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Keyword: elephants

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  • Hawaii lawmakers look to ban ivory

    03/27/2016 9:09:37 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 13 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Mar 27, 2016 5:09 PM EDT | Marina Starleaf Riker
    Cheryl Konrad has spent the last 35 years educating visitors to her Lahaina, Hawaii, store about the centuries-old history of scrimshaw. Konrad fills the shelves in Lahaina Scrimshaw with the etchings of local artists on fossilized walrus and mammoth ivory. But if a bill to ban the sale of ivory becomes law this year, she worries that she will be forced to close her store. “I feel like I’ve been a part of history. It’s just so hard to fathom that it could be criminal eventually,” Konrad said. Similar legislation in previous years has failed largely because of pushback from...
  • 1.1-Million-Year-Old Stegodon Tusk Unearthed in Pakistan

    02/16/2016 10:19:58 AM PST · by nickcarraway · 8 replies
    Discovery ^ | FEB 16, 2016
    A team of Pakistani researchers claims to have unearthed a 1.1 million-year-old stegodon tusk in the central province of Punjab, potentially shedding new light on the mammal's evolutionary journey. They've finally found a fossilized mosquito full of prehistoric blood! So a real "Jurassic Park" is right around the corner, right? Stegodonts, distant cousins of modern elephants, are thought to have been present on earth from around 11 million years ago until the late Pleistocene period, which lasted until the end of the last Ice Age around 11,700 years ago. The tusk measures some eight feet (2.44 metres) in length and...
  • This Ancient, Deadly Disease Is Still Killing In Europe

    12/30/2011 3:33:45 PM PST · by blam · 38 replies
    TBI ^ | 12-30-3011 | John Donnelly
    This Ancient, Deadly Disease Is Still Killing In Europe John Donnelly, GlobalPost Dec. 30, 2011, 12:53 PM GENEVA, Switzerland – On the sidelines of a conference in Baku, Azerbaijan, just three months ago, a senior health official from Belarus met privately with Mario Raviglione, whose job here at the World Health Organization’s headquarters is to control the spread of tuberculosis around the world. Belarus needed help. It had just confirmed a study that found 35 percent of all TB cases in the capital of Minsk were multi-drug resistant TB (MDR-TB) – the highest rate in the world ever recorded for...
  • Mastodon tusks tell of brutal battles

    12/16/2006 2:17:43 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies · 314+ views
    Australian Broadcasting Corporation ^ | Friday, 27 October 2006 | Jennifer Viegas
    Battle scars on male mastodon tusks show these Ice Age giants were not the peaceful creatures once thought... The scars reveal they fought in brutal combat each year during seasonal phases of heightened sexual activity and aggression. The discovery, announced at a recent Society of Vertebrate Paleontology meeting in Ontario, counters the view that now-extinct mastodons were peaceful, passive creatures that rarely engaged in battles. It also strengthens the link between mastodon and modern elephant behaviour, since male bull elephants also fight seasonal, hormonally-charged battles to show their dominance and win desired mates... "Mastodon tusks curve upward strongly at the...
  • Mastodons Driven To Extinction By Tuberculosis, Fossils Suggest

    10/03/2006 3:01:37 PM PDT · by blam · 93 replies · 1,673+ views
    National Geographic ^ | 10-3-2006 | Kimberly Johnson
    Mastodons Driven to Extinction by Tuberculosis, Fossils Suggest Kimberly Johnson for National Geographic News October 3, 2006 Tuberculosis was rampant in North American mastodons during the late Ice Age and may have led to their extinction, researchers say. Mastodons lived in North America starting about 2 million years ago and thrived until 11,000 years ago—around the time humans arrived on the continent—when the last of the 7-ton (6.35-metric-ton) elephantlike creatures died off. Scientists Bruce Rothschild and Richard Laub pieced together clues to the animals' widespread die-off by studying unearthed mastodon foot bones. Rothschild first noticed a telltale tuberculosis lesion on...
  • Activists blamed for causing another elephant to push her down

    03/09/2004 9:22:41 AM PST · by Dane · 18 replies · 131+ views
    SF Gate. Com ^ | 3/8/04 | Demian Bulwa
    <p>Calle the ailing elephant died at the San Francisco Zoo on Sunday morning, hours after another elephant attacked her -- an attack that zoo officials are blaming on animal rights demonstrators who they say agitated the beasts.</p> <p>Zoo veterinarians quietly euthanized Calle, a 37-year-old female Asian elephant, at about 5 a.m., after she dropped to her belly and rolled on her side.</p>
  • Peaches The Elephant Has Died In Chicago

