Keyword: computing

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  • Microsoft wants to turn quantum computing research into real products

    11/22/2016 4:21:17 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 11 replies
    Digital Trends ^ | 11/21/16 | Mark Coppock
    Many companies and researchers are investigating quantum computing as one of the next major steps in the evolution of computers. The “spooky” effects of quantum physics, it is hoped, will enable the creation of computers that operate on certain tasks at unprecedented levels of performance. Microsoft is one of those companies, and it has been looking at quantum computing for some time now. Today, however, the company is taking the next step of actively investing in the creation of a real, scaleable quantum computer that can be used to tackle real-world problems, as the company outlines on the official Microsoft...
  • USB Kill: The $55 Gadget That Will Fry Most Devices (Video of killer in operation)

    10/10/2016 11:56:27 PM PDT · by Swordmaker · 28 replies
    The Mac Observer ^ | October 10, 2016 | By Bryan Chaffin
    There’s a device out there called USB Kill 2.0 (or USB Killer and other variants) that can fry an electronic device with a USB port. While it looks like an every day USB flash drive, rather than memory, these devices have capacitors that can store up juice being transmitted over the USB bus and then discharge at once. The result is a high-voltage attack on your PC, Mac, smartphone, or other device that can fry the electronics.YouTuber EverythingApplePro posted a demonstration video with one of these devices where he fried a PC and tried to fry an iPhone 7 Plus...
  • Need Help With RealPlayer

    10/03/2016 11:32:56 AM PDT · by txnativegop · 34 replies
    3 Oct 16 | txnativegop
    I need help with RealPlayer. I have the last free version that was made available. RealPlayer apparently tries to connect to the Internet whenever the program is opened. This is, I think, causing it to crash whenever I play videos. I was without internet access for a week and the program never stopped working once.
  • A Commodore 64 has helped run an auto shop for 25 years

    10/01/2016 11:04:05 AM PDT · by Ciaphas Cain · 72 replies
    Geek.com ^ | September 26, 20-6 | Lee Matthews
    Apple’s Phil Schiller thinks it’s sad that people use 5-year-old computers. Well, Phil, there’s an auto repair shop in Poland that’s going to send you spiraling into a long depression.Why? Because one of the computers they’re using on a day-to-day basis is a Commodore 64, and I don’t mean one of the slick nostalgic remakes. I’m talking about a classically beautiful beige C64 and its whirring, clunking 5.25″ floppy disk drive.It’s been there for more than 25 years. See, not everyone finds the idea of using an old computer sad. Some, like the mechanics at this shop in Gdansk, treat...
  • AMD, Infineon Look Poised For VR/AR Boost

    09/01/2016 9:40:31 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 6 replies
    seekingalpha.com ^ | Sep. 1 2016 | Larry Ramer Larry Ramer
    *********************clip The tremendous success of Pokemon Go, which is based on augmented reality, shows that the augmented reality/virtual reality era has arrived and is poised to be huge. With research firm Gartner predicting that 1.4 million virtual reality headsets will be shipped this year and 6.3 million will be shipped next year, investors should look to benefit from this trend. In 2020, 45.6 million augmented reality devices will be sold, another research firm IDC predicted.********************************************CLIP*********************************
  • Old computer stuff

    08/17/2016 10:29:43 AM PDT · by zeugma · 179 replies
    None | 8/17/2016 | Self
    I was poking around some old data today from some old backups, and I ran across something the old time computer folks will recognize and thought I'd share. Many, many moons ago, before the internet was much more than a few government systems set up to 'talk' to each other, we still had PCs and stuff, believe it or not. Granted, compared to the system you can buy for a few hundred dollars today from just about anywhere on the internet, they weren't much, but they were what we had. There were also things called "magazines" printed on thinly sliced...
  • 'Thousands' of products vulnerable to code hooking abuse

