Free Republic 3rd Quarter Fundraising Target: $85,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $80,050
94%  
Woo hoo!! And now less than $5k to go!! We can do this!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: federalistpapers

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federalist #26

    06/10/2010 7:33:43 AM PDT · by Publius · 4 replies · 89+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 10 June 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    Hamilton Tackles the Mechanics of Controlling a Standing ArmyHamilton explores the methods for keeping a standing army under control and preventing it from becoming the tool of the Executive. Federalist #26The Idea of Restraining the Legislative Authority in RegardTo the Common Defense Considered (Part 1 of 3) Alexander Hamilton, 22 December 1787 1 To the People of the State of New York: *** 2 It was a thing hardly to be expected that in a popular revolution the minds of men should stop at that happy mean which marks the salutary boundary between power and privilege and combines the energy...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federalist #25

    06/07/2010 8:04:01 AM PDT · by Publius · 14 replies · 52+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 7 June 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    Hamilton Explains the Necessity of a Standing ArmyIt is not only that a standing army is necessary, but that it must be under federal control, for it is not the proper domain of the states. Federalist #25The Powers Necessary to the Common Defense Further Considered (Part 2 of 2) Alexander Hamilton, 21 December 1787 1 To the People of the State of New York: *** 2 It may perhaps be urged that the objects enumerated in the preceding number ought to be provided for by the state governments under the direction of the Union. 3 But this would be in...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federalist #24

    06/03/2010 8:02:33 AM PDT · by Publius · 5 replies · 173+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 3 June 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    Hamilton Addresses the Standing ArmyUsing the rhetorical style that charmed many a guest at New York dinner parties, Hamilton takes on the issue of a standing army by gently belittling his opponents and minimizing the risks. Federalist #24The Powers Necessary to the Common Defense Further Considered (Part 1 of 2) Alexander Hamilton, 19 December 1787 1 To the People of the State of New York: *** 2 To the powers proposed to be conferred upon the federal government in respect to the creation and direction of the national forces, I have met with but one specific objection which, if I...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Pennsylvania Minority Address

    05/29/2010 12:12:29 PM PDT · by Publius · 8 replies · 370+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 29 May 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    The Acrimonious Pennsylvania Ratifying ConventionOn 21 November 1787, some of the state’s great luminaries gathered in Philadelphia to discuss the proposed Constitution. Among the best known attendees were James Wilson, who had attended the Constitutional Convention, Benjamin Rush and Anthony Wayne. For the first several weeks of the convention, James Wilson and Thomas McKean spoke at great length defending the Constitution. In fact, when examining the official minutes of the ratifying convention, one gets the impression that the two men were the only ones who spoke. This was because a complete set of minutes of the ratifying convention was suppressed...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federalist #21

    05/20/2010 7:21:16 AM PDT · by Publius · 16 replies · 309+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 20 May 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    Hamilton Addresses TaxationHamilton pays a great deal of attention to taxation policy in these papers, and here he lays out indirect and direct taxation. Federalist #21Other Defects of the Present Confederation (Part 1 of 2) Alexander Hamilton, 12 December 1787 1 To the People of the State of New York: *** 2 Having in the three last numbers taken a summary review of the principal circumstances and events which have depicted the genius and fate of other confederate governments, I shall now proceed in the enumeration of the most important of those defects which have hitherto disappointed our hopes from...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federalist #22

    05/24/2010 7:56:22 AM PDT · by Publius · 31 replies · 437+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 24 May 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    Hamilton Dissects Basic Problems with the Current UnionLike a surgeon, Hamilton takes a scalpel to the Articles of Confederation in a very long paper that covers a lot of territory. At the end, he plants a mine that will detonate only a few decades after the deaths of the last Framers. Federalist #22Other Defects of the Present Confederation (Part 2 of 2) Alexander Hamilton, 14 December 1787 1 To the People of the State of New York: *** 2 In addition to the defects already enumerated in the existing federal system, there are others of not less importance which concur...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federalist #23

