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Keyword: florence

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  • Clorine leak prompts shelter-in-place for some Florence residents (TX)

    06/15/2016 9:09:48 AM PDT · by bgill · 9 replies
    kvue ^ | June 15, 2016 | kvue
    Officials have issued a shelter-in-place for some residents in Florence, Texas due to a chlorine leak Wednesday morning. According to Williamson County Emergency Services, the shelter has been issued for residents living just south of the city up to and including the 500 block of Farm to Market Road 970. Affected residents are asked to stay indoors with their doors and windows shut. They are also asked to put towels near any gaps and to turn off their air-conditioners. Officials have asked drivers to stay off the roads in the affected area. Residents will remain under a shelter-in-place until an...
  • Leonardo da Vinci's DNA

    05/10/2016 12:57:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Popular Archaeology ^ | Vol. 22 Spring 2016 | editors
    Born in Vinci, Italy, Leonardo died in 1519, age 67, and was buried in Amboise, southwest of Paris. His creative imagination foresaw and described innovations hundreds of years before their invention, such as the helicopter and armored tank. His artistic legacy includes the iconic Mona Lisa and The Last Supper. The idea behind the Project, founded in 2014, has inspired and united anthropologists, art historians, genealogists, microbiologists, and other experts from leading universities and institutes in France, Italy, Spain, Canada and the USA, including specialists from the J. Craig Venter Institute of California, which pioneered the sequencing of the human...
  • A High-Tech Hunt for Lost Art

    10/06/2009 6:22:58 PM PDT · by BGHater · 10 replies · 780+ views
    The New York Times ^ | 06 Oct 2009 | JOHN TIERNEY
    If you believe, as Maurizio Seracini does, that Leonardo da Vinci’s greatest painting is hidden inside a wall in Florence’s city hall, then there are two essential techniques for finding it. As usual, Leonardo anticipated both of them. First, concentrate on scientific gadgetry. After spotting what seemed to be a clue to Leonardo’s painting left by another 16th-century artist, Dr. Seracini led an international team of scientists in mapping every millimeter of the wall and surrounding room with lasers, radar, ultraviolet light and infrared cameras. Once they identified the likely hiding place, they developed devices to detect the painting by...
  • Engineers to search for Leonardo fresco [Battle of Anghiari]

    10/28/2007 11:45:44 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies · 428+ views
    Yahoo! ^ | Monday October 22, 2007 | Frances D'Emilio
    The hunt for the "Battle of Anghiari," ...which Leonardo began in 1505 to commemorate the 15th-century Florentine victory over Milan at Anghiari, a medieval Tuscan town... unfinished when Leonardo left Florence in 1506... was given new impetus about 30 years ago, when Seracini noticed a cryptic message on a fresco in the hall by Giorgio Vasari, a 16th-century artist famed for chronicling Renaissance artists' labors. "Cerca, trova" -- "seek and you shall find" -- said the words on a tiny green flag in the "Battle of Marciano in the Chiana Valley." ...A few years ago, using radar and X-ray scans,...
  • ART APPECIATION THREAD Is this the Da Vinci Clue? (Vasari fresco holds mystery)

    06/21/2005 3:11:06 PM PDT · by Liz · 16 replies · 1,603+ views
    ASSOCIATED PRESS | Tuesday, June 21, 2005 | ARIEL DAVID
    Maybe Vasari fresco refers to presence of greater art behind it ROME -- "Cerca trova" ("Seek and you shall find") is the tantalizing 5-century-old message painted on a fresco in the council hall of Florence's Palazzo Vecchio. Researchers now believe these cryptic words could be a clue to the location of a long-lost Leonardo da Vinci painting and are pressing local authorities to allow them to search for the masterpiece of Renaissance art. Maurizio Seracini, an Italian art researcher, first noticed the message during a survey of the hall 30 years ago, but his team lacked the technology then to...
  • On the trail of the lost Leonardo

    05/16/2006 10:40:00 AM PDT · by Republicanprofessor · 13 replies · 635+ views
    The Times Online UK ^ | 5/16/06 | Mark Irving
    Forget the Da Vinci Code. Dr Seracini thinks he's cracked art's biggest mystery Step by patient step, one man is drawing ever closer to the real Da Vinci mystery: tracking down the master’s greatest painting, lost for four and a half centuries. And it is hidden, he believes, in a room at the heart of political power since the Middle Ages in Florence. For art historians, finding Leonardo’s lost Battle of Anghiari is in the same league as finding the Titanic or the still lost tomb of the Ancient Egyptian architect Imhotep — as big as you can get. The...
  • Text in lost language may reveal god or goddess worshipped by Etruscans at ancient temple:

    03/29/2016 5:41:03 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 46 replies
    SMU Research Home ^ | 3/28/2016 | SMU
    Archaeologists in Italy have discovered what may be a rare sacred text in the Etruscan language that is likely to yield rich details about Etruscan worship of a god or goddess. The lengthy text is inscribed on a large 6th century BCE sandstone slab that was uncovered from an Etruscan temple. A new religious artifact is rare. Most Etruscan discoveries typically have been grave and funeral objects. “This is probably going to be a sacred text, and will be remarkable for telling us about the early belief system of a lost culture that is fundamental to western traditions,” said archaeologist...
  • Illegal immigrant 'screamed "you have treated me like a dog" before...strangling American artist

    01/14/2016 10:42:14 AM PST · by Red Badger · 69 replies
    www.dailymail.co.uk ^ | Updated: 12:58 EST, 14 January 2016 | By Jake Wallis Simons In Florence, Italy
    An illegal immigrant has confessed to killing American artist Ashley Olsen in her Italian apartment, who was punched and strangling her with a USB cord in a jealous 'drug-fueled' frenzy. Cheik Tidiane Diaw, 25, told officers he strangled Olsen after the pair had sex when she told him he had to leave because her boyfriend was coming back. The Senegalese man was caught because of DNA evidence from a used condom and cigarette found in the toilet - which he had tried to flush away unsuccessfully. Italian police said they had to swoop on him quickly because they feared he...
  • Niccolo Machiavelli: Advice on Disarming

    01/05/2016 7:43:27 AM PST · by marktwain · 25 replies
    Gun Watch ^ | 31 December, 2015 | Dean Weingarten
    Niccolo Machiavelli is what some have called the first modern analyst of political power.  Some have called him the founder of modern political science.  Others have compared him to the Devil, as he showed the moral underbelly of political power.  He is widely honored on the left as showing how to use power to stay in power.  Most of the people who know of Machiavelli know him from his most famous work "The Prince".  "The Prince" is essentially a short course on how to get and keep political power.  At the time it was written, it was a rather...
  • Archaeologists May Have Found What Was Once The Biggest City In Italy

    11/07/2004 5:27:22 PM PST · by blam · 51 replies · 2,055+ views
    The Economist ^ | 11-4-2004
    Scientific treasure hunters Nov 4th 2004 | CLUSIUM, OR POSSIBLY NOT From The Economist print edition Archaeologists may have found what was once the biggest city in Italy REAL archaeology bears about as much resemblance to an Indiana Jones movie as real spying bears to James Bond. Excavation—at least if it is to be meaningfully different from grave robbing—is a matter of painstaking trowel work, not gung-ho gold-grabbing. But there is still a glimmer of the grave robber in many archaeologists, and the search for a juicy royal tomb can stimulate more than just rational, scientific instincts. Few tombs would...
  • Presidential candidate Ted Cruz talks religious freedom at Florence Baptist Temple

    11/15/2015 3:32:58 PM PST · by Isara · 4 replies
    Morning News ^ | Sunday, November 15, 2015 | Justin Johnson
    Texas Sen. and GOP presidential candidate Ted Cruz visited and spoke at Florence Baptist Temple on Sunday, November 15, 2015. FLORENCE, S.C. - Texas Sen. Ted Cruz, a 2016 Republican Party presidential candidate, touched on a number of topics but focused mainly on the issue of religious freedom in the United States when he spoke Sunday morning to a packed church at Florence Baptist Temple. Cruz, the son of a pastor and a missionary, spoke with the cadence of a man who was no stranger to the church. He opted not to stand at the pulpit, though, instead working...
  • 1478 Assassination Solved. The Humanist Did It.

