Keyword: epigraphyandlanguage

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  • Jerusalem dig finds big gold hoard from 7th century

    12/22/2008 7:58:22 AM PST · by BGHater · 26 replies · 1,152+ views
    Reuters ^ | 22 Dec 2008 | Douglas Hamilton
    Excavations have unearthed a hoard of more than 1,300-year-old gold coins under a car park by the ancient walls of Jerusalem, the Israeli Antiquities Authority said on Monday. Archaeologists said the discovery of the 264 coins, in the ruins of a building dating to about the 7th century, the end of the Byzantine period, was one of the largest coin hoards uncovered in Jerusalem. "We've had pottery, we've had glass, but we've had nothing like this," said British archaeologist Nadine Ross, who found the hoard under a large rock on Sunday, in the fourth and final week of a trip...
  • Etruscan Code Uncracked

    07/09/2016 1:51:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Monday, June 13, 2016 | Rossella Lorenzi
    An inscribed stone slab unearthed at an Etruscan site in Tuscany is proving to contain one of the most difficult texts to decipher. It was believed that the sixth-century B.C. stela would shed light on the still-mysterious Etruscan language, but so far it remains a puzzle. “To be honest, I’m not yet sure what type of text was incised on the stela,” says Rex Wallace, professor of classics at the University of Massachusetts. Inscribed with vertical dots and at least 70 legible letters, the four-foot-tall and two-foot-wide slab had been buried for more than 2,500 years in the foundations of...
  • WORD FOR THE DAY: DEMOTIC

    07/05/2016 6:38:43 PM PDT · by Louis Foxwell · 33 replies
    2000 Most Challenging and Obscure Words | July 56, 2016 | Norman Schur
    In order that we might all raise the level of discourse and expand our language abilities, here is the daily post of "Word for the Day". demotic [dig MOT ik]hear it pronounced adjective Demotic pertains to anything relating to the common people. In that sense, it can be use as synonymous with "popular."Demotic has a narrow, specialized sense as a designation of a simplified form of ancient Egyptian writing in which the priests kept their records.The adjective comes from the Greek demotikus (popular, plebian), based on 111111111111,i1.demotes (a plebian) and demos (the common people, the populas.King Demos is a facetious...
  • Semerano, The Scholar Feared By The Academy, Awarded (2001)

    02/27/2005 9:36:15 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies · 471+ views
    Giovanni Semerano had to wait 90 years before receiving his first institutional acknowledgement for his important discoveries concerning ancient languages, in particular, the Etruscan language. Semerano has revolutionized the theories tied to the Indo-European languages as the root of the current Mediterranean and European languages. He was defined a "heretic" scholar because he erased centuries of philosophical studies that saw in the Greek-Latin philosophies the origins of European culture. Thanks to his etymological studies the 90-year-old philosopher instead sustains that Western culture derives from the Shiites and the Assyrians.
  • Finnish was the second language of Sweden for centuries. Now Arabic is overtaking it.

    04/07/2016 12:57:31 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 22 replies
    Washington Post ^ | 04/07/2016 | Adam Taylor
    Officially, Sweden doesn't keep a record of the languages its inhabitants speak. That fact was infuriating to Mikael Parkvall, a linguist at Stockholm University, so he decided to find out for himself. What is the most popular non-Swedish language in Sweden? After poring over various statistics and studies, Parkvall came to a conclusion: Arabic was very likely to now be the second most popular language in the Scandinavian country. Parkvall's study focused on native languages rather than second languages, which he says are a better judge of what languages are actually spoken in a country (while English is widely spoken...
  • Early Written Signs

    02/14/2016 9:12:52 AM PST · by Jandy on Genesis · 5 replies
    Just Genesis ^ | February 13, 2016 | Alice C. Linsley
    George and I have had several meaningful conversations via email. This one might be of interest to other readers and George gave me permission to reproduce the conversation. George: I want to thank you for your blogs. I read them all the time and they have been a BIG help! I've been trying to sell others on the fact that the Hebrew lettering system goes back further than the 4th century millennium BC thanks to your findings of the Ainu/Annu culture and their lettering system in their later homeland of Japan - but with no success. I definitely believe your...
  • Unearthed: the humble origins of world diplomacy (A Preserved Library from 1340BC discovered!)