    01/22/2005 3:00:35 PM PST · by Scenic Sounds · 29 replies · 843+ views
    San Diego Union-Tribune ^ | January 22, 2005 | By Craig Gustafson
    SAN PASQUAL VALLEY – For 50 years she called San Diego County home. That's why animal-welfare activists are upset that Peaches, the oldest African elephant in the country, died earlier this week at Chicago's Lincoln Park Zoo. Activists are criticizing the San Diego Wild Animal Park for its decision to move Peaches and two other older elephants, Wankie and Tatima, to the cold-weather city in early 2003. With two of those elephants now dead, they called the move "grossly irresponsible." Peaches, 55, died of "complications due to old age," according to Lincoln Park officials. She was found lying on the...
  • Inspiration for 'Babar the Elephant' Dies , 99

    04/08/2003 12:36:26 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 17 replies · 243+ views
    Yahoo! News ^ | 3/8/03 | AP - Paris
    PARIS - Cecile de Brunhoff, the inspiration for Babar, the enchanting little elephant whose adventures captivated generations of children, has died in Paris. She was 99. De Brunhoff suffered a stroke Saturday night and died Monday in a hospital in Paris, where she lived, said Mathieu de Brunhoff, one of her sons. She first invented the tale of a little elephant as a bedtime story for her boys in 1931. They in turn told their father, painter Jean de Brunhoff, who illustrated the story and filled in details, naming the elephant Babar and creating Celeste, Zephir and the "Old Lady,"...
  • Oregon Zoo staff infected by tuberculosis after exposure to infected elephants

    01/08/2016 9:52:00 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 7 replies
    oregonlive ^ | 01/08/2016 | Lynne Terry
    The good news is that even though TB is highly contagious, the three infected elephants at the zoo did not spread the disease to visitors, including those who attended one of Rama's painting parties in which he created splatter paintings. About 5 percent of the captive Asian elephants in North America are infected. The disease can be deadly to elephants. Three pachyderms at an exotic animal farm in Illinois died from the disease between 1994 and 1996, according to the CDC. One handler in that outbreak got sick as well. At the Oregon Zoo, the first case popped up in...
  • The animal that doesn't get cancer

    11/01/2015 3:36:17 AM PST · by WhiskeyX · 33 replies
    BBC ^ | 31 October 2015 | Melissa Hogenboom
    Many animals get cancer just like humans do, but there are a few mysterious species that rarely develop it.... A few animals don't seem to get cancer very often, or at all. Understanding why could help us treat it, or even prevent it.....
  • Elephant Comes to the Rescue of Her Caretaker in Thailand

    10/13/2015 5:34:07 AM PDT · by ETL · 16 replies
    AccuWeather.com ^ | Oct 12, 2015
    "Watch as this 17-year-old elephant named Thongsri comes to the aid of her caretaker in Chiang Mai, Thailand."
  • Dozens of Cecil the Lions Being Shipped off to China along with Baby Elephants

    08/19/2015 8:20:58 AM PDT · by Sean_Anthony · 2 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 08/19/15 | Judi McLeod
    Difficult to hold out hope for Zimbabwe elephants and lions being shipped like so much coal off to China In faraway Zimbabwe, when the veterinaries had to come to put down the family pets, because of widespread poverty, few outside the country noticed. The Western World never heard from animal rights activists until an American big game hunter dentist took down Cecil, the Lion, who now has his own Facebook page. The screams of animal rights activists went up worldwide. In the aftermath of Cecil the Lion, we learn of reports that staff at Hwange National Park have been suddenly...
  • It's Surprisingly Legal to Eat Lion Meat

    07/29/2015 6:06:15 PM PDT · by ScottWalkerForPresident2016 · 24 replies
    VICE News ^ | 02/19/2015 | Mark Hay
    As part of the celebrations for his 91st birthday next Saturday, Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe will be served a feast featuring five impala, two buffalo, two elephants, two sables, and one lion. According to a report in Zimbabwe's The Chronicle, the menagerie was donated by Tendai Musasa, owner of the prominent Woodlands Farm near the Elephant Hills Resort at Victoria Falls, where the 20,000-person shindig will take place. While you'd think that eating elephants and lions, icons of wildlife conservation, would be illegal, it turns out it's not—neither under Zimbabwean nor international law. As of 1997, elephant populations in Botswana,...
  • In the Absence of Fathers: A Story of Elephants and Men

