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Keyword: computing

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  • Toshiba issues big recall for laptop batteries over fire fears

    02/11/2016 7:28:06 PM PST · by Utilizer · 13 replies
    iTnews-aus ^ | Feb 12 2016 9:35AM (AUS) | By Staff Writer
    54 models affected. Toshiba has issued a recall for Li-Ion battery packs sold with certain models of its laptops and notebooks due a risk of the device catching fire. The hardware company yesterday advised customers to immediately turn off their PC and remove their battery to check whether their device was affected. The vendor is offering free replacement battery packs for customers with affected units. Around 54 different PC models are affected, sold nationally from retail stores like Harvey Norman and JB Hi-Fi from June 2011 to September 2015. A full list can be found here. "There is a risk...
  • How bad decisions and poor IT killed Target Canada

    02/11/2016 10:41:34 AM PST · by Swordmaker · 17 replies
    ZDNet ^ | February 11, 2016 | David Gewirtz
    Unmanageable deadlines and disastrous IT wrecked this top US retailer's attempt at international expansion. The moral of the story: IT drives the enterprise. Business school case studies tend to fall into two categories: epic wins and oh-my-gosh-how-could-they-possibly-have-been-so-stupid epic failures. This article discusses a real-world billion dollar story that falls into the second category. As epic failures go, this one is worthy of the history books. . . EVERYTHING WENT TERRIBLY, TERRIBLY WRONG . . .
  • DLL Hijacking Issue Plagues Products like Firefox, Chrome, iTunes, OpenOffice

    02/08/2016 6:41:43 PM PST · by Utilizer · 25 replies
    SOFTPEDIA ^ | Feb 8, 2016 12:00 GMT | Catalin Cimpanu
    Oracle has released new Java installers to fix a well-known security issue (CVE-2016-0603) that also affects a plethora of other applications, from Web browsers to antivirus products, and from file compressors to home cinema software. The problem is called DLL hijacking (or DLL side-loading) and refers to the fact that malware authors can place DLLs of the same name in specific locations on the target's filesystem and have it inadvertently load the malicious DLL instead of the safe one. DLL hijacking is a very well-known issue This type of attack is very old and has been known to many software...
  • SF Startup Creates $15 64-Bit Computer

    01/31/2016 8:13:16 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 39 replies
    NBC Bay Area ^ | Jan 29, 2016 | Tamara Palmer
    A San Francisco startup has created a $15 computer. Pine 64 is now taking pre-orders for its Quad core 64-Bit expandable single board supercomputer, which will ship in May. The product can be combined with a keyboard and mouse to function as a full Android 5.1 computer. The company recently raised $1,731,465 on a Kickstarter campaign that had a goal of $31,416.
  • Any Linux Gurus On FR?

    01/24/2016 4:32:58 PM PST · by Washi · 32 replies
    http://freerepublic.com ^ | 1/24/2016 | Self
    Are there any Linux gurus here? I've looked around online and asked some questions in various forums, but I'm not getting anywhere. I've found explanations of how to set it up, but no examples. I have yet to get it working. I am trying to configure an environment with several Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.1 virtual machines. All of these machines need to be NTP clients of my NTP server. The NTP server uses MD5 authentication, and I need to have the Linux clients authenticate the NTP traffic. Can someone please post a working "ntp.conf" and "keys" file so that...
  • Building your own CNC router/milling machine

    01/20/2016 8:18:38 PM PST · by Utilizer · 26 replies
    Instructables ^ | 2015? | Trochilidesign
    Already at the age of 12 I was dreaming of making a machine which could make things! A machine which would give me the opportunity to create products for in and around the house. Two years later I stumbled ont the words 'Computer Numerical Control' or more specifically the CNC milling machine. After I found out people were able to build one themselves in their own shed, I knew it! I had to build one, I yearned to have it!! For three months I tried to find the proper parts (A dremeltool, drawer slides, pieces of wood, etc.), but I...
  • Intel warns of major flaw in driver update software

    01/20/2016 7:33:51 PM PST · by Utilizer · 12 replies
    iTnews ^ | Jan 21 2016 9:00AM (AUS) | Allie Coyne
    Intel has patched a major flaw in its driver utility tool that could allow attackers to install malware on victim PCs remotely. The chipmaker has issued a patch advisory for its Driver Update Utility, urging customers to download the new version of the software. The tool analyses system drivers on a user's computer and reports on and downloads any new drivers that are available. The flaw - which exists because the software requests new drivers from Intel servers over an unencrypted connection - allows attackers to instigate man-in-the-middle attacks and cause the download of malicious files and software on victim...
  • Electronics That Last: How I Built an Heirloom Laptop

