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Keyword: constantine

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  • The Jews driven out of homes in Arab lands

    11/28/2017 5:33:36 AM PST · by SJackson · 6 replies
    Jewish Chronicle ^ | 11-26-17 | Tom Gross
    The removal of the Jews from the Arab world has been all but ignored, says Tom Gross It is not surprising, given the sheer scale of the Holocaust and its sadism, that it has dominated contemporary discourse among Jews and others. But, while the extermination of European Jews has rightfully (though belatedly) generated a great deal of study and research, the removal of the Jews from the Arab world has been all but ignored. This ignorance extends to policy-makers at the highest level. Some journalists and politicians I have spoken to have expressed surprise when I even mentioned that Jews...
  • Rome, September 1st, Islamic gathering at the Colosseum: “We want it as a place to pray”

    08/26/2017 8:07:34 PM PDT · by ebb tide · 34 replies
    Rorate Caeli ^ | August 25, 2017 | Libero Quotidiano
    Rome, September 1st, Islamic gathering at the Colosseum: “We want it as a place to pray” Libero Quotidiano August 25, 2017 Disturbing image of the October 2016 Muslim gathering The appointment is for September 1st. On that day Muslims will invade the Colosseum  transforming it into an open-air mosque. “Il Tempo” reports that the Islamic community of Rome will gather under the Flavian Amphitheatre, as they did last October. For the Muslims the occasion is a prime feast: 'Eid Al Adha, the  Sacrifice of Abraham.  The  Bengalese Association Dhuumcatu  organizing it, has decided to transform Via San Gregorio, under the...
  • Egypt: Rare Manuscript Discovered in Saint Catherine Monastery

    07/07/2017 7:55:31 PM PDT · by marshmallow · 9 replies
    Asharq Al Aswat ^ | 7/7/17 | Waleed Abdul Rahman
    Cairo- Egypt has announced the discovery of a rare manuscript dating back to the fifth or sixth century at the Saint Catherine Monastery in southern Sinai. Minister of Antiquities Khaled El-Enany said the manuscript was uncovered by monks during restoration works carried out at the monastery’s library. The minister highlighted the discovery’s importance, as it features medical texts written by the renowned Greek physician Hippocrates, along with three other texts by an anonymous writer. The monastery has a library containing 6,000 manuscripts, among them 600 manuscripts written in Arabic, Greek, Ethiopian, Coptic, Armenian and Syriac dating back to the 4th...
  • Space Impact 'Saved Christianity'

    06/25/2003 8:26:22 PM PDT · by Davea · 33 replies · 99+ views
    BBC | 06/25/03
    Space impact 'saved Christianity' By Dr David Whitehouse BBC News Online science editor Did a meteor over central Italy in AD 312 change the course of Roman and Christian history? About the size of a football field: The impact crater left behind A team of geologists believes it has found the incoming space rock's impact crater, and dating suggests its formation coincided with the celestial vision said to have converted a future Roman emperor to Christianity. It was just before a decisive battle for control of Rome and the empire that Constantine saw a blazing light cross the sky and...
  • It Came from Outer Space?

    11/25/2004 5:13:07 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 972+ views
    American Scientist ^ | November-December 2004 | David Schneider
    Speranza points out another difficulty with the impact-origins theory. Large blocks of limestone sit within the boundaries of the Sirente "crater." Such limestone would not have survived an impact. So if Ormö's theory is correct, one must surmise that somebody set these giant chunks of rock in place since the crater formed. To Speranza, that just didn't make sense. Speranza and colleagues further argue that Ormö's radiocarbon dating gave one age for the main feature (placing it in the 4th or 5th century a.d.) and a completely different age for a nearby "crater" called C9, a date in the 3rd...
  • The day the sky fell in

    02/24/2003 4:06:52 PM PST · by e_engineer · 22 replies · 616+ views
    Guardian ^ | February 6, 2003 | Duncan Steel
    A metallic asteroid may have coincided with the fall of Rome, says Duncan Steel Thursday February 6, 2003 The Guardian In the early fifth century, rampaging Goths swept through Italy. Inviolate for 1,100 years, Rome was sacked by the hordes in 410 AD. St Augustine's apologia, the City of God, set the tone for Christians for the next 16 centuries. But the Rome of that era came close to suffering a far worse calamity. A small metallic asteroid descended from the sky, making a hypervelocity impact in an Apennine valley just 60 miles east of the city. This bus-sized lump...
  • Roman-Era Shipwreck Yields Moon Goddess Statue, Coin Stashes

    05/17/2016 2:45:27 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Live Science ^ | May 16, 2016 | Stephanie Pappas
    One civilization's trash is another civilization's treasure. A ship in Israel's Caesarea Harbor was filled with bronze statues headed for recycling when it sank about 1,600 years ago. Now, thanks to a chance discovery by a pair of divers, archaeologists have salvaged a haul of statuary fragments, figurines and coins from the seafloor. The coins found in the wreckage date to the mid-300s A.D. Some show Constantine, who ruled the Western Roman Empire from A.D. 312-324, and who unified the Eastern and Western Roman Empire in A.D. 324; he ruled both until his death in A.D. 337. Other coins show...
  • Could the Doctrine of the Trinity Be Wrong?