    04/28/2015 10:05:38 PM PDT · by grundle · 24 replies
    These Stone Walls ^ | June 20, 2012 | Fr. Gordon J. MacRae
    Are committed fathers an endangered species in our culture? Fr. Gordon MacRae draws a troubling corollary between absent fathers and burgeoning prisons.Wade Horn, Ph.D., President of the National Fatherhood Initiative, had an intriguing article entitled “Of Elephants and Men” in a recent issue of Fatherhood Today magazine. I found Dr. Horn’s story about young elephants to be simply fascinating, and you will too. It was sent to me by a TSW reader who wanted to know if there is any connection between the absence of fathers and the shocking growth of the American prison population. Some years ago, officials at...
  • Elephants help rescue stuck 18-wheeler in Louisiana

    04/06/2015 9:23:00 AM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 13 replies
    ABC 8 News (WRIC) ^ | March 25, 2015 | WRIC Newsroom
    A pair of elephants helped rescue the truck they were riding in when it got stuck in the mud on a trip from New Orleans to Dallas. It all happened on Tuesday around 7:03 a.m., when the tractor trailer transporting three elephants pulled over from Interstate 49 near the Powhatan exit in Louisiana and accidentally got stuck in some mud, the Natchitoches Parish Sheriff’s office said in a statement. “When deputies arrived on scene, they were astounded to find two elephants keeping the eighteen wheeler from overturning,” the sheriff’s office said. The elephants on the truck were being transported to...
  • Prehistoric stone tools bear 500,000-year-old animal residue

    03/21/2015 6:02:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 60 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | March 19, 2015 | American Friends of Tel Aviv University
    Tel Aviv University discovers first direct evidence early flint tools were used to butcher animal carcasses. Some 2.5 million years ago, early humans survived on a paltry diet of plants. As the human brain expanded, however, it required more substantial nourishment - namely fat and meat - to sustain it. This drove prehistoric man, who lacked the requisite claws and sharp teeth of carnivores, to develop the skills and tools necessary to hunt animals and butcher fat and meat from large carcasses. Among elephant remains some 500,000 years old at a Lower Paleolithic site in Revadim, Israel, Prof. Ran Barkai...
  • Elephants dance to violin music

    08/27/2014 8:26:35 AM PDT · by John S Mosby · 20 replies
    UK Telegraph ^ | August 27,2014 | Olivia Rzadkiewicz
    Eleanor Bartsch was performing with the Wisconsin Chamber Orchestra, during which she played Bach’s Concerto in D Minor. During the performance, she noticed two elephants outside a tent at the back of the Circus World Museum, who seemed to be reacting to the music.
  • Humane Society pays multimillion-dollar settlement to Feld Entertainment

    07/01/2014 2:35:09 AM PDT · by ObamahatesPACoal · 14 replies
    bizjournals.com ^ | May 16, 2014 | Jo-Lynn Brown
    The Humane Society of the United States, along with other lawsuit co-defendants, have paid $15.75 million to settle cases with Feld Entertainment, the parent company of Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus. The settlement is the final stage of a 14-year litigation between the parties. The lawsuit was originally filed over the treatment of 43 Asian elephants, according to the Bradenton Herald.
  • California scientists discover mouse-like mammal related to elephants

    06/27/2014 5:36:33 PM PDT · by blueplum · 50 replies
    Reuters ^ | June 26, 2014 | Laura Zuckerman
    (Reuters) - A new mammal discovered in the remote desert of western Africa resembles a long-nosed mouse in appearance but is more closely related genetically to elephants, a California scientist who helped identify the tiny creature said on Thursday. The new species of elephant shrew, given the scientific name Macroscelides micus, inhabits an ancient volcanic formation in Namibia and sports red fur that helps it blend in with the color of its rocky surroundings, said John Dumbacher, one of a team of biologists behind the discovery. Genetic testing of the creature – which weighs up to an ounce (28 grams)...
  • Obama Criminalizes Antique Dealers and Endangers Wild Elephants