    01/18/2016 6:30:20 PM PST · by Utilizer · 22 replies
    Makezine ^ | January 15, 2016, 5:30 am PST | Kurt Mottweiler
    The Novena Heirloom is a limited edition custom enclosure system I built for use with the open-source Novena computer designed by Bunnie Huang and Sean Cross. It was crowd funded in cooperation with Portland, Oregon-based Crowd Supply. Several prototype concepts were developed for the campaign. After consulting with Huang, we decided to forgo an easel design in favor of a more traditional clam shell laptop. The requirement for user access to the internal components argued for a removable keypad and drove the final result. The thrust of the design concept is informed by, and hopefully serves as homage to, the...
  • OpenSSH fixes client crypto key leak

    01/14/2016 7:03:07 PM PST · by Utilizer · 2 replies
    iTnews ^ | Jan 15 2016 6:39AM (AUS) | Juha Saarinen
    OpenSSH developers have patched a serious flaw in the popular open source remote access protocol that could compromise encryption keys, with users urged to upgrade their OpenSSH installations straight away. According to the advisory, the vulnerability has been blamed on an experimental roaming feature, aimed at resuming SSH connections, in OpenSSH versions 5.4 to 7.1. Attackers who control servers could use the vulnerability to discover a client's private encryption keys, the OpenSSH developers said. "The matching server code has never been shipped, but the client code was enabled by default and could be tricked by a malicious server into leaking...
  • Linksys to Provide DD-WRT Support for All Current WRT Routers

    01/07/2016 12:29:24 PM PST · by ShadowAce · 17 replies
    Softpedia ^ | 7 January 2016 | Silviu Stahie
    Linksys has just revealed at CES 2016 that all the WRT routers now have DD-WRT support, making this the first company of its type to fully embrace an open source solution.Linksys is one of the most important companies that builds networking hardware, and it's known for its quality hardware. In this case we're talking about routers in the WRT series, which are already very good. The company decided to partner up with DD-WRT in order to provide better support for their products.Many Linksys users were already installing DD-WRT and other similar products on their routers, so the company figured out...
  • Raspberry Pi: computing for pocket change -- $5 computer unleashes a storm of creative computing

    01/04/2016 12:36:43 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 44 replies
    CBC News ^ | 01/04/2016 | By Greg Rasmussen, CBC News
    The era of the $5 computer has arrived.The latest version of the Raspberry Pi is even being given away free with a magazine. Not a subscription. Just buy the single issue of Magpi and you get a free computer.The devices have hobbyists and entrepreneurs excited about the possibilities of Pi. Raspberry Pi Zero $5 computer unveiledThe Next Thing unveils $9 computer, CHIP Ben Z. Cooper is using one as the brains behind a spectacular light show at Vancouver's VanDusen Gardens."You wave your hand in the air and control a whole grove of maple trees lighting up," Cooper told CBC News...
  • Washington State AG sues major tech support provider alleging deceptive scam

    12/24/2015 1:05:18 PM PST · by KeyLargo · 20 replies
    KOMO News ^ | December 16th 2015 | Connie Thompson
    State AG sues major tech support provider alleging deceptive scam By Connie Thompson Wednesday, December 16th 2015 State investigators just sued one of the rising stars in the tech-support industry claiming part of the operation is based on a scam. The company, called iYogi, is accused of tricking people into paying for tech support services they don't need. According to investigators iYogi engaged in a different twist on the notorious tech support scams where someone call you claiming your computer has problems. What's significant in this case is workers don't call you, you call them. And iYogi is one of...
  • Competition is Shifting to the High End

    12/18/2015 11:46:36 PM PST · by Swordmaker · 7 replies
    TechPinions ^ | December 17th, 2015 | by Jan Dawson
    The consumer electronics industry has always fascinated me. I spent my first ten years as an analyst covering the telecom industry, which historically has had very good margins. But, when I started covering the consumer electronics industry, I was struck by the fact the vast majority of players in that market make razor-thin margins, if they’re profitable at all. Even more striking is Apple, which might be described accurately, if incompletely, as a player in the consumer electronics market, makes telecom-like margins while competing with those barely profitable vendors. And just as interesting is the fact that, as players that...
  • The Official Fallout 4 Thread

