Free Republic 2nd Quarter Fundraising Target: $85,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $21,784
25%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 25% is in!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: dna

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Ancient DNA reveals Europe's dynamic genetic history

    04/23/2013 5:49:47 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 71 replies
    phys.org ^ | 6 hours ago
    Ancient DNA recovered from a series of skeletons in central Germany up to 7500 years old has been used to reconstruct the first detailed genetic history of modern Europe. The study, published today in Nature Communications, reveals a dramatic series of events including major migrations from both Western Europe and Eurasia, and signs of an unexplained genetic turnover about 4000-5000 years ago. The research was performed at the University of Adelaide's Australian Centre for Ancient DNA (ACAD). Researchers used DNA extracted from bone and teeth samples from prehistoric human skeletons to sequence a group of maternal genetic lineages that are...
  • Mayo Clinic and Illinois researchers develop new sensor for methylated DNA

    04/04/2013 3:38:37 PM PDT · by neverdem · 6 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | March 15, 2013 | NA
    Collaborators from Mayo-Illinois Alliance for Technology Based Healthcare have developed a new, single molecule test for detecting methylated DNA. Methylation -- the addition of a methyl group of molecules to a DNA strand -- is one of the ways gene expression is regulated. The findings appear in the current issue of Scientific Reports (Nature Publishing Group). "While nanopores have been studied for genomic sequencing and screening analysis, this new assay can potentially circumvent the need for some of the current processes in evaluating epigenetics-related diseases," says George Vasmatzis, Ph.D., co-leader of Mayo's Biomarker Discovery Program in the Center for Individualized...
  • Teenager astounds scientists by building a DNA testing machine in his bedroom - and he did it to

    04/05/2013 3:51:52 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 28 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 4/5/13 | Emma Innes
    Teenager astounds scientists by building a DNA testing machine in his bedroom - and he did it to discover why his brother is ginger Fred Turner, 17, from Yorkshire built a DNA testing machine in his bedroomBuilt the polymerase chain reaction machine from items he found at homeWanted to see if his brother had the mutated gene that causes ginger hairExperiment was a success and proved why his brother is ginger and he isn'tFred was named the UK's Young Engineer of the Year for his design A teenager has astounded scientists by building a DNA testing machine in his bedroom...
  • Complexity of Cell's 'Molecular Shredder' Revealed (article)

    04/05/2013 7:15:53 AM PDT · by fishtank · 18 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 3-25-2013 | Jeffrey Tomkins, Ph.D.
    Complexity of Cell's 'Molecular Shredder' Revealed by Jeffrey Tomkins, Ph.D. * When genes in the cell are turned on, the result is the production of gene copies called messenger RNAs, or mRNAs. The mRNAs are then used as templates to make proteins, the key molecules that enable the cell to function. But what happens to the excess mRNAs when they are no longer needed or the RNAs that have errors in them? They certainly can't remain active in the cell or serious problems would ensue. A good analogy for the cell's solution to this problem is the example of a...
  • Polynesian mtDNA in extinct Amerindians from Brazil

    04/04/2013 11:01:14 AM PDT · by Theoria · 14 replies
    Dienekes' Anthropology blog ^ | 03 April 2013 | Dienekes' Anthropology blog
    From the paper: In 1808 the Portuguese Crown declared “Just War” (Bellumiustum) against all Indian tribes that did not accept European laws (23). The fierce Botocudo were targeted in such wars and, in consequence, became virtually extinct by the end of the 19th century (24). Their importance for the history of the peopling of the Americas was revealed by studies reporting that the Botocudo had cranial features that consistently were described as intermediate between the polar Paleoamerican and Mongoloid morphologies (25, 26). Multivariate analyses of the cranial measures of different Amerindian and Paleoamerican groups from Brazil indeed concluded that the...
  • The Resurrection of 'Junk DNA'? (article)

    04/03/2013 8:45:29 AM PDT · by fishtank · 50 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 3-20-2013 | Nathaniel Jeanson, Ph.D., and Brian Thomas, M.S.
    The Resurrection of 'Junk DNA'? by Nathaniel Jeanson, Ph.D., and Brian Thomas, M.S. * Evolutionists are protesting. What has them so agitated? The results of the most in-depth human genome study to date, called the "ENCODE" project, revealed that 80 percent or more of the human genome appears to have some use in the set of human body tissues they investigated.1 This contrasts starkly to the evolutionary claim that "roughly 45 percent of the human genome [is] made up of such genetic flotsam and jetsam"2 or "junk DNA." ENCODE includes scores of researchers worldwide who sequence human DNA and measure...
  • Is An Alien Message Embedded In Our Genetic Code?