    03/19/2014 1:07:09 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 24 replies
    Godfather Politics ^ | March 19, 2014 | Dave Jolly
    From the mid-1800s on, hundreds of thousands of African elephants were slaughtered for their ivory. Their valuable ivory tusks, some weighing as much as 200 pounds each, were collected and the rest of the elephant was left to rot in the sun or for scavengers to feast on. The ivory was used for many things such as piano keys, to ladies combs to various ornate pieces of carved artwork. In some areas of Africa, elephants were hunted to extinction prompting many countries to pass laws on the import and sale of ivory from elephants. In 1975, the Convention on the...
  • War Elephant Myths Debunked by DNA

    01/20/2014 6:06:44 PM PST · by lbryce · 43 replies
    The Institute for Genomic Biology ^ | January 20, 2014 | Staff
    On a whim, I recently posted the image below of the frog riding the beetle irreverently entitling it as Hannibal Crossing the Carpathians. Hannibal Crosses The CarpathiansWhile it was obviously posted in jest, several comments appeared in scholarly discussion of the use of elephants in war, having come across this article thought it might be of interest.Please take note any establishment, organization involved in science will inevitably be a left-wing liberal tool, certainly so, a group with the tagline, where science meets society. War Elephant Myths Debunked by DNAThe Institute for Genomic BiologyWhere Science Meets Society Through DNA analysis, Illinois...
  • Hannibal Crosses The Carpathians

    01/08/2014 12:16:33 AM PST · by lbryce · 25 replies
    Hannibal Crosses The CarpathiansWhen did Hannibal cross the alps? According to http://carpenoctem.tv/military/hannibal.html it was in 218 B.C. Why did Hannibal take elephants to cross the alps? Hannibal took elephants across the Alps as weapons of war against the Romans. How many men crossed the alps with Hannibal? 50,000 infantry, 9,000 cavalry, and about 30 elephants when he first began the ascent. How many elephants did Hannibal have before he crossed the alps? Fifty
  • Anti-hunting extremists are boneheads

    11/24/2013 2:54:35 PM PST · by marktwain · 8 replies
    WND ^ | 21 November, 2013 | Jeff Knox
    On Thursday, Nov. 14, the U.S. government crushed nearly 11,000 pounds of raw and carved ivory that had been seized over the last 25 years from smugglers and illegal dealers. The value of the huge pile if ivory is inestimable, as the carved pieces are considered works of art, but it can be pretty safely assumed that this collection of ivory was worth well over $10 million, as small ivory figurines routinely sell for around $500 a piece, and prices have been escalating due to stricter regulation and enforcement of legal trade in ivory. Ivory is a tricky, and touchy,...
  • U.S. Crushes 6 Tons of Ivory to "Send Message" to Poachers

    11/17/2013 5:53:08 AM PST · by Kaslin · 81 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | November 17, 2013 | Mike Shedlock
    Here's an interesting video of the US taking 6 tons of confiscated ivory to Africa to crush it. The purpose was to "send a message" to poachers. The entire worldwide elephant population is 500,000. They are vanishing at a rate of 50,000 per year, just for their ivory. A couple of people sent me this video, Reader Michael was first. Link if video does not play: U.S. crushes 6 tons of confiscated ivory to send message to poachers Africa's elephants are being slaughtered at a record pace by poachers who hope to get rich by selling their ivory tusks. The...
  • Environmental crime wave costs world billions (poaching now “environmental crime”?)

    11/06/2013 9:51:18 AM PST · by Olog-hai · 11 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Nov 6, 2013 12:36 PM EST | Jason Straziuso
    The illegal cutting of timber and the poaching of elephants and rhinos are part of a “rapidly escalating environmental crime wave” that international governments must combat by increasing cooperation, police and environmental officials said Wednesday. Interpol and the United Nations Environmental Program are working together to stop environmental crimes that cost tens of billions of dollars a year, said Achim Steiner, the U.N. Environmental Program's Executive Director. … The demand for elephant ivory by China’s rising middle class is fueling the deaths of thousands of elephants across Africa, say wildlife experts. An estimated 17,000 elephants were illegally killed in Africa...
  • Poachers Use Cyanide to Massacre Over 300 Elephants in Zimbabwe