    11/28/2015 7:53:03 PM PST · by Lazamataz · 661 replies
    11/28./2015 | By Laz A. Mataz
    Had to do it. Had to create the thread. The game is too damned good. This thread is reserved for hardcore gamers who play Fallout 4. Norm, KC, TADSLOS and I have hijacked so many threads discussing this game, I felt we needed our own thread.Fallout 4 is amazing. The content is excessively large. There is so much to explore, you could replay this game 10 times and not find every mission or quest. The characters are so much better fleshed out than any other game I have played. Even the radio announcer of Diamond City Radio will have you...
  • Computer question: Green screen

    11/08/2015 10:20:41 PM PST · by An American in Turkiye · 22 replies
    Self | An American In Turkiye
    So I have been having some issues with video playback on my laptop. It doesn't happen often, but every once in awhile, I'll try to play a YouTube video or Windows Media Player vid, and the video is green. Audio still plays, but the screen is green. In some cases, WMV's are just a black screen, with audio playing. Any help/suggestions are appreciated. Running Windows 8, BTW. I have 10 downloaded, just haven't upgraded yet
  • Surface Book vs. MacBook Pro: It isn't twice as fast. It's three times as fast (Ruh-roh!)

    10/22/2015 9:53:06 AM PDT · by dayglored · 123 replies
    PC World ^ | Oct 22, 2015 | Gordon Mah Ung
    Of course we had to pit the Surface Book vs. the MacBook Pro. It’s like Ford vs. Chevy, or Coke vs. Pepsi. Each side has its diehard fans, plus others who just want to know which is better. Microsoft claims its new Surface Book is “twice” as fast as its equivalent MacBook Pro. Well, we ran some benchmarks, and hate to say it, but Microsoft lied. The Surface Book isn’t twice as fast. It’s three times as fast. Read on for the details. What Microsoft meant First, let’s clarify what Microsoft meant when it said the Surface Book would smoke...
  • Prime Diffie-Hellman Weakness May Be Key to Breaking Crypto

    10/18/2015 12:19:56 PM PDT · by Mycroft Holmes · 20 replies
    ThreadPost ^ | October 16, 2015 | Michael Mimoso
    The great mystery since the NSA and other intelligence agencies’ cyber-spying capabilities became watercooler fodder has not been the why of their actions, but the how? For example, how are they breaking crypto to decode secure Internet communication? A team of cryptographers and computer scientists from a handful of academic powerhouses is pretty confident they have the answer after having pieced together a number of clues from the Snowden documents that have been published so far, and giving the math around the Diffie-Hellman protocol a hard look. The answer is an implementation weakness in Diffie-Hellman key exchanges, specifically in the...
  • NEW Adobe Flash Zero-day Vulnerability / Exploit - Uninstall Flash Today From All Computers

    10/15/2015 11:34:56 AM PDT · by dayglored · 63 replies
    (vanity, multiple sources) ^ | Oct 15, 2015 | (vanity, multiple sources)
    Yet another bad new Zero-Day (already exploited) Adobe Flash vulnerability. Time to uninstall Flash from all your computers and keep it off for good! To remove Flash from Windows: Close your browser In Control Panel -> Programs and Features, remove/uninstall all Adobe Flash or Shockwave items. Restart your browser Go to Add-ons/Plugins and confirm there are no Shockwave or Flash plugins. To remove Flash from OS X (10.6 and later): Download and run this Flash uninstaller: http://fpdownload.macromedia.com/get/flashplayer/current/support/uninstall_flash_player_osx.dmg To remove Flash from Linux: Close your browser Use "apt-get remove", "yum erase", or find the flashplayer .so (e.g. in /usr/lib[64]/mozilla/plugins or ~/.mozilla/plugins)...
  • Apple, Intel and IBM get on GloFlo's SOI bandwagon

    10/08/2015 10:03:29 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 3 replies
    fudzilla ^ | 08 October 2015 | Nick Farrell
    FinFETs and SOI working in different environmentsSoitec's CEO and board chairman has raised an eyebrow or two when he said that the iPhone 6s has multiple RF chips built on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates and that Intel and IBM are using the tech for their silicon photonics push.According to EETimes  Paul Boudre, who claimed that SOI is already being used by Apple and Intel even though neither company is broadcasting it. SOI appears to be on track to major market penetration even while the rest of the industry is talking FinFETs.
  • Crucial hurdle overcome in quantum computing