    01/19/2003 11:04:10 AM PST · by vannrox · 9 replies · 375+ views
    UK Independent ^ | 19 January 2003 | By David Keys, Archaeology Correspondent
    Unearthed: the humble origins of world diplomacy By David Keys, Archaeology Correspondent 19 January 2003 Archaeologists have discovered evidence of an invasion of the Middle East by one of the world's first superpowers, which destroyed much of the region 33 centuries ago. Under the ruins of a 3,800-year-old royal palace in western Syria they have found part of an ancient diplomatic and administrative library, the most important archaeological discovery of its kind for more than 20 years. Accounts on clay tablets describe the region's conquest by one of the Bronze Age's superpowers, the Hittite Empire, in 1340BC. This helped to...
  • Messages from the Dead [ Qatna's royal palace and cuneiform archive ]

    02/01/2007 8:39:48 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies · 235+ views
    Archaeology ^ | January/February 2006 | Marco Merola
    Inscribed on the small, pillow-shaped tablet is a 3,000-year-old warning to Idanda, king of Qatna, from the Hittite general Hanutti, telling him to prepare for war. A small Bronze Age Syrian city-state, Qatna was once under Hittite control, but had been conquered by the Mitanni people from the north. The clay tablet, like others found with it, was fired twice--once just after it was written, to preserve it, and again when the ancient city was sacked and burned to the ground in 1340 B.C. by the Hittites, who ruled an empire that stretched from northern Turkey to Mesopotamia and Syria......
  • Crowdsourcing a modern means to crack code on Civil War texts

    07/03/2016 11:32:13 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 20 replies
    The Wall Street Journal reported on a trove of Civil War era telegrams — many of them to and from Abraham Lincoln — that have never been decoded. The telegrams are owned by the Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens in San Marino. They have started a project, "Decoding the Civil War," to transcribe and decipher their collection of nearly 16,000 Civil War telegrams between Lincoln, his Cabinet and Union Army officers. About a third of the telegrams were written in code. The library is crowdsourcing the project through the largest online platform for collaborative volunteer research, Zooniverse. They...
  • Discovery Of Roman Coins In Devon Redraws Map Of Empire

    06/22/2016 11:47:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | Wednesday, June 22, 2016 | Steven Morris
    The discovery of a few muddy coins in a Devon paddock by a pair of amateur metal detector enthusiasts has led to the redrawing of the boundary of the Roman empire in south-west Britain. Previously it had been thought that Ancient Rome’s influence did not stretch beyond Exeter but the find has resulted in a major archaeological dig that has unearthed more coins, a stretch of Roman road and the remnants of vessels from France and the Mediterranean once full of wine, olive oil and garum -- fish sauce. The far south-west of Britain has long been seen as an...
  • Make It So! Sayeth Cleopatra

    06/21/2016 6:35:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Archaeology, Volume 54 Number 1 ^ | January/February 2001 | Angela M. H. Schuster
    A single Greek word, ginesthoi, or "make it so," written at the bottom of a Ptolemaic papyrus may have been written by the Egyptian queen Cleopatra VII herself, says Dutch papyrologist Peter van Minnen of the University of Groningen. Received in Alexandria on Mecheir 26 (February 23, 33 B.C.), the papyrus text, recycled for use in the construction of a cartonnage mummy case found by a German expedition at Abusir in 1904, appears to be a royal ordinance granting tax exemption to one Publius Canidius, an associate of Mark Antony's who would command his land army during the Battle of...
  • The face of Cleopatra: Scientists recreate the first true image of the legendary beauty

    12/15/2008 9:59:29 AM PST · by yankeedame · 48 replies · 6,476+ views
    DailyMail.uk ^ | 15th December 2008 | Fiona Macrae
    The face of Cleopatra: Scientists recreate the first true image of the legendary beauty ...Cambridge University Egyptologist...believes the computer-generated 3D image is the best likeness of the legendary beauty... Pieced together from images on ancient artefacts, including a ring dating from Cleopatra's reign 2000 years ago, it is the culmination of more than a year of painstaking research. Likeness: The computer-generated 3D image has been pieced together from images on ancient artefacts The result is a strikingly beautiful young woman of mixed ethnicity... ...reflect the monarch's Greek heritage as well as her Egyptian upbringing. ...'She probably wasn’t just completely European....
  • Coin Shows Cleopatra's Ugly Truth

