Keyword: enlightenment

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  • Swiss Memorial to Atone for Killing of 'Witch' in Age of Enlightenment

    06/13/2014 6:36:43 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 23 replies
    Reuters ^ | Fri Jun 13, 2014
    The Swiss town that ordered Europe's last execution for witchcraft will unveil a memorial on Friday for the woman beheaded more than 200 years ago, accused of bewitching a child. Servant Anna Goeldi was denounced as a witch after her employer's eight-year-old daughter fell ill and began spitting up pins during fits of coughing, according to documents in the local archives. Authorities in Glarus, central Switzerland, became convinced Goeldi was a witch after she later appeared to cure the child using supernatural powers.
  • Cat Owners Have Higher IQs

    06/01/2014 7:56:28 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 115 replies
    counselheal.com ^ | May 30, 2014 06:56 PM EDT | Christine Hsu
    The findings revealed that cat lovers scored significantly higher on intelligence tests compared to their dog-loving counterparts. However, dog owners tend to be more energetic, obedient and outgoing than cat lovers, according to Live Science. Researcher Denise Guastello, a psychology professor at Carroll University, said at an annual Association for Psychological Science meeting in Chicago, that the average cat owner is more reserved, perceptive, tolerant and better at breaking rules than the average dog owner.
  • UN climate panel chair calls for 'enlightenment'

    04/07/2014 1:54:51 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 26 replies
    Yahoo! News ^ | 4/7/14 | FRank Jordans - ap
    BERLIN (AP) — The head of the United Nations scientific panel on climate change urged diplomats and scientists to show "enlightenment" Monday, as they began a weeklong meeting aimed at spelling out in plain terms what options the world has if it wants to prevent catastrophic global warming. Delegates at the closed-doors meeting in Berlin need to tackle a number of sensitive issues, including how best to cut carbon emissions and how to share the cost of shifting away from the fossil fuels that are largely blamed for producing the gases that are heating the planet. Their conclusions will feed...
  • Yoga fanatic drowned trying to achieve ‘enlightenment’ through near-death experience

    10/30/2013 10:42:42 AM PDT · by Teotwawki · 43 replies
    Daily Mail Online ^ | October 30, 2013 | Lizzie Parry
    An extreme yoga fanatic drowned in a quarry after an experiment to achieve enlightenment through a 'near-death experience' went tragically wrong, an inquest has heard. Spiritualist Luke Monrose believed that by pushing his body to its limits and catching hypothermia he could 'unlock the secrets of the afterlife'. [snip] But his risky experiment went tragically wrong and a coroner today ruled Mr Monrose 'died as a consequence of a near-death experience which resulted in physical death'.
  • Obama’s Benghazi Propagandist

    05/08/2013 5:35:25 AM PDT · by SJackson · 20 replies
    FrontPage Magazine ^ | May 8, 2013 | Matthew Vadum
    - FrontPage Magazine - http://frontpagemag.com - Obama’s Benghazi PropagandistPosted By Matthew Vadum On May 8, 2013 @ 12:56 am In Daily Mailer,FrontPage | 4 Comments A young White House speechwriter may be responsible for concocting the official lies about last September’s deadly terrorist attacks in Benghazi, Libya.The Obama administration’s rapidly unravelling narrative about what happened at the U.S. consulate in Libya’s second-largest city may have been cooked up by creative writer Ben Rhodes, the president’s 30-something Deputy National Security Advisor for Strategic Communications and Speechwriting.The origin of the administration’s desperate election-season fabrications may come up today as a congressional committee...
  • Whittaker Chambers and Totalitarian Islam

    07/09/2011 12:33:40 PM PDT · by neverdem · 17 replies
    NATIONAL REVIEW ONLINE | July 9, 2011 | Andrew G. Bostom
    Whittaker Chambers and Totalitarian Islam Playwright David Mamet recently acknowledged that he had been profoundly influenced by Communist apostate Whittaker Chambers’s 1952 anti-Communist memoir, Witness. Mamet described how reading Chambers’s opus inspired “the wrenching experience” of forcibly reevaluating the way he thought, particularly his confessed leftist-herd co-dependence. Also, echoing the delusive herd mentality of the Left’s ad hominem attacks in the 1950s on Chambers — whose allegations of Communist conspiracies have been entirely vindicated with irrefragable documentation from the captured Soviet Venona cables — Congressman Peter King’s staid initial hearings of March 10, 2011, on American Muslim radicalization engendered similarly...
  • Arab Awakening?

