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Keyword: epigraphyandlanguage

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  • 700-year-old Danish 'Civil War' coins uncovered

    02/13/2016 1:07:58 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    The Local ^ | Wednesday, February 10, 2016 | unattributed
    A horde of 700 year-old coins has been found by a group of metal detectors in a Jutland field being excavated by archaeologists, the Viborg Museum announced on Wednesday. Coins dating back to a tumultuous period of civil war in Denmark were found in a field south of Foulum and are being put on display at the Viborg Museum. The museum said that three members of the Central Jutland Detector Society (Midtjysk Detektorforening) discovered the mediaeval coins, which are thought to have been hidden during the first half of the 1300s, a period of internal unrest in Denmark which culminated...
  • How religious schools led to the decline of Arabic science

    01/21/2016 6:54:33 AM PST · by C19fan · 56 replies
    Patheos ^ | January 14, 2016 | Epiphenom
    The world’s first scientific renaissance took place not in Italy, but in the Arab world. The period between the 9th and 11th centuries AD, when Islam took hold of a band of territory strategy from Spain in the West through to what is now Pakistan, saw an extraordinary intellectual flowering. Scientists in the Arab world during this period made important advances in fields as varied as astronomy, mathematics, medicine and optics – advances that fed into and stimulated the later European Renaissance. Which makes it all the stranger that modern Islamic nations have such a lamentable record in science. Where...
  • Why was a 9th century Viking woman buried with a ring that says ‘for Allah’ on it?

    02/05/2016 12:57:25 PM PST · by beaversmom · 89 replies
    Washington Post ^ | March 18, 2015 | Adam Taylor
    By Adam Taylor March 18, 2015 Follow @mradamtaylor (Statens historiska museum / Christer Ahlin) In the modern-era, Scandinavian countries have become known for their sometimes awkward embrace of migrants from the Arab and Muslim world. But the history behind that relationship goes back far further than you might expect.Consider the case of a ring discovered in a Viking grave in Birka, a historic trading center in what is now Sweden. The woman in the grave died in the 9th century and was discovered around a thousand years later by the famous Swedish archaeologist Hjalmar Stolpe, who spent years excavating...
  • How Hebrew came to Yale

    12/07/2005 5:39:22 AM PST · by SJackson · 6 replies · 274+ views
    Jewish World Review ^ | 12-7-05 | Michael Feldberg
    Few Americans have heard of Rabbi Haim Isaac Carigal, but every Yale University graduate has seen the evidence of his influence over the history of that institution. Because of Carigal's relationship with Yale's fifth president, Reverend Ezra Stiles, in 1777 Hebrew became a required course in the freshman curriculum. Many colonial-era American Christians had a respect for even a fascination with the Hebrew language and Jewish religion. In part, their interest stemmed from a belief that the Hebrew Bible, which they dubbed the "Old Testament," laid the ground for the Christian "New Testament." Educated American Christians, especially New England...
  • Before Hatshepsut: Early Egyptian Queen Revealed in Hieroglyphs

    01/19/2016 11:23:30 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Live Science ^ | January 19, 2016 | Owen Jarus
    About 60 drawings and hieroglyphic inscriptions, dating back around 5,000 years, have been discovered at a site called Wadi Ameyra in Egypt’s Sinai Desert. Carved in stone they were created by mining expeditions sent out by early Egyptian pharaohs archaeologists say. They reveal new information on the early pharaohs. For instance, one inscription the researchers found tells of a queen named Neith-Hotep who ruled Egypt 5,000 years ago as regent to a young pharaoh named Djer. Archaeologists estimate that the earliest carvings at Wadi Ameyra date back around 5,200 years, while the most recent date to the reign of a...
  • Who should keep Iraqi Jewry’s archives, saved from Saddam, now on tour in US?

    01/06/2016 6:57:35 PM PST · by OddLane · 2 replies
    Times of Israel ^ | January 6 2016 | Rich Tenorio
    American special forces stormed the basement of the notorious Mukhabarat, the headquarters of Saddam Hussein’s secret police, shortly after the invasion of Iraq in 2003. And while they didn’t find the alleged weapons of mass destruction, nor the Iraqi dictator himself, what they did find was a rare collection of artifacts from the Iraqi Jewish community dating back hundreds of years, including a Hebrew Bible and Babylonian Talmud. The collection was waterlogged and damaged, and the Coalition Provisional Authority in Iraq placed an urgent call to the United States National Archives and Records Administration in Maryland. With permission from local...
  • Untangling an Accounting Tool and an Ancient Incan Mystery