    07/19/2016 5:53:01 PM PDT · by Utilizer · 3 replies
    iTnews (AUS) ^ | Jul 20 2016 6:29AM (AUS) | Juha Saarinen
    Bad implementation of the low-level code hooking technique by Microsoft and third-party security vendors has left millions of users open to attacks that bypass mitigation measures - some for up to a decade, researchers have found. Hooking is used by different kinds of software to monitor as well as to intercept and change the behaviour of operating system functions, and if needed, to inject code. Security software uses code hooking extensively to check for malicious activity on systems. EnSilo researchers Tomer Bitton and Udi Yavo said they looked at the hooking engines and injection techniques used by more than 15...
  • COURT: US GOVERNMENT CAN'T MAKE MICROSOFT REVEAL CLOUD DATA

    07/14/2016 1:41:33 PM PDT · by Swordmaker · 7 replies
    Associated Press ^ | July 14, 2016 | BY LARRY NEUMEISTER
    NEW YORK (AP) -- A federal appeals court delivered a victory to U.S. companies housing customer data overseas, ruling Thursday that prosecutors cannot force Microsoft to reveal content from a customer's email account stored in Ireland. The 2nd U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals in Manhattan overturned a lower court order finding the company in civil contempt for not handing over the data. Microsoft offers storage through its "public cloud," which places data from over 1 billion customers and over 20 million businesses on servers in over 40 countries, the court noted.
  • Symantec scrambles to patch severe holes in 26 products

    07/06/2016 10:19:36 PM PDT · by Utilizer · 27 replies
    iTnews (AUS) ^ | Jun 29 2016 12:09PM | Juha Saarinen
    Symantec enterprise and Norton security product users are being urged to patch their applications immediately after multiple dangerous vulnerabilities were discovered. The security firm has advised that 17 enterprise security products and nine Norton consumer offerings are affected. Google Project Zero researcher Tavis Ormandy discovered the flaws. The most serious is that the products unpack compressed executables in the operating system kernel to analyse them for malicious code. He said this dangerous practice means the vulnerability can be exploited by simply sending a link or an email - users don't need to do anything to activate an attack.
  • New (Windows) ransomware strain coded entirely in Javascript

    06/20/2016 7:31:04 PM PDT · by Swordmaker · 46 replies
    BBC ^ | June 20, 2016
    The script is disguised as a document Security researchers have discovered a new strain of ransomware coded entirely in Javascript, which could increase its chances of being activated. Unlike executable program files, Javascript documents do not always trigger a security warning on Windows or require administrator access to run. Named RAA, the malware is disguised as a document and starts encrypting files immediately when opened. One security expert said the approach was likely to fool many victims. "It's an interesting approach to ransomware," said Ken Munro of security company Pen Test Partners. "Using Javascript as an attachment to an email...
  • Kill Flash now. Or patch these 36 vulnerabilities. Your choice

    06/18/2016 10:08:56 AM PDT · by Utilizer · 26 replies
    The Register ^ | 16 Jun 2016 at 18:50 | Shaun Nichols
    Adobe has released an update for Flash that addresses three dozen CVE-listed vulnerabilities. The update includes a fix for the CVE-2016-4171 remote code execution vulnerability that is right now being exploited in the wild to install malware on victims' computers. Adobe is recommending that users running Flash for Windows, macOS, Linux, and ChromeOS update the plugin as quickly as possible, giving the update the "Priority 1" ranking, a designation reserved for flaws that are, according to Adobe, "being targeted, or which have a higher risk of being targeted." Adobe credited security researchers at Cisco Talos, Google Project Zero, FireEye, Microsoft...
  • Intel x86s hide another CPU that can take over your machine (you can't audit it)

    06/15/2016 7:43:51 PM PDT · by Utilizer · 44 replies
    Zicos ^ | Wednesday June 15, 2016. 02:48 PM | from BoingBoing
    The Intel Management Engine (ME) is a subsystem composed of a special 32-bit ARC microprocessor that's physically located inside the chipset. It is an extra general purpose computer running a firmware blob that is sold as a management system for big enterprise deployments. When you purchase your system with a mainboard and Intel x86 CPU, you are also buying this hardware add-on: an extra computer that controls the main CPU. This extra computer runs completely out-of-band with the main x86 CPU meaning that it can function totally independently even when your main CPU is in a low power state like...
  • Schrödinger's cat lives and dies in two boxes at once