    10/05/2015 1:38:55 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 22 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | Oct 5, 2015
    The significant advance, by a team at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Sydney appears today in the international journal Nature. "What we have is a game changer," said team leader Andrew Dzurak, Scientia Professor and Director of the Australian National Fabrication Facility at UNSW. "We've demonstrated a two-qubit logic gate - the central building block of a quantum computer - and, significantly, done it in silicon. Because we use essentially the same device technology as existing computer chips, we believe it will be much easier to manufacture a full-scale processor chip than for any of the leading...
  • IBM engineers carbon nanotube transistors to replace silicon in computing

    10/02/2015 10:07:16 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 23 replies
    venturebeat.com ^ | October 1, 2015 11:00 AM | Dean Takahashi
    Above: IBM's carbon nanotubes have tiny circuits that are fractions of a meter apart.Image Credit: IBM Carbon nanotubes are the leading candidate to replace silicon in semiconductor chips after the decades-long run of silicon electronics runs out. And IBM is hoping to usher along that transition with a new breakthrough being announced today.In the October 2 issue of the journal Science, IBM researchers say they have overcome one of the most daunting challenges around carbon nanotube transistors, which are the building blocks of electronic circuits with dimensions that are measured in billionths of a meter. Carbon nanotubes may be...
  • Clumps of gold nanoparticles can evolve to carry out computing

    09/22/2015 2:10:36 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 9 replies
    Move over, microchip. A random assembly of gold nanoparticles can perform calculations normally reserved for neatly arranged patterns of silicon. Traditional computers rely on ordered circuits that follow preprogrammed rules, but this strategy limits how efficient they can be. “The best microprocessors you can buy in a store now can do 1011 operations per second and use a few hundred watts,” says Wilfred van der Wiel of the University of Twente in the Netherlands. “The human brain can do orders of magnitude more and uses only 10 to 20 watts. That’s a huge gap.” To close that gap, researchers have...
  • What you should not expect when switching to Linux

    09/17/2015 6:48:25 AM PDT · by ShadowAce · 82 replies
    DarkDuck ^ | 17 September 2015 | Dmitry (Darkduck)
    Linux is a great operating system. Nobody in the Linux camp will argue about that. There are many articles on the Internet convincing you to try and to switch to Linux. There are also many articles that attempt to show you why you should not switch. Let's look at this question from a slightly different viewpoint today. Say, you are now convinced that you want to switch to Linux. What you should NOT expect from this switch? 1. Linux works much faster than Windows This isn't too far from the truth. Generally speaking, Linux OS is less resource-hungry than Windows....
  • Quantum computer that 'computes without running' sets efficiency record

    09/01/2015 10:33:43 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 29 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 8/31/15 | Lisa Zyga
    (Phys.org)—Due to quantum effects, it's possible to build a quantum computer that computes without running—or as the scientists explain, "the result of a computation may be learned without actually running the computer." So far, however, the efficiency of this process, which is called counterfactual computation (CFC), has had an upper limit of 50%, limiting its practical applications. Now in a new paper, scientists have experimentally demonstrated a slightly different version called a "generalized CFC" that has an efficiency of 85% with the potential to reach 100%. This improvement opens the doors to realizing a much greater variety of applications, such...
  • The Raspberry Pi is succeeding in ways its makers almost imagined

    08/27/2015 6:49:38 PM PDT · by markomalley · 41 replies
    The Register ^ | 8/27/15 | Mark Pesce
    “Grandpa is getting pretty old. Out there all alone on that farm, he has no one to look in on him, just to see if he’s ok. He’ll use the landline, but he’s beyond of the range of mobile, and he’s never been really great with computers. No Skype or emails. Grandpa does have internet. So I built this for him.”The girl points down to a small box with a few wires coming out. “I can bring up a web browser, and take photos inside grandpa’s house. Has he moved his coffee cup today? Is the telly on? At least...
  • Backdoors Won't Solve Comey's Going Dark Problem