    01/06/2016 12:06:36 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    New York Times ^ | January 2, 2016 | William Neuman
    In a dry canyon strewn with the ruins of a long-dead city, archaeologists have made a discovery they hope will help unravel one of the most tenacious mysteries of ancient Peru: how to read the knotted string records, known as khipus, kept by the Incas. At the site called Incahuasi, about 100 miles south of Lima, excavators have found, for the first time, several khipus in the place where they were used -- in this case, a storage house for agricultural products where they appear to have been used as accounting books to record the amount of peanuts, chili peppers,...
  • Earliest Sample of Minoan Hieroglyphics Found in Western Crete

    11/18/2011 7:13:57 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | Thursday, November 17, 2011 | Stella Tsolakidou
    A four-sided red jasper sealstone is among the finds unearthed during this season's excavation of the Minoan peak sanctuary at Vrysinas, located south of the city of Rethymnon. The whole area was officially announced and included in the archaeological sites list by the Central Archaeological Council of Greece. The sealstone, which is carved on all four surfaces with characters of the Minoan Hieroglyphic script, constitutes the sole evidence to date for the presence of this earliest Minoan style of writing in Western Crete. The excavation, which began in 2004, is conducted by the Ephorate of Prehistoric and Classical Antiquities under...
  • Φωτογραφίες Χρονολογίου

    01/01/2016 10:43:30 PM PST · by Rabin · 5 replies
    http://el-gr.el-gr.fb.me/NationalCryptologicMuseum/photos/a.350346695032536.76645.318661104867762/99
    First use of Code Talkers in combat, 1918 The use of pre American languages to protect U.S. voice com began in, 1918. Early on, in World War I, "Captain Lawrence noted conscripts speaking Choctaw bla bla, and recognized a potential to secure line active, field communications. Choctaw com contributed directly to constriction and later withdrawal of two companies during the Meuse-Argonne Offensive and were later used in the implementing a successful surprise attack on the Germans at Forest Farm. A belated program expanded in to World War II. http://www.comanchemuseum.com/code_talkers Comanche Code Talkers of World War II. In late 1940, 17...
  • How Muslims Did Not Invent Algebra

    08/11/2013 4:38:30 PM PDT · by Enza Ferreri · 68 replies
    Enza Ferreri Blog ^ | 2 August 2013 | Enza Ferreri
    Continuing on the theme of what Muslims did - or more likely did not do - for the world, there is a widespread misconception that they "invented algebra". Maybe this fallacy is due to the fact that "algebra" is a word of Arabic origin, but historical questions are not solved by etymological answers. Yes, the English word "algebra" derives from the Arabic. So does "sugar" (from the Arabic "sukkar") but that doesn't mean that Muslims invented sugar. The word "algebra" stems from the Arabic word "al-jabr", from the name of the treatise Book on Addition and Subtraction after the Method...
  • Kinder, Gentler Vikings? Not According to Their Slaves

    12/28/2015 10:24:11 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    National Geographic ^ | Monday, December 28, 2015 | Andrew Lawler
    New clues suggest slaves were vital to the Viking way of life -- and argue against attempts to soften the raiders' brutish reputation... Archaeologists are using recent finds and analyses of previous discoveries -- from iron collars in Ireland to possible plantation houses in Sweden -- to illuminate the role of slavery in creating and maintaining the Viking way of life. "This was a slave economy," said Neil Price, an archaeologist at Sweden's Uppsala University who spoke at a recent meeting that brought together archaeologists who study slavery and colonization. "Slavery has received hardly any attention in the past 30...
  • Vikings May Have Been More Social Than Savage

    10/05/2013 9:09:22 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    Science Daily ^ | October 1, 2013 | Coventry University, via AlphaGalileo
    Academics at Coventry University have uncovered complex social networks within age-old Icelandic sagas, which challenge the stereotypical image of Vikings as unworldly, violent savages. Pdraig Mac Carron and Ralph Kenna from the University's Applied Mathematics Research Centre have carried out a detailed analysis of the relationships described in ancient Icelandic manuscripts to shed new light on Viking society. In a study published in the European Physical Journal, Mac Carron and Kenna have asked whether remnants of reality could lurk within the pages of the documents in which Viking sagas were preserved. They applied methods from statistical physics to social networks...
  • Israel in Canaan (Long) Before Pharaoh Merenptah? A Fresh Look at Berlin Statue Pedestal Relief...