    02/14/2007 8:59:15 AM PST · by blam · 134 replies · 4,297+ views
    BBC ^ | 2-14-2007
    Coin shows Cleopatra's ugly truth The images of Antony and Cleopatra are less than flattering Antony and Cleopatra, one of history's most romantic couples, were not the great beauties that Hollywood would have us believe, academics have said. A study of a 2,000-year-old silver coin found the Egyptian queen, famously portrayed by Elizabeth Taylor, had a pointed chin, thin lips and sharp nose. Her Roman lover, played by Richard Burton, had bulging eyes, thick neck and a hook nose. The tiny coin was studied by experts at Newcastle University. The size of a modern 5p piece (18mm or 0.7in), the...
  • Cleopatra seduced the Romans with her irresistible . . . mind

    03/15/2005 8:10:16 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 110 replies · 2,420+ views
    The Times (U.K.) ^ | March 14, 2005 | Ben Hoyle
    LONG before Shakespeare portrayed her as history’s most exotic femme fatale, Cleopatra was revered throughout the Arab world — for her brain. Medieval Arab scholars never referred to the Egyptian queen’s appearance, and they made no mention of the dangerous sensuality which supposedly corrupted Julius Caesar and Mark Antony. Instead they marvelled at her intellectual accomplishments: from alchemy and medicine to philosophy, mathematics and town planning, a new book has claimed. Even Elizabeth Taylor, who famously played the title role in the 1963 epic Cleopatra, would have struggled to inject sex appeal into this queen. Arab writers depict Cleopatra’s court...
  • 'Jesus's wife' papyrus is likely a fake, professor now says

    06/20/2016 11:26:12 AM PDT · by Olog-hai · 74 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Jun 20, 2016 2:16 PM EDT
    A Harvard professor who caused a huge splash when she unveiled a small fragment of papyrus that she said referred to Jesus being married now says it’s likely a forgery. In 2012, Harvard Divinity School Professor Karen King presented the fragment, which includes the phrase, “Jesus said to them, my wife.” Since then, other scholars have raised doubts about the fragment’s authenticity. …
  • Latin Course Stage 6 (Pompeii Slave Girl)

    07/18/2004 7:24:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies · 5,740+ views
    Cambridge ^ | 2004 | University of Cambridge
    Gold bracelet found on arm of (slave?) girl killed near Pompeii by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD. On the inside of the bracelet is carved "from the Master to his slave girl" (DOM[I]NUS ANCILLAE SUAE).
  • LATIN 1: THE EASY WAY

    09/25/2004 12:02:15 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 68 replies · 3,109+ views
    Cherryh website ^ | 1999 | C.J. Cherryh
    I used to teach this subject. I use a method that's a little different than the standard, a method aimed at results, not tradition, and no need to learn grammar at the outset, when you've got enough new things to learn. If you learned by the traditional method you may find this radically different; but trust me.
  • 'Believe Me, Father, the Latin for Hot Pants Is Brevissimae Bracae'

    08/28/2004 5:12:23 PM PDT · by quidnunc · 29 replies · 1,028+ views
    The Telegraph ^ | August 29, 2004 | Elizabeth Day
    As the iuvenis voluptarius might say, put on your brevissimae bracae femineae and let's go to the taberna nocturna and drink some vinum rubrum Burdigalense. The Vatican has helpfully produced a new lexicon of modern words in Latin, providing translations for such non-classical terms as playboy, hot pants, nightclub and Merlot. The lexicon, which has just been launched, is intended to provide updated vocabulary for theologians writing in Latin about current issues. For those wishing to write about anarchy or dissent in the 21st century, entries include tromocrates (terrorist) and punkianae catervae assecla (punk). Theologians referring to the modern vices...
  • (Vanity) Sunday Morning Chuckles: Latin Phrases for the Here-and-Now

    05/23/2004 6:59:08 AM PDT · by yankeedame · 27 replies · 1,602+ views
    Sunday May 23,'04 | submitted by Yankeedame
    (Gang, what you see is what I recieved from the friend of a friend kind of person. So if the Latin isn't exactly...well, "Latin" ... remember --as our liberal friends would say-- it's the intention that counts! [grin] -- YD.) -Pecunia in arbotis non cresat Money doesn't grow on trees. -Sane ego te vocavi. Forsitan capedictum tuum desit. I did call. Maybe your answering machine is broken.-Ne feceris ut ridram Don't make me laugh.-Te precor dulcissime supplex! Pretty please with a cherry on top!-Fac ut nemo me vocet Hold my calls-Ita erat quando hic adveni It was that way when...
  • Archaeologists Find Ancient Collector's Hoard of Hasmonean Coins