    08/16/2015 11:10:27 AM PDT · by zeugma · 13 replies
    Crypto-gram ^ | 8/15/2015 | Bruce Schneier
    At the Aspen Security Forum two weeks ago, James Comey (and others) explicitly talked about the "going dark" problem, describing the specific scenario they are concerned about. Maybe others have heard the scenario before, but it was a first for me. It centers around ISIL operatives abroad and ISIL-inspired terrorists here in the US. The FBI knows who the Americans are, can get a court order to carry out surveillance on their communications, but cannot eavesdrop on the conversations, because they are encrypted. They can get the metadata, so they know who is talking to who, but they can't find...
  • Spyware, Key Logger: Exoprience, Expertise Requested

    07/31/2015 8:02:12 PM PDT · by Hostage · 32 replies
    Self ^ | July 31, 2015 | Histage
    A neighbor's estranged Ex has possibly installed spyware and a key logger onto a new notebook given as a 'gift' to both neighbor and teenage daughter. The neighbor is the custodial parent of the one teenage daughter who recently received the new 'spy loaded' notebook computer from her estranged parent. The notebook runs Win 8.1 and is to be eventually upgraded to Windows 10. The teenager was told directly by the estranged parent that everything the custodial parent does could be seen and recorded and then messaged out clandestinely. The neighbor would like to know the following: 1. How to...
  • Researcher says can hack GM's OnStar app, open vehicle, start engine

    07/30/2015 1:55:36 PM PDT · by Zakeet · 11 replies
    Reuters ^ | July 30, 2015 | Jim Finkle and Bernie Woodall
    A researcher is advising drivers to halt the use of a mobile app for General Motors Co's (GM.N) OnStar vehicle communications system, saying hackers can exploit a security flaw in the product to remotely unlock cars and start engines. "White-hat" hacker Samy Kamkar posted a video on Thursday saying he had figured out a way to "locate, unlock and remote-start" vehicles by intercepting communications between the OnStar RemoteLink mobile app and the OnStar service. Kamkar said he plans to provide technical details on the hack next week in Las Vegas at the Def Con conference, where tens of thousands of...
  • Ransomeware attack, need advice

    07/19/2015 6:34:05 AM PDT · by fwdude · 84 replies
    self | 07/16/15 | fwdude
    I have recently had the unpleasant experience of having one of the new variants of the cryptolocker malware infect our computer servers at work. In case someone doesn't know, its a computer worm that encrypts all the standard-format files on a system so that the use can't open the file without a "key," supplied by the hacker for a ransom. My question, which I have researched extensively over over the internet, is whether it is advisable consider paying the ransom, if there is enough "honor among thieves" to trust that the files will be unlock if I pay, and if...
  • Adobe Flash, the much-loathed, bug-plagued relic of a browser plugin..[tr]

    07/14/2015 11:51:13 AM PDT · by don-o · 75 replies
    CNN Money ^ | July 14, 2015
    Mozilla blocked Flash by default in its Firefox browser late Monday night, a day after Facebook's (FB, Tech30) security chief called for Adobe to kill Flash once and for all. The Flash-bashing picked up last week after revelations that the spyware giant known as the Hacking Team had been using Flash to remotely take over people's computers and infect them with malware. (That discovery took place after the Hacking Team was itself hacked. Documents revealed in the breach showed that the Hacking Team exploited two critical vulnerabilities in Flash's code.) "It is time for Adobe to announce the end-of-life date...
  • Security Experts Oppose Government Access to Encrypted Communication (excerpt)

    07/08/2015 8:57:30 AM PDT · by Eric Pode of Croydon · 5 replies
    NY Times ^ | 7 July 2015 | Nicole Perlroth
    SAN FRANCISCO — An elite group of security technologists has concluded that the American and British governments cannot demand special access to encrypted communications without putting the world’s most confidential data and critical infrastructure in danger. A new paper from the group, made up of 14 of the world’s pre-eminent cryptographers and computer scientists, is a formidable salvo in a skirmish between intelligence and law enforcement leaders, and technologists and privacy advocates. After Edward J. Snowden’s revelations — with security breaches and awareness of nation-state surveillance at a record high and data moving online at breakneck speeds — encryption has...
  • Deprecating Secure Sockets Layer Version 3.0 (RFC 7568)