    03/07/2004 3:08:22 PM PST · by farmfriend · 29 replies · 392+ views
    NYT ^ | March 6, 2004 | FELICIA R. LEE
    1478 Assassination Solved. The Humanist Did It. By FELICIA R. LEE On April 26, 1478, Lorenzo de' Medici (who escaped) and his brother Giuliano (who died) were repeatedly attacked with knives by a gang of men who invaded the Duomo cathedral in Florence during a high Mass. It was part of a plot against the powerful Medici family, de facto rulers in the Florentine republic for hundreds of years. Now a Wesleyan University scholar says he has cracked the 500-year-old case with the help of a recently discovered coded letter. For hundreds of years historians have known the plot was...
  • Italy's Medici Murder Plot Solved

    02/25/2004 10:53:57 AM PST · by blam · 28 replies · 574+ views
    Discovery News ^ | 2-24-2004 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Italy's Medici Murder Plot Solved By Rossella Lorenzi, Discovery News Lorenzo dei Medici Feb. 24, 2004 — One of the most notorious crimes of the Renaissance, the attempted assassination of Florence's grandest son, Lorenzo dei Medici, has been solved more than 500 years later. Known as the Pazzi conspiracy, the plot was led by Francesco dei Pazzi, whose banking family had resented for years the Medici climb to power. The Pazzi plotted to kill Lorenzo and his brother Giuliano during a High Mass in the city's cathedral in April 1478. Wounded, Lorenzo managed to escape and barricade himself behind the...
  • U.S. prison frees terrorist who plotted to kill Golda Meir

    02/20/2009 10:14:00 PM PST · by Cindy · 21 replies · 1,894+ views
    AP via HAARETZ.com ^ | Last update - 07:26 20/02/2009 | n/a
    SNIPPET: "A Black September terrorist who served only about half his 30-year sentence for planting three car bombs in New York City in 1973 was released Thursday into the custody of immigration officials to be deported. Khalid Al-Jawary, 63, was released from the Supermax maximum-security prison in Florence, Colorado, said Carl Rusnok, a U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement spokesman. Rusnok said a federal immigration judge had signed a deportation order for Al-Jawary."
  • Florence Gun Show vendors say more women buying guns

    09/21/2015 2:09:05 PM PDT · by Red in Blue PA · 16 replies
    FLORENCE, SC (WBTW) – The fall gun show at the Florence Civic Center revealed a new demographic for sales Sunday afternoon. Vendors who were there say women are buying more guns, hunting and participating in the shooting sport. Stan Davis is the owner of S&R Gun Sales. He attends the gun show in Florence in the spring and fall. However, this year he’s noticed a difference in people who are buying guns. “I have seen an increase in ladies, coming in and buying small arms for themselves, getting signed up for CWP classes,” Davis Said.
  • Hidden secrets of 1491 world map revealed via multispectral imaging

    06/12/2015 10:43:35 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 65 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 06-12-2015 | Mike Cummings
    Henricus Martellus, a German cartographer working in Florence in the late 15th century, produced a highly detailed map of the known world. According to experts, there is strong evidence that Christopher Columbus studied this map and that it influenced his thinking before his fateful voyage. Martellus' map arrived at Yale in 1962, the gift of an anonymous donor. Scholars at the time hailed the map's importance and argued that it could provide a missing link to the cartographic record at the dawn of the Age of Discovery. However, five centuries of fading and scuffing had rendered much of the map's...
  • New North America Viking Voyage Discovered

    06/06/2013 7:08:32 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 32 replies
    LiveScience ^ | June 5, 2013 | Owen Jarus
    Some 1,000 years ago, the Vikings set off on a voyage to Notre Dame Bay in modern-day Newfoundland, Canada, new evidence suggests. The journey would have taken the Vikings, also called the Norse, from L'Anse aux Meadows on the northern tip of the same island to a densely populated part of Newfoundland and may have led to the first contact between Europeans and the indigenous people of the New World.
  • Mystery Surrounds Possible Oldest Church in North America

    04/17/2007 2:12:55 PM PDT · by NYer · 25 replies · 1,182+ views
    Yahoo News ^ | April 16, 2007 | Heather Whipps
    North America's oldest church may lie beneath a small town in Newfoundland, according to information cobbled together from the research of a historian who recently died before publishing her seminal work. "To describe Alwyn Ruddock's claims as revolutionary would not be an exaggeration," Jones said. "If Ruddock is right, it means that the remains of the only medieval church in North America may still lie buried under the modern town of Carbonear."Ruddock, a historian with the University of London, was one of the world's foremost experts on Cabot's voyages until her death in late 2005. In keeping with her will,...
  • Well! Who did name the place?