    08/30/2015 10:04:00 AM PDT · by CHRISTIAN DIARIST · 127 replies
    The Christian Diarist ^ | August 30, 2015 | JP
    “Who do men say I am?” Jesus posed the question to his disciples as they went out to the towns of Caesarea Philippi. John the Baptist, Elijah or other of the prophets, they answered. “But who do you say that I am?” Jesus asked them. And while 11 of the 12 disciples were uncertain, Peter responded, “You are the Christ.” This account, taken from the Gospel According to Mark, appears in slightly different form in Matthew and Luke, the other two synoptic gospels. What is noteworthy is that in none of the accounts does Jesus say He is other than...
  • Should we ban Christmas? Telling children the myth of Santa Claus could damage them, claims...

    06/06/2014 3:33:04 AM PDT · by markomalley · 71 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 6/4/2014 | Ellie Zolfagharifard
    Fairy tales and believing in Father Christmas could cause children harm.This is according to controversial biologist Richard Dawkins who warned an audience at the Cheltenham Science Festival about the dangers of make-believe. In typically incendiary style, Dawkins suggested it was 'pernicious to instil in a child the view that the world is shaped by supernaturalism.'The 73-year-old acknowledged that the appeal of fairytales lay in their magic but believes they may be causing more harm than we think.He also questioned whether we should let children believe in the myth of Father Christmas at all.'Is it a good thing to go along...
  • Rare Roman coin found in Acle only the second of its kind

    02/09/2013 4:38:46 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    edp24 ^ | Friday, February 8, 2013 | Lauren Rogers
    An incredibly rare Roman coin discovered in Acle has been donated to Norwich Castle Museum. The coin -- only the second of its kind known in the world -- was unearthed by Dave Clarke during the Springfield archaeology dig last summer. Acle Parish Council has sent the ancient artefact to Norwich where it may go on display and will be used by experts to identify and date other coins. The coin dates from AD 312 when Emperor Constantine I ruled the Roman world. The only other example was found in the 18th Century and is on show in Lisbon. One...
  • Scholars Unearth Mystery (Romans)

    02/19/2006 4:46:32 PM PST · by blam · 4 replies · 1,559+ views
    Rocky Mountain News ^ | 2-13-2006 | Jim Erickson
    Scholars unearth mysteryVilla of Roman emperor raises new questions for researchers on dig in Italy Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius Valerius Maxentius is depicted on a coin. Print By Jim Erickson Rocky Mountain News February 13, 2006 In The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, Edward Gibbon portrays the pagan emperor Maxentius as a licentious youth and "a tyrant as contemptible as he was odious." Historians have long assumed that the reviled Roman emperor lived part-time at an 80-acre suburban villa complex until he was killed by his rival Constantine at the Battle of the Milvian Bridge in A.D. 312....
  • Emperor Maxentius insignia found in Rome

    12/03/2006 11:57:26 AM PST · by NormsRevenge · 13 replies · 555+ views
    AP on Yahoo ^ | 12/3/06 | Marta Falconi - ap
    ROME - Archaeologists have unearthed what they say are the only existing imperial insignia belonging to Emperor Maxentius — precious objects that were buried to preserve them and keep them from enemies when he was defeated by his rival Constantine. Excavation under Rome's Palatine Hill near the Colosseum turned up items including three lances and four javelins that experts said are striking for their completeness — digs usually turn up only fragments — and the fact that they are the only known artifacts of their kind. Clementina Panella, the archaeologist who made the discovery, said the insignia were likely hidden...
  • Rome's Palatine Hill shows new treasures

    01/23/2007 5:07:37 PM PST · by Dysart · 41 replies · 1,007+ views
    AP via Yahoo! ^ | 1-23-07 | ARIEL DAVID
    ROME - Work on Rome's Palatine Hill has turned up a trove of discoveries, including what might be the underground grotto where ancient Romans believed a wolf nursed the city's legendary founders Romulus and Remus. ADVERTISEMENT Archaeologists gathered Tuesday at a conference to save crumbling monuments on the Palatine discussed findings of studies on the luxurious imperial homes threatened by collapse and poor maintenance that have forced the closure of much of the hill to the public.While funds are still scarce, authorities plan to reopen some key areas of the honeycombed hill to tourists by the end of the year,...
  • Emperor's Treasures Found (Maxentius)