    04/02/2013 6:57:24 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 75 replies
    discovery.com ^ | Apr 1, 2013 11:27 AM ET // by | Ray Villard
    Vladimir I. shCherbak of al-Farabi Kazakh National University of Kazakhstan, and Maxim A. Makukov of the Fesenkov Astrophysical Institute, hypothesize that an intelligent signal embedded in our genetic code would be a mathematical and semantic message that cannot be accounted for by Darwinian evolution. They call it “biological SETI.” What’s more, they argue that the scheme has much greater longevity and chance of detecting E.T. than a transient extraterrestrial radio transmission. Writing in the journal Icarus, they assert: “Once fixed, the code might stay unchanged over cosmological timescales; in fact, it is the most durable construct known. Therefore it represents...
  • Revolutionizing the “Out of Africa” Story

    04/01/2013 5:23:50 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 14 replies
    Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News ^ | Apr 1, 2013 | Alan R. Templeton, Ph.D.
    The discovery of the structure of DNA and the subsequent developments in genetics and genomics have had a great impact on all of the biological sciences, including human evolution. Our ideas about human evolution 60 years ago came primarily from the fossil and archaeological records. These fields revealed that the last two million years were a dynamic period of our evolutionary history. The human lineage two million years ago was a population with ape-sized brains limited to sub-Saharan Africa. The human lineage expanded into Eurasia around 1.85 million years ago, and our brain size increased throughout the Pleistocene. Anatomically modern...
  • Human Y Chromosome Much Older Than Previously Thought

    03/21/2013 7:05:11 AM PDT · by Renfield · 15 replies
    UANews ^ | 3-1-2013 | Daniel Stolte
    UA geneticists have discovered the oldest known genetic branch of the human Y chromosome – the hereditary factor determining male sex. The new divergent lineage, which was found in an individual who submitted his DNA to Family Tree DNA, a company specializing in DNA analysis to trace family roots, branched from the Y chromosome tree before the first appearance of anatomically modern humans in the fossil record. The results are published in the American Journal of Human Genetics. "Our analysis indicates this lineage diverged from previously known Y chromosomes about 338,000 ago, a time when anatomically modern humans had not...
  • 11 crazy Bigfoot conspiracy theories

    03/17/2013 1:52:10 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 19 replies
    Yahoo! News ^ | Mar 12, 2013 | Mark Mancini
    11 crazy Bigfoot conspiracy theories Whether or not you believe in Bigfoot, chances are you live pretty close to somebody who does: Sasquatch sightings have been reported in every state but Hawaii over the course of several centuries. In the process, a number of bizarre theories have been put forth to explain how the mysterious beasts came to be, reproduce, and constantly evade us. 1. A DNA test proved that bigfoot is a part-human hybrid...and deserves U.S. citizenship! Texas veterinarian Melba S. Ketchum claimed last November to have proved via a Sasquatch DNA sample that the legendary apes are partially...
  • China Is Engineering Genius Babies (Collecting DNA samples to produce genius race)

    03/16/2013 6:15:08 PM PDT · by Dallas59 · 46 replies
    Vice ^ | 3/16/2013 | Vice
    It’s not exactly news that China is setting itself up as a new global superpower, is it? While Western civilization chokes on its own gluttony like a latter-day Marlon Brando, China continues to buy up American debt and lock away the world’s natural resources. But now, not content to simply laugh and make jerk-off signs as they pass us on the geopolitical highway, they’ve also developed a state-endorsed genetic-engineering project. At BGI Shenzhen, scientists have collected DNA samples from 2,000 of the world’s smartest people and are sequencing their entire genomes in an attempt to identify the alleles which determine...
  • Former APA Pres. Dr. Cummings Discusses Gay Change,Epigenetics,Neutrinos,& Political Correctness