    05/27/2010 8:04:01 AM PDT · by Publius · 20 replies · 245+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 27 May 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    Hamilton Makes Some ListsIn this short paper, Hamilton breaks down the proper arenas for the federal government activities and builds the case for a vigorous government to handle the assigned tasks. Federalist #23The Necessity of a Government as Energetic as the One ProposedTo the Preservation of the Union Alexander Hamilton, 18 December 1787 1 To the People of the State of New York: *** 2 The necessity of a constitution at least equally energetic with the one proposed to the preservation of the Union is the point at the examination of which we are now arrived. *** 3 This inquiry...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federalist #20

    05/17/2010 7:54:00 AM PDT · by Publius · 10 replies · 298+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 17 May 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    The History Lesson Ends with a SummationThe authors finish with a lesson about the Netherlands and then sum up the previous papers, tying them to America’s situation. Federalist #20The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (Part 6 of 6) Alexander Hamilton and James Madison, 11 December 1787 1 To the People of the State of New York: *** 2 The United Netherlands are a confederacy of republics, or rather of aristocracies of a very remarkable texture, yet confirming all the lessons derived from those which we have already reviewed. *** 3 The union is composed of seven...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federalist #17

    05/06/2010 8:05:25 AM PDT · by Publius · 8 replies · 292+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 6 May 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    Hamilton Explains Why the States Have Nothing to FearHamilton gets to the meat of his argument that the federal government has more to fear from the states than the other way around – but he carefully hedges his arguments. Federalist #17The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (Part 3 of 6) Alexander Hamilton, 5 December 1787 1 To the People of the State of New York: *** 2 An objection of a nature different from that which has been stated and answered in my last address may perhaps be likewise urged against the principle of legislation for...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federalist #19

    05/13/2010 7:56:24 AM PDT · by Publius · 11 replies · 308+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 13 May 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    Another Collaborative History LessonMadison and Hamilton now dissect the remains of the Holy Roman Empire, the German city-states. They also take notice of Poland, which had recently been dismembered, and Switzerland. Federalist #19The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (Part 5 of 6) Alexander Hamilton and James Madison, 8 December 1787 1 To the People of the State of New York: *** 2 The examples of ancient confederacies cited in my last paper have not exhausted the source of experimental instruction on this subject. 3 There are existing institutions founded on a similar principle which merit particular...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federalist #18

    05/10/2010 7:49:32 AM PDT · by Publius · 8 replies · 293+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 10 May 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    A Collaborative History LessonMadison, the earnest professor of history, delves into ancient history to find parallels to Greece, where faction led to failure and conquest. Perhaps concerned about his earlier history lesson and its pedantic style, Madison turns to his friend Hamilton to liven up the prose. Federalist #18The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (Part 4 of 6) Alexander Hamilton & James Madison, 7 December 1787 1 To the People of the State of New York: *** 2 Among the confederacies of antiquity, the most considerable was that of the Grecian republics associated under the Amphictyonic...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federalist #16

    05/03/2010 8:37:29 AM PDT · by Publius · 13 replies · 355+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 3 May 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    Hamilton Addresses the Prospect of Interstate ConflictIn his second essay upon the topic, Hamilton dissects the issues of conflict between states versus the federal government, and states versus other states. He addresses the issue of a large standing army and once again looks at how a social contract might function. Federalist #16The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (Part 2 of 6) Alexander Hamilton, 4 December 1787 1 To the People of the State of New York: *** 2 The tendency of the principle of legislation for states or communities in their political capacities, as it has...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federalist #15

    04/29/2010 7:56:41 AM PDT · by Publius · 80 replies · 646+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 29 April 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    Hamilton Indicts the Current UnionIn this long paper, Hamilton begins with a six-part diagnosis of the ills of the Union under the Articles of Confederation, doing so in the form of an indictment, no doubt influenced by John DeWitt, the anonymous Massachusetts lawyer who had also used the interrogatory method to make his case earlier. He finishes with the case for coercive government. Federalist #15The Insufficiency of the Present Confederation to Preserve the Union (Part 1 of 6) Alexander Hamilton, 1 December 1787 1 To the People of the State of New York: *** 2 In the course of the...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federalist #14

