Keyword: fcs

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  • RMA, Cold War End for Army

    01/11/2010 1:34:39 AM PST · by ErnstStavroBlofeld · 1 replies · 374+ views
    DoD Buzz ^ | 1/07/2010 | Greg Grant
    “Ideas matter.” So says the first sentence in the Army’s newly published Capstone Concept, titled Operational Adaptability: Operating Under Conditions of Uncertainty and Complexity in an Era of Persistent Conflict. It bears the imprimatur of its primary author, Brig. Gen. H.R. McMaster, a revolutionary thinker. Not surprisingly then, its the most revolutionary document the Army has produced in a long time because it discards two very big ideas – actually it discards one and demolishes the other — that have driven Army doctrine and weapons buying over the past three decades. The first idea retired by the new capstone concept...
  • Future Combat System Died For Our Sins (MBTs Superior to 20 ton FCS Vehicles)

    07/19/2009 12:51:24 PM PDT · by GOPGuide · 27 replies · 1,799+ views
    Strategypage ^ | June 26, 2009 | Strategypage
    On June 23rd, the U.S. Army announced the official cancellation of its FCS (Future Combat Systems). This was a program of next generation weapons, vehicles and other equipment that was going to cost over $160 billion. The cancellation was no surprise. A year ago, the army dropped any pretence of trying to roll out its new FCS stuff as a complete package. That's mainly because the Department of Defense had ordered that FCS items be readied for combat use as soon as possible. The future will arrive piecemeal, as had been actually happening ever since September 11, 2001, and especially...
  • The Miracle Tank Of Legend

    12/05/2008 10:08:23 PM PST · by neverdem · 58 replies · 7,592+ views
    strategypage.com ^ | December 3, 2008 | NA
    The U.S. Army is carrying out an aggressive development program to produce a new, lightweight composite armor for its next generation tank. This vehicle, part of the FCS (Future Combat System) series of vehicles, will weigh under 30 tons. The current U.S. tank, the M-1, weighs 70 tons. Composite armor was invented in Britain during the 1980s. The British developers had found that layers of different metals and ceramics made the armor lighter, and more resistant to penetration by solid shot or HEAT shells. The U.S. added a layer of depleted uranium to its composite armor, and produced the most...
  • Robot gunships join US Army

    05/24/2007 8:38:09 AM PDT · by Fractal Trader · 17 replies · 1,186+ views
    The Register ^ | 24 May 2007 | Lewis Page
    The march of the killer droids continues, with news that a US robot helicopter gunship has passed a significant milestone - engine testing. This success means the robot can head for production - once avionics and sensors arrive. The cyber-copter in question is the RQ/MQ-8 vertical takeoff and landing tactical unmanned air vehicle (VTUAV) commonly known as "Fire Scout". Fire Scout MQ-8B UAV makes its first flight in St Inigoes, Maryland. The Fire Scout is a heavily modified small commercial 3/4-seat chopper, the Schweizer 333. The cockpit for outmoded flesh pilots has been removed and replaced by robo control and...
  • Army, Dems skirmish over Future Combat Systems cuts

    05/16/2007 4:43:35 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 7 replies · 394+ views
    EETimes ^ | 5/16/07 | George Leopold
    WASHINGTON — Army brass and Democratic lawmakers are trading fire over proposed cuts to the service's top modernization priority, the Future Combat Systems (FCS) program. Lt. Gen. Stephen Speakes, who overseas operations for the Army chief of staff, told Army Times this week that a proposed $867 million cut to the Army's $3.7 billion request for FCS in fiscal 2008 would gut the program. Speakes told the paper that proposed cuts approved by the House Armed Services Committee on May 9 would force the cancellation of eight variants of planned ground vehicles. "The Army is not going to surrender its...
  • Soldiers Like FCS Test Systems So Much, They Don’t Want to Return Them

    02/13/2007 3:47:59 PM PST · by SandRat · 6 replies · 647+ views
    WASHINGTON, Feb. 13, 2007 – Testing for some of the systems slated for the first “spin out” of the Army’s Future Combat Systems program has gone well, except for one minor glitch: the soldiers testing them don’t want to give the prototypes back. The Future Combat Systems Class I unmanned aerial vehicle can be carried in a backpack and provides dismounted soldiers with new capabilities in reconnaissance, surveillance and target acquisition capability on the battlefield. U.S. Army photo  '(Click photo for screen-resolution image);high-resolution image available. “They won’t give me back my stuff,” joked Army Maj. Gen. Charles A. Cartwright, program...
  • U.S. Army Demos Future Combat Systems (FCS) in Live-Fire Soldier Exercise