    03/15/2013 10:43:49 AM PDT · by Maelstorm · 2 replies
    RPVNetwork ^ | March 15, 2013 | F.R Newbrough
    Former APA Pres. Dr. Nicolas Cummings Discusses Gay Change, Epigenetics, Neutrinos, & Political Correctness. - RPVNetwork
  • Innocent man cleared after 14 years behind bars for attempted rape of girl

    03/13/2013 9:34:38 AM PDT · by BlatherNaut · 19 replies
    NBCBayArea.com ^ | 3/13/13 | Lisa Fernandez and Kris Sanchez
    Johnny Williams spent 14 years in prison for an attempted rape he never committed. On Friday, a judge overturned his conviction. And on Tuesday, the 37-year-old Williams spoke publicly for the first time. "I'm truly happy," Williams said in a one-on-one interview at Santa Clara University. That's where a team of students and lawyers from the Northern California Innocence Project helped prove that the DNA on a 9-year-old's T-shirt did not belong to him. The DNA is what led to his 1998 attempted rape arrest. "Everything happens for a reason," he said.
  • Lost Soldier’s Remains Return Home 62 Years After He Was Reported Missing In Action In North Korea

    02/27/2013 7:32:27 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 12 replies
    CBSLA.com ^ | February 27, 2013 6:05 AM
    LOS ANGELES (CBSLA.com) — An American soldier arrived home Wednesday more than 60 years after he disappeared in North Korea. Police, fire officials, the USO Greater Los Angeles and family greeted the remains of Private First Class Roosevelt “Jack” Clark around 5:40 a.m. at Los Angeles International Airport. Clark was reported missing in action on Nov. 28, 1950 while fighting with the 35th Regiment in North Korea. The 20-year-old Bakersfield resident was never found and few details about his death were available. Clark’s remains were recently located overseas and positively identified through DNA. Following the arrival of Clark’s remains, a...
  • Russian Bigfoot DNA Analyzed By Scientists: Yeti Or Yogi?

    02/06/2013 7:27:29 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 13 replies
    Inquisitr.com ^ | February 4, 2013 | Inquisitr.com
    Russian Bigfoot DNA Analyzed By Scientists: Yeti Or Yogi? Bigfoot DNA is in the news again. Over the last three years, the Russian Bigfoot, or Yeti, was claimed to be a “towering, long-haired beast roaming the Mount Shoria region of southern Russia.” This potential Bigfoot has left clumps of hair in caves that scientists have just now analyzed. Professor Bryan Sykes of Oxford’s Wolfson Institute has led a global genetics project to test hair samples from possible Bigfoots. Professor Sykes told The Sun what he thought about this Bigfoot DNA: “The hairs did not come from a yeti. The American...
  • Aztec Conquerors Reshaped Genetic Landscape of Mexico

    02/04/2013 8:09:48 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    LiveScience ^ | January 31, 2013 | Tia Ghose
    The Aztecs who conquered the city of Xaltocan in ancient Mexico around 1435 may have fundamentally changed the genetic makeup of the people who lived there, new research suggests... Xaltocan was the capital of a pre-Aztec city-state ruled by the Otomi, an indigenous people who lived in Mexico. The period before the Aztec conquest was a tumultuous time for the Otomi, when a century of warfare led to the collapse of their capital city. Colonial records from the 1500s onward told tales of the Otomi fleeing the city en masse in 1395. Those records suggested that the city was abandoned...
  • Epigenetics: How Our Experiences Affect Our Offspring

    02/04/2013 1:10:36 PM PST · by blam · 23 replies
    The Week Magazine ^ | 1-20-2013 | The Week Staff
    Epigenetics: How Our Experiences Affect Our Offspring New research suggests that people's experiences, not just their genes, can affect the biological legacy of their offspring By The Week Staff January 20, 2013 Isn't our genetic legacy hardwired? From Mendel and Darwin in the 19th century to Watson and Crick in the 20th, scientists have shown that chromosomes passed from parent to child form a genetic blueprint for development. But in a quiet scientific revolution, researchers have in recent years come to realize that genes aren't a fixed, predetermined program simply passed from one generation to the next. Instead, genes can...
  • Skeleton found in parking lot identified as that of England's King Richard III, experts say