    12/07/2010 6:48:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    Journal of Ancient Egyptian Interconnections ^ | 2010, v 2:4 | Peter van der Veen, Christoffer Theis, Manfred Gorg
    ...As for the name rings on the slab no. 21687, three names can be discerned. The first on the left reads... "Ashkelon." A similar writing (but with a vowel marker) is attested on Merenptah's Israel Stele... The name in the central ring reads... "Canaan." This form of the name is well attested during the Eighteenth Dynasty, and finds close parallels under Amenhotep II... Grg derives the name "Canaan"... translating it as "low land"... and suggests that the... ending reflects an Amorite name pattern. This too would underscore the antiquity of the name... As discussed above, evidence of early orthography is...
  • Syria's mysterious Dead Cities

    01/14/2010 7:09:52 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies · 678+ views
    The Guardian ^ | Saturday January 9, 2010 | Kevin Rushby
    The stone window ledge has two rows of seven shallow depressions cut into it, and I am sitting next to them, trying to remember where on earth I've seen this pattern before. Far away, beyond the massive fortifications and the moat, are the white-capped mountains of Lebanon. I had not expected to see so much snow around, but then Syria throws up surprises all the time. Even this 12th-century crusader castle, Krak des Chevaliers, a fabulous place long picked over by archaeologists and historians, is full of mysteries. Like the timeworn inscription I found tucked away in a corner: "Ceso:...
  • Newberry Tablet

    12/26/2015 5:57:30 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 46 replies
    Fort de Buade Museum ^ | bef. 2015 | unattributed
    ...Why do the Greek descendants of the Minoans share a gene in their DNA with the Chippewas and no one else on the planet? In November of 1896, near the town of Newberry, Michigan. In Michigan's Upper Peninsula two woodsmen clearing land on a farm uprooted a tree and discovered three statues, and a clay tablet. The tablet was 19 by 26 inches in size. 140 small squares were cut into the stone. In each square a letter or character. The University of Michigan and the Smithsonian Institution were notified. Both of these institutions, at the time refused to look...
  • Is this the first EVER finished Koran? Fragments at Birmingham University may belong to the original

    Fragments of the oldest Koran in existence, which were discovered at a British university library, could be from the original copy of the Muslim holy book. Leading academic Jamal bin Huwareib believes the pages found at Birmingham University earlier this year are from the first assembled Koran by the Prophet Muhammad's close friend Abu Bakr. The pages, thought to be between 1,448 and 1,371 years old, were discovered bound within the pages of another Koran from the late seventh century at the university's library. Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3373020/Is-finished-Koran.html#ixzz3vJuIrw7F Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook
  • The Yemeni Koran

    12/14/2009 5:55:25 AM PST · by SJackson · 7 replies · 975+ views
    Frontpagemagazine ^ | 12-14-09 | Jamie Glazov/Robert Spencer/Moorthy Muthuswamy.
    Explosive ramifications result from new evidence revealing the Muslim holy book has undergone a textual evolution Frontpage Interviews guests today are Robert Spencer and Moorthy Muthuswamy. Moorthy Muthuswamy is an expert on terrorism in India. He grew up in India, where he had firsthand experience with political Islam and jihad. He moved to America in 1984 to pursue graduate studies. In 1992, he received a doctorate in nuclear physics from Stony Brook University, New York. Since 1999 he has extensively published ideas on neutralizing political Islams terror war as it is imposed on unbelievers. He is the author of the...
  • Higher Criticism of the Koran Resisted

    11/02/2009 5:50:14 PM PST · by Tefilo · 13 replies · 547+ views
    Folks, Sandro Magister, the world-renowned vaticanista, hosted in his website an exchange between Muslim theologian Aref Ali Nayed and the Catholic Islamologist Michel Cuypers which I think you should read. The subject of the exchange is one that Ive covered repeatedly in these humble folios, having to do with the need for a higher criticism of the Koran in order to know, expose, and study its literary genres, its historical context, the oral traditions that converged in its formation, and the phases in its redaction that gave us the text as we read it today. Of course, such an...
  • What is the Koran?

