Keyword: darkflow

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  • Is an Adjacent Universe Causing the Dark Flow of Hundred of Millions of Stars at the Edge of the...

    04/16/2011 5:50:42 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 30 replies
    Daily Galaxy ^ | 4/15/11
    Is an Adjacent Universe Causing the Dark Flow of Hundred of Millions of Stars at the Edge of the Observable Universe? Or, Might It Be Something ElseBack in the Middle Ages, maps showed terrifying images of sea dragons at the boundaries of the known world. Today, scientists have observed strange new motion at the very limits of the known universe -- kind of where you'd expect to find new things, but they still didn't expect this. A huge swathe of galactic clusters seem to be heading to a cosmic hotspot and nobody knows why. The unexplained motion has hundreds of...
  • New Proof Unknown "Structures" Tug at Our Universe

    03/22/2010 8:02:28 PM PDT · by Feline_AIDS · 72 replies · 1,643+ views
    National Geographic ^ | 22 March 2010 | NatGeo
    "Dark flow" is no fluke, suggests a new study that strengthens the case for unknown, unseen "structures" lurking on the outskirts of creation. In 2008 scientists reported the discovery of hundreds of galaxy clusters streaming in the same direction at more than 2.2 million miles (3.6 million kilometers) an hour. This mysterious motion can't be explained by current models for distribution of mass in the universe. So the researchers made the controversial suggestion that the clusters are being tugged on by the gravity of matter outside the known universe. Now the same team has found that the dark flow extends...
  • Mysterious force's long presence

    11/16/2006 7:22:01 PM PST · by Jedi Master Pikachu · 26 replies · 482+ views
    BBC ^ | November 16, 2006
    Dark energy - the mysterious force that is speeding up the expansion of the Universe - has been a part of space for at least nine billion years. That is the conclusion of astronomers who presented results from a three-year study using the Hubble Space Telescope. The finding may rule out some competing theories that predict the strength of dark energy changes over time. Dark energy makes up about 70% of the Universe; the rest is dark matter (25%) and normal matter (5%). "It appears this dark energy was already boosting the expansion of the Universe as much as...
  • Monster galactic cluster seen in deep Universe: European agency

    08/25/2008 3:56:31 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 15 replies · 307+ views
    AFP on Yahoo ^ | 8/25/08 | AFP
    PARIS (AFP) – An orbiting observatory has spotted a massive cluster of galaxies in deep space that can only be explained by the exotic phenomenon known as dark energy, the European Space Agency (ESA) said on Monday. Spotted in a scan by ESA's orbiting X-ray telescope XMM-Newton, the cluster's mass is about 1,000 times that of our own galaxy, the Milky Way, it said. The huge cluster, known by its catalogue number of 2XMM J083026+524133, lies 7.7 billion light years from Earth and helps confirm the existence of dark energy, the agency said. Under this hypothesis, most of the Universe...
  • Tsunami invisibility cloak, dark energy v. the void, sorting nanotubes with light, and more

    09/26/2008 4:30:39 AM PDT · by decimon · 12 replies · 490+ views
    American Physical Society ^ | Sep 26, 2008 | Unknown
    Tsunami invisibility cloak, dark energy v. the void, sorting nanotubes with light, and moreNews from the American Physical SocietyTsunami Invisibility Cloak M. Farhat, S. Enoch, S. Guenneau and A.B. Movchan Physical Review Letters (forthcoming) Rather than building stronger ocean-based structures to withstand tsunamis, it might be easier to simply make the structures disappear. A collaboration of physicists from the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS) and Aix-Marseille Universite in France and the University of Liverpool in England have conducted laboratory experiments showing that it's possible to make type of dike that acts as an invisibility cloak that hides off-shore...
  • Do We Live in a Giant Cosmic Bubble?

    09/30/2008 3:23:48 PM PDT · by decimon · 35 replies · 739+ views
    SPACE.com ^ | Sep 30, 2008 | Clara Moskowitz
    If the notion of dark energy sounds improbable, get ready for an even more outlandish suggestion. Earth may be trapped in an abnormal bubble of space-time that is particularly void of matter. Scientists say this condition could account for the apparent acceleration of the universe's expansion, for which dark energy currently is the leading explanation.
  • Mysterious Dark Matter Might Actually Glow

    11/07/2008 3:21:52 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies · 594+ views
    SPACE.com ^ | Thursday, November 6, 2008 | Staff
    Nobody knows what dark matter is, but scientists may now have a clue where to look for it. The strange stuff makes up about 85 percent of the heft of the universe. It's invisible, but researchers know it's there because there is not enough regular matter -- stars and planets and gas and dust -- to hold galaxies and galaxy clusters together. Some other unseen material, dubbed dark matter, must be gluing things together... A new computer simulation of the evolution of a galaxy like our Milky Way suggests it might be possible to observe high-energy gamma-rays given off by...
  • Galaxy Surprise Sheds Light on Dark Matter

    11/07/2008 4:48:38 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies · 666+ views
    Space.com ^ | August 27, 2008 | Clara Moskowitz
    A study of small galaxies circling around the Milky Way found that while they range dramatically in brightness, they all surprisingly pack about the same mass. The work suggests there is a minimum size for galaxies, and it could shed light on mysterious dark matter. Spinning around the Milky Way are at least 23 pint-sized galaxies, each shining with the light of anywhere from a thousand to a billion suns. Though each of these galaxies is very dim compared to large galaxies like our own, they span a large range in brightness. Astronomers led by Louis Strigari of the University...
  • Unknown "Structures" Tugging at Universe, Study Says [ Dark Flow ]

    11/07/2008 3:29:16 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 73 replies · 1,866+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | November 5, 2008 | John Roach
    Everything in the known universe is said to be racing toward the massive clumps of matter at more than 2 million miles (3.2 million kilometers) an hour -- a movement the researchers have dubbed dark flow. The presence of the extra-universal matter suggests that our universe is part of something bigger -- a multiverse -- and that whatever is out there is very different from the universe we know, according to study leader Alexander Kashlinsky, an astrophysicist at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Maryland... Dark flow was named in a nod to dark energy and dark matter -- two...
  • Mysterious New 'Dark Flow' Discovered in Space

    09/25/2008 8:58:58 AM PDT · by nobama08 · 18 replies · 755+ views
    foxnews.com ^ | Thursday, September 25, 2008 | Clara Moskowitz
    As if the mysteries of dark matter and dark energy weren't vexing enough, another baffling cosmic puzzle has been discovered. Patches of matter in the universe seem to be moving at very high speeds and in a uniform direction that can't be explained by any of the known gravitational forces in the observable universe. Astronomers are calling the phenomenon "dark flow." The stuff that's pulling this matter must be outside the observable universe, researchers conclude.
  • Mysterious New 'Dark Flow' Discovered in Space

    09/23/2008 4:46:02 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 37 replies · 252+ views
    Space.com on Yahoo ^ | 9/23/08 | Clara Moskowitz
    As if the mysteries of dark matter and dark energy weren't vexing enough, another baffling cosmic puzzle has been discovered. Patches of matter in the universe seem to be moving at very high speeds and in a uniform direction that can't be explained by any of the known gravitational forces in the observable universe. Astronomers are calling the phenomenon "dark flow." The stuff that's pulling this matter must be outside the observable universe, researchers conclude. When scientists talk about the observable universe, they don't just mean as far out as the eye, or even the most powerful telescope, can see....