have instigated the breakup of the so-called Gondwana supercontinent, which pushed Australia northward, the researchers said. "This...