    05/27/2016 11:17:02 AM PDT · by C19fan · 39 replies
    Physics World ^ | May 27, 2016 | Staff
    Schrödinger's cat now has a second box to play in, thanks to an international team of physicists that has created a two-mode "Schrödinger's cat state" for the first time. The experiment brings together two purely quantum properties, in that the "cat" (i.e. the photons) is simultaneously "alive and dead" (in a superposition of states) while also in two locations at once (the two boxes are entangled with one another).
  • IRRITATING SNAPFISH POPUP

    05/25/2016 9:20:32 AM PDT · by knarf · 19 replies
    self ^ | May 25, 2016 | knarf
    About six months ago I downloaded SNAPFISH thinking it was something I wantedI soon learned it was not and went into my programs, uninstalled and everything was OK until todayI am getting a constant annoying popup saying, "We are unable to authenticate your acct." etc I've been everywhere I know and can't find this annoyance to remove ithelpW7 w/chrome
  • Chaps make working 6502 CPU by hand. Because why not? (With discretes on a 12"x15" PCB)

    05/18/2016 10:21:45 AM PDT · by dayglored · 55 replies
    The Register ^ | May 18, 2016 | Richard Chirgwin
    The 6502 CPU is a fondly-remembered CPU* for good reason: along with chips from Motorola, Intel and Zilog, it helped create the personal computer business in the 1980s. However, this project is affection on a grand scale: some US enthusiasts are creating a transistor-for-transistor replica of the chip's design using discrete components. It's a good thing we're in the era of surface mount components, because even with small components the 3,218 transistors, 1,019 resistors and various other bits of the MOnSter 6502 need a four-layer PCB measuring 12” x 15” with components mounted on both sides. Because a big, slow,...
  • Most ACCURATE CDR/DVD burner

    04/22/2016 4:04:41 PM PDT · by newfreep · 49 replies
    SELF
    I'm seeking an external (USB) CDR/DVD burner that is HIGHLY accurate. Any recommendations is most welcomed and appreciated.
  • Intel Corp. (INTC) To Cut 12,000 Jobs Globally, Or 11% Of Its Workforce As PC Sales Plummet

    04/20/2016 1:20:58 PM PDT · by Lorianne · 5 replies
    International Business Times ^ | 19 April 2016 | Angelo Young
    Intel Corp. said Tuesday it will cut about 11 percent of its global workforce, or up to 12,000 positions, as the world’s largest chipmaker grapples with plunging global sales of desktop computers. The aggressive cost-cutting campaign will include the loss of executive staffers at the Santa Clara, California, company and will be completed by the middle of next year, the company said in a regulatory filing. The company also said it will book a one-time charge of $1.2 billion in the second quarter. The planned job losses come as Intel shifts its focus toward mobile applications, data centers and connectivity...
  • Linux is so grown up, it's ready for marriage with containers

    04/07/2016 10:46:02 AM PDT · by ShadowAce · 13 replies
    The Register ^ | 07 April 2016 | Liam Proven
    Linux is all grown up. It has nothing left to prove. There's never been a year of the Linux desktop and there probably never will be, but it runs on the majority of the world's servers. It never took over the desktop, it did an end-run around it: there are more Linux-based client devices accessing those servers than there are Windows boxes.Linux Foundation boss Jim Zemlin puts it this way: "It's in literally billions of devices. Linux is the native development platform for every SOC. Freescale, Qualcomm, Intel, MIPS: Linux is the immediate choice. It's the de facto platform. It's...
  • Apple At 40: 12 Products That Changed Computing Forever (Slide Show)

    04/03/2016 12:43:54 PM PDT · by Swordmaker · 33 replies
    Information Week ^ | April 3, 2016 | by Curtis Franklin Jr.
    Apple reached its 40th anniversary this month, no mean feat in a tech industry littered with the names of long-gone giants. Here's a look at the 12 products that defined the company, and changed what we know as computing in the process.
  • Heat doesn't kill hard drives. Here's what does (humidity)