    11/20/2002 3:13:18 PM PST · by dennisw · 122 replies · 6,190+ views
    atlantic monthly ^ | J A N U A R Y 1 9 9 9 | Toby Lester
    J A N U A R Y 1 9 9 9Researchers with a variety of academic and theological interests are proposing controversial theories about the Koran and Islamic history, and are striving to reinterpret Islam for the modern world. This is, as one scholar puts it, a "sensitive business" by Toby Lester (The online version of this article appears in three parts. Click here to go to part two. Click here to go to part three.) N 1972, during the restoration of the Great Mosque of Sana'a, in Yemen, laborers working in a loft between the structure's inner and...
  • Brass tacks discussion on Islam

    11/18/2015 8:12:10 PM PST · by Jim Robinson · 238 replies
    Ok, let's get down to brass tacks. How long has the Islam religion been around and have they always been so hateful and violent (like so many of them are today)? I believe they claim to be direct descendants of Abraham but I also believe that Abraham was a favorite of our one true Judeo-Christian God, and was the father or grandfather of the Jewish and Christian religions. I have a hard time believing that our loving Judeo-Christian God is also the Islam God, Allah, whose Muslim followers seem to be so misplaced. Haven't the warlike Muslim tribes fanned out...
  • 'Birmingham Koran' fragment could shake Islam, carbon-dating suggests it is OLDER than Muhammad

    09/01/2015 6:46:13 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 30 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 09/01/2015 | By JENNIFER NEWTON
    The 'Birmingham Koran' fragment that could shake Islam after carbon-dating suggests it is OLDER than the Prophet Muhammad Fragments of the oldest Koran were discovered last month in BirminghamCarbon dating found the pages were produced between 568AD and 654AD But several historians now say that the parchment may predate MuhammadThey believe that this discovery could rewrite the early history of Islam Fragments of the world's oldest Koran, found in Birmingham last month, may predate the Prophet Muhammad and could even rewrite the early history of Islam, according to scholars.The pages, thought to be between 1,448 and 1,371 years old, were...
  • THE BBC REALLY WANTS YOU TO BELIEVE THE QURAN IS AUTHENTIC [Will bend truth to convince you]

    07/23/2015 8:07:49 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 50 replies
    FrontPage Mag ^ | 07/23/2015 | Robert Spencer
    The BBC announced enthusiastically Wednesday that what may be the worlds oldest fragments of the Koran have been found by the University of Birmingham. This news is not only of interest to scholars and Muslim intellectuals; it appears to buttress the Islamic claim that the Qurans text has remained unchanged for 1,400 years which is purported to be proof of its divine origin. There is only one problem with all this: the BBC article raises more questions than it answers, and reveals more about the wishful thinking of the academic and media establishments than it does about the...
  • 'Oldest' Koran Fragments Found in Birmingham University

    07/22/2015 1:16:50 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 33 replies
    BBC News ^ | 22 July 2015 | Sean Coughlan
    What may be the world's oldest fragments of the Koran have been found by the University of Birmingham. Radiocarbon dating found the manuscript to be at least 1,370 years old, making it among the earliest in existence. The pages of the Muslim holy text had remained unrecognised in the university library for almost a century. The British Library's expert on such manuscripts, Dr Muhammad Isa Waley, said this "exciting discovery" would make Muslims "rejoice". The manuscript had been kept with a collection of other Middle Eastern books and documents, without being identified as one of the oldest fragments of the...
  • Archaeologist Claims to Have Unlocked Phaistos Disk Mystery [again]

    12/20/2015 6:53:53 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Greek Reporter ^ | December 16, 2015 | Philip Chrysopoulos
    The goddess of love, the Minoan Astarte, is the key figure that unlocks the mystery of the Phaistos Disk, according to linguist, archaeologist and coordinator of the program Erasmus of Crete Technological Institute; Gareth Owens. Speaking to the ANA -- MPA news agency, Owens said that after new data found in his research, his theory has changed slightly compared to the position he had expressed about a year ago. The focus is no longer the "pregnant mother", as originally estimated, but a "pregnant goddess" that takes shape in the face of Astarte, the goddess of love. "There is no doubt...
  • Crystal Amulet Poses Question On Early Christianity (Denmark - 100AD)

    03/09/2007 11:37:30 AM PST · by blam · 88 replies · 2,310+ views
    Denmark DK ^ | 3-9-2007
    9 March 2007 Crystal amulet poses question on early Christianity An overlooked crystal amulet in the National Museum suggests new understandings about Christianity's origins in Denmark King Harold Bluetooth brought Christianity to Denmark roughly 1100 years ago. At least that's what he declared on the Jelling Stone located in Jutland: 'King Haraldr ordered this monument made in memory of Gormr, his father, and in memory of Thyrv, his mother; that Haraldr who won for himself all of Denmark and Norway and made the Danes Christian.' A tiny crystal amulet in the National Museum's archives suggests something quite different though, that...
  • Cave Skeleton Is European, 1,300 Years Old