    02/04/2013 10:09:11 AM PST · by AngieGal · 65 replies
    Fox News ^ | February 04, 2013 | Fox News
    He wore the English crown, but he ended up defeated, humiliated and reviled. Now things are looking up for King Richard III. Scientists announced Monday that they had found the monarch's 500-year-old remains under a parking lot in the city of Leicester -- a discovery Richard's fans say will inspire new research into his maligned history. University of Leicester researchers say tests on a battle-scarred skeleton unearthed last year prove "beyond reasonable doubt" that it is the king, who died at the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485, and whose remains have been missing for centuries. "Richard III, the last...
  • Uncovered, the 'toxic' gene hiding in GM crops: Revelation throws new doubt over safety of foods

    01/25/2013 7:38:13 AM PST · by opentalk · 71 replies
    Daily Mail UK ^ | January 21, 2013 | Sean Poulter
    •EU watchdog reveals approval for GM foods fails to identify poisonous gene •54 of the 86 GM plants approved contain the dangerous gene •Gene found in food for farm animals producing meat, milk and eggs •Biotech supporters argue there is no evidence that GM foods are harmful A virus gene that could be poisonous to humans has been missed when GM food crops have been assessed for safety. GM crops such as corn and soya, which are being grown around the world for both human and farm animal consumption, include the gene. A new study by the EU’s official food...
  • DNA could be used for storage of Computer Data

    01/24/2013 1:10:00 PM PST · by shineon · 12 replies
    Computerworld - Researchers have created a way to store data in the form of DNA, which can last for tens of thousands of years. The encoding method makes it possible to store at least 100 million hours of high-definition video in about a cup of DNA, the researchers said in a paper published in the journal Nature this week.
  • With Shakespeare's help, researchers show potential of DNA for storing digital information

    01/23/2013 4:29:28 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 11 replies
    fox ^ | January 23, 2013
    It can store the information from a million CDs in a space no bigger than your little finger, and could keep it safe for centuries. Is this some new electronic gadget? Nope. It's DNA. The genetic material has long held all the information needed to make plants and animals, and now some scientists are saying it could help handle the growing storage needs of today's information society. Researchers reported Wednesday that they had stored all 154 Shakespeare sonnets, a photo, a scientific paper, and a 26-second sound clip from Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech. That all...
  • Wanted: 'Adventurous woman' to give birth to Neanderthal man - ... seeks mother for cloned cave baby

    01/21/2013 10:32:31 AM PST · by Red Badger · 65 replies
    Daily Mail UK ^ | PUBLISHED: 10:36 EST, 20 January 2013 | UPDATED: 04:16 EST, 21 January 2013 | By Allan Hall and Fiona Macrae
    They're usually thought of as a brutish, primitive species. So what woman would want to give birth to a Neanderthal baby? Yet this incredible scenario is the plan of one of the world’s leading geneticists, who is seeking a volunteer to help bring man’s long-extinct close relative back to life. Professor George Church of Harvard Medical School believes he can reconstruct Neanderthal DNA and resurrect the species which became extinct 33,000 years ago. His scheme is reminiscent of Jurassic Park but, while in the film dinosaurs were created in a laboratory, Professor Church’s ambitious plan requires a human volunteer. He...
  • Team solves mystery associated with DNA repair

    12/14/2012 4:01:29 PM PST · by neverdem · 12 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | December 13, 2012 | NA
    Every time a human or bacterial cell divides it first must copy its DNA. Specialized proteins unzip the intertwined DNA strands while others follow and build new strands, using the originals as templates. Whenever these proteins encounter a break – and there are many – they stop and retreat, allowing a new cast of molecular players to enter the scene. Scientists have long sought to understand how one of these players, a repair protein known as RecA in bacterial cells, helps broken DNA find a way to bridge the gap. They knew that RecA guided a broken DNA strand to...
  • John Wayne Gacy's DNA May Help Solve Cold-Case Murders

    12/04/2012 3:12:13 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 10 replies
    The Times-Picayune ^ | December 03, 2012
    Detectives have long wondered what secrets serial killer John Wayne Gacy and other condemned murderers took to the grave when they were executed -- mostly whether they had other unknown victims. Now, in a game of scientific catch-up, the Cook County Sheriff's Department is trying to be creative: They've created DNA profiles of Gacy and others and figured out they could get the executed men entered in a national database shared with other law enforcement agencies because the murderers were technically listed as homicide victims when they were put to death by the state.
  • Researchers Claim To Have Sequenced Bigfoot DNA