    03/08/2016 8:34:18 AM PST · by dennisw · 54 replies
    zdnet.com ^ | March 8, 2016 | By Robin Harris for Storage Bits
    Heat doesn't kill hard drives. Here's what does"Free-cooled" datacenters use ambient outside air instead of air conditioning. That lets us see how environment affects system components. Biggest surprise: temperature is not the disk drive killing monster we thought. Here's what is. At last months Usenix FAST 16 conference, in the Best Paper award winner Environmental Conditions and Disk Reliability in Free-cooled Datacenters, researchers Ioannis Manousakis and Thu D. Nguyen, of Rutgers, Sriram Sankar of GoDaddy, and Gregg McKnight and Ricardo Bianchini of Microsoft, studied how the higher and more variable temperatures and humidity of free-cooling affect hardware components. They reached...
  • Dual Bootin' Linux Windows 10

    02/29/2016 3:05:35 PM PST · by Bob434 · 69 replies
    Me | Feb | Me
    Ok good linuxian folks, Here's what I'd like to do IF possible- Dual boot windows 10 and linux mint cinnamon BUT have windows 10 run again in linux under a virtual machine (yes I know it sounds redundant, but i have a reason for this setup if possible) I'm not sure if I coudl install windows 10 twice on one machine or not, but let's for now just assume i could- (windows 10 is 'free' and you can download the iso for it and use it without activating it legally- the iso is direct from MS- and while I don't...
  • DVD DRM Circumvention Firm Shuts Down Surrounded by Mystery

    02/25/2016 10:21:16 PM PST · by Utilizer · 10 replies
    SOFTPEDIA ^ | Feb 25, 2016 18:37 GMT | Catalin Cimpanu
    SlySoft Inc. is a software company registered in the Carribean country of Antigua and Barbuda. For the past few years, the firm has been a thorn in the side of Hollywood studios and game makers by creating and releasing software that would circumvent DRM and copyright protections on CDs and DVDs. Its product line includes tools like AnyDVD, AnyDVD HD, Clone CD, CloneDVD mobile, Virtual Clone Drive, Game Jackal, and Game Jackal Enterprise. With no doubt, the company's most known product is AnyDVD, a device driver used by many movie, game, and software piracy groups (and even home users) to...
  • Use a wireless mouse? This $15 hack could compromise your laptop

    02/25/2016 6:36:42 AM PST · by ShadowAce · 30 replies
    CNET ^ | 23 February 2016 | Sean Hollister
    They broke in like it was nothing. They could have wiped my hard drive, stolen my files, or practically anything nefarious you can do with a computer. All because I had a wireless mouse dongle plugged into my laptop. And all they needed was a simple antenna that costs as little as $15 at Amazon. Thankfully, "they" were a pair of security researchers from a company called Bastille, and every company that builds wireless mice and keyboards has already been alerted to the issue. If you have a Logitech Unifying receiver, there's already a fix. (Here is a link to...
  • Need a new computer

    02/17/2016 2:00:49 PM PST · by Hot Tabasco · 80 replies
    2/17/2016 | Me
    I'm looking to purchase a new computer and would like some advice.
  • Toshiba issues big recall for laptop batteries over fire fears

    02/11/2016 7:28:06 PM PST · by Utilizer · 13 replies
    iTnews-aus ^ | Feb 12 2016 9:35AM (AUS) | By Staff Writer
    54 models affected. Toshiba has issued a recall for Li-Ion battery packs sold with certain models of its laptops and notebooks due a risk of the device catching fire. The hardware company yesterday advised customers to immediately turn off their PC and remove their battery to check whether their device was affected. The vendor is offering free replacement battery packs for customers with affected units. Around 54 different PC models are affected, sold nationally from retail stores like Harvey Norman and JB Hi-Fi from June 2011 to September 2015. A full list can be found here. "There is a risk...
  • How bad decisions and poor IT killed Target Canada

    02/11/2016 10:41:34 AM PST · by Swordmaker · 17 replies
    ZDNet ^ | February 11, 2016 | David Gewirtz
    Unmanageable deadlines and disastrous IT wrecked this top US retailer's attempt at international expansion. The moral of the story: IT drives the enterprise. Business school case studies tend to fall into two categories: epic wins and oh-my-gosh-how-could-they-possibly-have-been-so-stupid epic failures. This article discusses a real-world billion dollar story that falls into the second category. As epic failures go, this one is worthy of the history books. . . EVERYTHING WENT TERRIBLY, TERRIBLY WRONG . . .
  • DLL Hijacking Issue Plagues Products like Firefox, Chrome, iTunes, OpenOffice