    06/30/2015 8:21:27 PM PDT · by zeugma · 32 replies
    Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) ^ | 06/2015 | R. Barnes et.al.
    A post for the computer techies on the site Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF) R. Barnes Request for Comments: 7568 M. Thomson Updates: 5246 Mozilla Category: Standards Track A. Pironti ISSN: 2070-1721 INRIA A. Langley Google June 2015 Deprecating Secure Sockets Layer Version 3.0 Abstract The Secure Sockets Layer version 3.0 (SSLv3), as specified in RFC 6101, is not sufficiently secure. This document requires that SSLv3 not be used. The replacement versions, in particular, Transport Layer Security (TLS) 1.2 (RFC 5246), are considerably more secure and capable protocols. This document updates the backward compatibility section of RFC 5246 and its...
  • POPULAR SECURITY SOFTWARE CAME UNDER RELENTLESS NSA AND GCHQ ATTACKS

    06/22/2015 7:33:22 AM PDT · by rickyrikardo · 100 replies
    GLENN GREENWALD's (Snowden's pal) Firstlook.org The Intercept ^ | June 22 ,2015 | ANDREW FISHMAN AND MORGAN MARQUIS-BOIRE
    The National Security Agency and its British counterpart, Government Communications Headquarters, have worked to subvert anti-virus and other security software in order to track users and infiltrate networks, according to documents from NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden. The spy agencies have reverse engineered software products, sometimes under questionable legal authority, and monitored web and email traffic in order to discreetly thwart anti-virus software and obtain intelligence from companies about security software and users of such software. One security software maker repeatedly singled out in the documents is Moscow-based Kaspersky Lab, which has a holding registered in the U.K., claims more than...
  • Plugging a 1986 Mac Plus into the modern Web

    06/20/2015 11:12:19 AM PDT · by Swordmaker · 35 replies
    Kernel Mag — The Early Internet ^ | March 22nd, 2015 | By Jeff Keacher
    Reviving an old computer is like restoring a classic car: There’s a thrill from bringing the ancient into the modern world. So it was with my first “real” computer, my Mac Plus, when I decided to bring it forward three decades and introduce it to the modern Web. It’s a lowly machine, my Mac. The specs pale in comparison to even my Kindle: 8 MHz CPU, 4 MB RAM, 50 MB hard drive, and 512 x 384 pixel black-and-white screen. My current desktop PC is on the order of 200,000 times faster—not even including the GPU. Still, that Mac Plus...
  • Encryption “would not have helped” at OPM, says DHS official (Outsourced to China)

    06/17/2015 4:37:13 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 17 replies
    Ars Technica | June 16, 2015 | Sean Gallagher
    Link only due to copyright issues: http://arstechnica.com/security/2015/06/encryption-would-not-have-helped-at-opm-says-dhs-official/
  • Is the FOSS Infrastructure Crumbling?

    06/17/2015 8:36:35 AM PDT · by ShadowAce · 14 replies
    FOSSForce ^ | 17 June 2015 | Christine Hall
    It appears as if much of the open source infrastructure we depend on is suffering from neglect. That’s the message brought to the SouthEast LinuxFest (SELF) by David Nally. Listening to his talk, “The Tragedy of Open Source,” it was hard not to think that some of our infrastructure projects are beginning to resemble some disintegrating municipal water and sewer systems, or maybe compare his examples with our crumbling roads and bridges. Nally is a South Carolina based “recovering sysadmin” who now wears many hats at Apache as well as being an employee at Citrix.The neglect he mentions has caused...
  • Duqu 2.0 malware buried into Windows PCs using stolen Foxconn certs (Signed by Chinese factory)

    06/15/2015 8:24:50 PM PDT · by dayglored · 38 replies
    The Register ^ | June 15, 2015 | John Leyden
    The super-sophisticated malware that infiltrated Kaspersky Labs is more crafty than first imagined. We're told that the Duqu 2.0 software nasty was signed using legit digital certificates issued to Foxconn – a world-leading Chinese electronics manufacturer, whose customers include Microsoft, Dell, Google, BlackBerry, Amazon, Apple, and Sony. The code-signing was uncovered by researchers at Kaspersky Lab, who are studying their Duqu 2.0 infection. Windows trusts Foxconn-signed code because the Chinese goliath's certificate was issued by VeriSign, which is a trusted certificate root. Thus, the operating system will happily load and run the Foxconn-signed Duqu 2.0's 64-bit kernel-level driver without setting...
  • Malware is not only about viruses – companies preinstall it all the time