    09/30/2002 3:47:50 PM PDT · by blam · 69 replies · 3,344+ views
    Sunday Gazette Mail ^ | 9-29-2002 | Rick Steelhammer
    Cave skeleton is European, 1,300 years old, man says Archaeologist group wants a look at evidence Sunday September 29, 2002 By Rick Steelhammer STAFF WRITER MORGANTOWN The man who first advanced the theory that markings carved on in a Wyoming County cave are actually characters from an ancient Irish alphabet has found human remains at the site, which tests indicate are European in origin and date back to A.D. 710, he maintains. Robert Pyle of Morgantown says that a DNA analysis of material from the skeletons teeth roots was conducted by Brigham Young University. That analysis, he says, shows...
  • Found: Slab With Hebrew Inscription Where Bible Says Jesus Performed "Miracle Of The Swine"

    12/17/2015 6:44:34 AM PST · by Biggirl · 35 replies
    Breitbart.com ^ | December 17, 2015 | Deborah Danan
    Israeli archaeologists discovered a 1,500-year-old slab of marble with Hebrew inscriptions (pictured) by Kursi near the Sea of Galilee in Israel’s north, reaffirming a Jewish presence at what Christians believe to be the location of Jesus’ “Miracle of the Swine.”
  • Viking hoard discovery reveals little-known king 'airbrushed from history'

    12/12/2015 5:43:43 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    A hoard of Viking coins could change our understanding of English history, after showing how Alfred the Great 'airbrushed' out a rival king A Viking hoard discovered by an amateur metal detectorist could prompt the re-writing of English history, after experts claimed it shows how Alfred the Great "airbrushed" a rival king from history. Ceolwulf II of Mercia is barely mentioned in contemporary records and largely forgotten by history, only briefly described in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle as an "unwise King's thane". But as of today, his reputation might be rescued after a haul of coins dug up after more than...
  • Tiny 2,700-year-old royal seal of Judah's king Hezekiah found in ancient rubbish dump in Jerusalem

    12/09/2015 8:50:12 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 32 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 12/09/2015 | By RICHARD GRAY
    * The oval piece of clay bears the symbol of a winged sun and hieroglyphs * Archaeologists said it was the private seal of the biblical King Hezekiah * During his rule, the Kingdom of Judah saw its power rise dramatically * The seal has provided new clues about Hezekiah's life and politics ____________________________________________________________________________________________________________ A 2,700-year-old royal seal bearing the mark of the biblical King Hezekiah has been unearthed in Jerusalem. The tiny oval piece of clay bears the impression of a sun with two wings turned downward, flanked by two ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs that symbolise 'life'. King Hezekiah's rule...
  • Religious scholar finds ancient New Testament papyrus on eBay for $99

    12/09/2015 8:45:54 AM PST · by SeekAndFind · 11 replies
    NewOK ^ | 11/25/2015 | Herb Scribner, Deseret News
    You could have bought an ancient religious text online for less than $100. That text was an ancient Greek papyrus fragment of the Gospel of John (likely John 1:50-51), and was listed on eBay with an opening bid of $99, according to The New York Times. The papyrus -- called the "Willoughby Papyrus" since it belonged to Harold Willoughby, a University of Chicago professor, according to the eBay listing -- didn’t stay there for long. Dr. Geoffrey Smith, who researches Christianity at the University of Texas, contacted the seller and asked if he could research the fragment, The Times reported....
  • First Humans To Settle Americas Came From Europe, Not From Asia Over Bering Strait -

    07/16/2008 8:02:06 PM PDT · by Free ThinkerNY · 36 replies · 1,253+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | July 17, 2008
    Land-ice Bridge, New Research Suggests -- Research by a Valparaiso University geography professor and his students on the creation of Kankakee Sand Islands of Northwest Indiana is lending support to evidence that the first humans to settle the Americas came from Europe, a discovery that overturns decades of classroom lessons that nomadic tribes from Asia crossed a Bering Strait land-ice bridge. Valparaiso is a member of the Council on Undergraduate Research. Dr. Ron Janke began studying the origins of the Kankakee Sand Islands a series of hundreds of small, moon-shaped dunes that stretch from the southern tips of Lake...
  • Research Casts New Light On History Of North America

    07/01/2008 10:26:26 AM PDT · by blam · 27 replies · 408+ views
    Newswise ^ | 7-1-2008 | Valparaiso University
    Research Casts New Light on History of North America Research by a Valparaiso University geography professor and his students lends support to evidence the first humans to settle the Americas came from Europe, rather than crossing a Bering Strait land-ice bridge. Valparaisos research shows the Kankakee Sand Islands a series of hundreds of small dunes in the Kankakee River area of Northwest Indiana and northeastern Illinois were created 14,500 to 15,000 years ago and that the region could not have been covered by ice as previously thought. Newswise Research by a Valparaiso University geography professor and his...
  • Seal Connects Hezekiah With Horite Beliefs