    02/03/2007 9:11:52 AM PST · by Srirangan · 10 replies · 843+ views
    The Army this week successfully completed the first Live-Fire Soldier exercise, Experiment 1.1, involving Future Combat Systems (FCS) technologies and equipment. The culmination of an eight-month demonstration that took place at both Fort Bliss, Texas, and Huntington Beach, Calif., the exercise is the first step in accelerating the delivery of key FCS capabilities to current-force Soldiers and part and parcel of the most comprehensive Army modernization effort in more than half a century. "The future is now," said Army FCS Program Manager Maj. Gen. Charles Cartwright. "Networked Soldiers already are using early FCS systems; and we're getting invaluable Soldier feedback...
  • Bolstering the military

    02/10/2006 5:47:29 PM PST · by neverdem · 5 replies · 782+ views
    The Washington Times ^ | February 3, 2006 | Robert Scales
        Today the Quadrennial Defense Review hits the Beltway. While I don't agree with some of the provisions in the document, I was impressed with the commitment of the Defense Department to preserve substantively intact modernization of the ground services. This is a historical departure from the past when the Army and Marine Corps always arrived at the dispensing of materiel largess with hands out and expectations low.     The second most expensive program within the DoD is the Army's Future Combat System. FCS is in fact a collection of many smaller systems, ranging from light armored vehicles to aerial drones and...
  • To Armor or Not to Armor? That is the Question

    02/07/2006 9:18:46 AM PST · by Cannoneer No. 4 · 24 replies · 1,558+ views
    Defense Tech ^ | February 7, 2006 | David Axe
    The Army's pie-in-the-sky Future Combat Systems will make brigades more easily deployable by replacing vehicles like 70-ton M-1 Abrams tanks with much lighter alternatives. To match the survivability of the older systems, FCS will rely on superior communications, new surveillance equipment and forthcoming electromagnetic shields. That's the fantasy. The reality might turn out quite differently. For while many of the communications and surveillance tools of the future force are already finding their way into service in Iraq, the Army isn't getting any lighter. In fact, it's only getting heavier. The North Dakota National Guard's 164th Engineer Regiment has got to...
  • Army Cuts Modernization for Modularity

    12/22/2005 3:59:47 AM PST · by SLB · 7 replies · 813+ views
    Inside Defense ^ | December 14, 2005 | Jen DiMascio
    The Pentagon last week was poised to approve Army plans to move billions of dollars within its spending plans, including small cuts to hundreds of modernization efforts while boosting its modularity initiative. In a draft program budget decision obtained by Inside the Army, the Pentagon describes a set of “program change proposals” nominated by the Army to modify its spending plans over the next five years. The PBD, No. 701, includes more than 20 pages of line items, each outlining a cut or a boost to a specific program. Most of the cuts impact procurement and research and development plans,...
  • "Future Combat System": Cuts, or More Cash?

    11/23/2005 9:11:51 AM PST · by GOPGuide · 17 replies · 747+ views
    Defense Tech ^ | November 18, 2005 | Defense Tech
    It's only taken $50 billion in extra cash, a heap of missed deadlines and redrawn requirements, and a war that's lasted about two years too long. But the Pentagon may finally be ready to start putting the axe to the Army's leviathan modernization program, Future Combat Systems. Inside Defense reports that FCS is on a "short list of...weapon system programs that could be terminated or significantly pared back." “They are looking to slip it to the right or kill it,” said a source familiar with FCS options advanced by the Pentagon's office of program analysis and evaluation. Army officials are...
  • Lockheed Martin Successfully Tests Loitering Attack Missile Warhead

    08/23/2005 4:11:35 PM PDT · by Righty_McRight · 16 replies · 902+ views
    Lockheed Martin, part of the NetFires with Raytheon, recently performed four successful tests of the Non-Line-of-Sight – Launch System (NLOS-LS) Loitering Attack Missile (LAM) Multiple Explosively Formed Penetrator (MEFP) warhead. The tests took place at the National Technical Systems (NTS) facility in Camden, AR, and confirmed the performance of the penetrator. All of the objectives in the four tests were achieved. The data from each test will be used in compiling additional Army lethality simulations, which have already shown the LAM warhead to be lethal against the desired target set. The Aerojet designed and built warhead was integrated onto the...
  • Modern War Toys Play Defense (The U.S. Army has big plans to modernize its fleet, but...)