    04/26/2010 7:59:24 AM PDT · by Publius · 12 replies · 373+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 26 April 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    Madison Teaches a Geography Lesson and Makes a PleaThe earnest professor of history turns to geography and lays out the dimensions of the country, explaining why a republic is possible. He also takes great pains to describe the differences between a democracy and a republic. Federalist #14Objections to the Proposed Constitution from Extent of Territory Answered James Madison, 30 November 1787 1 To the People of the State of New York: *** 2 We have seen the necessity of the Union as our bulwark against foreign danger, as the conservator of peace among ourselves, as the guardian of our commerce...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Brutus #4

    04/22/2010 7:45:56 AM PDT · by Publius · 37 replies · 389+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 22 April 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    An Anti-Federalist Indicts the Structure of CongressBrutus, who was most likely Judge Robert Yates of New York, dissects the structure of both Houses of Congress and points out the dangers created by the deficiencies of the design as he perceives it. His words have a haunting quality because so many of the design flaws he has noted have born fruit over the centuries. Brutus #4 29 November 1787 1 To the People of the State of New York: *** 2 There can be no free government where the people are not possessed of the power of making the laws by...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federalist #13

    04/19/2010 8:02:23 AM PDT · by Publius · 13 replies · 401+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 19 April 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    Hamilton Plans to Save MoneyHaving laid out his ideas for raising taxes in Federalist #12, in this very short paper Hamilton now lays out his ideas for saving money, and the Union under the new Constitution is his way of doing it. Here he war-games different scenarios about how the Union might break up, and what would be the results of that breakup. Federalist #13Advantage of the Union in Respect to Economy in Government Alexander Hamilton, 28 November 1787 1 To the People of the State of New York: *** 2 As connected with the subject of revenue, we may...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Cato #5

    04/15/2010 8:10:23 AM PDT · by Publius · 11 replies · 363+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 15 April 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    An Anti-Federalist Summarizes the SituationThe name Cato had strong echoes throughout the entire Revolutionary period. Every schoolboy knew of Cato the Younger’s integrity and his stand against Julius Caesar, not only from reading Plutarch, but from Joseph Addison’s popular play. “Cato” had been George Washington’s favorite play, and he’d had it performed for his troops at Valley Forge. Many famous utterances of the day were as soaked in “Cato” as they were in the Bible. Historians believe that the anti-Federalist writer who took that name was most likely New York Governor George Clinton. Cato #5 27 November 1787 1 To...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federalist #12

    04/12/2010 7:47:48 AM PDT · by Publius · 15 replies · 489+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 12 April 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    Hamilton Looks to Raise TaxesIt is not surprising that the man who was to become America’s first central banker would take a hard look at how to build a platform for taxation. That he had been a businessman first is apparent in his level-headed approach to a sensitive topic. Federalist #12The Utility of the Union In Respect to Revenue Alexander Hamilton, 27 November 1787 1 To the People of the State of New York: *** 2 The effects of union upon the commercial prosperity of the states have been sufficiently delineated. 3 Its tendency to promote the interests of revenue...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federalist #11

    04/08/2010 8:23:54 AM PDT · by Publius · 12 replies · 397+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 8 April 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    Hamilton Invents the United States NavyHamilton’s experience in the West Indies as a businessman in the import-export trade showed him the importance of a navy in the successful projection of power. It should be no surprise that the examples he chose for his lesson were all based on his experiences in the islands. Federalist #11The Utility of the Union in Respect to Commercial Relations and a Navy Alexander Hamilton, 24 November 1787 1 To the People of the State of New York: 2 The importance of the Union in a commercial light is one of those points about which there...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federalist #10