    10/21/2013 7:05:53 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 31 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 20 Oct 2013 | Peta Thornycroft, and Aislinn Laing
    Poachers kill 300 Zimbabwe elephants with cyanide • Cyanide has been used to kill 300 elephants in Zimbabwe's biggest nature reserve - three times the original estimate - as new photos show the scale of the slaughter Poachers in Zimbabwe have killed more than 300 elephants and countless other safari animals by cyanide poisoning, The Telegraph has learned. The full extent of the devastation wreaked in Hwange, the country's largest national park, has been revealed by legitimate hunters who discovered what conservationists say is the worst single massacre in southern Africa for 25 years. Pictures taken by the hunters, which...
  • Elephants Understand Human Gestures

    10/14/2013 8:38:08 AM PDT · by null and void · 88 replies
    Scientific Computing ^ | October 10, 2013 | University of St Andrews
    Elephants understand humans in a way most other animals don’t, according to the latest research from the University of St Andrews. The new study, published October 10, 2013 by Current Biology, found that elephants are the only wild animals to understand human pointing without any training to do so. The researchers, Anna Smet and Professor Richard Byrne from the University’s School of Psychology and Neuroscience, set out to test whether African elephants could learn to follow pointing — and were surprised to find them responding successfully from the first trial. They said, “In our study we found that African elephants spontaneously...
  • Will elephants still roam earth in 20 years?

    04/30/2013 8:42:17 AM PDT · by chessplayer · 74 replies
    (CNN) -- At the start of the 1980s there were more than a million elephants in Africa. During that decade, 600,000 were destroyed for ivory products. Today perhaps no more than 400,000 remain across the continent, according to Samuel Wasser of the University of Washington, who is widely recognized as an authority on the subject. If this level of killing continues, if elephants continue to be slaughtered for trinkets and statuettes, in 10 years' time most of Africa's elephants will be gone and an ineffable symbol of majesty and wonder -- and the linchpin in the ecology of an entire...
  • War Elephant - Photograph of Elephant with Mounted Machine Gun, circa 1914 - 1918

    02/15/2013 8:38:17 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 73 replies
    Retronaut ^ | 1914 - 1918 | Retronaut
    The gun is John Moses Browning’s M1895 Colt-Browning machine gun, aka ... Potato Digger.
  • The Children of Hannibal (MICHAEL J. TOTTEN)

    12/17/2012 11:22:08 PM PST · by neverdem · 5 replies
    City Journal ^ | Autumn 2012 | MICHAEL J. TOTTEN
    The rich heritage of Tunisia, maybe the only place where the Arab Spring stands a chance Modern-day Tunisians, more Westernized than most Arabs, see themselves as descendants of the great Carthaginian general who invaded Italy. The Arab Spring began in Sidi Bouzid, a small Tunisian town, at the end of 2010. In a desperate protest against the corrupt and oppressive government that had made it impossible for him to earn a living, food-cart vendor Mohamed Bouazizi stood before City Hall, doused himself with gasoline, and lit a match. His suicide seeded a revolutionary storm that swept the countryside and eventually...
  • Elephant Lessons: Real Men Leading Boys to Manhood [males raised by single mothers turn violent]

    02/04/2013 4:25:08 PM PST · by grundle · 10 replies
    Violence and bizarre aggressive behaviors among young male elephants has increased dramatically over the course of a few decades. A team of researchers, trauma experts and neuropsychologists among them, studied the causes and found a way to resolve the elephant violence. Their findings can help us understand why we need mature men leading boys to manhood and to guide for those coming into renewed manhood following the overthrow of repressive regimes. The lessons require connecting three dots. 1. The social development systems of male elephants. 2. The abuse of women in oppressive regimes. 3. Boy Gangs – A poor substitute...
  • THE ELEPHANT'S JOURNEY TO PAY RESPECT, BUT HOW DID THEY KNOW? (L Anthony death)

    01/22/2013 5:33:02 AM PST · by NYer · 15 replies
    Spirit Daily ^ | January 18, 2013
      THE ELEPHANT'S JOURNEY TO PAY RESPECT, BUT HOW DID THEY KNOW? Lawrence Anthony, a legend in South Africa and author of 3 books including the bestseller The Elephant Whisperer, bravely rescued wildlife and rehabilitated elephants all over the globe from human atrocities, including the courageous rescue of Baghdad Zoo animals during US invasion in 2003.   Anthony, Nana and calf (Photo courtesy of the Anthony family) On March 7, 2012 Lawrence Anthony died. He is remembered and missed by his wife, 2 sons, 2 grandsons and numerous elephants. Two days after his passing, the wild elephants showed up...
  • Bardot: Save Elephants, or I'll Go to Russia too