    05/01/2011 12:59:31 AM PDT · by Scanian · 5 replies
    The American Thinker ^ | May 01, 2011 | G. Murphy Donovan
    First it was the "Jasmine Revolution" and then it was the "Arab Spring." The "Arab Awakening" is latest euphemism for internecine mayhem in Muslim world. These terms are invariably accompanied by the adjectives "peaceful' and "democratic." As the body bags accumulate, such circumlocutions are harder to digest. The principal purveyor of such pretense is al Jazerra, global network propagandist for the Arab Emirates. American and European reporters, indolent or inept, are quick to take their cues from al Jazerra, but the latest attempt to mask the mayhem of Muslim civil wars offers a special insult to American history. The "awakenings'...
  • Rare book collection on display at Stanford University

    02/20/2011 12:37:20 PM PST · by thecodont · 5 replies
    San Jose Mercury News / mercurynews.com ^ | Posted: 02/19/2011 03:57:18 PM PST | By Lisa M. Krieger
    Over hundreds of years, and thousands of miles, a collection of rare historic books now on display at Stanford University bristles with an excitement as fresh as yesterday. The collection, "The American Enlightenment: Treasures from the Stanford University Libraries," offers a glimpse of transatlantic intellectual debates triggered by the discovery of the New World, contributing to the revolutionary experiment that created our nation. Could a perfect new government -- uncorrupted by European degeneracy and disorder-- be created? Were the American Indians "the fundamental state of nature" of all human societies? How should children be raised? Was slavery immoral? What were...
  • The Birth of The Blues (great read about church and state)

    01/25/2011 8:04:48 AM PST · by Notary Sojac · 3 replies
    The American Interest ^ | 24 January 2011 | Walter Russel Mead
    In music, as everybody knows, the blues were born in the Mississippi Delta and traveled up the river and the railroads from New Orleans to Memphis, St. Louis and on to Chicago. In politics, the blues were born farther north: in the Puritan commonwealth of 17th century New England centered around Boston. For the Puritans, the construction of a godly society was the first order of business. The state was not the enemy of liberty; the state was society’s moral agent. Today’s libertarians sometimes like to call their blue model liberal opponents “unamerican”. Nothing could be farther from the truth:...
  • Enlightened and Enriched

    08/04/2010 8:55:56 PM PDT · by Lorianne · 12 replies · 1+ views
    City Journal ^ | Summer 2010 | Joel Mokyr
    We owe our modern prosperity to Enlightenment ideas. ___ Was the Enlightenment a Good Thing? At first blush, the question sounds almost sacrilegious. The eighteenth-century Enlightenment, after all, taught us to be democratic and to believe in human rights, tolerance, freedom of expression, and many other values that are still revered, if not always practiced, in modern societies. On the other hand, historians question whether the Enlightenment actually led to brotherhood and equality (it did not, of course), and even freedom, its third objective, was achieved only partially and late. Some have even suggested that its ideas of human “improvement”...
  • Bedtime Stories for the Islamic World (Stuck on failure without embracing enlightenment)

    07/09/2010 6:42:41 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 14 replies · 2+ views
    National Review ^ | 07/08/2010 | Rich Lowry
    In the 16th century, astronomer Taqī al-Dīn built one of the world’s great observatories in Istanbul. It rivaled that of the pioneering Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe — while it lasted. “Taqī al-Dīn’s observatory was razed to the ground by a squad of Janissaries, by order of the sultan, on the recommendation of the Chief Mufti,” Bernard Lewis writes in his book What Went Wrong? “This observatory had many predecessors in the lands of Islam; it had no successors until the age of modernization.” NASA administrator Charles Bolden caused a furor when he revealed that President Obama had directed him “to...
  • Repentance for a misspent youth

    08/25/2009 9:57:12 AM PDT · by Zionist Conspirator · 15 replies · 1,028+ views
    Jewish World Review ^ | 8/25/'09 | Jonathan Rosenblum
    The anti-clericalism of the leading Enlightenment thinkers contained within it the potential for a new clericalism more authoritarian and murderous than that which it superseded, with intellectuals as its priests. That the cult of the expert — itself an outgrowth of the Enlightenment's enthroning of human reason above all — should appeal to intellectual elites is unsurprising: It is a form of the revenge of the nerds whose superior qualities were unnoted by the pretty girls in high school. The assumption that "rationality" is a matter easily ascertained, at least by the brainy folks, underlies the preference for centrally planned...
  • God Talk (Part 1)

    05/19/2009 9:41:55 AM PDT · by Titus Quinctius Cincinnatus · 1 replies · 215+ views
    New York Slimes (surprisingly) ^ | 3 May 2009 | Stanley Fish
    In the opening sentence of the last chapter of his new book, “Reason, Faith and Revolution,” the British critic Terry Eagleton asks, “Why are the most unlikely people, including myself, suddenly talking about God?” His answer, elaborated in prose that is alternately witty, scabrous and angry, is that the other candidates for guidance — science, reason, liberalism, capitalism — just don’t deliver what is ultimately needed. “What other symbolic form,” he queries, “has managed to forge such direct links between the most universal and absolute of truths and the everyday practices of countless millions of men and women?” Eagleton acknowledges...
  • Let’s Declare a Truce in the Culture War [Why are believers and atheists still bickering?]