    04/05/2010 8:13:00 AM PDT · by Publius · 34 replies · 819+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 5 April 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    Madison Enters the FrayThe tone of the argument changes. Hamilton is the brilliant raconteur and legal thinker, and Madison is the earnest professor of history. After Shays’ Rebellion, Madison sat down and wrote a scholarly paper titled “Vices of the Political System of the United States”, known by historians today as “Madison’s Vices”, which would have prompted a giggle from the man himself. James Madison was a man of abstemious habits who did not smoke and drank only in moderation with meals. If one wanted a dinner guest who could charm a room with his repartee and sing old songs...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federalist #9

    04/01/2010 8:33:46 AM PDT · by Publius · 6 replies · 307+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 1 April 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    Hamilton Lays Out the Case for Union as a Deterrent to Internecine WarUsing Montesquieu and the Lycian Confederacy as examples, Hamilton argues that only confederation can prevent difficulties between states from leading to petty wars. Federalist #9The Union as a Safeguard Against Domestic Faction and Insurrection (Part 1 of 2) Alexander Hamilton, 21 November 1787 1 To the People of the State of New York: 2 A firm union will be of the utmost moment to the peace and liberty of the states as a barrier against domestic faction and insurrection. 3 It is impossible to read the history of...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federalist #8

    03/29/2010 8:38:10 AM PDT · by Publius · 9 replies · 391+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 29 March 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    Hamilton Warns of Military Conflict between the StatesWith the example of England’s civil wars not that far back in the past, Hamilton warns that only the Constitution and the Union can prevent war between states at home. Federalist #8The Consequences of Hostilities between the States Alexander Hamilton, 20 November 1787 1 To the People of the State of New York: *** 2 Assuming it, therefore, as an established truth that the several states, in case of disunion or such combinations of them as might happen to be formed out of the wreck of the general Confederacy, would be subject to...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federalist #6

    03/22/2010 7:55:06 AM PDT · by Publius · 8 replies · 329+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 22 March 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    Hamilton Narrows the FocusThe classical educations of the era provided a thorough grounding in history, both recent and ancient. Alexander Hamilton, like his colleague and friend James Madison, was a keen student of history, and here he shows off his erudition in a brilliant display of historical facts, a genuine tour de force. Federalist #6Concerning Dangers from Dissensions between the States (Part 1 of 2) Alexander Hamilton, 14 November 1787 1 To the People of the State of New York: *** 2 The three last numbers of this paper have been dedicated to an enumeration of the dangers to which...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federalist #5

    03/18/2010 7:41:06 AM PDT · by Publius · 9 replies · 248+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 18 March 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    The Foreign Policy Expert FinishesJohn Jay examines the what-if’s of the country breaking into separate confederacies, and what he finds is disturbing, based on his understanding of both classical and recent history. The nation’s foreign policy expert sounds the tocsin on a potentially alarming future. Federalist #5Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence (Part 4 of 4) John Jay, 10 November 1787 1 To the People of the State of New York: *** 2 Queen Anne, in her letter of the 1st July 1706 to the Scotch Parliament, makes some observations on the importance of the union then forming between...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federalist #7

    03/25/2010 9:09:25 AM PDT · by Publius · 7 replies · 281+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 25 March 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    Hamilton Tackles Territorial and Financial Causes for WarHamilton now lays out the case for possible disputations between the states if the Union is sundered. He takes on commercial and territorial issues, bringing up the ongoing unpleasantness in Pennsylvania and the lingering Vermont issue. Federalist #7Concerning Dangers from Dissensions between the States (Part 2 of 2) Alexander Hamilton, 15 November 1787 1 To the People of the State of New York: *** 2 It is sometimes asked with an air of seeming triumph what inducements could the states have, if disunited, to make war upon each other? 3 It would be...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, John DeWitt #3

    03/08/2010 7:42:55 AM PST · by Publius · 10 replies · 176+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 8 March 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    The New England Lawyer Attacks the Basic ModelReturning to his earlier technique of probing questions, the writer known as John DeWitt opens up arguments that resonate today. It was a perspicacious individual who could dissect the role money plays in politics. John DeWitt #3 5 November 1787 1 To the Free Citizens of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts: *** 2 Civil liberty in all countries [has been] promoted by a free discussion of public measures and the conduct of public men. 3 The freedom of the press has, in consequence thereof, been esteemed one of its safeguards. 4 That freedom gives...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federalist #3