    01/04/2013 5:54:51 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 19 replies
    The Local ^ | 04 Jan 2013
    French cinema legend Brigitte Bardot on Friday threatened to follow Gérard Depardieu to Russia unless two elephants under threat of being put down are granted a reprieve. Depardieu the Russian praises 'democracy' (04 Jan 13) Putin makes Depardieu Russian citizen (03 Jan 13) Bardot leaps to Depardieu's defence (19 Dec 12) In a surreal twist to the saga over Depardieu's move into tax exile, the veteran animal rights campaigner said she would emulate his request for Russian nationality unless authorities intervened to save Baby and Nepal. The two elephants face being put down because they have been diagnosed with tuberculosis...
  • Extinct elephant 'survived late' in North China

    12/19/2012 4:13:23 AM PST · by Renfield · 6 replies
    BBC News ^ | 12-19-2012 | Michelle Warwicker
    Wild elephants living in North China 3,000 years ago belonged to the extinct genus Palaeoloxodon, scientists say. They had previously been identified as Elephas maximus, the Asian elephant that still inhabits southern China. The findings suggest that Palaeloxodon survived a further 7,000 years than was thought. The team from China examined fossilised elephant teeth and ancient elephant-shaped bronzes for the study. The research, published in Quaternary International was carried out by a group of scientists from Shaanxi Normal University and Northwest University in Xi'an and The Institute of Geographic Sciences and Natural Resources Research, Beijing.....
  • Elephants Digest Beans for Pricey Coffee

    12/07/2012 9:06:41 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 44 replies
    UPI ^ | Dec. 7, 2012
    A Canadian entrepreneur said his $500-per-pound coffee is made by plucking the beans from the dung of a herd of elephants in Thailand. Blake Dinkin, 42, proprietor of Black Ivory Coffee, said the beans are fed to elephants at the Golden Triangle Asian Elephant Foundation then later plucked from their dung, Sky News reported Friday. "When an elephant eats coffee, its stomach acid breaks down the protein found in coffee, which is a key factor in bitterness," Dinkin said. "You end up with a cup that's very smooth without the bitterness of regular coffee." John Roberts, director of elephants at...
  • Coffee from an elephant's gut fills a $50 cup

    12/07/2012 7:48:44 PM PST · by dynachrome · 21 replies
    Associated Press via SFGate ^ | 12-7-12 | JOCELYN GECKER
    In the lush hills of northern Thailand, a herd of 20 elephants is excreting some of the world's most expensive coffee. Trumpeted as earthy in flavor and smooth on the palate, the exotic new brew is made from beans eaten by Thai elephants and plucked a day later from their dung. A gut reaction inside the elephant creates what its founder calls the coffee's unique taste.
  • Elephant's sixth 'toe' discovered

    12/26/2011 8:28:17 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 57 replies
    BBC News ^ | Rebecca Morelle
    A mysterious bony growth found in elephants' feet is actually a sixth "toe", scientists report. For more than 300 years, the structure has puzzled researchers, but this study suggests that it helps to support elephants' colossal weight. Fossils reveal that this "pre-digit" evolved about 40 million years ago, at a point when early elephants became larger and more land-based. The research is published in the journal Science. Lead author Professor John Hutchinson, from the UK's structure and motion laboratory at the Royal Veterinary College, said: "It's a cool mystery that goes back to 1706, when the first elephant was dissected...
  • 'Longest Tusked' Elephant in Asia Dies in Sri Lanka

    08/07/2011 7:46:26 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 4 replies
    BBC ^ | 4 August 2011 | Charles Haviland
    An elephant said to have the longest tusks in Asia has died in Sri Lanka. The animal, named Millangoda Raja, was about 70 years old and had served in a ceremonial capacity for several decades in the city of Kandy. Many Asian elephants, smaller in stature than their African cousins, fail to grow tusks at all. But Millangoda Raja's tusks were so long that they reached to the ground. There are now plans to stuff the dead elephant and put him on public display. His owner, Appuhami Millangoda, recalled that Millangoda Raja had been among a batch of elephants he...
  • Go Daddy CEO Bob Parsons: Africa Elephant Hunt Video 'Nothing to Be Ashamed Of'