    07/10/2008 11:31:50 AM PDT · by Uncle Ralph · 32 replies · 110+ views
    The American, A Magazine of Ideas ^ | June 16, 2008 | Peter J. Wallison
    Neither faith nor science can answer the most important questions. So why are believers and atheists still bickering? I went to a debate recently in New York between a rabbi and the famous polemicist Christopher Hitchens, on the question "Does God exist?" Hitchens was called on to speak first, and he won the debate with his first two sentences: "I don't know why I have to speak first. He has the burden of proof." The mostly secular ... audience heartily applauded this sally, which was based on the premise -- never challenged by the rabbi -- that science provides an...
  • Postmodernism (Plus Why Modernism Is Preferable To This Pillar Of Liberalism

    05/04/2008 11:48:46 AM PDT · by Laissez-faire capitalist · 9 replies · 126+ views
    Conservapedia ^ | April 28, 2008 | Staff
    Postmodernism is a worldview characterized by a belief in the lack of an objective truth, and wehich asserts that assertions of objective knowledge are essentially impossible. A strong part of postmodernist thought is an intentional departure from traditional approaches that had previously been dominant... Some postmodernist idea are: Truth is a "social construct," rather than objectively provable. There is no superior culture; Western culture is no better than any other (see cultural relativism)...
  • Muslim antisemitism is becoming our fetish

    11/21/2007 6:45:42 AM PST · by Zionist Conspirator · 1 replies · 60+ views
    The Jewish Chronicle ^ | 11/20/'07 | David Klinghoffer
    Setting priorities in keeping with your values is a daily task for us all. I may, for example, feel the need to spend two hours exercising every day. But if that conflicts with my family responsibilities, I have to consult an overall worldview, a scheme of values, to decide which imperative comes first. So it goes in public life no less than in private. The world Jewish community is united in few things, but a rough consensus has emerged that our greatest worry, our top priority in need of being addressed, is the threat posed by Muslim extremists. With some...
  • The Quest for a New Enlightenment

    04/06/2007 12:23:27 PM PDT · by G. Stolyarov II · 3 replies · 303+ views
    Associated Content ^ | April 5, 2007 | G. Stolyarov II
    The 18th-century Enlightenment was the single most important intellectual development in human history; it made possible the comfortable, prosperous, stable, and relatively free Western civilization that we enjoy today. Enlightenment thinkers believed in a single, knowable, absolute reality guided by rational natural laws. Individuals—said Enlightenment thinkers—had the faculty of reason, which enabled them to accurately understand the absolute reality. Using reason, individuals could understand not only the factual data of reality but a rational moral system which would instruct them on how they ought to behave. The Enlightenment cultivated the rights of every human being to his life, liberty, property,...
  • Faith and Terror: Where Some Agree with Osama

    02/25/2007 8:14:15 AM PST · by Zionist Conspirator · 2 replies · 249+ views
    The New York Post ^ | 2/25/'07 | David Klinghoffer
    THE ENEMY AT HOME: THE CULTURAL LEFT AND ITS RESPONSIBILITY FOR 9/11 BY DINESH D'SOUZA DOUBLEDAY, 333 PAGES, $26.95 CONSERVATIVES are as deeply factionalized as any other domestic ideological group. But it's still surprising when one of our own writes a book that manages to make him not only the scourge of the Left but hardly more popular on the Right. Such a book is Dinesh D'Souza's "The Enemy at Home," which blames American left-liberals for provoking radical Muslims into committing the attacks of 9/11. From folks on the Right, D'Souza has evoked responses ranging from pure hysteria (e.g. Bruce...
  • Legacy of the 18th-Century Enlightenment Movement for Today's Problems

    01/02/2007 11:48:57 AM PST · by G. Stolyarov II · 2 replies · 398+ views
    Helium.com ^ | December 23, 2006 | G. Stolyarov II
    The 18th-century Enlightenment was the single most important intellectual development in human history; it made possible the comfortable, prosperous, stable, and relatively free Western civilization that we enjoy today. Enlightenment thinkers believed in a single, knowable, absolute reality guided by rational natural laws. Individuals—said Enlightenment thinkers—had the faculty of reason, which enabled them to accurately understand the absolute reality. Using reason, individuals could understand not only the factual data of reality but a rational moral system which would instruct them on how they ought to behave. The Enlightenment cultivated the rights of every human being to his life, liberty, property,...
  • Losing the Enlightenment [Editorial]