    05/24/2003 6:27:48 AM PDT · by scouse · 8 replies · 225+ views
    BBC History page ^ | 5/24 | Macdonald
    There are two key characters in this story, John Cabot, a sailor, and Richard Amerike, a Bristol business man. Unfortunately, neither left much of themselves for us to see or read: no portrait, nothing in their own writing, no detailed contemporary record of themselves or their work. There is, however, enough recorded to know that they both achieved things of lasting importance; one very directly, the other less obviously but in its way even more portentous: Cabot awakened the world to the existence of the North American continent, and Amerike gave his name and badge to what, in time, was...
  • Something to declare: America named after Welsh Customs man

    04/28/2002 8:37:13 PM PDT · by aculeus · 15 replies · 8+ views
    The Observer [UK] ^ | Sunday April 28, 2002 | Amelia Hill
    America was named after a British Customs officer and not, as historians have long believed, the Italian explorer Amerigo Vespucci, who participated in Christopher Columbus's voyages to the New World. Martin Waldseemuller, whose 1507 map of the world was the first to show the so-called Unknown Territory as a separate continent, has long been credited with naming the new land after the Florentine nobleman. But according to a new book by Rodney Broome - Amerike, The Briton Who Gave America its Name - the country was named in 1496, years before Vespucci's voyage, by John Cabot - the Bristol-based explorer...
  • Anglosphere: Celebrating Wrong Italian? (Columbus vs. Cabot)

    10/13/2002 10:02:58 AM PDT · by Tancred · 8 replies · 4,358+ views
    United Press Int'l ^ | October 12, 2002 | James C. Bennett
    WASHINGTON, Oct. 12 (UPI) -- A few years ago I chanced to be in Buenos Aires on Columbus Day. It is a major holiday there, during which no business is transacted. I spent the day wandering about town enjoying the celebrations. One plaza held a Columbus Day festival in which passersby could enjoy demonstrations and samples of music, dance, crafts and foods of all the various Latin American nations, and of many of the source-nations of Argentina's immigration. The interesting thing to me was the complete absence of anything representing the United States. This was not a coincidence. Columbus, and...
  • Briton found America in 1499

    08/29/2009 12:03:39 AM PDT · by OldSpice · 36 replies · 1,365+ views
    The Daily Mirror ^ | 29 Aug., 2009 | By Tom Pettifor
    The first Briton sailed to the New World only seven years after Columbus, a long-lost royal letter reveals.Written by Henry VII 510 years ago, it suggests Bristol merchant William Weston headed for America in 1499.In his letter the king, right, instructs his Chancellor to suspend an injunction against Weston because "he will shortly with God's grace, pass and sail for to search and find if he can the new found land".Bristol University's Dr Evan Jones believes it was probably the earliest attempt to find the North-West Passage - the searoute around North America to the Pacific. He said: "Henry's...
  • The Discovery Of America: The Revolutionary Claims Of A Dead Historian

    04/04/2007 4:49:18 PM PDT · by blam · 7 replies · 867+ views
    University Of Bristol ^ | 4-4-2007 | Alwyn Ruddock
    The discovery of America: the revolutionary claims of a dead historian Press release issued 4 April 2007Replica Of John Cabot's Ship Dr Alwyn Ruddock, a former reader in history at the University of London, was the world expert on John Cabot’s discovery voyages from Bristol to North America (1496-98). What she was said to have found out about these voyages looked set to re-write the history of the European discovery of America. Yet, when Dr Ruddock died in December 2005, having spent four decades researching this topic, she ordered the destruction of all her research. In an article published today...
  • Rewriting History: Alwyn Ruddock and John Cabot

    Alwyn Ruddock, an 89-year-old historian, had all her notes & research materials detailing perhaps tremendous discoveries relating to John Cabot's voyages to the New World in the late 1490s posthumously destroyed. This article, Rewriting History: Alwyn Ruddock and John Cabot, gives a lengthy retelling of that tale. From what I can tell, it looks as though our good friend "Peer Review" or its relatives, well-known to us from the phony Global Warming money scam, is mostly responsible for the destruction of her astonishing research on Cabot and his predecessors. Dr Evan Jones and his research partner, Margaret Condon, have set...
  • Mona Lisa's Skeleton? Scientists Perform DNA Testing, Digital Reconstruction On Da Vinci's Neighbor

    08/09/2013 11:54:34 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 15 replies
    Headlines and Global News ^ | 08/09/2013 | By Rebekah Marcarelli
    Researchers may have found the "Mona Lisa" model's skeleton. (Photo : Wikimedia Commons) Scientists are on a mission to find the model for the "Mona Lisa," they plan to dig up centuries-old graves and digitally reconstruct the face of a choice skeleton. Experts believe the model for the famous "Mona Lisa" painting was Leonardo da Vinci's neighbor, Lisa Gherardini Del Giocondo, ANSA reported. Several skeletons found in a Florence convent last year could be the remains of the model. Experts plan to identify the most likely candidate and compare the DNA with a body believed to be her son. "Right...
  • Younger, happier Mona Lisa painted 10 years earlier, experts believe