    06/14/2016 12:54:02 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Haaretz ^ | June 10, 2016 | Nir Hasson
    A rare cache of silver coins dating to the Hasmonean period, some 2,140 years ago, has been discovered in a salvage excavation in central Israel. The 16 coins, shekels and half-shekels (tetradrachms and didrachms), date from around 126 BCE. They had been minted farther north, in the city of Tyre, and bear the images of the king, Antiochus VII and his brother Demetrius Israeli, stated Avraham Tendler, director of the excavation on behalf of the Israel Antiquities Authority... Closer analysis of the coins showed that the cache contains one or two coins from every year between 135 to 126 BCE... Aside...
  • Bulgaria's Burgas Showcases for the first time 7,000-year-old... 'Pre-Alphabetic Writing'

    06/13/2016 11:25:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Archaeology in Bulgaria ^ | June 12, 2016 | Ivan Dikov
    A nearly 7,000-year-old ceramic prism with what might be pre-alphabetic writing has been unveiled to the public for the first time by the Regional Museum of History in Bulgaria’s Black Sea city of Burgas. The prism-shaped prehistoric artifact featuring the supposedly pre-alphabetic signs on its four sides was discovered during the excavations of an Early Chalcolithic settlement mound near Burgas back in 2008, and has never been shown to the public before. The artifact (and the Burgas Chalcolithic Mound where it was found) dates back to the Early Chalcolithic (Aeneolithic, Copper Age) – 4,900 / 4,850-4,600 / 4,550 BC, the...
  • The World's First Computer May Have Been Used To Tell Fortunes [Engraved text translation]

    06/10/2016 6:55:53 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 21 replies
    A ten-year project to decipher inscriptions on the ancient Greek “Antikythera mechanism” has revealed new functions, including the first hint that the device was used to make astrological predictions. The writings also lend support to the idea that the gadget, often called the world's first computer because of its ability to model complex astronomical cycles, originated from the island of Rhodes. Until now, scholars have focused on decoding the sophisticated array of gearwheels inside the 2000-year-old artifact. The new publication tackles instead the lettering squeezed onto every available surface. “It’s like discovering a whole new manuscript,” says Mike Edmunds, emeritus...
  • (from April 22, 2016) Some fairy tales may be 6000 years old

    06/09/2016 4:55:27 PM PDT · by SteveH · 51 replies
    sciencemag.org ^ | April 22, 2016 | David Shultz
    When it comes to the origin of Western fairy tales, the 19th century Brothers Grimm get a lot of the credit. Few scholars believe the Grimms were actually responsible for creating the tales, but academics probably didn’t realize how old many of these stories really are. A new study, which treats these fables like an evolving species, finds that some may have originated as long as 6000 years ago. The basis for the new study, published in Royal Society Open Science, is a massive online repository of more than 2000 distinct tales from different Indo-European cultures known as the Aarne–Thompson–Uther...
  • Letters to the Crocodile God

    11/11/2007 10:47:56 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies · 114+ views
    Archaeology ^ | Volume 60 Number 6, November/December 2007 | Marco Merola
    The desert swallowed Tebtunis in the twelfth century A.D., so the town does not appear on any maps. We know its name, and a great deal more, from the tens of thousands of papyrus fragments found throughout the twentieth century by a succession of archaeologists, including those working at the site today. These records, which range from pieces found in ancient garbage dumps, to sheets recycled as wrappings for mummies, to five-yard-long scrolls, include literary texts and records of private contracts and public acts. "The papyri give us particular and historic information that cannot be found elsewhere," says Claudio Gallazzi,...
  • Discovery of 410 wooden tablets gives glimpse into life of London's first Romans (ed)

    06/01/2016 7:41:27 PM PDT · by Ray76 · 39 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | Jun 1, 2016 | Ryan O'Hare
    An archaeological dig has turned up the earliest known handwritten documents in Britain among hundreds of Roman waxed writing tablets. Some 410 wooden tablets have been discovered, 87 of which have been deciphered to reveal names, events, business and legal dealings and evidence of someone practising writing the alphabet and numerals. With only 19 legible tablets previously known from London, the find from the first decades of Roman rule in Britain provides a wealth of new information about the city's earliest Romans.
  • Archaeologists and geographers team to predict locations of ancient Buddhist sites [Ashoka's Edicts]