    11/29/2006 12:24:05 PM PST · by bnelson44 · 47 replies · 1,217+ views
    WSJ ^ | 11/29/06 | Victor Davis Hanson
    Losing the Enlightenment [A civilization that has lost confidence in itself cannot confront the Islamists.] Our current crisis is not yet a catastrophe, but a real loss of confidence of the spirit. The hard-won effort of the Western Enlightenment of some 2,500 years that, along with Judeo-Christian benevolence, is the foundation of our material progress, common decency, and scientific excellence, is at risk in this new millennium. But our newest foes of Reason are not the enraged Athenian democrats who tried and executed Socrates. And they are not the Christian zealots of the medieval church who persecuted philosophers of heliocentricity....
  • Losing the Enlightenment: Remarks at the Claremont Institute's annual Churchill Dinner (VDH)

    11/23/2006 1:08:22 AM PST · by Stoat · 12 replies · 1,279+ views
    The Claremont Institute ^ | November 20, 2006 | Victor Davis Hanson
    Losing the Enlightenment Remarks at the Claremont Institute's annual Churchill Dinner By Victor Davis HansonPosted November 20, 2006These remarks were delivered on November 10, 2006 at the Claremont Institute's annual dinner in honor of Sir Winston Churchill. (To applause.) Good evening, and thank you very much for the honor of the Statesmanship Award at this annual Claremont Institute dinner in memory of Sir Winston Churchill—a tribute conceived in the name of a great man, bestowed by a great institute, and honored by great past recipients. Tonight I would like to talk of our current crisis—not yet a catastrophe, but...
  • The Dark Ages -- Live From the Middle East!

    10/25/2006 10:14:13 PM PDT · by ProtectOurFreedom · 36 replies · 1,118+ views
    Tribune Media Services c/o Real Politics ^ | 10/26/06 | Victor Davis Hanson
    The most frightening aspect of the present war is how easily our pre-modern enemies from the Middle East have brought a stunned postmodern world back into the Dark Ages. Students of history are sickened when they read of the long-ago, gruesome practice of beheading. ... And how lucky we thought we were to have evolved from such elemental barbarity. ... The 18th-century European Enlightenment gave people freedom to express views formerly censored by clerics and the state. Just imagine what life was like once upon a time when no one could write music, compose fiction or paint without court or...
  • Traitors to the Enlightenment - Europe turns its back on Socrates, Locke, et al.

    10/02/2006 6:28:07 PM PDT · by neverdem · 60 replies · 3,038+ views
    National Review Online ^ | October 02, 2006 | Victor Davis Hanson
    October 02, 2006, 6:02 a.m. Traitors to the EnlightenmentEurope turns its back on Socrates, Locke, et al. By Victor Davis Hanson The first Western Enlightenment of the Greek fifth-century B.C. sought to explain natural phenomena through reason rather than superstition alone. Ethics were to be discussed in the realm of logic as well as religion. Much of what Pythagoras, Socrates, Plato, and the Sophists thought may today seem self-evident, if not at times nonsensical. But that century was the beginning of the uniquely Western attempt to bring to the human experience empiricism, self-criticism, irony, and tolerance in thinking. The...
  • It is a legacy of the Enlightenment that we find it so hard to deal with madness and fanaticism

    08/15/2006 11:45:47 AM PDT · by NutCrackerBoy · 35 replies · 1,060+ views
    National Review Online ^ | August 15, 2006 | Emanuele Ottolenghi
    Scholars of the Enlightenment should be in high demand these days. For the political and media responses to the plot to bomb up to ten U.S. airliners in mid air above the Atlantic reflect its two-faced intellectual and philosophical heritage. There is that great optimism in human nature, the belief in rationality and science, the conviction that everything has an explanation and that every problem has a solution. There is the unbending belief that “all men are created equals,” that we are entitled to “life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.” Then there is the dark side, not of Locke...
  • How Voltaire praised the 'enlightened despot' Catherine the Great