    10/01/2012 5:51:27 AM PDT · by jmcenanly · 54 replies
    Discovery News via FoxNews ^ | September 27, 2012 | Discovery News
    Leonardo da Vinci painted a younger and happier Mona Lisa some 10 years before painting the famous painting, art experts are claiming. Slightly larger in size than the famous portrait,‭ ‬which now hangs in the Louvre in Paris,‭ ‬the painting features‭ ‬a darker tonality,‭ ‬a different and unfinished background framed by two columns,‭ ‬and‭ ‬shows a younger lady with a less enigmatic smile. Known as the Isleworth Mona Lisa,‭ ‬the artwork will be unveiled in Geneva on Thursday by the Mona Lisa Foundation,‭ ‬a Zurich‭-based consortium which has‭ ‬kept the painting in a Swiss bank vault for‭ ‬40‭ ‬years....
  • Is This An Early 'Mona Lisa?'

    09/28/2012 7:03:40 PM PDT · by smokingfrog · 8 replies
    wfae.org ^ | 28 Sept 2012 | Mark Memmot
    The Zurich-based Mona Lisa Foundation said today that it has evidence that a painting that first came to light in the late 1800s is an early "Mona Lisa" also done by Leonard Da Vinci. Known as the "Isleworth Mona Lisa," the painting is a "portrait of a young woman with an enigmatic smile" much like the famous work of art in The Louvre, as The Associated Press writes. The foundation, which was created for the specific purpose of researching the history of the "early Mona Lisa," says it believes the painting was created 11 or 12 years before the more...
  • Mona Lisa’s ‘twin sister’ discovered in Spain’s Prado art museum

    02/02/2012 3:36:53 AM PST · by Daffynition · 81 replies
    TorontoStar.com ^ | Feb 01 2012 | Sinikka Tarvainen
    MADRID—Spain’s Prado art museum said Wednesday it had discovered an unusual copy of Leonardo da Vinci’s “La Gioconda,” painted by one of the master’s pupils at the same time that the original was being completed. The copy had been on display at the Madrid art museum for years without experts being aware of its importance. A routine restoration led experts to discover that the dark background behind the female figure popularly known as Mona Lisa had been added afterward and that it covered an Italian landscape similar to that in da Vinci’s original.
  • Artist Believes He's Found Secret Code in the Mona Lisa

    12/09/2011 2:33:14 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 30 replies
    News5 ^ | 12/9/2012
    A New York artist believes he's "cracked the code" of Leonardo da Vinci's "Mona Lisa" painting. Ron Piccirillo stated on his blog that the painting is an optical illusion with one painting hidden within another. He refers to a "secret that has been hiding for five hundred years" as he claims to have found a lion's head, an ape head and a buffalo head in the painting while turning it around. "I had first Googled this, but could not find anything on it," he stated. "How could something like this have gone unnoticed for five hundred years?" The key to...
  • A New Theory for "Mona Lisa"

    02/02/2011 4:26:26 PM PST · by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis · 42 replies
    Yahoo News ^ | February 2 2011 | Mike Krumboltz
    For centuries, people have been speculating about who modeled for Leonardo Da Vinci's "Mona Lisa." Was it Lisa Gherardini, the wife of a Florentine merchant? Was it Isabella of Aragon? Was it the artist himself, as some experts believe? Or was it, as new research suggests, none of the above? An Italian art historian, Silvano Vinceti, believes the model for the "Mona Lisa" was a man named Gian Giacomo Caprotti, better known as Salai, a male apprentice (and possible lover) of da Vinci...
  • Professor discovers hidden literary references in the Mona Lisa

    01/06/2011 12:40:58 PM PST · by decimon · 22 replies
    Queen's University ^ | January 6, 2011 | Unknown
    Queen’s University Classics professor emeritus Ross Kilpatrick believes the Leonardo da Vinci masterpiece, the Mona Lisa, incorporates images inspired by the Roman poet Horace and Florentine poet Petrarch. The technique of taking a passage from literature and incorporating it into a work of art is known as ‘invention’ and was used by many Renaissance artists. “The composition of the Mona Lisa is striking. Why does Leonardo have an attractive woman sitting on a balcony, while in the background there is an entirely different world that is vast and barren?” says Dr. Kilpatrick. “What is the artist trying to say?”
  • Mona Lisa painting 'contains hidden code'