    01/31/2007 2:21:08 PM PST · by blam · 9 replies · 1,029+ views
    The Times Online ^ | 1-31-2007 | Richard Owen
    Emperor's treasures found Richard Owen ROME The lost treasure of Maxentius, the last preChristian Roman emperor, has been unearthed by archaeologists. Imperial standards, lances and glass spheres, right, were buried on the Palatine Hill by Maxentius before his battle with Constantine the Great in AD312. Archaeologists believe that he planned to retrieve the treasure if he won. In the event, he and his closest aides were killed, so that no one knew where it was hidden.
  • Archaeologists in Turkey claim they found piece of Jesus’ cross

    08/02/2013 8:47:28 AM PDT · by Daffynition · 39 replies
    WashingtonTimes ^ | August 2, 2013 | Cheryl K. Chumley
    Archaeologists digging around an ancient church in Turkey say they’ve made a startling discovery and unearthed a piece of the cross that used to crucify Jesus. The diggers found a stone chest this week and inside were several relics believed to be tied to the crucifixion. Among them was a piece of the actual cross upon which Jesus was nailed, one historian with Turkey’s Mimar Sinan University of Fine Arts said in the Hurriyet Daily News.
  • Relics unearthed in Turkey may contain piece of Jesus' cross

    08/01/2013 9:26:53 AM PDT · by Sopater · 91 replies
    Fox News ^ | August 01, 2013
    Archeologists conducting excavations at the site of a church in Turkey have unearthed a stone chest containing a relic that may be part of the cross on which Jesus was crucified. The items were discovered during a large-scale excavation at the Balatlar Church, which was built in A.D. 660 near the Black Sea, Today's Zaman reported. Professor Gülgün Köroğlu, an associate professor at Turkey's Mimar Sinan Fine Arts University and excavation leader, told the newspaper the artifacts are linked to Jesus' crucifixion.
  • The True Cross (Separating Myth From History)

    07/16/2003 11:52:04 AM PDT · by blam · 23 replies · 685+ views
    Biblical Archaeology ^ | 7-16-2003 | Jan Willem Drijvers
    The True Cross Separating Myth from History Jan Willem Drijvers In the days of Constantine the Great, the cross on which Jesus died was “rediscovered” in Jerusalem. Tradition gives Constantine’s mother, Helena, full credit for the find. Today, visitors to Jerusalem are shown the very spot, in a cistern beneath the Church of the Holy Sepulchre, where the empress is said to have unearthed not only the true cross, but the nails that punctured Jesus’ hands and feet, the crosses of the two thieves who died beside Jesus, and the plaque, naming Jesus “King of the Jews,” that hung on...
  • Constantine Has Been Beaten to Death (by anti-catholics)

    05/25/2013 4:22:36 AM PDT · by NYer · 255 replies
    Catholic Answers ^ | May 20, 2013 | Jon Sorensen
    I’m sure you’ve heard the phrase “beating a dead horse.” It refers to something that has been said or done so many times that it has outlived its usefulness. This is especially true of arguments that are not only old but also untrue.Like the proverbial horse, the Roman emperor Constantine has been beaten to death by anti-Catholics.I make it a point to check all of the comments posted on our YouTube and Facebook pages at least twice a day. As sure as fish live in water, I have come to expect at least one message a day from a...
  • Happy Easter, Which is Not Named After Istar, OK?

    03/30/2013 9:35:24 PM PDT · by donmeaker · 29 replies
    Daily Beast ^ | Megan McCardle
    My unfavorite new Facebook meme is this bit of sillyness which has apparently been spotted everywhere from the feeds of my college friends to (allegedly) that of Richard Dawkins' Foundation for Reason and Science:
  • Global Inflation - waiting for a new Constantine

    05/31/2012 7:32:04 AM PDT · by se99tp · 1 replies
    Christian Concepts Daily ^ | May 31st, 2012 | Dr Norman Bailey
    It is worthwhile noting that inflation as a factor of global economic security has the innate capacity to upend carefully laid plans and further upset the equilibrium, being a source of economic hardship that only a limited number of state actors can affect via their national policies argue former Reagan advisor Dr Norman Bailey and Dr Alexander Mirtchev Governments everywhere are responding by devaluing currencies, applying price restrictions, raising interest rates or imposing currency controls — in a way, true to the legacy of Diocletian. In some cases, they are attempting to obfuscate price increases — by changing definitions, altering...