    05/31/2016 3:51:48 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    UCLA ^ | May 26, 2016 | Jessica Wolf
    For archaeologists and historians interested in the ancient politics, religion and language of the Indian subcontinent, two UCLA professors and their student researchers have creatively pinpointed sites that are likely to yield valuable transcriptions of the proclamations of Ashoka, the Buddhist king of northern India's Mauryan Dynasty who ruled from 304 B.C. to 232 B.C. In a study published this week in Current Science, archaeologist Monica Smith and geographer Thomas Gillespie identified 121 possible locations of what are known as Ashoka's "edicts." First they isolated shared features of 29 known locations of Ashokan edicts, which were found carved into natural...
  • 10 Controversial Artifacts That Could Have Changed History

    05/20/2016 10:12:43 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 19 replies
    listverse.com ^ | 05/09/2016 | Debra Kelly
    6. The Davenport Tablets The Davenport Academy was a major force in early American amateur archeology. Unfortunately, the organization ended up lending its name to one of the most ridiculous hoaxes in American history. In 1877, Reverend Jacob Gass claimed to have found a set of four inscribed tablets buried in an ancient mound in Iowa. Gass was quickly invited to join the Davenport Academy, which contained many supporters of the “Mound Builders” myth. This theory, now entirely discredited, argued that Native Americans were too primitive to have built the giant earthworks that dot the American countryside. Instead, 19th century...
  • Meet the UC Berkeley Grad Who Created the Dothraki Language for 'Game of Thrones'

    05/17/2016 11:08:00 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 20 replies
    NBC Bay Area ^ | 5/17 | Lisa Fernandez
    David Peterson has so far created 4,000 Dothraki words When the misogynistic, male Dothraki characters launch into curse-laden tirades on "Game of Thrones," viewers have a 35-year-old Southern California father and a University of California Berkeley graduate to thank for what they hear. David J. Peterson invented Dothraki, the language spoken by the crass race of nomadic horse warriors first described in George R.R. Martin's "A Song of Fire and Ice," on which the HBO series is based. "It's a lot of fun," he said Tuesday, in his first, interactive Facetime Live interview. Especially coming up with the curse...
  • Devastating 'World War ZERO' destroyed ancient civilisations and plunged Europe into a dark age

    05/15/2016 1:12:48 PM PDT · by Trumpinator · 65 replies
    mirror.co.uk ^ | 11:44, 13 MAY 2016 | JASPER HAMILL
    Devastating 'World War ZERO' destroyed ancient Mediterranean civilisations and plunged Europe into a dark age 11:41, 13 MAY 2016 UPDATED 11:44, 13 MAY 2016 BY JASPER HAMILL Controversial theory finally identifies mysterious 'Sea Peoples' blamed for cataclysmic series of events which changed the course of history It was a disaster which destroyed the ancient world's greatest civilisations and plunged Europe into a dark age that lasted centuries. Now one archaeologist think he's worked out who's to blame for sparking an event he calls "World War Zero", but which most academics refer to as the The Late Bronze Age Collapse ....
  • What phrases commonly used today are derived from obsolete technologies?

    05/05/2016 5:03:45 AM PDT · by harpygoddess · 159 replies
    VA Viper ^ | 05/04/2016 | HarpyGoddess
    "Hang up the phone." comes from one specific kind of land-line phone that had a kind of hook you'd hang the handset from when you were done. Doing so would pull down the hook that was connected to a switch inside the phone that would disconnect the line. And lots of nautical stuff: Groggy - In 1740, British Admiral Vernon (whose nickname was "Old Grogram" for the cloak of grogram which he wore) ordered that the sailors' daily ration of rum be diluted with water. The men called the mixture "grog". A sailor who drank too much grog was "groggy"....
  • World War Zero brought down mystery civilisation of 'sea people'

    05/13/2016 7:38:33 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 60 replies
    New Scientist ^ | May 12, 2016 | Colin Barras
    The Trojan War was a grander event than even Homer would have us believe. The famous conflict may have been one of the final acts in what one archaeologist has controversially dubbed "World War Zero" -- an event he claims brought the eastern Mediterranean Bronze Age world crashing down 3200 years ago. And the catalyst for the war? A mysterious and arguably powerful civilisation almost entirely overlooked by archaeologists: the Luwians. By the second millennium BC, civilisation had taken hold throughout the eastern Mediterranean. The Egyptian New Kingdom coexisted with the Hittites of central Anatolia and the Mycenaeans of mainland...
  • Birdwatcher Spies Egyptian Scarab Seal at Dor [Middle Kingdom]