    12/04/2012 4:48:51 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 22 replies
    A genetic researcher is saying that Bigfoot DNA tests prove that the hairy creature really does exist. Dr. Melba S. Ketchum says she and her team sequenced three complete Sasquatch nuclear genomes and concluded the species is a human hybrid -- a mosaic of human and novel non-human elements. Their findings have yet to pass peer review. A Texas veterinarian says she and fellow genetic researchers have confirmed the existence of "Bigfoot," though their findings have yet to pass peer review. Dr. Melba S. Ketchum of Nacogdoches, founder of DNA Diagnostics Inc. in the eastern Texas town of Timpson, said...
  • DNA imaged with electron microscope for the first time

    11/30/2012 6:59:20 PM PST · by neverdem · 22 replies
    New Scientist | 28 November 2012 | Roland Pease
    Here's the link for the article.Here's the link for the abstract, "Direct Imaging of DNA Fibers: The Visage of Double Helix."
  • HAVE YOU USED THE GENOGRAPHIC PROJECT?

    11/28/2012 2:41:29 PM PST · by WHATNEXT? · 53 replies
    ME
    Thinking of getting the kit for a Christmas gift.
  • Pentagon's semiconductor industry requirement for DNA markers

    11/21/2012 10:39:54 AM PST · by ExxonPatrolUs · 5 replies
    Military Aerospace Blog ^ | Nov 2012 | John Keller
    A new anti-counterfeiting requirement from the U.S. Defense Logistics Agency (DLA) at Fort Belvoir, Va., is triggering pushback from semiconductor manufacturers, who claim the new requirement is not an appropriate cure for electronics counterfeiting, does not authenticate legacy semiconductors, has not been tested adequately, and will increase semiconductor manufacturing costs. The DNA-marking mandate, which became effective on 15 November requires all semiconductors sold to the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) to be marked with DNA-based materials unique to each government contractor. The intent is to prevent counterfeit parts from entering the DOD supply chain by authenticating each piece with a...
  • Creationism or Evolution?

    11/18/2012 6:18:07 AM PST · by GonzoII · 121 replies
    Stay Catholic .Com ^ | 2001 | Sebastian R. Fama
    Creationism or Evolution?by Sebastian R. Fama Is it possible to know that God exists even though we cannot see or touch Him? Well, we believe that radio waves exist and we can’t see or touch them. And we believe it because the evidence allows for no other conclusion. We turn on a television and we see and hear someone who is many miles away. Adjusting the antenna changes the quality of the picture. Disconnect the antenna, and there is no picture. Obviously the television is receiving the pictures and sound from the air. Thus we can know that radio...
  • 30,000-year-old DNA preserved in poo a window into the past

    11/16/2012 8:08:30 AM PST · by Renfield · 18 replies
    Murdoch University DNA scientists have used 30,000-year-old faecal matter known as middens to ascertain which plants and animals existed at that time in the hot, arid Pilbara region of North Western Australia.To date, this is the oldest environmental sample from which DNA has been obtained in Australia. It had previously been considered unrealistic to extract DNA from hot, arid zone samples due to the extreme heat.PhD candidate Dáithí Murray from Murdoch’s Ancient DNA Lab said that comparing the genetic signatures obtained from old material such as middens to present day plant and animal surveys would allow for an exploration...
  • Junk DNA Myth Continues Its Demise (article)

    11/07/2012 12:26:44 PM PST · by fishtank · 7 replies
    Junk DNA Myth Continues Its Demise by Jeffrey Tomkins, Ph.D. * Secular biology, intelligent design, and creationist communities are abuzz with the recently reported data from 30 simultaneously published high-profile research papers in the field of human genomics, proclaiming that the human genome is irreducibly complex and intelligently designed.1 From an evolutionary perspective, this is a massive blow to the myth of “junk DNA.” A large-scale international research effort, ENCODE (Encyclopedia of DNA Elements), began in 2003 as an outgrowth of the Human Genome Project. Although the human genome had been largely finished in its final draft form in 2004,...
  • Male DNA Found In Female Brains