    06/03/2006 10:52:24 AM PDT · by lizol · 12 replies · 789+ views
    Guardian ^ | Friday June 2, 2006 | Nick Paton Walsh
    How Voltaire praised the 'enlightened despot' Catherine the Great Satirist's heartfelt letters to the woman he admired are bought for Russia Nick Paton Walsh in Moscow Friday June 2, 2006 The Guardian They are the heartfelt correspondence from the great acerbic wit of the European Enlightenment to the last Russian empress, in which he praises her authoritarian style and mocks the extravagances of her French counterparts. For years, the letters from Voltaire to Catherine the Great have been hidden away in a private collection - the contents a mystery. But now, courtesy of a Moscow art dealer, they will be...
  • The collapse of reason

    05/30/2006 2:47:08 PM PDT · by jexus · 27 replies · 1,174+ views
    The collapse of reason By Cathy Young  |  May 29, 2006 AT A TIME when conservatives dominate all three branches of government and hold an increasingly large share of the Fourth Estate, the academy remains the last liberal stronghold. You would think, then, that liberal intellectuals would offer some thoughtful and productive critiques of conservative policies. But instead, argues one leading liberal intellectual, the academic left is making itself irrelevant by embracing ideological extremism and trying to purge its ranks of those who are not politically correct.
  • Europe at a crossroads

    05/24/2006 6:03:44 PM PDT · by sageb1 · 35 replies · 752+ views
    American University of Rome ^ | February 21, 2006 | Marcello Pera
    21 February 2006 Europe at a crossroads Address to the American University of Rome by Marcello Pera 1. A geopolitical continental drift The subject I intend to address today is the crisis of the West, and particularly of Europe. In my view this crisis is twofold, both geopolitical and spiritual, with the latter as the main cause of the former. The fact that the Old Continent is in a state of deep crisis has been upheld by many distinguished scholars, observers and a few – unfortunately just a few – political leaders in Europe. This was argued in most alarming...
  • In Arabic, 'Internet' Means 'Freedom' (BEST ARTICLE OF THE WEEK)

    03/03/2006 4:44:43 PM PST · by Dark Skies · 42 replies · 1,135+ views
    National Journal ^ | 3/3/2006 | Jonathan Rauch
    Odd though it may sound, somewhere in Baghdad a man is working in secrecy to edit new Arabic versions of Liberalism, by the Austrian economist Ludwig von Mises, and In Defense of Global Capitalism, by the Swedish economist Johan Norberg. He is doing this at some risk of kidnap, beating, and death, because he hopes that a new Arabic-language Web site, called LampofLiberty.org -- MisbahAlHurriyya.org in Arabic -- can change the world by publishing liberal classics. Odder still, he may be right. Interviewed by e-mail, he asks to be known by a pseudonym, H. Ali Kamil. A Shiite from Iraq's...
  • I've given up on trying to teach anyone here anything (They gave Socrates hemlock, now this guy.)

    02/12/2006 7:39:47 AM PST · by a true thinker · 336 replies · 7,739+ views
    There's no helping you. This site is now just a diversion -- like a train wreck. This site is inherently for and about raving egomaniacs, and Jim's site policies -- which amount to excluding reality and actual dialogue in favor of political/militaristic pornography -- is conducive to cognitive dissonance, which at the times your worldview is threatened leads you into psychotic breaks (on the political cognitive plane, that is, and just maybe in other realms too). Not to mention that your baseline politics is based in mythology about American demographics, science, economics, ethics etc. You spoonfeed each other in the...
  • Indigo Children claim special powers; skeptics abound

    02/02/2006 9:13:49 PM PST · by Coleus · 67 replies · 3,291+ views
    NorthJersey.com ^ | 02.02.06 | MAKEBA SCOTT HUNTER
    Jurate Cannara knew her daughter Laura was different when, as a toddler, she would stand out in the rain, her tiny hands outstretched toward the lightning. "Mama, I need energy," the little girl would tell her. As Laura Mikuseviciuje grew from toddler to child to teen to young woman, Cannara noticed that her daughter's eccentricities only increased with age. "I didn't understand my daughter," said Cannara, who lives in Verona, of her daughter's early expressions of intuition and odd, energetic behavior. According to some, Laura's tendencies are not odd at all; they even have a name. She and others like...
  • Neaderthals At It Again

    01/11/2006 8:42:47 PM PST · by TheClintons-STILLAnti-American · 71 replies · 1,893+ views
    Conservative Battleline Online ^ | January 11, 2006 | Donald Devine
    Neanderthals At It Again H.L. Mencken’s final report from the famous Scopes trial in Dayton Tennessee comes roaring down to us after 80 years as sharply edged as ever: "Let no one mistake [the trial] for comedy, farcical though it may be in all its details.  It serves notice on the country that Neanderthal man is organizing in these forlorn backwaters of the land, led by a fanatic, rid of sense and devoid of conscience.  Tennessee, challenging him too timorously and too late, now sees its courts converted into camp meetings and its Bill of Rights made a mock...
  • Cardinal Ratzinger's Thoughts on Evolution An Excerpt From "Truth and Tolerance"