    12/12/2010 10:14:30 PM PST · by bruinbirdman · 70 replies · 2+ views
    The Telegraph ^ | 12/12/2010 | Nick Pisa, Rome
    Art historians are probing a real life Da Vinci Code style mystery after discovering tiny numbers and letters painted into the eyes of the artist's enigmatic Mona Lisa painting. The numbers and letters are not visible to the human eye but have to be viewed under a microscope Leonardo Da Vinci's 500-year-old Renaissance masterpiece has long been steeped in mystery, and even today the true identity of the woman with the alluring smile still far from certain. Now members of Italy's National Committee for Cultural Heritage have revealed that by magnifying high resolution images of the Mona Lisa's eyes letters...
  • Is Mona Lisa too fat?

    02/13/2010 6:48:53 PM PST · by Big Bureaucracy · 27 replies · 863+ views
    Big Bureaucracy ^ | February 13th, 2010 | Ellie Velinska
    BBC reports that Dr. Vito Franco from Palermo University believes that Mona Lisa has a build-up of fatty acids under the skin of her eyes. That is supposed to be a sign of high cholesterol. The news is so absurd I decided to join the fray and come up with few matching thoughts of nonsense.... There was no McDonald’s back in the 1507 when Lisa Del Gioconda posed for Leonardo. I wonder what Mona Lisa’s diet was back then. What we know for sure is that Mrs. Gioconda did not eat French fries because the potatoes were imported from the...
  • "Mona Lisa" comes to life in high-tech art exhibit

    08/27/2009 5:07:34 PM PDT · by JoeProBono · 7 replies · 443+ views
    .reuters ^ | Aug 27, 2009 | Hanna Rantala
    For centuries, Leonardo da Vinci's "Mona Lisa" and her enigmatic smile have inspired as much speculation as admiration. Now she's ready to answer questions -- in Mandarin. A digital, interactive version of the renowned 16th century painting is one of 61 high-tech replicas breathing life into classical and ancient art works in the "World Classic Interactive Arts Exhibition" which opened in Beijing last week.
  • Yet Another Mona Lisa Video Released

    04/20/2009 9:35:29 AM PDT · by Selkirk · 1 replies · 391+ views
    Political Castaway ^ | 4/20/2009 | Selkirk
    Words cannot describe how powerful this video is, just as its pedecessors have been. Live Action, as part of its Mona Lisa Project, have now visited Planned Parenthood clinics in Indiana, Arizona, California, and Tennessee. The story remains the same: young teenage girl, pregnant by her much-older boyfriend seeks help at a Planned Parenthood clinic. Clinic ignores the story and instructs her on how to obtain an abortion, often by lying to a judge (to avoid parental consent) or by crossing state lines (to take advantage of more liberal abortion access laws). By doing so, these clinics are repeatedly violating...
  • German experts crack Mona Lisa smile (discovers model's identity)

    01/14/2008 6:13:34 PM PST · by Clintonfatigued · 29 replies · 535+ views
    Yahoo News ^ | January 14, 2007 | Sylvia Westall
    German academics believe they have solved the centuries-old mystery behind the identity of the "Mona Lisa" in Leonardo da Vinci's famous portrait. ADVERTISEMENT Lisa Gherardini, the wife of a wealthy Florentine merchant, Francesco del Giocondo, has long been seen as the most likely model for the sixteenth-century painting. But art historians have often wondered whether the smiling woman may actually have been da Vinci's lover, his mother or the artist himself. Now experts at the Heidelberg University library say dated notes scribbled in the margins of a book by its owner in October 1503 confirm once and for all that...
  • High resolution image hints at 'Mona Lisa's' eyebrows

    10/18/2007 7:45:46 AM PDT · by Goodness · 18 replies · 127+ views
    CNN ^ | 10/18/07 | CNN/uncredited
    SAN FRANCISCO, California (CNN) -- The "Mona Lisa" has long been shrouded in mystery, including one long-standing question about the famous lady: What happened to her eyebrows and eyelashes? Now, a French engineer and inventor says he's uncovered part of the enigma.
  • ‘Mona Lisa’ died in 1542, buried in Florence

    01/19/2007 8:52:36 AM PST · by FLOutdoorsman · 33 replies · 1,311+ views
    AFP ^ | 19 Jan 2007 | AFP
    ROME - An expert on the “Mona Lisa” says he has ascertained with certainty that the symbol of feminine mystique died on July 15, 1542, and was buried at the convent in central Florence where she spent her final days. Giuseppe Pallanti found a death notice in the archives of a church in Florence that referred to “the wife of Francesco del Giocondo, deceased July 15, 1542, and buried at Sant’Orsola,” the Italian press reported Friday. Born Lisa Gherardini in May 1479, she is thought to have been the second wife of Del Giocondo, a wealthy silk merchant, with whom...
  • Scan hints Mona Lisa pregnant for pose (was La Joconde pregnant?)