    02/08/2016 6:41:43 PM PST · by Utilizer · 25 replies
    SOFTPEDIA ^ | Feb 8, 2016 12:00 GMT | Catalin Cimpanu
    Oracle has released new Java installers to fix a well-known security issue (CVE-2016-0603) that also affects a plethora of other applications, from Web browsers to antivirus products, and from file compressors to home cinema software. The problem is called DLL hijacking (or DLL side-loading) and refers to the fact that malware authors can place DLLs of the same name in specific locations on the target's filesystem and have it inadvertently load the malicious DLL instead of the safe one. DLL hijacking is a very well-known issue This type of attack is very old and has been known to many software...
  • SF Startup Creates $15 64-Bit Computer

    01/31/2016 8:13:16 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 39 replies
    NBC Bay Area ^ | Jan 29, 2016 | Tamara Palmer
    A San Francisco startup has created a $15 computer. Pine 64 is now taking pre-orders for its Quad core 64-Bit expandable single board supercomputer, which will ship in May. The product can be combined with a keyboard and mouse to function as a full Android 5.1 computer. The company recently raised $1,731,465 on a Kickstarter campaign that had a goal of $31,416.
  • Any Linux Gurus On FR?

    01/24/2016 4:32:58 PM PST · by Washi · 32 replies
    http://freerepublic.com ^ | 1/24/2016 | Self
    Are there any Linux gurus here? I've looked around online and asked some questions in various forums, but I'm not getting anywhere. I've found explanations of how to set it up, but no examples. I have yet to get it working. I am trying to configure an environment with several Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6.1 virtual machines. All of these machines need to be NTP clients of my NTP server. The NTP server uses MD5 authentication, and I need to have the Linux clients authenticate the NTP traffic. Can someone please post a working "ntp.conf" and "keys" file so that...
  • Building your own CNC router/milling machine

    01/20/2016 8:18:38 PM PST · by Utilizer · 26 replies
    Instructables ^ | 2015? | Trochilidesign
    Already at the age of 12 I was dreaming of making a machine which could make things! A machine which would give me the opportunity to create products for in and around the house. Two years later I stumbled ont the words 'Computer Numerical Control' or more specifically the CNC milling machine. After I found out people were able to build one themselves in their own shed, I knew it! I had to build one, I yearned to have it!! For three months I tried to find the proper parts (A dremeltool, drawer slides, pieces of wood, etc.), but I...
  • Intel warns of major flaw in driver update software

    01/20/2016 7:33:51 PM PST · by Utilizer · 12 replies
    iTnews ^ | Jan 21 2016 9:00AM (AUS) | Allie Coyne
    Intel has patched a major flaw in its driver utility tool that could allow attackers to install malware on victim PCs remotely. The chipmaker has issued a patch advisory for its Driver Update Utility, urging customers to download the new version of the software. The tool analyses system drivers on a user's computer and reports on and downloads any new drivers that are available. The flaw - which exists because the software requests new drivers from Intel servers over an unencrypted connection - allows attackers to instigate man-in-the-middle attacks and cause the download of malicious files and software on victim...
  • Electronics That Last: How I Built an Heirloom Laptop

    01/18/2016 6:30:20 PM PST · by Utilizer · 22 replies
    Makezine ^ | January 15, 2016, 5:30 am PST | Kurt Mottweiler
    The Novena Heirloom is a limited edition custom enclosure system I built for use with the open-source Novena computer designed by Bunnie Huang and Sean Cross. It was crowd funded in cooperation with Portland, Oregon-based Crowd Supply. Several prototype concepts were developed for the campaign. After consulting with Huang, we decided to forgo an easel design in favor of a more traditional clam shell laptop. The requirement for user access to the internal components argued for a removable keypad and drove the final result. The thrust of the design concept is informed by, and hopefully serves as homage to, the...
  • OpenSSH fixes client crypto key leak