    03/04/2010 7:56:50 AM PST · by Publius · 41 replies · 612+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 4 March 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    The Foreign Policy Expert Weighs InJohn Jay had been battle tested in the diplomatic offices and salons of Paris and Madrid, and had navigated the infant Republic through the shoals of French, Spanish and British intrigue. More than anyone else, he understood the duplicity behind the smiles and kind words from European powers, both friendly and not so friendly. He knew precisely what the Great Powers of Europe were up to. He was nobody’s fool. In this essay, Jay explores the dangers of one foreign policy versus thirteen separate foreign policies. Federalist #3Concerning Dangers from Foreign Force and Influence (Part...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federalist #2

    03/01/2010 7:43:46 AM PST · by Publius · 20 replies · 445+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 1 March 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    Hamilton’s First Writing Partner Weighs InJohn Jay had taken a profoundly conservative approach to the relationship with the Mother Country in the events leading up to the Revolution. He was not willing to undertake conflict thoughtlessly and rebuked Patrick Henry for his intemperate rhetoric at the First Continental Congress. Like Franklin, Jay did not want a complete breach with England unless there were no other choice. But when the breach came, Jay was ready, functioning as a judge in a lawless New York split between Patriots, Loyalists and those who swayed daily from one side to the other. In his...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, John DeWitt #2

    02/25/2010 7:53:30 AM PST · by Publius · 22 replies · 437+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 25 February 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    The Anonymous Writer Issues a Bill of IndictmentIf there were any doubt that the writer masked by the name John DeWitt was a practicing attorney, this essay dispels it. Having laid down a foundation for criticism of the new Constitution in question-and-answer format, he now lists a bill of particulars for its supporters to answer, and haste is the least of his criticisms. A fine legal mind now dissects the document and locates the traps that future generations would discover too late. John DeWitt #2 27 October 1787 1 To the Free Citizens of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. *** 2...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, John DeWitt #1

    02/18/2010 7:50:27 AM PST · by Publius · 37 replies · 572+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 18 February 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    Another Anonymous Writer Makes a StandHistory has not recorded the true identity of John DeWitt, only that he was from Massachusetts. His choice of pseudonym was in honor of Johan de Witt, a 17th Century Dutchman who had defended the people against a central government. His use of question-and-answer in delineating his case would lead one to suspect that he was a lawyer – and probably a fine litigator. One can sense proponents of the Constitution reeling at his relentless interrogation. John DeWitt #1 22 October 1787 1 To the Free Citizens of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. *** 2 Whoever...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Brutus #1

    02/15/2010 7:43:28 AM PST · by Publius · 35 replies · 600+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 15 February 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    A Jurist Analyzes with BoldnessThe identity of Brutus is only a little bit of a mystery because most historians accept the verdict that it was Robert Yates of New York. Yates’ record in the Revolution was impeccable. He had led resistance to the Stamp Act in Albany and joined the local Committee of Correspondence. He spent the war years on the state Supreme Court and aligned himself with the patroon families in the orbit of Governor George Clinton. Appointed delegate to the Constitutional Convention, he saw it heading in a direction he didn’t like, fired off a letter of protest...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federal Farmer #2

    02/11/2010 7:58:19 AM PST · by Publius · 20 replies · 499+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 11 February 2010 | Publius/Billthedrill
    The Anonymous Author Questions the Basic ConceptTo the supporters of the new Constitution, Federal Farmer must have raised some hackles, but also some significant concerns. He had first directed his fire at the circumstances surrounding the calling of the Convention and the financial chaos it had been intended to fix. He had criticized the unseemly haste with which the backers of the Constitution had insisted on ratification, the goals of the men who had attended the Convention, and the possible consequences of what they had wrought. Now he would attack the idea of the Union itself. Federal Farmer #2Letters from...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federal Farmer #1