    09/27/2006 11:37:35 AM PDT · by presidio9 · 91 replies · 2,091+ views
    Researchers using three-dimensional technology to study the "Mona Lisa" say the woman depicted in Leonardo da Vinci's 16th century masterpiece was either pregnant or had recently given birth when she sat for the painting. ADVERTISEMENT That was one of many discoveries found by French and Canadian researchers during one of the most extensive physical examinations ever carried out on the artwork. "Thanks to laser scanning, we were able to uncover the very fine gauze veil Mona Lisa was wearing on her dress. This was something typical for either soon-to-be or new mothers at the time," Michel Menu, research director of...
  • Copy of Mona Lisa provides insight into original

    09/26/2006 3:48:28 AM PDT · by Republicanprofessor · 28 replies · 1,202+ views
    CBC Arts ^ | Sept. 24, 2006
    An early copy of Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa, which has bright colours believed to reflect the original painting, will go on display in London for the first time since 1902. The original Mona Lisa painting hangs in the Louvre in Paris. (Canadian Press) The Dulwich Picture Gallery will exhibit a reproduction once owned by portrait painter Sir Joshua Reynolds, who received it from the Duke of Leeds in 1790. ..... The reproduction is wider than the original, showing a pair of columns flanking the figure that are only hinted at in Leonardo's version. As well, the colours are much...
  • Scientists to unveil secrets of Mona Lisa

    09/25/2006 4:27:00 PM PDT · by wagglebee · 47 replies · 2,491+ views
    Reuters ^ | 9/25/06 | Reuters
    PARIS (Reuters) - Scientists are due to unveil some of the secrets behind Western art's most enigmatic smile this week, when they present the findings of the most extensive three dimensional scan ever undertaken on the Mona Lisa. Leonardo da Vinci's 16th century masterpiece, perhaps the world's most famous painting, is considered a milestone in the art of portraiture and an icon of European culture. A comprehensive examination of the work, painted at some time around 1503-06, was undertaken in 2004, using special 3D technology developed by scientists from Canada's National Research Council (NRC). The scientists scanned the picture on...
  • Riddle of Mona Lisa is finally solved: she was the mother of five

    08/03/2006 6:17:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies · 410+ views
    Telegraph ^ | 1/08/2004 | Bruce Johnston
    After four centuries in which historians have debated the identity of the artist's subject - with theories ranging from his mother to a Florentine prostitute - new research has supported the claim first made in 1550: that she was Lisa Gherardini, the wife of a wealthy silk merchant.
  • Enigma of Mona Lisa Smile Cracked

    12/15/2005 3:42:43 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 63 replies · 2,329+ views
    Sci-Tech Today ^ | December 15, 2005 | Robin Arnfield
    According to findings published in the New Scientist, a British journal, the exact breakdown of Mona Lisa's emotions, as captured by Leonardo da Vinci, were 83 percent happy, 9 percent disgusted, 6 percent fearful, and 2 percent angry. The enigma of Leonardo da Vinci's famous Mona Lisa painting has been cracked with the help of emotion-recognition software from scientists at the University of Amsterdam in the Netherlands and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. The painting, which is now in the Louvre Museum in Paris, France, was painted at some point between 1503 and 1506, according to art historians. After...
  • Cracking da Vinci's coded smile (83% happy, 9% disgusted, 6% fearful and 2% angry)

    12/15/2005 8:10:20 AM PST · by DaveLoneRanger · 14 replies · 460+ views
    The Scotsman ^ | December 15, 2005 | IAN JOHNSTON
    A FEMME fatale with a mocking, ironic smile, a man in drag, an expectant mother or simply a housewife trying to hide the appalling state of her teeth. The true meaning of Mona Lisa's enigmatic smile has haunted art lovers for years, but scientists now believe they have hit upon a breakthrough. Using a computer programme designed to reveal the emotions of a face, they have worked out that Leonardo da Vinci's muse was 83 per cent happy, 9 per cent disgusted, 6 per cent fearful and 2 per cent angry. The study, which was carried out by Professor Nicu...
  • Mona Lisa Smiles From New Louvre Digs

