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Keyword: civilwar

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  • Need Good History of Reconstruction (Vanity)

    05/11/2012 10:02:22 AM PDT · by Trailerpark Badass · 8 replies
    5/11/12 | Trailerpark Badass
    Looking for a good, balanced (read "not leftist") survey of the period, both political/legislative & social/cultural developments.Don't need anything with an agenda on either side.
  • President in petticoats (Jefferson Davis)

    05/09/2012 6:14:45 AM PDT · by C19fan · 17 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | May 8, 2012 | Jennifer Madison
    He led the Confederacy during its charge for succession. But after its inglorious surrender in the American Civil War, President of the Confederate States, Jefferson Davis, was very much caught with his skirt up, according to these propaganda photographs. The statesman, who became a political fugitive after the South fell, is said to have fled in such haste he grabbed his wife's overcoat rather than his own - a story re-imagined by northern artists depicting reports of his capture in a woman's petticoat.
  • Civil War shipwreck creates hurdle for government's $653M plan

    05/05/2012 6:24:33 PM PDT · by JerseyanExile · 19 replies
    Fox News ^ | May 5, 2012 | AP
    Before government engineers can deepen one of the nation's busiest seaports to accommodate future trade, they first need to remove a $14 million obstacle from the past -- a Confederate warship rotting on the Savannah River bottom for nearly 150 years. Confederate troops scuttled the ironclad CSS Georgia to prevent its capture by Gen. William T. Sherman when his Union troops took Savannah in December 1864. It's been on the river bottom ever since. Now, the Civil War shipwreck sits in the way of a government agency's $653 million plan to deepen the waterway that links the nation's fourth-busiest container...
  • 1st Brigade Band tunes up for new generation

    05/03/2012 6:23:52 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 16 replies
    JS Online ^ | 5-2-12 | Meg Jones
    Watertown - Back when "The Star Spangled Banner" was simply a patriotic song, when community bands marched off to war together and drummer boys died on battlefields still clutching their drumsticks, a group of young men from a small Wisconsin town played the soundtrack of the Civil War. They left behind no recordings. But their music can still be heard. Through the efforts of another hearty band, the tradition of young musicians whose patriotic fervor spurred them to join the Union Army and leave behind their families continues in Wisconsin. The 1st Brigade Band is a group of around 100...
  • Grierson's Raid

    Starting from La Grange, Tennessee, Grierson’s aim was to reach the Southern Railroad of Mississippi, and destroy as much of it as possible. From there he could either return to La Grange, or head south to the Union position at Baton Rouge, Louisiana. He started with three regiments, some 1,700 men. One of the reasons for his success was that he was willing to split this force. He began on 20 April, sending 175 men (what he called the “least effective portion of the command”) back to La Grange, with orders to make it look at if the entire expedition...
  • Hillsdale Constitution 101 Week 9: "The Progressive Rejection of the Founding”

    04/16/2012 8:02:17 AM PDT · by iowamark · 16 replies
    Hillsdale College ^ | 04/16/2012 | Ronald J. Pestritto
    Progressivism is the belief that America needs to move or “progress” beyond the principles of the American Founding. Organized politically more than a hundred years ago, Progressivism insists upon flexibility in political forms unbound by fixed and universal principles. Progressives hold that human nature is malleable and that society is perfectible. Affirming the inexorable, positive march of history, Progressives see the need for unelected experts who would supervise a vast administration of government. Progressivism is rooted in the philosophy of European thinkers, most notably the German philosopher G.W.F. Hegel. Progressivism takes its name from a faith in “historical progress.” According...
  • Civil War Navy Conference (4 videos)

    04/13/2012 4:29:44 AM PDT · by iowamark · 5 replies
    C-SPAN, Mariners' Museum ^ | March 9 2012 | C-SPAN
    The Civil War along the Atlantic Coast This week on The Civil War, American History TV visits the Mariners' Museum in Newport News, Virginia. The museum hosted a Civil War Navy Conference in early March to mark the 150th anniversary of the Battle of Hampton Roads, when for the first time, ironclads battled during the Civil War. First, author and Naval Academy history professor Craig Symonds talks about the War along the Atlantic Coast. Then, David Alberg of the Monitor National Marine Sanctuary talks about the recovery and identification of human remains from the USS Monitor, the Union ship that...
  • Civil War vet to be laid to rest -- 88 years after death