    09/03/2005 8:32:59 AM PDT · by Forgiven_Sinner · 33 replies · 817+ views
    Zenit.org ^ | ROME, SEPT. 1, 2005 | Cardinal Ratzinger
    Cardinal Ratzinger's Thoughts on Evolution An Excerpt From "Truth and Tolerance" ROME, SEPT. 1, 2005 (Zenit.org).- Cardinal Christoph Schönborn's July 7 editorial in the New York Times entitled "Finding Design in Nature" provoked a flurry of reactions, both supportive and critical. Requests have begun to arrive in Rome for Benedict XVI to make some sort of clarification on the Church's stand regarding evolution. The following text, delivered in 1999 as part of a lecture at the Sorbonne in Paris by Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger (the future Benedict XVI) and subsequently published in the 2004 book "Truth and Tolerance" (Ignatius), can give...
  • In the name of God (Polly Toynbee: Must Oust Religion From Public Life)

    08/29/2005 11:52:59 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 41 replies · 960+ views
    The Guardian (U.K.) | Friday July 22, 2005 | Polly Toynbee
    Blair has appeased and prevaricated. Now, as the death cult strikes again, he must oust religion from public lifeTwo weeks on, London is stricken once more. The death cult strikes again, unstoppable in its deranged religious mania. This time no deaths but a savage reminder of the unknown waves of demented killers lining up to murder in the name of God. Whatever they intended, the message was loud and clear: they can and will do this whenever they want and it does indeed spread very real terror. The police have said there are many more of them. The security services...
  • "Glenn Beck on Ice" Review

    06/08/2005 5:12:42 AM PDT · by TheRobb7 · 4 replies · 636+ views
    The Perspective ^ | 06-08-05 | therobb7
    This review is concise. I posted a picture from the meet-and-greet after the show on my website (click link above). Last night at the Orpheum Theatre (Memphis, TN) my wife and I attended the GlennBeck on Ice program. If you listen to Beck on the radio, you know that he and his staff are trying to come up with a way to describe the show to people in other cities on the tour. We were part of the meet-and-greet after the show and Glenn asked us to call in Wednesday to tell listeners how they felt about the show. If...
  • John Paul II and the Revitalization of Western Civilization

    05/11/2005 11:49:07 AM PDT · by animoveritas · 3 replies · 416+ views
    Intellectual Conservative . com ^ | 3 May 05 | John Radzilowski
    In sum, cultures that ignore faith and morals can secure neither freedom nor truth and will sooner or later begin to violate the dignity of their citizens. Totalitarian states were the most obvious example of this, but democracies have also fallen prey to the temptations of unrestrained secular ideologies, especially nihilism.The Pope’s refusal to “go along” with the fads of secular, post-modern society was viewed with rage and amazement. It was, many believed, impossible to stop the historical inevitability of trends embodied by so-called “sexual liberation” and the modern cult of victimhood.
  • Establishing Religion or Abolishing It? - (replacing 10 Commandments with secularism)

    03/22/2005 5:25:14 PM PST · by CHARLITE · 5 replies · 446+ views
    THE AMERICAN ENTERPRISE ONLINE.COM ^ | MARCH 21, 2005 | WILLIAM TUCKER
    About 15 years ago I wrote a book about crime, tackling the knotty problem of how "technicalities" based on the Bill of Rights could end up excusing people of ancient crimes like robbery and murder. The problem, I found, was the tendency of judges and lawyers to elevate the Constitution to Holy Writ. Murder, rape, and other crimes, you see, are only statutory offenses. There's nothing in the Constitution that says you can't kill someone. On the other hand, if a murderer argues that he wasn't read his Miranda warnings three times in the language of his choice, he is...
  • Our Godless Constitution (from THE NATION)

    02/24/2005 12:12:11 AM PST · by Corinthian Warrior · 53 replies · 1,263+ views
    THE NATION ^ | Feb 21, 2005 | Broke Allen
    <p>It is hard to believe that George Bush has ever read the works of George Orwell, but he seems, somehow, to have grasped a few Orwellian precepts. The lesson the President has learned best--and certainly the one that has been the most useful to him--is the axiom that if you repeat a lie often enough, people will believe it. One of his Administration's current favorites is the whopper about America having been founded on Christian principles. Our nation was founded not on Christian principles but on Enlightenment ones. God only entered the picture as a very minor player, and Jesus Christ was conspicuously absent.</p>
  • The Future of Judaism