    08/07/2005 1:53:16 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 23 replies · 946+ views
    Red Herring ^ | Sunday, August 07, 2005
    The U.S. Army has big plans to modernize its fleet, but faces some heavy fighting ahead.In March 2002, 1,700 U.S. troops brought the full power of American military technology to bear on 100 square kilometers of rough mountainside in Afghanistan. Unmanned aerial drones, sensor-laden ground robots, and satellites scoured the Shar-I-Kot valley for an estimated 1,000 al Qaeda and Taliban fighters hiding in crags and caves. But the electronic eyes did not see all. While the United States claimed victory in the battle 18 days after it started, nine U.S. soldiers were killed and scores—possibly hundreds—of enemy fighters escaped. The...
  • The plan that Blair and Chirac hatched will spell the end of the 'British' Army

    07/24/2005 10:26:32 AM PDT · by ScaniaBoy · 29 replies · 1,333+ views
    The Daily Telegraph ^ | 24/07/2005 | Christopher Booker
    Last week a furore rightly erupted over the insistence of Ministry of Defence officials that soldiers engaged in Iraq must face prosecution for alleged offences against the European Convention on Human Rights. Earlier this month in the House of Lords, six former Chiefs of the Defence Staff joined forces to protest that this posed a major threat to the morale and future efficiency of the British Army. Only gradually emerging, however, from behind veils of official obfuscation, are the details of another, equally serious threat to the army's future, as MoD officials plan to lock it into a fully integrated...
  • Misstatement could extend McCain probe of FCS deal

    04/29/2005 9:34:29 PM PDT · by talosiv · 1 replies · 343+ views
    The Hill ^ | March 23, 2005 | Megan Scully
    Misstatements by the Army’s top acquisition chief on a $14.8 billion agreement with Boeing could spur another round of congressional hearings, forcing the Army once again to defend its decision to use a nontraditional contract for its key transformation program. During congressional testimony March 16, Claude Bolton assured the Senate Armed Services Airland Subcommittee that the Future Combat Systems contract contained a provision requiring Boeing to certify its cost and pricing figures with government contracting agencies. The next day, Bolton wrote Sen. John McCain (R-Ariz.), chairman of the powerful subcommittee, to correct the record to show that the contract did...
  • FCS Team Issues Final Requests for Proposals for Class II and III Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    03/22/2005 12:21:52 PM PST · by Righty_McRight · 6 replies · 389+ views
    Boeing ^ | March 22, 2005 | Staff
    ST LOUIS, March 22, 2005 – Boeing (NYSE: BA) and Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), as the Lead Systems Integrator team for the U.S. Army's Future Combat Systems (FCS) program, recently released separate Requests for Proposals for development of FCS Class II and III Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) systems. Industry participants will have 30 days in which to respond with contract awards anticipated in early August. A phased acquisition approach will be implemented for Class II and III development efforts, working collaboratively with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). Multiple contracts will be awarded in early August 2005 for...
  • Army Prepares 'Robo-Soldier' for Iraq

    01/22/2005 7:10:39 PM PST · by anymouse · 23 replies · 2,055+ views
    Associated Press ^ | January 22, 2005 | Michael P. Regan
    The rain is turning to snow on a blustery January morning, and all the men gathered in a parking lot here surely would prefer to be inside. But the weather couldn't matter less to the robotic sharpshooter they are here to watch as it splashes through puddles, the barrel of its machine gun pointing the way like Pinocchio's nose. The Army is preparing to send 18 of these remote-controlled robotic warriors to fight in Iraq beginning in March or April. Made by a small Massachusetts company, the SWORDS, short for Special Weapons Observation Reconnaissance Detection Systems, will be the first...
  • Modified Stryker Could Serve as Main Platform for FCS Vehicles

    08/27/2004 9:51:45 AM PDT · by SLB · 50 replies · 4,557+ views
    NetDefense | 26 August 2004
    Dean Lockwood, a weapons systems analyst for Forecast International, says that a modified version of the U.S. Army's Stryker vehicle could end up serving as the primary platform for the service's manned ground vehicle portion of FCS. He says that Stryker's proven effectiveness in battle, combined with the Army's recent decision to push back portions of the FCS manned ground vehicle development, could cause Congress to divert money from FCS to Stryker. "The main point I have about it is that while the ground FCS vehicle is being pushed back, [the Army] has yet to be set on any concrete...
  • US Army Division Regrouped Into Four Brigades

    06/09/2004 5:09:20 AM PDT · by SLB · 93 replies · 606+ views
    Jane's Defence Weekly | June 9, 2004 | Joshua Kucera, JDW Staff Reporter, Washington, DC
    The US Army's 3rd Infantry Division (Mechanized) (3ID) has almost completed its reorganisation into brigades capable of being deployed for independent operations. The move is part of the army transformation that will culminate with the fielding of the Future Combat Systems (FCS) from 2010. The division's three ground manoeuvre brigades have now been regrouped into four identical brigades with an expanded reconnaissance capability and integral artillery. Each brigade now has its own battalion-strength reconnaissance squadron, whereas under the previous structure each brigade had a company-strength reconnaissance troop with a squadron under divisional command. "The added reconnaissance to each brigade is...
  • Army Seeks Short-Term Payoff From Future Combat Systems