    04/02/2011 1:17:00 PM PDT · by Erik Latranyi · 14 replies
    ABC News ^ | 2 April 2011 | SUSANNA KIM and MICHAEL S. JAMES
    Go Daddy CEO Bob Parsons has a message for those outraged by a four-minute video of an elephant hunt in Zimbabwe on his Go Daddy video site. More Video Watch: Hunter Illegally Kills Bear Using Pastries Watch: Nat Geo: Leopard Queen Watch: Hole Rips in Roof of Plane"I think if you had all the facts and you knew exactly what was going on and the difference it makes in these people's lives there," he told ABC News Radio, "you'd feel completely different." Parsons has said he participated in the hunt because the elephants were a nuisance destroying crops the local...
  • GoDaddy.com CEO Under Fire for Posting Video of Elephant Hunt in Zimbabwe

    03/31/2011 5:36:22 PM PDT · by mewykwistmas · 21 replies
    foxnews.com ^ | 3/31/2011 | foxnews.com
    “So be it, I'm not ashamed of what I did... All these people that are complaining that this shouldn't happen, that these people who are starving to death otherwise shouldn't eat these elephants, you probably see them driving through at McDonald cutting a steak. These people (in Zimbabwe) don't have that option,” he told the station by phone. Conflict with humans is the biggest threat to the African elephant, according to the World Wildlife Fund. "As the elephants continue to raid crop fields, farmers are being killed while trying to defend their fields and elephants are becoming the source of...
  • Obama, Elephants, and Fathers

    01/28/2011 6:17:20 PM PST · by mbeaven · 2 replies
    http://considerandhearme.wordpress.com ^ | 01/26/2011 | considerandhearme
    "Schools don’t need more money, they need more parents." http://considerandhearme.wordpress.com/2011/01/26/obama-elephants-and-fathers/
  • Did the ancient Egyptians know of pygmy mammoths? Well, there is that tomb painting.

    01/20/2011 6:38:56 AM PST · by Palter · 31 replies
    Tetrapod Zoology ^ | 19 Jan 2011 | Darren Naish
    One of the things that came up in the many comments appended to the article on Bob's painting of extinct Maltese animals was the famous Egyptian tomb painting of the 'pygmy mammoth'. You're likely already familiar with this (now well known) case: here's the image, as it appears on the beautifully decorated tomb wall of Rekhmire, 'Governor of the Town' of Thebes, and vizier of Egypt during the reigns of Tuthmose III and Amenhotep II (c. 1479 to 1401 BCE) during the XVIII dynasty... In 1994, Baruch Rosen published a brief article in Nature in which he drew attention to...
  • African elephant is two species, researchers say

    12/21/2010 6:00:58 PM PST · by decimon · 14 replies
    BBC ^ | December 21, 2010 | Richard Black
    Genetic researchers may have resolved a long-standing dispute by proving there are two species of African elephant.Savannah and forest elephants have been separated for at least three million years, they say, and are as distinct from each other as Asian elephants are from the extinct woolly mammoth. The researchers also made what they say are the first sequences of nuclear DNA from the extinct American mastodon. > "The divergence of the two species took place around the time of the divergence of the Asian elephant and woolly mammoths," said Michi Hofreiter, a specialist in ancient DNA at the UK's York...
  • Seven Elephants Killed by Speeding Train in India [Herd remain vigilant over dead and injured]

    09/24/2010 6:10:44 PM PDT · by fight_truth_decay · 35 replies
    TELEGRAPH.CO.UK ^ | 6:30AM BST 24 Sep 2010 | Wildlife Staff
    A speeding goods train has crushed seven elephants to death in eastern India after the animals tried to rescue two calves that got stuck in the tracks. The baby elephants became trapped as a herd was crossing the line in a densely forested area in the northern district of Jalpaiguri in West Bengal state on Wednesday night. "Five elephants died immediately on the track while two others succumbed to their injuries on Thursday morning," Atanu Raha, West Bengal's chief forest conservator, said. The adults had crowded around the stricken calves to protect them when they were hit, he added. The...
  • Elephants 'Scared of Ants'