    02/08/2010 7:57:31 AM PST · by Publius · 40 replies · 770+ views
    A Publius/Billhedrill Essay | 8 February 2010 | Publius/Billthedrill
    An Anonymous Author and His Measured CritiqueAfter more than two centuries, no one knows the true identity of Federal Farmer. Some have theorized it was Richard Henry Lee or Melancton Smith, but nobody really knows. His letters were initially published as pamphlets addressed to “the Republican”, widely believed to be Governor George Clinton of New York. A month after their initial publication, a New York newspaper opposed to the adoption of the Constitution printed them after a bit of editing. Today an astute editor would contact the author, work with him to tighten up his arguments, trim it a bit...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, James Wilson's Speech

    02/04/2010 8:26:25 AM PST · by Publius · 33 replies · 691+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 4 February 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    The First Nationalist SpeaksJames Wilson had been one of the lesser known delegates from Pennsylvania at the Convention, the best known being Benjamin Franklin, the most famous commoner in the world. Wilson had come to the colonies at the age of sixteen from Scotland and still spoke with a pronounced Scottish burr. At the Convention, he had discreetly floated the idea of the direct popular election of the President and of senators, but being apprised by James Madison of strong opposition to such a plan, he instead invented the Electoral College on the spot. Wilson was resourceful. The day after...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Centinel #1

    02/01/2010 7:56:26 AM PST · by Publius · 70 replies · 1,119+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 1 February 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    The States’ Men Speak First: The Battle is JoinedThe proceedings of the Constitutional Convention in the summer of 1787 were conducted in secret, thus masking to the public the divisions between Nationalists and States’ Men, small states and large states, North and South. The mandate from Congress had been to propose amendments to the Articles of Confederation, but the Convention quickly decided to start afresh, something that upset the States’ Men. The lines between the two factions were based on a combination of social class and activity during the Revolution. Nationalists, for the most part, had served as officers in...
  • Our Second FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution

    01/20/2010 11:29:03 AM PST · by Publius · 171 replies · 3,045+ views
    A Publius Essay | 20 January 2010 | Publius
    There is tendency for modern Americans to think that there was overwhelming support for replacing the Articles of Confederation with the Constitution and that the process was rapid and without serious opposition. The truth is quite different. Those against the Constitution spoke first and with great vehemence, and after three weeks Alexander Hamilton realized the tide was turning against him. Thus he sat down, first with John Jay, and then with James Madison, to write detailed responses in favor of the Constitution to get New York’s ratifying convention to support the new document. These papers, published in the newspapers of...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federalist #1

    02/22/2010 7:42:21 AM PST · by Publius · 33 replies · 654+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 22 February 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    The Nationalists Become the FederalistsTo an American of 1787, a “federalist” was one who supported a federated system of government in which the rights of the states were balanced against a central authority, something that would have best described the outlook of the States’ Men. But as the debate began, the States’ Men quickly took control of the discussion. Alexander Hamilton sensed the tide turning against the proposed Constitution and decided to act. But first Hamilton had to frame the debate to his advantage, and his first move was to appropriate the term “Federalist” for his cause, which was really...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Afterword and Suggested Reading

    03/09/2011 11:55:08 AM PST · by Publius · 35 replies
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 9 March 2011 | Publius & Billthedrill
    AfterwordThe flurry of newspaper pieces that began in October 1787 concluded some ten months later with a piece in which the reader senses as much exhaustion from Hamilton’s pen as exhilaration, as much trepidation as triumph. It turned out to be quite a series of papers: 85 in total. Taken along with papers written by the opposition, whose somewhat misleading name of “anti-Federalist” came about in part through the machinations of Hamilton himself, they compose a window on the creation of a government that was unique in history up to its time. The debates at the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia...
  • Establishment clause

    11/21/2003 3:10:32 PM PST · by Kerberos · 72 replies · 1,393+ views
    First Amendment Center ^ | Unknown | First Amendment Center
    Establishment clause         The first of the First Amendment's two religion clauses reads: “Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion ... .” Note that the clause is absolute. It allows no law. It is also noteworthy that the clause forbids more than the establishment of religion by the government. It forbids even laws respecting an establishment of religion. The establishment clause sets up a line of demarcation between the functions and operations of the institutions of religion and government in our society. It does so because the framers of the First Amendment recognized...
  • Some Detective Work on the Constitution and Government