    01/25/2005 11:35:24 AM PST · by stevejackson · 30 replies · 2,433+ views
    netWMD - The War to Mobilize Democracy ^ | January 25, 2005 | Daniel Pipes
    Until the 18th century, there was basically only one kind of Judaism, that which is now called Orthodox. It meant living by the religion's 613 laws, and doing so suffused Jews' lives with their faith. Then, starting with the thinker Baruch Spinoza (1632-77) and moving briskly during the Haskala, or "enlightenment," from the late 18th century, Jews developed a wide variety of alternate interpretations of their religion, most of which diminished the role of faith in their lives and led to a concomitant reduction in Jewish affiliation.These alternatives and other developments, in particular the Holocaust, caused the ranks of the...
  • Reason without the Divine is morally useless

    01/18/2005 7:55:49 PM PST · by CHARLITE · 4 replies · 181+ views
    JEWISH WORLD REVIEW.COM ^ | JANUARY 18, 2005 | DENNIS PRAGER
    Those who do not believe that moral values must come from the Bible or be based upon G-d's moral instruction argue that they have a better source for values: human reason. In fact, the era that began the modern Western assault on Judeo-Christian values is known as the Age of Reason. That age ushered in the modern secular era, a time when the men of "the Enlightenment" hoped they would be liberated from the superstitious shackles of religious faith and rely on reason alone. Reason, without G-d or the Bible, would guide them into an age of unprecedented moral greatness....
  • European Secular Madness vs Judao-Christian Values

    01/05/2005 12:27:26 PM PST · by Lindykim · 26 replies · 977+ views
    RedState.org ^ | Jan. 5, 2005 | Treowth
    In "Better Answers: The Case For Judao-Christian Values," http://www.worldnetdaily.com/news/article.asp?ARTICLE_ID=42234 Dennis Prager said....."There is an epic battle taking place in the world over what value system humanity will embrace. There are essentially three competitors: European secularism, American Judeo-Christianity and Islam. I have described this battle in previous columns." Under the aegis of European secularism, Americans have been lured and seduced into liberating themselves from the social constraints of America's traditional Judao-Christian moral ethics, which served as both eternally unchanging moral anchor and as the anchor to objective reality. "This much needed liberation," we were told, "is a sign of social enlightenment."...
  • Down With the French!

    12/23/2004 4:50:21 PM PST · by Juana la Loca · 17 replies · 740+ views
    National Review Online ^ | 12/23/04 | Jonah Goldberg
    Ah, Christmastime. Joy to the world. God bless us, everyone. Through the rapturous din of carols and chimes, a stray condemnatory note can be heard, chastising the yuletide revelers for being too materialistic, too concerned with gifts that come wrapped in pretty paper and shiny bows. Who can help but sympathize with such concerns as the groaning hoards of shoppers appear like Huns outside the doors of Wal-Mart? That is why I am so grateful for a special Christmas present — holiday present if you must — for the whole world. No mere thing or shiny bauble, this present is...
  • Enlightened Heresies

    12/13/2004 12:08:48 PM PST · by skellmeyer · 34 replies · 1,894+ views
    Bridegroom Press ^ | Steve Kellmeyer
    "Muslims need … a new Enlightenment, a movement away from brutality." This remark came from a friend of mine as we were discussing the problem of faith in the public square. My friend is by his own description, "a militantly agnostic Jew", a philosophy professor who loves to debate anything that comes to hand. His remark was in response to a discussion of Islamic law. While I acknowledge Muslims are to be admired for their rigorous prayer life, their marvelous emphasis on almsgiving and their belief in Jesus’ virgin birth and consequent great respect for the Blessed Virgin Mary, the...
  • NYP Book Review: A BETTER ENLIGHTENMENT re: THE ROADS TO MODERNITY, by Gertrude Himmilfarb

    11/14/2004 9:44:12 AM PST · by OESY · 11 replies · 908+ views
    New York Post ^ | November 14, 2004 | JAMES GARDNER
    ...Her book is thus animated by dismay and perplexity over the way the French Enlightenment is seen as the main intellectual event of the 18th century, whereas a parallel and in many respects more successful movement in Britain is routinely relegated to an inferior status. Her heroes, therefore, are not Voltaire, Diderot and Rousseau as much as Adam Smith, David Hume and Edmund Burke. In a similar spirit, she invokes and concurs with Hannah Arendt's notion that the American revolution, rather than the revolution in France, was the great political watershed of modern times. For Himmelfarb, the contrast between the...
  • "Creeping Totalitarianism"