    11/23/2003 5:19:13 AM PST · by Cannoneer No. 4 · 256 replies · 9,827+ views
    National Defense Magazine ^ | December 2003 | Sandra I. Erwin
    The Army is redirecting priorities in the Future Combat Systems program, in an attempt to meet short-term needs for new technologies. This shift in emphasis means the program will be less about developing futuristic concepts and more about upgrading the current tanks, armored infantry vehicles and trucks. Program officials assert that the chief of staff of the Army, Gen. Peter J. Schoomaker, supports the FCS and intends to keep the $15 billion project on track to field a new family of vehicles by 2010. But the ongoing wars in Iraq and Afghanistan clearly have forced the Army to reassess the...
  • The Air-Maneuver and Transport Concept: Can it Transform the Nature of Rapid Contingency Operations?

    01/05/2004 5:34:40 PM PST · by xzins · 44 replies · 426+ views
    Army Magazine, AUSA ^ | Jan 04 | Lt. Gen. H. Thomas Fields Jr., U.S. Army retired
    The Air-Maneuver and Transport Concept: Can it Transform the Nature of Rapid Contingency Operations? January 2004 By Lt. Gen. H. Thomas Fields Jr., U.S. Army retired In the year 2020 a Middle East dictator attacked and occupied an oil-rich neighboring state. Other neighboring states were intimidated and reluctant to provide basing or overflight rights to a U.S.-led coalition. The United States initially responded with long-range strike and naval aviation to achieve air superiority and destroy the enemy's integrated air defense system. The enemy countered by dispersing ground forces, including mobile gun-missile air defense artillery (ADA) systems, into urban areas. The...
  • Army transformation changes direction

    10/15/2003 8:26:48 AM PDT · by inPhase · 5 replies · 141+ views
    FCW.com ^ | October 13, 2003 | BY Frank Tiboni
    Much ballyhooed Future Combat System could lose ground in the push toward digitization servicewide Trading armor for knowledge: Can the Army do it? Long before the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks launched the war on terrorism — in fact, even before the first war against Iraq — Army officials were pondering transformation. In many ways, transformation and modernization are not new issues for U.S. military forces. Yet in recent years, the effort has taken on a new sense of urgency because of fundamental global changes brought about by the end of the Cold War, which has necessitated that the armed...
  • US Military Projects: Future Combat passes milestone

    05/20/2003 1:07:24 PM PDT · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 5 replies · 240+ views
    Federal Computer Week ^ | May 19, 2003 | Dan Caterinicchia
    The Army received approval May 18 to move the cornerstone of its transformation — Future Combat Systems — into the nearly $15 billion system development and demonstration phase.Edward "Pete" Aldridge Jr., undersecretary of defense for acquisition, technology and logistics, signed the milestone B decision after last week's meeting of the Defense Acquisition Board, according to Army officials. Aldridge is scheduled to retire this week.FCS is a networked family of 18 systems that uses advanced communications and technologies to link soldiers with manned and unmanned air and ground platforms and sensors.Speaking May 19 at a Pentagon press briefing, Lt. Gen....
  • Pentagon OKs Next Phase of U.S. Army Modernization [Post-Clinton recovery]

    05/20/2003 12:29:03 PM PDT · by mr. mojo risin · 7 replies · 197+ views
    Washington Post (Reuters) ^ | 5/20/03 | Charles Aldinger
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The Pentagon has approved the $14.92 billion development and demonstration phase of the Future Combat Systems program, a project led by Boeing Co. to modernize the U.S. Army, the Army said on Monday. The FCS is expected to become a lethal family of manned and unmanned air and ground weapons interlinked and tied to forces from other U.S. military services over a sophisticated command network. It aims for an initial operating capability by 2010. Defense Undersecretary Edward "Pete" Aldridge, the Pentagon's chief weapons buyer, signed an acquisition defense memorandum on Sunday approving the second phase, Army officials...
  • Urban Warfare: The future of U.S. military operations

    05/09/2003 8:39:31 AM PDT · by Stand Watch Listen · 9 replies · 269+ views
    Washington Times | May 6, 2003 | Christopher Yunker
    Yellow Smoke: The Future Of Land Warfare For America's Military. By Robert H. Scales Jr. Rowan and Littlefield, $24.95, 179 pages During a Rand conference on urban warfare in 1999, Army Maj. Gen. Robert Scales derided the emphasis on urban warfare that was then becoming trendy by reiterating the Army's traditional concept of bypassing cities or laying siege to them. Gen. Scales' schedule did not allow him to stay for questions and answers, but he left behind a firestorm of controversy among officers with recent urban combat experience, including several Russians in the audience. Say what you like about Bob...