    12/16/2003 6:28:03 PM PST · by Federalist 78 · 36 replies · 224+ views
    HUMAN EVENTS ^ | Dec 16, 2003 | Walter E. Williams
    I'd like to enlist the services of my fellow Americans with a bit of detective work. Let's start off with hard evidence. The Federalist Papers were a set of documents written by John Jay, Alexander Hamilton and James Madison to persuade the 13 states to ratify the Constitution. In one of those papers, Federalist Paper 45, James Madison wrote: "The powers delegated by the proposed Constitution to the Federal Government, are few and defined. Those which are to remain in the State Governments are numerous and indefinite. The former will be exercised principally on external objects, as war, peace, negotiation...
  • Ten Books Every Student Should Read in College

    05/30/2003 11:45:30 AM PDT · by Remedy · 252 replies · 19,680+ views
    HUMAN EVENTS ^ | Week of June 2, 2003 | 28 distinguished scholars and university professors
    The editors of HUMAN EVENTS asked a panel of 28 distinguished scholars and university professors to serve as judges in developing a list of Ten Books Every Student Should Read in College.To derive the list, each scholar first nominated titles. When all the nominations were collected-they amounted to more than 100 titles-HUMAN EVENTS then sent a ballot to the scholars asking each to list his or her Top Ten selections. A book was awarded ten points for receiving a No. 1 rating, 9 points for receiving a No. 2 rating, and so on. The ten books with the highest aggregate...
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federalist #80

    02/07/2011 7:58:41 AM PST · by Publius · 47 replies
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 7 February 2011 | Publius & Billthedrill
    Hamilton Dissects the Responsibilities of the Judicial BranchOn the same day that Melancton Smith made his second speech to New York’s ratifying convention at Poughkeepsie, Alexander Hamilton’s third essay on the Judiciary appeared in print. Federalist #80The Judiciary (Part 3 of 6) Alexander Hamilton, 21 June 1788 1 To the People of the State of New York: *** 2 To judge with accuracy of the proper extent of the Federal Judicature, it will be necessary to consider in the first place what are its proper objects. *** 3 It seems scarcely to admit of controversy that the judiciary authority of...
  • THE HISTORY OF THE SECOND AMENDMENT

    04/20/2003 9:59:37 PM PDT · by 2nd_Amendment_Defender · 13 replies · 7,958+ views
    Only part of the article is posted. To read the full article go to the website I have linked. The article is long but contains a wealth of information about the Second Amendment and it's history.A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.[1] Introduction Long overlooked or ignored, the Second Amendment has become the object of some study and much debate. One issue being discussed is whether the Second Amendment recognizes the right of each citizen to keep and bear arms,[2]...
  • From The Federalist to The Patriot Post...A Retrospective

    08/19/2006 5:34:28 AM PDT · by the invisib1e hand · 16 replies · 133+ views
    The Patriot Post ^ | 18 August 2006 | Mark Alexander
    The Patriot: 10 Years on the Internet August 2006 marks The Patriot Post’s tenth year on the Internet. In ten years, thanks in large measure to YOU, our Patriot readers, The Patriot has grown from its humble beginnings into the most widely subscribed Internet-based publication in the world. Many of our readers have asked me, in my capacity as The Patriot’s publisher, to write a column about our inception and how we attained our success. Our 10th anniversary seems a fitting occasion to do just that. The Patriot Post was conceived as The Federalist back in 1996, (though I had...
  • James Madison on Term Limits

    12/31/2007 5:01:33 AM PST · by hellbender · 5 replies · 83+ views
    Patriot Post | December 31, 2007
    The Patriot Post Founders' Quote Daily "If we resort for a criterion to the different principles on which different forms of government are established, we may define a republic to be, or at least may bestow that name on, a government which derives all its powers directly or indirectly from the great body of the people, and is administered by persons holding their offices during pleasure for a limited period, or during good behavior." -- James Madison (Federalist No. 39) Reference: Madison, Federalist No. 39 (241)
  • FReeper Book Club: The Debate over the Constitution, Federalist #38