    09/07/2010 10:59:39 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 9 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 02 Sep 2010
    Mice are bad enough, according to the myth - but the creature that really fills an elephant with fear is a lot smaller.Ants are getting the better of nature's biggest land beast on the African savannah, scientists have discovered. The ants act as guardians of acacia trees, which risk being ravaged by hungry elephants. Any elephant foolish enough to approach an ant-protected tree is liable to find swarms of the angry insects crawling up its trunk. Experts believe the ant tree-guards play a vital ecosystem role that has previously been overlooked. Professor Todd Palmer, from the University of Florida, US,...
  • Could Bees hHelp Keep Elephants Away From Crops in Africa?

    06/15/2010 12:26:26 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 9 replies · 173+ views
    Washington Post ^ | Tuesday, June 15, 2010
    It is said that elephants are afraid of mice, but scientists have discovered what elephants are really afraid of: bees. It turns out that the enormous mammals sound an alarm when they encounter bees, and that knowledge could help save African farmers' crops from elephants -- and could save elephants, too. Elephants and humans don't always live well together, particularly in African countries including Kenya. A single hungry elephant can wipe out a family's crops overnight. During the harvest season, farmers will huddle by fires all night, and when an elephant comes near, they will jump up with flaming sticks...
  • ELEPHANTS ATTACK IN ORISSA EXACTLY AFTER ONE YEAR OF PERSECUTIONS

    12/20/2009 3:19:51 PM PST · by markomalley · 40 replies · 2,366+ views
    Archdiocese of Colombo ^ | 12/9/2009 | Fr. Sunil De Silva
    In July 2008 a severe persecution of Christians broke out in the Indian state of Orissa. A 22 year old nun was burnt to death when angry mobs burnt down an orphanage in Khuntpali village in Barhgarh district, another nun was gang raped in Kandhamal, mobs attacked churches, torched vehicles, houses of Christians destroyed, and Fr. Thomas Chellen, director of the pastoral center that was destroyed with a bomb, had a narrow escape after a Hindu mob nearly set him on fire.  The end result saw more than 500 Christians murdered, and thousands of others injured and homeless after their houses...
  • St. Louis Zoo Elephant Undergoing Herpes Treatment

    12/10/2009 9:31:54 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 12 replies · 597+ views
    KPLR ^ | 12/10/09
    The Saint Louis Zoo's two-and-a-half-year-old Asian elephant named Jade is undergoing treatment for elephant endotheliotropic herpesvirus (EEHV), according to Curator of Mammals Martha Fischer. Jade was successfully treated for EEHV in February of this year and since then her blood tests had been negative. The virus is potentially fatal to elephants. "Jade is holding her own," according to Fischer. "We have continued to monitor our young elephants very closely every day for symptoms of EEHV and check their blood levels regularly." A cooperative multi-institutional research effort to study EEHV and find a cure has been underway for the last several...
  • The lure and peril of southern Africa's elephants

    11/06/2009 7:14:55 PM PST · by Saije · 2 replies · 484+ views
    LA Times ^ | 11/6/2009 | Robyn Dixon
    Here's how to pitch this (true) story to Hollywood: Ordinary guy named John, ordinary Sunday, cycling home into a setting sun. Monster roars out of the bushes! John abandons his bike, flees in terror. The creature smashes the bicycle, catches him in a few short strides, grabs him by the shirt. But he slides out of his shirt and falls to the ground. It picks him up again and he slips out of his trousers. Naked, too afraid to even to scream, he scrambles away. But he doesn't get far. The shrieking monster smashes him against a tree. Camera pans...
  • Extinct giant elephant skeleton discovered in Indonesia

    06/25/2009 3:29:09 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies · 1,412+ views
    Times Online ^ | Tuesday, June 9, 2009 | Sophie Tedmanson
    The accidental death of an elephant which had become bogged in mud 200,000 years ago led to the perfect preservation of its skeleton -- and a remarkable scientific discovery... the skeleton of the prehistoric ancestor to the modern Asian elephant which was fossilised in an abandoned sand quarry in East Java, Indonesia. The ancient bones were discovered after land collapsed at the sand quarry on the Indonesian island, adjacent to the Solo River, which killed two men in April. Researchers from the University of Wollongong in Australia and the Geological Survey Institute spent four weeks excavating the bones of the...