    01/14/2016 7:03:07 PM PST · by Utilizer · 2 replies
    iTnews ^ | Jan 15 2016 6:39AM (AUS) | Juha Saarinen
    OpenSSH developers have patched a serious flaw in the popular open source remote access protocol that could compromise encryption keys, with users urged to upgrade their OpenSSH installations straight away. According to the advisory, the vulnerability has been blamed on an experimental roaming feature, aimed at resuming SSH connections, in OpenSSH versions 5.4 to 7.1. Attackers who control servers could use the vulnerability to discover a client's private encryption keys, the OpenSSH developers said. "The matching server code has never been shipped, but the client code was enabled by default and could be tricked by a malicious server into leaking...
  • Linksys to Provide DD-WRT Support for All Current WRT Routers

    01/07/2016 12:29:24 PM PST · by ShadowAce · 17 replies
    Softpedia ^ | 7 January 2016 | Silviu Stahie
    Linksys has just revealed at CES 2016 that all the WRT routers now have DD-WRT support, making this the first company of its type to fully embrace an open source solution.Linksys is one of the most important companies that builds networking hardware, and it's known for its quality hardware. In this case we're talking about routers in the WRT series, which are already very good. The company decided to partner up with DD-WRT in order to provide better support for their products.Many Linksys users were already installing DD-WRT and other similar products on their routers, so the company figured out...
  • Raspberry Pi: computing for pocket change -- $5 computer unleashes a storm of creative computing

    01/04/2016 12:36:43 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 44 replies
    CBC News ^ | 01/04/2016 | By Greg Rasmussen, CBC News
    The era of the $5 computer has arrived.The latest version of the Raspberry Pi is even being given away free with a magazine. Not a subscription. Just buy the single issue of Magpi and you get a free computer.The devices have hobbyists and entrepreneurs excited about the possibilities of Pi. Raspberry Pi Zero $5 computer unveiledThe Next Thing unveils $9 computer, CHIP Ben Z. Cooper is using one as the brains behind a spectacular light show at Vancouver's VanDusen Gardens."You wave your hand in the air and control a whole grove of maple trees lighting up," Cooper told CBC News...
  • Washington State AG sues major tech support provider alleging deceptive scam

    12/24/2015 1:05:18 PM PST · by KeyLargo · 20 replies
    KOMO News ^ | December 16th 2015 | Connie Thompson
    State AG sues major tech support provider alleging deceptive scam By Connie Thompson Wednesday, December 16th 2015 State investigators just sued one of the rising stars in the tech-support industry claiming part of the operation is based on a scam. The company, called iYogi, is accused of tricking people into paying for tech support services they don't need. According to investigators iYogi engaged in a different twist on the notorious tech support scams where someone call you claiming your computer has problems. What's significant in this case is workers don't call you, you call them. And iYogi is one of...
  • Competition is Shifting to the High End

    12/18/2015 11:46:36 PM PST · by Swordmaker · 7 replies
    TechPinions ^ | December 17th, 2015 | by Jan Dawson
    The consumer electronics industry has always fascinated me. I spent my first ten years as an analyst covering the telecom industry, which historically has had very good margins. But, when I started covering the consumer electronics industry, I was struck by the fact the vast majority of players in that market make razor-thin margins, if they’re profitable at all. Even more striking is Apple, which might be described accurately, if incompletely, as a player in the consumer electronics market, makes telecom-like margins while competing with those barely profitable vendors. And just as interesting is the fact that, as players that...
  • The Official Fallout 4 Thread

    11/28/2015 7:53:03 PM PST · by Lazamataz · 668 replies
    11/28./2015 | By Laz A. Mataz
    Had to do it. Had to create the thread. The game is too damned good. This thread is reserved for hardcore gamers who play Fallout 4. Norm, KC, TADSLOS and I have hijacked so many threads discussing this game, I felt we needed our own thread.Fallout 4 is amazing. The content is excessively large. There is so much to explore, you could replay this game 10 times and not find every mission or quest. The characters are so much better fleshed out than any other game I have played. Even the radio announcer of Diamond City Radio will have you...
  • Computer question: Green screen

    11/08/2015 10:20:41 PM PST · by An American in Turkiye · 22 replies
    Self | An American In Turkiye
    So I have been having some issues with video playback on my laptop. It doesn't happen often, but every once in awhile, I'll try to play a YouTube video or Windows Media Player vid, and the video is green. Audio still plays, but the screen is green. In some cases, WMV's are just a black screen, with audio playing. Any help/suggestions are appreciated. Running Windows 8, BTW. I have 10 downloaded, just haven't upgraded yet
  • Surface Book vs. MacBook Pro: It isn't twice as fast. It's three times as fast (Ruh-roh!)