    12/03/2015 5:45:37 PM PST · by Jandy on Genesis · 7 replies
    Just Genesis ^ | Dec. 2, 2015 | Alice C. Linsley
    This remarkable seal or bulla of the Judean King Hezekiah was discovered by Efrat Greenwald at the Ophel, an ancient dump beside the wall that surrounds Jerusalem's Old City. This bulla was found with 33 additional bullae, many pottery sherds and figurines in Area A of the 2009 excavation season supervised by Hagai Cohen-Klonymus of Hebrew University in Jerusalem. This is the first seal impression of an Israelite or Judean king ever exposed in situ in a scientific archaeological excavation. Initial inspection failed to recognize the seal's importance and it was put in storage. Recently the bulla was identified by...
  • Jerusalem: Incredible archaeological find brings Bible to life [Psalms 85]

    12/02/2015 1:06:22 PM PST · by Jan_Sobieski · 46 replies
    Israel National News ^ | 12/2/2015 | Ari Soffer
    Archaeologists digging just south of Jerusalem's Temple Mount have made a historic discovery, unearthing the first-ever seal impression of an Israelite or Judean king ever exposed in situ in a scientific archaeological excavation. The discovery, made by the Hebrew University of Jerusalem’s Institute of Archaeology under the direction of Dr. Eilat Mazar during Ophel excavations at the foot of the southern wall of the Temple Mount, is an impression of the royal seal of the Biblical King Hezekiah, who reigned between 727–698 BCE. Measuring 9.7 X 8.6 mm, the oval impression was imprinted on a 3 mm thick soft bulla...
  • THE BANKRUPT IRISHMAN WHO CREATED THE DOLLAR SIGN BY ACCIDENT

    11/25/2015 2:52:09 PM PST · by NYer · 13 replies
    Atlas Obscura ^ | November 23, 2015 | DAN HESS
    The only known depiction of Oliver Pollock, in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. (Photo: Richard Cummins/Alamy)Wars cost money. So when the Revolutionary War broke out, the Colonies turned to a number of sources for backing. The top contributors to America’s Independence: The Kingdoms of France and Spain, the Dutch banking conglomerate, and a single Irish merchant based in New Orleans. His name was Oliver Pollock, and he was the “Financier of the Revolution in the West.”  Pollock saw opportunity in war– the chance for a young but wealthy immigrant to stand as a symbol of success and greatness. He desired to carve out a...
  • Staedtler erasers help solve mystery of ultra-thin 13th Century parchment

    11/25/2015 11:46:09 PM PST · by Brad from Tennessee · 14 replies
    The History Blog ^ | November 25, 2015
    For a short window of about 80 years in the 13th century, small, portable bibles were produced on a large scale to satisfy the needs of the growing mendicant friar community and university students. Both groups needed bibles that were lightweight and easy to transport, a far cry from the large, thick-paged, multi-volume bibles common in scriptoria, libraries, churches and learning institutions. Between around 1220 and 1300, at least 20,000 and possibly as many as 30,000 portable bibles were produced, most of them in Paris, but also elsewhere in France, plus England, Italy and Spain. The university centers of Paris,...
  • Iberia, Not Siberia

    12/21/2003 9:48:22 AM PST · by blam · 19 replies · 3,482+ views
    Team Atlantis ^ | 12-6-2000 | Michael A Arbuthnot
    IBERIA, NOT SIBERIA?A Look at the Evidence Supporting a Late Pleistocene Migration to the New World from Europe Michael A. Arbuthnot ANT 5152 Paleoindian Archaeology Dr. Michael Faught December 6th, 2000 Perhaps the most provocative question facing North American paleo-archaeologists is the origin of the Clovis complex. Traditional models have placed Clovis origins in Asia, though one controversial theory contends that Clovis progenitors may have migrated from Iberia (Spain, France, and Portugal). This theory suggests that the descendants of an Upper Pleistocene culture known as Solutrean were the first unquestionable inhabitants of the New World. The recent revitalization of a...
  • Immigrants From The Other Side (Clovis Is Solutrean?)