    11/12/2004 5:50:17 PM PST · by CHARLITE · 2 replies · 229+ views
    HERITAGE.ORG ^ | NOVEMBER 10, 2004 | EDWIN J. FUELNER, PhD
    It’s company policy at The New York Times that opinion columnists may not officially endorse presidential candidates. Still, there was no doubt during the past year which man most of the page’s writers were backing. A trio of hysterical pieces published Nov. 4 confirmed that, each claiming that a nationwide outbreak of religious zealotry had led to Sen. John Kerry’s defeat. “The president got re-elected by dividing the country along fault lines of fear, intolerance, ignorance and religious rule,” wailed Maureen Dowd. Not to be outdone, Tom Friedman chipped in, “We don’t just disagree on what America should be doing;...
  • Intellectuals Without Intellect (Post-election, irrational Dems claim to be party of reason)

    11/09/2004 11:37:11 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 10 replies · 952+ views
    The American Prowler ^ | 11/10/2004 | George Neumayr
    John Kerry possessed reason, George Bush possessed faith. That's the consoling critique of the campaign by defeated liberals. But the truth is Kerry displayed neither. Without credible reason or faith, Kerry had nothing to offer Americans except experiments in radicalism. To salvage their self-esteem, liberals are pushing the idea that they have lost the country but retained their reason. It hasn't yet dawned on them that they lost the country because they lost their reason. Their irrational anger and tired theories weren't persuasive. The American people rejected Kerry because of an absence not only of authentic faith but also of...
  • 'The Roads to Modernity'

    09/01/2004 2:38:31 PM PDT · by swilhelm73 · 9 replies · 323+ views
    WSJ ^ | September 1, 2004 | DARRIN M. MCMAHON
    Ever since Immanuel Kant posed his famous question in 1784--"What is Enlightenment?"--critics and commentators have searched for an answer, and they still do. For it is to the Enlightenment--a particular set of 18th-century ideas--that many thinkers trace the political and intellectual origins of the modern world. To pose Kant's question is to ask nothing less than who we are. The respected historian Gertrude Himmelfarb is the latest critic to take up this challenge. But she gives the question a plural form, asking "What are Enlightenments?" Surveying the experiences of England, France and America, she follows three different "roads to modernity."...
  • Hunting Witches: Clearing the Record

    12/03/2003 9:12:11 AM PST · by Mr. Silverback · 58 replies · 1,506+ views
    BreakPoint ^ | 3 dec 03 | Chuck Colson
    For many, the image of women burned to death for practicing witchcraft is a potent symbol of both Christian intolerance and Christian irrationality. That's why critics of Christianity are so quick to bring the subject up. But as a new book demonstrates, nearly everything we've been told about Christianity and witch-hunts is wrong. Feminists like Andrea Dworkin and Mary Daly claim that up to nine million European women were burned at the stake for witchcraft. And even non-feminist historians write about how the witch-hunts "consumed millions of innocents." Historian Rodney Stark calls these claims "absurd" and "nonsense." In his new...
  • Religious and the ACLU

    10/09/2003 12:34:19 PM PDT · by aynfan · 26 replies · 426+ views
    Author | 10-09-03 | Robert Wolf
    Religious Intolerance and the ACLU By Robert Wolf Amendment I of the Constitution of the US reads: “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof;” and continues with “or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the Government for a redress of grievances.” This is the so-called Establishment clause we hear so much about. The phrase separation of Church and State we hear so often comes from a letter by Thomas Jefferson 21 years later in which he...
  • Not So 'Bright'

    10/06/2003 6:00:49 AM PDT · by OESY · 109 replies · 1,177+ views
    COMMENTARY: The Wall Street Journal ^ | October 6, 2003 | DINESH D'SOUZA
    <p>"We have always had atheists among us," the philosopher Edmund Burke wrote in his "Reflections on the Revolution in France," "but now they have grown turbulent and seditious." It seems that in our own day some prominent atheists are agitating for greater political and social influence. In this connection, leading atheist thinkers have been writing articles declaring that they should no longer be called "atheists." Rather, they want to be called "brights."</p>
  • Unintelligent Designs on Academic Freedom

    09/30/2003 10:13:27 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 27 replies · 362+ views
    The American Prowler ^ | 10/1/2003 | Hunter Baker
    It's been an unusual week in the academy. The academic freedom that so incensed Bill Buckley as a student at Yale decades ago is now acting to protect a conservative scholar under fire. Baylor's J.M. Dawson Institute for Church-State Studies hired Francis Beckwith as its Associate Director last summer. Although previously known as a philosopher who had developed powerful critiques of abortion, Beckwith has used the past few years and a research fellowship at Princeton to transform himself into a legal scholar investigating the controversy over public schools and the teaching of human origins. His research culminated in publication of...