    10/22/2015 9:53:06 AM PDT · by dayglored · 123 replies
    PC World ^ | Oct 22, 2015 | Gordon Mah Ung
    Of course we had to pit the Surface Book vs. the MacBook Pro. It’s like Ford vs. Chevy, or Coke vs. Pepsi. Each side has its diehard fans, plus others who just want to know which is better. Microsoft claims its new Surface Book is “twice” as fast as its equivalent MacBook Pro. Well, we ran some benchmarks, and hate to say it, but Microsoft lied. The Surface Book isn’t twice as fast. It’s three times as fast. Read on for the details. What Microsoft meant First, let’s clarify what Microsoft meant when it said the Surface Book would smoke...
  • Prime Diffie-Hellman Weakness May Be Key to Breaking Crypto

    10/18/2015 12:19:56 PM PDT · by Mycroft Holmes · 20 replies
    ThreadPost ^ | October 16, 2015 | Michael Mimoso
    The great mystery since the NSA and other intelligence agencies’ cyber-spying capabilities became watercooler fodder has not been the why of their actions, but the how? For example, how are they breaking crypto to decode secure Internet communication? A team of cryptographers and computer scientists from a handful of academic powerhouses is pretty confident they have the answer after having pieced together a number of clues from the Snowden documents that have been published so far, and giving the math around the Diffie-Hellman protocol a hard look. The answer is an implementation weakness in Diffie-Hellman key exchanges, specifically in the...
  • NEW Adobe Flash Zero-day Vulnerability / Exploit - Uninstall Flash Today From All Computers

    10/15/2015 11:34:56 AM PDT · by dayglored · 63 replies
    (vanity, multiple sources) ^ | Oct 15, 2015 | (vanity, multiple sources)
    Yet another bad new Zero-Day (already exploited) Adobe Flash vulnerability. Time to uninstall Flash from all your computers and keep it off for good! To remove Flash from Windows: Close your browser In Control Panel -> Programs and Features, remove/uninstall all Adobe Flash or Shockwave items. Restart your browser Go to Add-ons/Plugins and confirm there are no Shockwave or Flash plugins. To remove Flash from OS X (10.6 and later): Download and run this Flash uninstaller: http://fpdownload.macromedia.com/get/flashplayer/current/support/uninstall_flash_player_osx.dmg To remove Flash from Linux: Close your browser Use "apt-get remove", "yum erase", or find the flashplayer .so (e.g. in /usr/lib[64]/mozilla/plugins or ~/.mozilla/plugins)...
  • Apple, Intel and IBM get on GloFlo's SOI bandwagon

    10/08/2015 10:03:29 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 3 replies
    fudzilla ^ | 08 October 2015 | Nick Farrell
    FinFETs and SOI working in different environmentsSoitec's CEO and board chairman has raised an eyebrow or two when he said that the iPhone 6s has multiple RF chips built on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates and that Intel and IBM are using the tech for their silicon photonics push.According to EETimes  Paul Boudre, who claimed that SOI is already being used by Apple and Intel even though neither company is broadcasting it. SOI appears to be on track to major market penetration even while the rest of the industry is talking FinFETs.
  • Crucial hurdle overcome in quantum computing

    10/05/2015 1:38:55 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 22 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | Oct 5, 2015
    The significant advance, by a team at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) in Sydney appears today in the international journal Nature. "What we have is a game changer," said team leader Andrew Dzurak, Scientia Professor and Director of the Australian National Fabrication Facility at UNSW. "We've demonstrated a two-qubit logic gate - the central building block of a quantum computer - and, significantly, done it in silicon. Because we use essentially the same device technology as existing computer chips, we believe it will be much easier to manufacture a full-scale processor chip than for any of the leading...
  • IBM engineers carbon nanotube transistors to replace silicon in computing