    04/06/2005 1:48:39 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 7 replies · 515+ views
    Stuff (New Zealand) ^ | 06 April 2005
    PARIS: Four years and almost 5 million euros later, Leonard da Vinci's Mona Lisa has moved into spacious new digs at the Louvre Museum in Paris but her famous smile remains as enigmatic as ever. From Wednesday, visitors will find the 500-year-old painting in the Salle des Etats, a large gallery that served as a parliamentary debating chamber until 1870 and which has undergone a 4.8 million euro makeover since 2001. Peruvian architect Lorenzo Piqueras said he wanted to make it easier for six million annual visitors to find what is arguably the world's most celebrated smile, and to prevent...
  • Louvre: The Mona Lisa Is Deteriorating

    04/26/2004 10:21:27 AM PDT · by presidio9 · 111 replies · 455+ views
    AP ^ | April 26, 2004
    The Mona Lisa (search), Leonardo da Vinci's masterpiece of a mysterious woman with a slight smile, is deteriorating, and the Louvre Museum (search) said Monday it will conduct an in-depth technical study to determine why. The thin panel of poplar wood that the work is painted on has become deformed since conservation experts last evaluated the painting, the Louvre said in a written statement. It did not say when the last evaluation was. The Louvre said the condition of the Mona Lisa was causing "some worry" and that a new study on the state of the work has been launched....
  • Nude, Mona Lisa-like painting surfaces

    06/12/2009 4:52:22 PM PDT · by re_tail20 · 58 replies · 3,811+ views
    Discovery ^ | JUne 12, 2009 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Leonardo da Vinci, in a Renaissance version of Mad Magazine, may have painted his famous Mona Lisa in a number of ways, including nude. Now, a painting has surfaced that looks much like the original, sparking debate over just how far the master took his iconic painting. The newly revealed painting, hidden for almost a century within the wood wall of a private library, shows a portrait of a half-naked woman with clear links to the famous (and clothed) Mona Lisa. The work, which documents suggest was at least based on never-seen similar work by da Vinci, is now on...
  • A Da Vinci Complex? Call It a Hypothesis

    01/14/2005 8:26:14 PM PST · by wagglebee · 7 replies · 985+ views
    New York Times ^ | 1/15/05 | JASON HOROWITZ
    FLORENCE, Italy, Jan. 14 - Researchers at a military geography institute here say they have discovered - hiding practically in plain sight in their building - what might have been a workshop for Leonardo da Vinci. They have also homed in on fading frescoes that they think might have been painted by Leonardo or by a workshop student 500 years ago, although that hypothesis has not been put to the test by art historians or by scientific analysis. Italian museum officials are hoping that the discovery of the frescoes and five small rooms where Leonardo might have lived and worked,...
  • Hidden room where Leonardo met his Mona

    01/12/2005 12:59:52 AM PST · by nickcarraway · 5 replies · 1,304+ views
    Telegraph (UK) ^ | 12/01/2005
    Restorers find artist’s workshop in old Florence friary, writes Bruce Johnston The workshop where Leonardo da Vinci first met and may have begun painting the woman he immortalised as the Mona Lisa has been discovered in a military college. The studio and lodgings, filling five rooms on two floors and still showing traces of wall paintings bearing what one expert called "astonishing associations" with his work, have come to light in what was once part of the friary of the Santissima Annunziata in Florence and was later taken over by Italy's Military Geographical Institute. A team of restorers found the...
  • Discovery of hidden laboratory sheds light on Leonardo's genius

    01/13/2005 12:05:31 PM PST · by aculeus · 47 replies · 2,839+ views
    The Belfast Telegraph ^ | 12 January 2005 | By John Phillips in Rome
    Researchers have discovered the hidden laboratory used by Leonardo da Vinci for studies of flight and other pioneering scientific work in previously sealed rooms at a monastery next to the Basilica of the Santissima Annunziata, in the heart of Florence. The workshop rooms, located between the Institute for Military Geography and the Basilica, contain frescos painted by Leonardo that have "impressive resemblances" to other examples of his experimental work. The frescos include a triptych of birds circling above a subsequently erased representation of the Virgin Mary that "constitutes a clear citation of the studies by the maestro on the flight...