    04/12/2012 5:33:09 AM PDT · by smokingfrog · 15 replies
    koinlocal6.com ^ | 11 April 2012 | Kohr Harlan
    PORTLAND, Ore. -- A Civil War veteran who died years ago will finally be laid to rest this Friday in Portland. He was the youngest of 13 children, and the last one to die. And so, after he passed away, his remains laid unclaimed for 88 years. Alice Knapp's curiosity about her own family tree led her to Peter Knapp's remains. She still remembers taking possession of the box Peter's remains are in. "It was a gold box -- both he and his wife were placed in this gold box," Alice Knapp said. "It had a ribbon around it and...
  • Md. Civil War museum gives severed arm a good look

    04/12/2012 3:37:34 AM PDT · by smokingfrog · 16 replies
    google-hosted AP story ^ | 11 April 2012 | DAVID DISHNEAU
    Long after the guns fell silent at Antietam, the earth yielded up gruesome reminders of the bloodiest day of the American Civil War: bodies, bones, buttons and entire severed limbs — one of which is now the focus of intense study at the National Museum of Civil War Medicine. A Sharpsburg-area farmer is said to have found the human forearm while plowing a field two weeks after the 1862 battle. Officials at the museum in Frederick, Md., are trying to learn more about the limb in hopes of verifying that it's a relic of the Battle of Antietam and exhibiting...
  • Hillsdale Constitution 101 Week 8: “Abraham Lincoln and the Constitution”

    04/09/2012 7:38:08 AM PDT · by iowamark · 16 replies
    Hillsdale College ^ | April 9 2012 | Kevin Portteus
    Abraham Lincoln’s fidelity to the Declaration of Independence is equally a fidelity to the Constitution. The Constitution takes its moral life from the principles of liberty and equality, and was created to serve those principles. We are divided as a nation today, as in Lincoln’s time, because we have severed the connection between these two documents. Lincoln’s “Fragment on the Constitution and the Union” contains the central theme of Lincoln’s life and work. Drawing upon biblical language, Lincoln describes the Declaration of Independence as an “apple of gold,” and the Constitution as the “frame of silver” around it. We cannot...
  • Buell and Grant Surprise the Rebels at Shiloh

    04/07/2012 6:16:18 PM PDT · by Upstate NY Guy · 139 replies
    Civil War Daily Gazette ^ | April 7, 2012 | Eric
    April 7, 1862 (Monday) Pittsburg Landing, Tennessee General Grant tried to sleep, first under a tree near his men and then in a cabin that he found already occupied with the wounded. Through the night, Union transports and reinforcements arrived at Pittsburg Landing, bringing 25,000 much-needed men. Grant was certain that his line could withstand a Confederate attack. In fact, he was so certain, that he wanted to go on the offensive. Meanwhile, General Beauregard, now the sole commander of the Confederate Army of Mississippi, slept in General Sherman’s tent, the former owner vacating it as the Rebels attacked the...
  • My God! We Are Attacked! Disorganized Surprise at Shiloh Church

    04/06/2012 4:35:17 AM PDT · by Upstate NY Guy · 21 replies
    Civil War Daily Gazette ^ | April 6, 2012 | Eric
    April 6, 1862 (Sunday) Pittsburg Landing, Tennessee. The Confederate Army of Mississippi was exhausted. After three treacherous days of marching through cold mud and rain, all 40,000 of them lay quiet, flat against the soaked ground waiting for dawn and the call to attack. As the dawn cast its first light slivers across the eastern horizon, Generals Albert Sidney Johnston and P.G.T. Beauregard, first and second in command of the army, listened to the incipient tenors of battle developing cautiously in their front. Johnston sent word for a general advance and rode to lead his men. Beauregard remained to organize...
  • General McClellan and the Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day

    04/05/2012 5:10:55 PM PDT · by Upstate NY Guy · 32 replies
    Civil War Daily Gazette ^ | April 5, 2012 | Eric
    April 5, 1862 (Saturday) Yorktown, VA The previous day had been a good one for George Briton McClellan, commander of the Union Army of the Potomac. The Rebels to his front gave up ground quickly as he advanced two columns up the Virginia Peninsula. Though a division had been withheld from him a few days ago, he quickly recovered, taking less than two days to get his entire army of 66,700 on the road. As the dawn drove out the night, he must have felt a renewed optimism. He was certain that Confederate commander General John Magruder had left his...
  • U.S. Civil War Took Bigger Toll Than Previously Estimated