    11/02/2003 4:11:21 PM PST · by blam · 55 replies · 16,673+ views
    CSFA ^ | 11-3-2003 | Dennis Sanford
    Immigrants from the Other Side? According to the Clovis-First theory, for decades the gospel preached by authorities on the peopling of the Americas, the first Americans walked across the Bering Land Bridge from Asia about 12,000 years ago, and after finding a corridor through the Cordilleran Ice Sheet--admittedly it wasn't an easy trip and the timing was tricky--descended into temperate North America. We know them by their classic fluted points, unlike any others in the world, they left at campsites on their journey south to populate Central and South America. [~ 45:l ~] There have been variations of the basic...
  • Rediscovering America. (The New World May Be 20,000 Years Older Than Experts Thought)

    12/10/2003 1:30:57 PM PST · by blam · 30 replies · 2,783+ views
    Blue Corn Comics (?) ^ | Charles W, Petit
    Rediscovering AmericaThe New World may be 20,000 years older than experts thought BY CHARLES W. PETIT Late in the afternoon last May 17, a tired archaeological team neared the end of a 14-hour day winching muck to the deck of a Canadian Coast Guard vessel. It was in water 170 feet deep in Juan Perez Sound, half a mile offshore among British Columbia's Queen Charlotte Islands. For four days, team members had fruitlessly sieved undersea mud and gravel. Then, in the slanting light of sunset, a deckhand drew from the goop a triangular blade of dark basalt. Its sharp edge...
  • Who Were the First Americans?

    01/13/2002 7:51:38 AM PST · by sarcasm · 10 replies · 1+ views
    Scientific American ^ | September 2000 | Sasha Nemecek
    Images: Pamela Patrick MAMMOTH HUNTER OR FISH CATCHER? Archaeologists had concluded that the first inhabitants of the New World were fur-clad big-game hunters who swept across the Bering land bridge in pursuit of their prey. But recent evidence suggests that the first settlers may have been just as likely to hunt small game, catch fish or gather plants as they moved through more temperate environments. The leaf-shaped spearpoint I'm holding is surprisingly dainty--for a deadly weapon. I let my mind wander, trying to imagine life some 14,700 years ago in the marshes of southern Chile, where this relic was ...
  • 4,000 coins found in Roman treasure trove in Swiss orchard

    11/19/2015 11:59:36 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Thursday 19 November 2015 | Agence France-Presse
    A trove of more than 4,000 bronze and silver coins dating back to ancient Rome, uncovered this summer in the orchard of a fruit and vegetable farmer, has been described as one of the biggest treasures of this kind found in Switzerland. The huge hoard of coins, buried about 1,700 years ago and weighing 15kg (33lb), was discovered in Ueken, in Switzerland’s northern canton of Aargau, after the farmer spotted some shimmering green coins on a molehill in his cherry orchard... On Thursday the archaeological service announced that after months of digs, 4,166 coins had been found at the site,...
  • AMERICA GOT HER NAME FROM THIS 1507 MAP

    11/13/2015 5:37:41 AM PST · by NYer · 54 replies
    Atlas Obscura ^ | November 9, 2015 | ERIC GRUNDHAUSER
    The first time America was called America. (All Images from The Library of Congress)The Universalis Cosmographia, a 1507 cartographic exploration of the known world, depicted the New World as two entirely separate continents. This was quite a revolutionary stance on the early days of the Age of Discovery: many people still believed that the New World was connected to Asia. Although we now know that North and South America are a single continent, this ambitious map by German cartographer Martin Waldseemüller is rightfully revered for giving America its name.The wide wall map was originally printed in a gorgeous tome of cartographic illustrations and gores (maps designed to...
  • Am I the Only One Never Heard of a 'HOBO NICKEL' Before?

    11/06/2015 9:17:28 AM PST · by Reaganite Republican · 26 replies
    Reaganite Republican ^ | 06 October 2015 | Reaganite Republican
    Certainly no lack of historical curiosity in my noggin, but this one's new on me. Hard to imagine how I missed it, because it's a delightful folk art form to be sure- pure Americana. Due to the relative cheapness, softness, portability, and (adequate) thickness for sculpturing, the US 5-cent coin proved perfect for carving into highly-creative works that can be carried around in your pocket. Alterations of coins hadoccurred in Europe, S. Africa, and the US in the 18th and 19th century -in cruder forms- but introduction of the 'Buffalo' nickel in 1913 broughtabout a surge in popularity of...
  • HOW CAPICOLA BECAME GABAGOOL: THE ITALIAN NEW JERSEY ACCENT, EXPLAINED