    11/04/2012 10:20:50 AM PST · by blam · 28 replies
    Science News ^ | 11-3-2012 | Laura Sanders
    Male DNA Found In Female Brains Discovery suggests fetal cells can slip through blood-brain barrier By Laura Sanders November 3, 2012; Vol.182 #9 (p. 12) Children live on in their mothers’ brains for decades, and not just as memories. Scientists have found pockets of male DNA, presumably from boy fetuses, in the brain tissue of women who died in their 70s. Not only is male DNA present in women’s brains, it’s common, researchers report online September 26 in PLOS ONE. J. Lee Nelson of the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle and her colleagues found snippets of a male-only...
  • The DNA of Aztec conquest: Genetic evidence tracks missing inhabitants of Mexican city

    11/03/2012 11:36:55 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Nature ^ | Wednesday, October 24, 2012 | Brian Switek
    Mata-Míguez and his colleagues sampled mitochondrial DNA from 25 bodies recovered from patios outside excavated Xaltocan houses. The remains dated from between 1240 and 1521, and so acted as markers of the population before and after the occupation. It turned out that the DNA in the pre-conquest samples did not match those of the post-conquest ones, indicating that a new biological influence came with cultural overthrow. The team concedes that its sample is small and may not be entirely representative of the historical conquest. "We originally thought the question was simply a matter of whether the population was replaced or...
  • DNA has a 521-year half-life

    10/10/2012 8:32:08 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 181 replies
    Nature ^ | Wednesday, October 10, 2012 | Matt Kaplan
    By comparing the specimens' ages and degrees of DNA degradation, the researchers calculated that DNA has a half-life of 521 years. That means that after 521 years, half of the bonds between nucleotides in the backbone of a sample would have broken; after another 521 years half of the remaining bonds would have gone; and so on. The team predicts that even in a bone at an ideal preservation temperature of -5 °C, effectively every bond would be destroyed after a maximum of 6.8 million years. The DNA would cease to be readable much earlier -- perhaps after roughly 1.5...
  • Introducing "Bi-Fi": The Biological Internet

    10/09/2012 4:22:38 AM PDT · by ShadowAce · 21 replies
    Evolution News and Views ^ | 3 October 2012 | Staff
    Imagine storing books in DNA and sending them across a biological Internet. It's already happening. As we reported here back in May, bioengineers are realizing that DNA is an excellent storage medium. They've started writing books in DNA letters. Now a research team at Harvard has just announced in Science the "Next-Generation Digital Information Storage in DNA":Digital information is accumulating at an astounding rate, straining our ability to store and archive it. DNA is among the most dense and stable information media known. The development of new technologies in both DNA synthesis and sequencing make DNA an increasingly feasible digital...
  • DNA Unveils Enigmatic Denisovans

    09/29/2012 1:04:30 PM PDT · by blam · 19 replies
    Science News ^ | 9-22-2012 | Bruce Bower
    DNA Unveils Enigmatic Denisovans Extinct Neandertal relatives serve up a complete genetic playbook By Bruce BowerScience News September 22nd, 2012; Vol.182 #6 (p. 5) A replica of a partial Denisovan finger bone, placed on its corresponding position on a person’s hand, emphasizes the small size of this ancient find. Scientists have retrieved a comprehensive set of genetic instructions from the actual Denisovan finger fossil. Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology Genetic data of unprecedented completeness have been pulled from the fossil remains of a young Stone Age woman. The DNA helps illuminate the relationships among her group — ancient Siberians...
  • Crux condom in Assange assault case lacks his DNA

    09/16/2012 4:02:51 PM PDT · by OL Hickory · 9 replies
    Russia Today ^ | 16-sept-2012
    A ripped condom given to Swedish police by one of Julian Assange’s accusers does not contain the WikiLeaks founder’s DNA, forensic scientists have reportedly found.
  • Texas Man Freed After DNA Clears Him Of 1988 Rape

    08/27/2012 7:33:28 PM PDT · by Altariel · 77 replies
    CBS Local (DFW) ^ | August 24, 2012 | CBS Dallas
    FORT WORTH (CBSDFW.COM) – After serving 24 years in prison for a crime he didn’t commit, today a North Texas man received an apology from a judge and a standing ovation in the courtroom. David Lee Wiggins was freed from jail Friday after DNA tests proved he wasn’t the person who raped a 14-year-old girl back in 1988. Wiggins was convicted of Aggravated Sexual Assault in 1989 after the teen victim identified him. The person who assaulted the young girl had covered her face for during most of the attack. Police showed the girl a photo lineup, then a live...
  • Neurological Correlates of Political Ideology and Homosexuality