    04/03/2012 11:07:36 PM PDT · by U-238 · 125 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 11/21/2012 | Science Daily
    The Civil War -- already considered the deadliest conflict in American history -- in fact took a toll far more severe than previously estimated. That's what a new analysis of census data by Binghamton University historian J. David Hacker reveals. Hacker says the war's dead numbered about 750,000, an estimate that's 20 percent higher than the commonly cited figure of 620,000. His findings will be published in December in the journal Civil War History. "The traditional estimate has become iconic," Hacker says. "It's been quoted for the last hundred years or more. If you go with that total for a...
  • Hillsdale Constitution 101 Week 7: “Crisis of Constitutional Government”

    04/03/2012 5:18:40 AM PDT · by iowamark · 3 replies
    Hillsdale College ^ | April 2 2012 | Will Morrisey
    Welcome to Week 7 “Crisis of Constitutional Government” At the heart of the American constitutional crisis of the mid-nineteenth century stood the moral, social, and political evil of slavery. At stake in this crisis was the future of republican self-government.Abraham Lincoln saw the dilemma facing the nation as the “crisis of a house divided.” While the American Founders worked to put slavery, as Lincoln said, “on the course of ultimate extinction,” the institution had instead flourished in the first half of the nineteenth century. By the 1850s, efforts to expand slavery threatened to tear the nation apart.Illinois Senator Stephen Douglas...
  • Before well-known Battle of Glorieta Pass, Texans captured Santa Fe

    03/10/2012 10:46:03 PM PST · by Kartographer · 24 replies
    Santa Fe New Mexican ^ | 3/10/12 | Tom Sharpe
    The Confederates who briefly occupied Santa Fe 150 years ago this month found it an inhospitable city with Jewish merchants who refused their money, terrified nuns and a Hispanic majority neutral in the fight between Anglos. Much has been written about the Battle of Glorieta Pass, known as the Gettysburg of the West, which took place from March 26 to 28, 1862. But less is known about Santa Fe's few weeks as a Confederate territory. That is partly because just about anyone who openly sided with the Union had left Santa Fe -- heading either to Fort Craig, south of...
  • The Battle of Hampton Roads: The Monitor Meets The Merrimack (CSS Virginia)

    03/09/2012 8:36:56 AM PST · by Upstate NY Guy · 40 replies
    Civil War Daily Gazette ^ | March 9, 2012 | Eric
    Washington was replete with panic as word of the previous day’s destruction reached its doorstep. The ravaging and ruin wrought by the ironclad CSS Virginia (once the USS Merrimack) at Hampton Roads was utterly astonishing. After nightfall, as the USS Congress smoldered, fixing its thick black smoke to the Hampton Roads horizon, and as several other ships were run aground, General Wool at Fortress Monroe reported the travesty to Secretary of War Edwin Stanton. The note had to first travel to Baltimore before being telegraphed to Washington, leaving the citizens the entire night to be peacefully passed. But at 9:30am,...
  • Libertarianism and the Civil War

    03/06/2012 8:27:38 AM PST · by donmeaker · 105 replies · 1+ views
    Volokh Conspiracy ^ | 6 March 2012 | Ilya Somin
    There are, generally speaking, three types of libertarian perspectives on the Civil War. Many libertarians actually support the war, some condemn it without defending the Confederacy, and some are actually pro-Confederate.
  • Faces of Civil War sailors from sunken USS Monitor reconstructed in hopes of identifying them

    03/04/2012 3:58:49 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 29 replies
    AP ^ | Saturday Mar 3, 2012 | Steve Szkotak
    Faces of Civil War sailors from sunken USS Monitor reconstructed in hopes of identifying them Faces of 2 USS Monitor crewmembers reconstructed Recovery: The turret of the Civil War ironclad USS Monitor is lifted out of the ocean off the coast of Hatteras, N.C. on August 5, 2002 RICHMOND, Va. — When the turret of the Civil War ironclad Monitor was raised from the ocean bottom, two skeletons and the tattered remnants of their uniforms were discovered in the rusted hulk of the Union Civil War ironclad, mute and nameless witnesses to the cost of war. A rubber comb was...
  • The Original Secessionists

    02/18/2012 11:09:23 AM PST · by HMS Surprise · 302 replies · 1+ views
    the tea party tribune ^ | 2/18/12 | jim funkhouser
    There is nothing more irritating to a warrior-poet than an unwillingness to debate. If speech is troubling, or blatantly false, or amateurish, then it will fall of its own weight. I don’t need, and I suspect a majority of truthseekers don’t want, an administrator hovering above the public forum deciding which issues are too controversial for polite company. The Civil War has become untouchable, unless you agree with the standard arguments. 1. Lincoln was a god among men. 2. The South was evil. 3. Union is the ultimate goal of the American experiment. 4. The Federal government’s design trumps the...