    05/07/2016 4:24:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    BAR ^ | Wednesday, May 4, 2016 | Robin Ngo
    Birdwatcher Alexander Ternopolsky made a remarkable discovery one day at the archaeological site of Tel Dor on Israel's Carmel Coast -- not a bird, but a rare Egyptian scarab seal. The stone scarab -- an ancient Egyptian object shaped like a scarab beetle -- belonged to a high-ranking official of the 13th Dynasty (18th-17th centuries B.C.E.) in Middle Kingdom Egypt... The name of the scarab's owner, his position, and ankh and djed symbols (representing eternal life and stability, respectively) are engraved on the Egyptian scarab seal. While the owner's name hasn't been deciphered yet, he is described on the scarab...
  • Recently Discovered Mayan Pyramid Confirmed As One Of The Largest Ever Seen

    05/06/2016 7:31:17 AM PDT · by Fractal Trader · 132 replies
    Misterious Earth ^ | 6 May 2016
    Researchers have confirmed that the Mayan pyramid excavated at the Acropolis of Toniná, Chiapas is one the largest pyramids ever discovered. Discovered in 2010, Emiliano Gallaga and his team began their excavation under the impression that the pyramid was built on the top of a hill. It was not until recently that they’ve managed to fully assess it and truly see what they’re working with. Wighing in at 75-meters tall with seven distinct districts all with their own purpose – such as Temples, palaces, markets, housing, administration – the magnitude of the Toniná pyramid compares even to that of the...
  • 1000 year old marks in tree found near Prague

    08/28/2009 11:50:37 AM PDT · by BGHater · 14 replies · 1,414+ views
    DiscoveryON ^ | 21 Aug 2009 | DO
    Czech archaeologists have uncovered a unique 1000-year-old mark engraved into an oak tree the remains of which were found near Celakovice in Prague, which is probably the oldest preserved sign of this kind in the world. According to a report from the Czech News Agency, the real meaning of the 10-cm star-shaped mark on the oak trunk is not certain. Experts say it may have marked the territory or serve some iconic purposes. This find is rare as so old engraved signs were not previously mapped and they are not systematically searched for either, archaeologist Jana Marikova of the Academy...
  • Medieval Doodles Of A 7-Year Old Boy Hints At The ‘Universality’ Of Daydreaming

    05/02/2016 4:24:27 PM PDT · by Sawdring · 34 replies
    Realm Of History ^ | APRIL 30, 2016 | DATTATREYA MANDAL
    Novgorod or Veliky Novgorod, is one of the major historical cities of Russia, and it started out as a trading station for the Varangians who traveled from the Baltic region to Constantinople by (possibly) late 10th century AD. But as it turns out, this historically significant settlement of northern Russia is also home to around thousand personal ‘tomes’ that are inscribed on bark of birch trees and are almost preserved in perfect condition. In fact, historians hypothesize that there are 20,000 similar specimens still waiting to be salvaged from the conducive anaerobic clay soil layers of the city environs. And...
  • Construction workers unearth over half a tonne of Roman coins in Spain

    04/29/2016 7:42:11 AM PDT · by wtd · 94 replies
    UK Telegraph ^ | 29 April 2016 | Keely Lockhart
    Construction workers unearth over half a tonne of Roman coins in Spain Workers laying pipes in a park in Seville have unearthed a 600-kilogram trove of Roman coins in what culture officials say is a unique historic discovery.
  • Who Wrote the Books of the Bible?: New Book Addresses Historical Origins of the Bible

    02/16/2007 2:06:00 PM PST · by Alex Murphy · 15 replies · 1,290+ views
    PR Newswire ^ | Feb. 16, 2007
    LAPORTE, Ind., Feb. 16 /PRNewswire/ -- C. Jack Trickler presents a clear and accessible study of the people who wrote the books of the Bible, their motivations and the historical, political and social settings in which they wrote in his new book, "A Layman's Guide to Who Wrote the Books of the Bible?" (now available through AuthorHouse). Trickler discusses his own theories, as well as those of other religious scholars, to offer a thorough, well-researched argument. "When you get into the Bible, you see enough evidence that the Bible was written by humans that you have to say, 'Well, who...
  • 'Lost' Shakespeare Play Double Falsehood Published