    08/23/2012 9:23:59 AM PDT · by AnonymousConservative · 55 replies
    Anonymous Conservative Website ^ | August 22, 2012 | Anonymous Conservative
    The funniest thing about the r/K divide within our species is how pervasive it is. Everywhere I look, I see aspects of it manifesting in our culture, our behavior, our history, and even our future. Here is a free abstract from an interesting study examining the “balancing selection hypothesis” of homosexuality. Let me rephrase this, so it makes more sense. There may be a gene which produces women who are more fertile, have more offspring, and want to deal with children less. At the same time it makes men more feminine (and more promiscuous, since that correlates with homosexuality). (There...
  • Scottish people's DNA study could 'rewrite nation's history'

    08/22/2012 7:05:20 AM PDT · by Renfield · 137 replies
    The Guardian (UK) ^ | 8-14-2012 | Charlotte Higgins
    Evidence of African, Arabian, south-east Asian and Siberian ancestry in Scotland, says author of book tracing genetic journey A large scale study of Scottish people's DNA is threatening to "rewrite the nation's history", according to author Alistair Moffat. Scotland, he told the Edinburgh international book festival, despite a long-held belief that its ethnic make-up was largely Scots, Celtic, Viking and Irish, was in fact "one of the most diverse nations on earth". "The explanation is simple. We are a people on the edge of beyond; on the end of a massive continent. Peoples were migrating northwest; and they couldn't get...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- DNA: The Molecule that Defines You

    08/20/2012 9:12:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 48 replies
    NASA ^ | August 21, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: Every living thing on planet Earth is defined by its own molecule -- what's yours? This molecule, called DNA, spans about two meters stretched out but is coiled into every cell in your body. The many copies of DNA that compose you were all copied from one single cell, and your body is continually making new copies. The above ground-breaking animated video depicts the tiny, amazing, bio-molecular machinery that makes these DNA copies. For a fee, it is now possible to find part of all of the code of the DNA molecule that defines you, but lively debates involving...
  • Polar bears' ancient roots pushed way back

    07/25/2012 6:22:06 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Science News ^ | Monday, July 23rd, 2012 | Devin Powell
    ...A new analysis of its DNA suggests that Ursus maritimus split from the brown bear between 4 million and 5 million years ago -- around the same time when, some scientists believe, the Arctic's thick sea ice first formed. With such old origins, the creature must have weathered extreme shifts in climate, researchers report online July 23 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Simulations of how the DNA changed over time suggest that polar bear populations rose and fell with the temperature. After thriving during cooler times between 800,000 and 600,000 years ago, the bears seem to...
  • Human DNA Variation Linked to Biblical Event Timeline

    07/23/2012 3:33:52 PM PDT · by fishtank · 11 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | Jul. 23, 2012 | Jeffrey Tompkins, Ph.D.
    Human DNA Variation Linked to Biblical Event Timeline by Jeffrey Tomkins, Ph.D. | Jul. 23, 2012 Each person is different, and each, except an identical twin, has unique DNA differences. These differences can be traced across global populations and ethnic groups. Furthermore, recent research provides interesting insight about the approximate time that these DNA differences entered the human race. A new study reported in the journal Science has advanced our knowledge of rare DNA variation associated with gene regions in the human genome.1 By applying a demographics-based model to the data, researchers discovered that the human genome began to rapidly...
  • Science points to God

    07/19/2012 5:48:29 PM PDT · by kathsua · 63 replies
    Hutchinson News ^ | 7/12/12 | DAVE DENLINGER
    I appreciated the comments of Leroy Stucky (Western Front, June 28) defending the biblical view of the beginning of mankind, the world and the universe, otherwise known as creationism. Creationism will always be a very difficult doctrine to accept, as long as people exclude the supernatural influence and presence of an almighty God who, in my opinion, started the whole process. I have never read an issue of The American Spectator magazine, but recently at the library I happened to pick up the May 2012 issue. The magazine, I found out, is very conservative, but not necessary Christian. However, included...
  • Native Americans descended from three Asian groups: study