    10/02/2015 10:07:16 AM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 23 replies
    venturebeat.com ^ | October 1, 2015 11:00 AM | Dean Takahashi
    Above: IBM's carbon nanotubes have tiny circuits that are fractions of a meter apart.Image Credit: IBM Carbon nanotubes are the leading candidate to replace silicon in semiconductor chips after the decades-long run of silicon electronics runs out. And IBM is hoping to usher along that transition with a new breakthrough being announced today.In the October 2 issue of the journal Science, IBM researchers say they have overcome one of the most daunting challenges around carbon nanotube transistors, which are the building blocks of electronic circuits with dimensions that are measured in billionths of a meter. Carbon nanotubes may be...
  • Clumps of gold nanoparticles can evolve to carry out computing

    09/22/2015 2:10:36 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 9 replies
    Move over, microchip. A random assembly of gold nanoparticles can perform calculations normally reserved for neatly arranged patterns of silicon. Traditional computers rely on ordered circuits that follow preprogrammed rules, but this strategy limits how efficient they can be. “The best microprocessors you can buy in a store now can do 1011 operations per second and use a few hundred watts,” says Wilfred van der Wiel of the University of Twente in the Netherlands. “The human brain can do orders of magnitude more and uses only 10 to 20 watts. That’s a huge gap.” To close that gap, researchers have...
  • What you should not expect when switching to Linux

    09/17/2015 6:48:25 AM PDT · by ShadowAce · 82 replies
    DarkDuck ^ | 17 September 2015 | Dmitry (Darkduck)
    Linux is a great operating system. Nobody in the Linux camp will argue about that. There are many articles on the Internet convincing you to try and to switch to Linux. There are also many articles that attempt to show you why you should not switch. Let's look at this question from a slightly different viewpoint today. Say, you are now convinced that you want to switch to Linux. What you should NOT expect from this switch? 1. Linux works much faster than Windows This isn't too far from the truth. Generally speaking, Linux OS is less resource-hungry than Windows....
  • Quantum computer that 'computes without running' sets efficiency record

    09/01/2015 10:33:43 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 29 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 8/31/15 | Lisa Zyga
    (Phys.org)—Due to quantum effects, it's possible to build a quantum computer that computes without running—or as the scientists explain, "the result of a computation may be learned without actually running the computer." So far, however, the efficiency of this process, which is called counterfactual computation (CFC), has had an upper limit of 50%, limiting its practical applications. Now in a new paper, scientists have experimentally demonstrated a slightly different version called a "generalized CFC" that has an efficiency of 85% with the potential to reach 100%. This improvement opens the doors to realizing a much greater variety of applications, such...
  • The Raspberry Pi is succeeding in ways its makers almost imagined

    08/27/2015 6:49:38 PM PDT · by markomalley · 41 replies
    The Register ^ | 8/27/15 | Mark Pesce
    “Grandpa is getting pretty old. Out there all alone on that farm, he has no one to look in on him, just to see if he’s ok. He’ll use the landline, but he’s beyond of the range of mobile, and he’s never been really great with computers. No Skype or emails. Grandpa does have internet. So I built this for him.”The girl points down to a small box with a few wires coming out. “I can bring up a web browser, and take photos inside grandpa’s house. Has he moved his coffee cup today? Is the telly on? At least...
  • Backdoors Won't Solve Comey's Going Dark Problem

    08/16/2015 11:10:27 AM PDT · by zeugma · 13 replies
    Crypto-gram ^ | 8/15/2015 | Bruce Schneier
    At the Aspen Security Forum two weeks ago, James Comey (and others) explicitly talked about the "going dark" problem, describing the specific scenario they are concerned about. Maybe others have heard the scenario before, but it was a first for me. It centers around ISIL operatives abroad and ISIL-inspired terrorists here in the US. The FBI knows who the Americans are, can get a court order to carry out surveillance on their communications, but cannot eavesdrop on the conversations, because they are encrypted. They can get the metadata, so they know who is talking to who, but they can't find...