    11/06/2015 2:41:39 PM PST · by NYer · 76 replies
    Atlas Obscura ^ | November 5, 2015 | DAN NOSOWITZ
    Mulberry Street, where New York's "Little Italy" is centered, c. 1909.  (Photo: Library of Congress)“Don’t eat gabagool, Grandma,” says Meadow Soprano on an early episode of The Sopranos, perhaps the most famous depiction of Jersey Italian culture in the past few decades. “It’s nothing but fat and nitrates.” The pronunciation of “gabagool,” a mutation of the word "capicola," might surprise a casual viewer, although it and words like it should be familiar to viewers of other New Jersey-based shows like the now-defunct Jersey Shore and The Real Housewives of New Jersey, where food often drives conversation. The casts are heavily Italian-American, but...
  • The “Other” Lost Scriptures (Beyond the Dead Sea Scrolls, Slavonic texts break all the rules)

    11/03/2015 2:52:20 PM PST · by NYer · 25 replies
    Aletelia ^ | November 3, 2015 | PHILIP JENKINS
    We all know where priceless ancient manuscripts should be found: somewhere remote, preferably a desert, and we need a good hiding place; caves are perfect. In terms of creating a stereotype, the Dead Sea Scrolls are the model case, followed by the ancient Christian and Gnostic texts found at Nag Hammadi, in Egypt, around the same time. Yet one of the greatest such discoveries in modern times broke all those rules, which might explain why it remains so thoroughly unknown outside quite a narrow specialist world. And we still are only beginning to come to terms with the implications.The...
  • In how many languages can you read a whole Bible?

    08/31/2011 3:23:07 AM PDT · by Cronos · 21 replies
    Eternity ^ | 22 Aug 2011 | Andrew Mathewson
    The latest figures, covering 2010, show that The complete Bible has now been translated into 469 languages and the New Testament into 1,231, according to 2010 figures. Bibles have become available in ten more languages and New Testaments in 27 more than this time last year. The latest Scripture Language Report (SLR), the authoritative guide to the annual progress of worldwide Bible translation, published annually by United Bible Societies, measures the progress made by UBS and other Bible translation agencies in the past 12 months. There are estimated to be 6,600 spoken languages in the world and most people would...
  • Birds can distinguish languages: researchers

    02/07/2006 9:36:32 AM PST · by presidio9 · 2 replies · 65+ views
    AFP ^ | Mon Feb 6, 2006
    Pet birds can not only imitate sounds, they can distinguish between languages, potentially offering new clues on how the brain recognizes speech, Japanese researchers say. It has already been confirmed that monkeys, mice and other mammals can recognize different languages but this is the first time that birds have been found to possess the ability, the Mainichi Shimbun newspaper reported. A research team exposed Java Sparrows to English and Chinese translations recorded by exchange students of two well-known Japanese novels, "The Tale of Genji" and Natsume Soseki's "I Am a Cat." A bird sitting on a perch first listened to...
  • The origins of language: Signs of success

    02/21/2004 6:37:52 AM PST · by Pharmboy · 27 replies · 661+ views
    The Economist ^ | Feb 19th 2004 | Anon
    Deaf people are making a profound contribution to the study of language Ann Senghas We all speak smile JUST as biologists rarely see a new species arise, linguists rarely see a new language being born. You have to be in the right place at the right time, which usually you are not. But the past few decades have seen an exception. Linguists have been able to follow the formation of a new language in Nicaragua. The catch is that it is not a spoken language but, rather, a sign language which arose spontaneously in deaf children. Ann Senghas, of Columbia...
  • Why Do Dogs Bark? It's Still Mostly a Mystery.

    04/24/2014 4:35:17 PM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 102 replies
    Real Clear Science ^ | 4-24-14 | Ross Pomeroy
    Whether a woof, ruff, yip, or yap, dogs bark dozens, if not hundreds, of times each day. Imagine if every pet canine in the U.S. -- all 83.3 million of them -- congregated. The chorus would be a postal worker's nightmare. Dogs sound off in almost any situation. Maybe the doorbell rang, or a stranger approached, or a bird fluttered nearby. Even with little to no obvious stimulation, dogs can bark incessantly. Behaviorist and biologist Raymond Coppinger once observed a dog that barked for seven hours straight, even though no other canines were within miles. Because dogs bark repetitively and...
  • Surprised I Speak Your Language?:Understanding those barks and meows

    12/17/2008 12:13:33 PM PST · by JoeProBono · 66 replies · 1,468+ views
    sfgate ^ | December 17, 2008
    When your dog says "Woof," you hear an eager, "Let's take a walk." And your cat has a certain entitled meow that you know means, "Put more food in my bowl now!" You are not alone. Sixty-seven percent of pet owners say they understand their animals' barks, purrs and other sounds, according to an Associated Press-Petside.com poll released Wednesday. In a finding many parents of teenagers might envy, 62 percent of owners say that when they speak their pets get the message.