    07/11/2012 11:22:20 AM PDT · by Theoria · 57 replies
    AFP ^ | 11 July 2012 | AFP
    Native Americans spread out today from Canada to the tip of Chile descended not from one but at least three migrant waves from Siberia between 5,000 and 15,000 years ago, a study said Wednesday. The finding is controversial among geneticists, archaeologists and linguists -- many of whom have maintained that a single Asian ancestral group populated the Americas. But the new study, claiming to be the most comprehensive analysis yet of Native American genetics, claims to have found incontrovertible proof that there were three immigration waves -- a theory first put forward in 1986. Most Native Americans, said the study,...
  • DNA clues to Queen of Sheba tale

    06/23/2012 9:34:37 PM PDT · by Theoria · 17 replies
    BBC ^ | 21 June 2012 | Helen Briggs
    Clues to the origins of the Queen of Sheba legend are written in the DNA of some Africans, according to scientists.Genetic research suggests Ethiopians mixed with Egyptian, Israeli or Syrian populations about 3,000 years ago. This is the time the queen, mentioned in great religious works, is said to have ruled the kingdom of Sheba. The research, published in The American Journal of Human Genetics, also sheds light on human migration out of Africa 60,000 years ago.According to fossil evidence, human history goes back longer in Ethiopia than anywhere else in the world. But little has been known until now...
  • British Bioethics Council Gives OK to Three-Parent Embryo

    06/14/2012 2:53:02 PM PDT · by NYer · 13 replies
    Life News ^ | June 14, 2012 | Rebecca Taylor
    A British ethics committee has recommended going forward with creating human embryos with 3 genetic parents. The Nuffield Council on Bioethics, an independent body that considers issues in biotechnology and medicine, has found the genetic engineering technique is ethical and should move forward even though the technique is currently against the law in the United Kingdom.Why would doctors want to engineer an embryo with the genetic material from 3 people? Because, it will “prevent” the inheritance of mitochondrial disease. Not all of our DNA that we inherit is in the nuclei of the egg and sperm that join at fertilization....
  • Bigfoot and Yeti DNA Study Gets Serious

    05/22/2012 6:44:00 PM PDT · by Theoria · 47 replies
    LiveScience ^ | 22 May 2012 | Jeanna Bryner
    A new university-backed project aims to investigate cryptic species such as the yeti whose existence is unproven, through genetic testing. Researchers from Oxford University and the Lausanne Museum of Zoology are asking anyone with a collection of cryptozoological material to submit descriptions of it. The researchers will then ask for hair and other samples for genetic identification. "I'm challenging and inviting the cryptozoologists to come up with the evidence instead of complaining that science is rejecting what they have to say," said geneticist Bryan Sykes of the University of Oxford. While Sykes doesn't expect to find solid evidence of a...
  • California considers DNA privacy law

    05/22/2012 11:20:10 AM PDT · by Theoria · 1 replies
    Nature ^ | 18 May 2012 | Helen Shen
    Academic researchers fear measures would prohibit work with genetic databases. California lawmakers are weighing a bill aimed at protecting their state's citizens from surreptitious genetic testing but scientists are voicing their growing concerns that, if passed, such a law would have a costly and damaging effect on research. The bill, dubbed the Genetic Information Privacy Act, would require an individual’s written consent for the collection, analysis, retention, and sharing of his or her genetic information—including DNA, genetic test results, and even family disease history. “It’s becoming easier and quicker and cheaper for people to obtain their genetic profile or genetic...
  • Remains may be ancient[Australia]

    05/17/2012 11:44:04 PM PDT · by Theoria · 16 replies
    The Area News ^ | 16 May 2012 | Emily Tinker
    ARCHAEOLOGISTS are on the cusp of unravelling the mystery behind a set of “hugely significant” ancient Aboriginal remains discovered in the region last year. Former local man Robert Harris Jnr found the remains near an old water course late last February while working on a property outside Lake Cargelligo. The remains – confirmed to be tens of thousands of years old –have been hailed as the greatest discovery in more than half a century. “They’re more significant than first thought,” local Aboriginal site recorder and brother of Robert, Max Harris said. “They are as old, or even older than Mungo...