    03/16/2010 12:25:03 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 29 replies · 637+ views
    BBC ^ | Monday, 15 March 2010
    A play which was first discovered nearly 300 years ago has been credited to William Shakespeare. The work, titled Double Falsehood, was written by the playwright and another dramatist, John Fletcher. Theatre impresario Lewis Theobald presented the play in the 18th century as an adaptation of a Shakespeare play but it was dismissed as a forgery. But scholars for British Shakespeare publisher, Arden, now believe the Bard wrote large parts of the play. Researchers think the play is based on a long-lost work called Cardenio, which was itself based on Don Quixote. "I think Shakespeare's hand can be discerned in...
  • Computer program proves Shakespeare didn't work alone, researchers claim

    10/12/2009 10:28:02 AM PDT · by BGHater · 20 replies · 1,425+ views
    Times Online ^ | 12 Oct 2009 | Jack Malvern
    The 400-year-old mystery of whether William Shakespeare was the author of an unattributed play about Edward III may have been solved by a computer program designed to detect plagiarism. Sir Brian Vickers, an authority on Shakespeare at the Institute of English Studies at the University of London, believes that a comparison of phrases used in The Reign of King Edward III with Shakespeare’s early works proves conclusively that the Bard wrote the play in collaboration with Thomas Kyd, one of the most popular playwrights of his day. The professor used software called Pl@giarism, developed by the University of Maastricht to...
  • South Sudan adopts the language of Shakespeare

    10/09/2011 6:02:37 AM PDT · by decimon · 14 replies
    BBC ^ | October 8, 2011 | Rosie Goldsmith
    The young nation of South Sudan has chosen English as its official language but after decades of civil war, the widespread learning of English presents a big challenge for a country brought up speaking a form of Arabic.I knew there might be problems as soon as I arrived at Juba International airport - and was asked to fill in my own visa form, as the immigration officer could not write English. The colourful banners and billboards hung out to celebrate South Sudan's independence back in July, and still adorning the streets now, are all in English. As are the names...
  • Director posits proof of biblical Exodus

    04/14/2006 5:58:16 AM PDT · by timsbella · 157 replies · 3,529+ views
    The Globe and Mail ^ | 14 April 2006 | Michael Posner
    A provocative $4-million documentary by Toronto filmmaker Simcha Jacobovici claims to have found archeological evidence verifying the story of the biblical Exodus from Egypt, 3,500 years ago. Religious Jews consider the biblical account incontrovertible — the foundation story of the creation of the nation of Israel. Indeed, they celebrated the Exodus Wednesday night and last night with the annual Passover recitation of the Haggadah. But among scholars, the question of if and when Moses led an estimated two million Israelite slaves out of pharaonic Egypt, miraculously crossed the Red Sea ahead of the pursuing Egyptian army and received the Ten...
  • When Was The Bible Written? New Study Suggests Earlier Than We Thought

    04/13/2016 8:46:30 AM PDT · by avrakay · 29 replies
    Tech Times ^ | April 13 2016 | Deepthi B
    Certain texts of the Bible may have been written earlier than previously believed, according to a new research based on the handwriting analysis of ancient inscriptions. It is dated to be at least 600 B.C. and the presumption is that literacy was prevalent and the texts were composed in the kingdom of Judah, a city with biblical reverence, according to researchers from the Tel Aviv University. They suggest that the educational infrastructure to support Bible writing presumably existed at that time.
  • New Evidence on When Bible Was Written: Ancient Shopping Lists

    04/11/2016 5:41:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    New York Times ^ | April 11, 2016 | Isabel Kershner
    Based on a statistical analysis of the results, and taking into account the content of the texts that were chosen for the sample, the researchers concluded that at least six different hands had written the 18 missives at around the same time. Even soldiers in the lower ranks of the Judahite army, it appears, could read and write... The study was based on a trove of about 100 letters inscribed in ink on pieces of pottery, known as ostracons, that were unearthed near the Dead Sea in an excavation of the Arad fort decades ago and dated from about 600...
  • Easy as Alep, Bet, Gimel? Cambridge research explores social context of ancient writing

    04/08/2016 1:50:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | April 5, 2016 | University of Cambridge
    The project, called Contexts of and Relations between Early Writing Systems (CREWS)... is led by Dr Philippa Steele of the University's Faculty of Classics... For instance, today the notion of "alphabetical order" is used to arrange everything from dictionaries to telephone books, but why is the alphabet organised the way it is? Alphabetical order as we would recognise it first appeared over three thousand years ago in Ugaritic, written in a cuneiform script made of wedge-shaped signs impressed on clay tablets. The Ugaritic alphabet was in use in the ancient city of Ugarit, uncovered at Ras Shamra in modern Syria....
  • Text in lost language may reveal god or goddess worshipped by Etruscans at ancient temple:

    03/29/2016 5:41:03 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 46 replies
    SMU Research Home ^ | 3/28/2016 | SMU
    Archaeologists in Italy have discovered what may be a rare sacred text in the Etruscan language that is likely to yield rich details about Etruscan worship of a god or goddess. The lengthy text is inscribed on a large 6th century BCE sandstone slab that was uncovered from an Etruscan temple. A new religious artifact is rare. Most Etruscan discoveries typically have been grave and funeral objects. “This is probably going to be a sacred text, and will be remarkable for telling us about the early belief system of a lost culture that is fundamental to western traditions,” said archaeologist...
  • The Muratorian fragment, dated 170 A.D., affirms 22 out of 27 New Testament books

    03/24/2016 5:42:06 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 92 replies
    Wintery Knight ^ | 03/19/2016
    The Muratorian fragment / The Muratorian canon (click for larger image) I sometimes hear this odd objection that the books that were to be included in the Bible were not decided until the 4th century. I think it comes from some Hollywood movie, or maybe a TV show. Anyway, this post should help fix that myth.I’m going to quote from New Testament expert Dr. Michael J. Kruger from his blog.He writes: One of the key data points in any discussion of canon is something called the Muratorian fragment (also known as the Muratorian canon). This fragment, named after its discoverer...
  • Metallic ink used in the Herculaneum scrolls

    03/23/2016 3:02:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Monday, March 21, 2016 | editors, source Emmanuel Brun et al.
    Analysis of Herculaneum papyrus scroll fragments reveals the use of metallic ink in Greco-Roman literary inscription centuries earlier than previously thought, according to a study*. Scholars of ancient scrolls hold that texts from antiquity, particularly Greek and Latin literary manuscripts produced until the fourth century AD, were largely written in carbon-based ink on papyri, the fibrous structure of which allowed scribes to jettison ruling lines. Vito Mocella and colleagues used nondestructive synchrotron X-ray-based methods to chemically analyze the barely visible black inscriptions on two nearly flat, multilayered papyrus fragments that were found at the Villa dei Papiri at Herculaneum in...
  • That's No Bottlecap! Hiker In Israel Finds Rare Gold Coin

    03/15/2016 9:40:40 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 11 replies
    npr ^ | Emily Harris
    Laurie Rimon spotted a gleam while on a hike in northern Israel with several friends. It turned out to be a gold coin so unusual, Israeli archaeologists say there is only one other one with the same symbols in the world. "It's extremely exciting," said Dr. Donald Ariel, an expert with the Israel Antiquities Authority, in comments released by the agency, which says the coin was struck by Roman Emperor Trajan in the year 107. "His gold coins are extremely rare." One side of the gold disc shows an image of Augustus, the founder of the Roman Empire more than...
  • Israeli hiker finds rare, 2,000-year-old gold coin

    03/15/2016 1:12:30 AM PDT · by Berlin_Freeper · 28 replies
    washingtonpost.com ^ | March 14, 2016 | Associated Press
    JERUSALEM — Israel’s Antiquities Authority says a hiker has found a rare, nearly 2,000-year-old gold coin. The authority said Monday that the ancient coin appears to be only the second of its kind to have been found. It said London’s British Museum possesses the other coin. The coin, from the year A.D. 107, bears the image of Augustus, the first emperor of the Roman Empire. It was minted as part of a series of coins honoring Roman rulers.
  • Wari-Bateshwar One Of Earliest Kingdoms

    03/19/2008 3:01:13 PM PDT · by blam · 9 replies · 709+ views
    The Daily Star ^ | 3-19-2008 | Emran Hossain
    Wari-Bateshwar one of earliest kingdomsSuggests find of pre-Mauryan silver coins in the area Emran Hossain, back from Narsingdi The coin hoard, unearthed by excavators from Wari-Bateshwar, containing silver punch-marked coin of Pre-Mauryan (right) and Mauryan (left) periods reveals that Wari-Batehswar was one of the Mahajanapadas in the Indian sub-continent. The discovery of silver punch-marked coins of the pre-Mauryan period dating back to 600 BC to 400 BC in Wari-Bateshwar reveals that the place was a Mahajanapada, one of the earliest kingdoms or states in the Indian subcontinent. The silver coins and artefacts unearthed and collected so far and geographical positioning...