    05/27/2015 4:52:27 PM PDT · by sopwith · 66 replies
    the guardian ^ | ‘Amazon’s Kindle shackles the user against sharing or even freely giving away or lending the book, | Richard Stallman
    In 1983, when I started the free software movement, malware was so rare that each case was shocking and scandalous. Now it’s normal. To be sure, I am not talking about viruses. Malware is the name for a program designed to mistreat its users. Viruses typically are malicious, but software products and software preinstalled in products can also be malicious – and often are, when not free/libre. In 1983, the software field had become dominated by proprietary (ie nonfree) programs, and users were forbidden to change or redistribute them. I developed the GNU operating system, which is often called Linux,...
  • New maze-like beamsplitter is world's smallest

    05/25/2015 4:57:28 PM PDT · by aimhigh · 50 replies
    Physics World ^ | 05/25/2015 | Ker Than
    An ultracompact beamsplitter – the smallest one in the world – has been designed and fabricated by researchers in the US. Using a newly developed algorithm, the team built the smallest integrated polarization beamsplitter to date, which could allow computers and mobile devices of the future to function millions of times faster than current machines.
  • Google Tone Shares Links To Computers Within Earshot Using Beeps And Boops

    05/23/2015 9:46:54 AM PDT · by Enlightened1 · 21 replies
    Popular Science ^ | 05/22/15 | Jason Cipriani
    A new Chrome extension, called Google Tone, released this week makes it possible to share a URL with another computer in the room using a series of beeps and boops. The concept is dead simple yet instantly instills a sense of disbelief. A computer making seemingly random sounds can transmit the URL for the tab I have open in Chrome across the room? Get out. Full of skepticism, I decided to put it to the test. I installed the Chrome extension on a MacBook Air and a HP laptop running Windows 10. And you know what? It works! Click on...
  • Critical vulnerability in NetUSB driver exposes millions of routers to hacking

    05/20/2015 9:48:26 PM PDT · by Utilizer · 13 replies
    ITworld.com ^ | May 19, 2015 | Lucian Constantin
    Millions of routers and other embedded devices are affected by a serious vulnerability that could allow hackers to compromise them. The vulnerability is located in a service called NetUSB, which lets devices connected over USB to a computer be shared with other machines on a local network or the Internet via IP (Internet Protocol). The shared devices can be printers, webcams, thumb drives, external hard disks and more. NetUSB is implemented in Linux-based embedded systems, such as routers, as a kernel driver. The driver is developed by Taiwan-based KCodes Technology. Once enabled, it opens a server that listens on TCP...
  • CHIP, a $9 computer with WiFi, Bluetooth, 1GHz CPU, 512MB RAM and 4GB storage

    05/10/2015 3:56:53 PM PDT · by ShadowAce · 59 replies
    The Next Digit ^ | 10 May 2015 | Suzanne Jean
    With the sizes slimming down, it is certainly not a huge surprise that we have a Chip sized computer amidst us. What is really astonishing is the fact that this chip sized computer costs only $9 and can do literally everything for you. The Chip as it has been named runs on Linux and includes Wi-Fi and Bluetooth as well.In fact, CHIP from Next Thing Co. also offers a VGA or an HDMI post for monitors, adding immense versatility to it. To be true, this is certainly one invention that all of us might just have been looking forward to.CHIP has...
  • Solid-state drives lose data if left without power for just a few days

    05/10/2015 1:06:11 PM PDT · by Utilizer · 49 replies
    ZDNet ^ | May 9, 2015 | Zack Whittaker
    Storage. It's not a sexy topic. But everyone uses it in some way or another. You have iPhones, you have computers. Everyone knows how important a person's data is. But it doesn't just "disappear." Or does it? New research suggests that newer solid-state hard drives, which are faster and offer better performance, are vulnerable to an inherent flaw -- they lose data when they're left dormant in storage for periods of time where the temperature isn't properly regulated. The worrying factor is that the period of time can be weeks, months, but even in some circumstances -- just a few...
  • Taking on the Smart Criminals