    07/29/2010 8:04:28 AM PDT · by Publius · 6 replies · 1+ views
    A Publius/Billthedrill Essay | 29 July 2010 | Publius & Billthedrill
    Madison Teaches Ancient History and Catalogs Anti-Federalist ComplaintsOn 2 January 1788, the ratifying convention of Georgia ratified the Constitution unanimously. On 9 January, Connecticut ratified by a 3-to-1 margin. Once can imagine Madison and Hamilton breathing sighs of relief that the Pennsylvania Minority Report had come and gone without leaving a major impact. Thus the earnest professor of history can now show a flash of humor, etched with acid, as he compiles a master list of the items brought up by all the anti-Federalist writers and takes them to task for their inconsistency. Federalist #38The Difficulties of the Convention in...
  • The Framers of the US Constitution Argued for SMALL GOVERNMENT

    01/21/2009 11:39:15 AM PST · by Shellybenoit · 9 replies · 685+ views
    The Federalist Papers/Yidwithlid ^ | 1/21/09 | Yidwithlid
    One of the sections of Yesterday's Inauguration Speech that has been widely discussed was the President's discourse on the size of government... ....My friend John is one of the few people I know who shares an interest in the writings of the framers, the Federalist Papers. The Federalist Papers were written to sell the Constitution to American People. They are the most important work of political philosophy and pragmatic government EVER written in the United States. I am sure that John would agree, that based on his speech, it is unlikely that the President ever read the Federalist Papers as...
  • State Rep. Agema wants Michigan to require pledge, teaching of historical U.S. documents

    01/14/2012 2:46:17 PM PST · by cripplecreek · 24 replies
    Jim Harger | The Grand Rapids Press (Mlive) ^ | January 14, 2012 | Jim Harger
    State Rep. Dave Agema, R-Grandville, says kids are graduating from high school without a sound education in our constitutional underpinnings. He and 22 Republican co-sponsors have introduced a bill mandating the Declaration of Independence, the Federalist Papers, the Anti-Federalist Papers, the U.S. Constitution and the Bill of Rights are taught in public schools. His bill also calls for a daily recitation of the Pledge of Allegiance. Similar measures have failed in the past, but Agema said he hopes tea party groups will push for passage. "Hopefully, they will put enough pressure on and get it done," said Agema, who is...
  • The Anti-Federalists Were Right: Predicting The Most "Arbitrary Government" From The Supreme Court

    08/12/2011 12:57:19 AM PDT · by stevelackner · 15 replies
    STEVELACKNER.COM ^ | August 11, 2011 | Steve W. Lackner
    The Anti-Federalists were those that opposed the ratification of the United States Constitution by their respective State Ratifying Conventions. "Federal Farmer," whose identity is unknown, though scholars have put forward Richard Henry Lee and Melancton Smith as possibilities, wrote essays that were among the more important documents of the constitutional ratification debate. He warned in 1788 in Federal Farmer No. 15 that because "particular circumstances exist at this time to increase our inattention to limiting properly the judicial powers, we may fairly conclude, we are more in danger of sowing the seeds of arbitrary government in this department [of the...
  • Anti-Federalist papers 78-82 - The Power of the Judiciary (warning about Tyrants in Black Robes)

    03/25/2005 7:12:40 PM PST · by Dan from Michigan · 27 replies · 1,482+ views
    Anti-Federalists | 1788 | Brutus
    Antifederalist Nos. 78-79 THE POWER OF THE JUDICIARY (PART 1) Part one is taken from the first part of the "Brutus's" 15th essay of The New-York Journal on March 20, 1788; Part two is part one of his 16th of the New York Journal of April 10, 1788. The supreme court under this constitution would be exalted above all other power in the government, and subject to no control. The business of this paper will be to illustrate this, and to show the danger that will result from it. I question whether the world ever saw, in any period of...