    05/07/2015 11:29:45 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 1 replies
    Financial Times ^ | Emma Jacobs
    In the mid-1990s, Marc Goodman, then an investigator in the Los Angeles Police Department, tried to convince his boss of the need for a computer crime unit. The reaction? Utter bafflement. “This captain said to me, ‘Computer crime, what is that? Like if you take the monitor and hit somebody in the head and kill them?’” It is a telling anecdote. While law enforcement agencies have become in­creasingly sophisticated technologically, criminals have the edge, according to Mr Goodman. That was something he observed when investigating drugs and vice in LA. “In those days the only people that had pagers in...
  • Big adobe Illustrator Issues

    04/29/2015 11:50:22 AM PDT · by MeshugeMikey · 26 replies
    MeshugeMikey ^ | April 29, 2015 | MeshugeMikey
    When I do a normal launch of adobe illustrator It freezes. when I do the optional launch....I get no toolbar etc etc. Im stumped and haven't been able to get anywhere on the adobe forums help! Thank you
  • "Fed Up" Colorado Man, 38, Busted For Killing His Computer In Cold Blood

    04/21/2015 3:34:59 PM PDT · by MeshugeMikey · 110 replies
    The Smoking Gun ^ | APRIL 21, 2015 | No Attribution
    A Colorado man who has been “fighting with his computer for the last several months” unloaded a volley of shots into his Dell tormentor, resulting in the death of the computer and his arrest for discharging a firearm, cops report. When asked about the shooting, Hinch told TSG, “I just had it,” adding that he tired of the balky computer’s “blue screen of death.” Hinch said that he whacked the computer with a 9mm Hi-Point pistol recently purchased from a Craigslist seller. The gun was seized by police, who left the computer behind. The late Dell XPS 410 model, seen...
  • Adobe Patches Flash Flaw Targeted by Exploit in the Wild

    04/14/2015 8:34:23 PM PDT · by Swordmaker · 45 replies
    Intego.com ^ | April 14th, 2015 | by Derek Erwin
    Adobe Systems has released a patch for 22 vulnerabilities in Flash Player, one of which is reportedly under attack by an exploit that exists in the wild. The most critical vulnerability, CVE-2015-3043, could lead to code execution. Adobe's Flash Player security updates are available for Macintosh, Windows and Linux."Adobe is aware of a report that an exploit for CVE-2015-3043 exists in the wild, and recommends users update their product installations," said Adobe. If you reached this page because you're unsure if a popup alert from Adobe is real, take a look at our helpful guide for best practices how to safely install and...
  • Kaspersky releases tools to decrypt files encrypted with CoinVault Ransomware

    04/14/2015 6:46:32 PM PDT · by Utilizer · 20 replies
    TechWorm ^ | on April 14, 2015 | Abhishek Kumar Jha
    Software security group Kaspesky labs in collaboration with the Dutch police has released a tool which helps to decrypt files locked by Ransomware. Kaspersky Labs has released a decryption tool for files encrypted with CoinVault ransomware. The tool was developed by the Kaspersky lab after the The National High Tech Crime Unit (NHTCU) of the Dutch police handed over the information obtained from a database of CoinVault command-and-control server containing the decryption keys.
  • How to: How much RAM do you really need?

    04/11/2015 11:25:09 AM PDT · by Utilizer · 126 replies
    PC Authority ^ | Friday 21 March 2014 | Darien Graham-Smith
    Typically, today’s budget PCs come with 4GB of RAM. A mid-range configuration may offer double that, and high-end gaming systems and workstations go as high as 16GB or more. There’s no doubt which way the wind’s blowing, either: Windows 8 supports up to 128GB of physical memory (assuming you’re running the 64-bit edition), while Windows 8 Pro can go up to 512GB. Does anyone really need this much RAM? Memory isn’t as expensive as it used to be, but there’s obviously no point paying for gigabytes of RAM from which you’ll receive no material gain. Does more equal faster? Many...
  • Mono 4 Released, First Version To Adopt Microsoft Code (Windows .NET for Linux)

    04/05/2015 8:26:58 AM PDT · by dayglored · 8 replies
    Slashdot ^ | April 5, 2015 | jones_supa
    Version 4.0.0 of Mono, the FOSS implementation of the .NET Framework, has been released. This is the first release of Mono that replaces various components of Mono with code that was released by Microsoft under the MIT license. Microsoft itself is working towards .NET Core: a redistributable and re-imagined version of .NET, which has two code drops: CoreFX and CoreCLR. Mono at this point continues to provide an API that tracks the .NET desktop/server version. This means that most of the Mono code that has been integrated from Microsoft comes from the ReferenceSource code drop. ...