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Keyword: forensics

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  • IT’S A FAKE! Analyst Says Judge Roy Moore Signature

    11/14/2017 10:41:48 AM PST · by scooby321 · 137 replies
    Gateway Pundit ^ | 11/14/2017 | Joshua Caplan
    Known for his insightful take on politics, journalist and author Thomas Wictor believes Judge Roy Moore’s signature in Gloria Allred accuser Beverly Young Nelson’s yearbook is a forgery. The sevens in 1977 to the right of “Christmas,” are very different from the sevens in the date (12-22-77) above “Old Hickory House.” “Look at the two versions of the number “7,” tweeted Wictor. “”12-22-77” and “Olde Hickory House” were written by a different person,” he added. Next, Wictor points out “the “R” and “y” in “Roy,”” are not written the same way.
  • The Crisis in America's Crime Labs

    07/12/2017 4:49:49 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 5 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | July 12, 2017 | Michelle Malkin
    Junk science endangers lives. Forensic junk science in the hands of overzealous prosecutors, ignorant police detectives and reckless experts threatens liberty. There is a crisis in America's government-run crime labs -- and it's not just the result of a few rogue operators. The problem is long-festering and systemic. In April, Massachusetts state crime lab chemist Annie Dookhan made national headlines after investigations and lawsuits over her misconduct prompted the state's Supreme Judicial Court to order the largest dismissal of criminal convictions in U.S. history. Prosecutors were forced to dismiss a stunning 21,000-plus drug cases after Dookhan admitted to forging signatures,...
  • Study: Brain Scan Sees Lies More Clearly than Polygraph

    11/07/2016 6:37:34 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 16 replies
    Forensic Magazinbe ^ | 11/07/2016 | Michelle Taylor
    When it comes to lying, the brain may be our Achilles’ heel, rather than physiological indices like blood pressure, pulse, respiration and skin conductivity. A new study from researchers at the University of Pennsylvania suggests functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) is significantly more effective at spotting lies than a traditional polygraph test. In the study, neuroscience experts with no experience in lie detection were 24 percent more likely to spot falsehoods than professional polygraph examiners reviewing polygraph recordings. An fMRI is a functional neuroimaging procedure using MRI technology that measures brain activity by detecting changes associated with blood flow. The...
  • A trail of microbes (could bacteria constantly dropping off our bodies allow tracking of us?)

    03/16/2016 1:08:57 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 45 replies
    Science Magazine ^ | 3/11/16 | Kai Kupferschmidt
    The unique mix of bacteria you leave behind wherever you go might be used to identify you. Touching a phone, or just walking through a room, will leave behind hundreds of microbial species, sometimes including Staphylococcus aureus (inset).PHOTOS: (LEFT TO RIGHT) SCIENCE SOURCE; MATTHEW RAKOLA One morning last summer, evolutionary biologist Jose Lopez was having coffee on the back porch of his house in Hollywood, Florida, when two burglars climbed in through a front window and did what home invaders usually do: They rifled through drawers, disconnected the TV to carry it off, and even opened the fridge to...
  • Forensic analysis confirms Planned Parenthood undercover videos were not manipulated

    09/29/2015 1:13:58 PM PDT · by AT7Saluki · 12 replies
    Coalfire Systems, a highly accredited forensic analysis and cybersecurity company that does work for Fortune 500 companies, issued a report Monday which found that 10 full-footage videos the Center for Medical Progress recorded while undercover at Planned Parenthood facilities and related locations “are authentic and show no evidence of manipulation or editing.” “This conclusion is supported by the consistency of the video file date and time stamps, the video timecode, as well as the folder and file naming scheme,” the report states. “The uniformity between the footage from Investigator 1’s camera and Investigator 2’s camera also support the evidence that...
  • Researchers can trace dust samples using fungal DNA

    04/15/2015 10:22:14 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 1 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 4/15/15
    Researchers from North Carolina State University and the University of Colorado, Boulder, have developed a statistical model that allows them to tell where a dust sample came from within the continental United States based on the DNA of fungi found in the sample. The primary goal of the research was to develop a new forensic biology tool for law enforcement or archaeologists. "But it may also give us a greater understanding of the invisible ecosystems of microbial life that we know are all around us, but that we don't fully comprehend," says Neal Grantham, a Ph.D. student in statistics at...
  • Could students' art solve mystery of unidentified bodies?

    02/09/2015 7:27:16 PM PST · by wtd · 5 replies
    Fox5 NY ^ | Sharon Crowley
    Could students' art solve mystery of unidentified bodies?NEW YORK (MYFOXNY) - Students at the New York Academy of Art are combining art and science in hopes of solving mysteries. They are trying to help police identify people who died in New York but were never identified. If you walk down Franklin Street in Tribeca and look into the window of the New York Academy of Art you will see faces staring right back at you. These sculptures are not just works of art each head represents a real person, on display here to try to solve a mystery. New...
  • Before He Died, Richard III Lived Large

    08/24/2014 10:48:27 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 37 replies
    The Smithsonian ^ | 8-19-14 | Rachel Nuwer
    Bone chemistry sheds light on the monarch's shifting diet throughout his brief life Richard III was only 32 years old when he was struck down at the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485. But according to new research, the King of England at least enjoyed some good eating throughout his life—especially in the few years leading up to his death. Scientists from the British Geological Survey and the University of Leicester analyzed Richard III's teeth, his femur and his ribs to see what they could reveal about the monarch's diet, Phys.org reports. They used isotope analysis to identify chemical signatures...
  • The Strange Case of the 'Time Travel' Murder

    05/01/2014 11:49:36 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 17 replies
    BBC ^ | 4/27
    A woman's body is found in London. DNA turns up a hit, yet the suspect apparently died weeks before the alleged victim. Here, forensic scientist Dr Mike Silverman tells the story of one of the strangest cases of his career. It was a real-life mystery that could have come straight from the pages of a modern-day detective novel. During the late 1970s... the idea of being able to identify someone from a few tiny drops of blood seemed like something out of science fiction” A woman had been brutally murdered in London and biological material had been found under...
  • 100 serial rapists identified after rape kits from Detroit Crime Lab are finally processed

    03/13/2014 8:20:33 PM PDT · by george76 · 57 replies
    WXYZ ^ | Kim Craig
    "I was in shock. I was outraged and I just assumed kits were being tested," said actress Mariska Hargitay about the thousands of rape kits in Detroit and across the country that have been left sitting in storage without being processed, allowing rapists to remain free to attack again. And they often do. Hargitay joined Wayne County Prosecutor Kym Worthy to announce legislation that will soon be introduced to state lawmakers that is aimed at setting guidelines and deadlines for rape kits tests to be processed. "Testing rape kits is vital for keeping rapists off the street," said Hargitay during...
  • Juarez's "Dr. Frankenstein" Is Breathing New Life Into Unsolved Murders

    02/26/2014 7:15:10 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 9 replies
    KFOX 14 ^ | Tuesday, February 25 2014 | Stephanie Guadian
    Juarez's 'Dr. Frankenstein' is breathing new life into unsolved murders Just outside of Juarez a group of mothers frustrated by local law enforcement and desperate to find their missing loved ones --- decides to search the outskirts of their neighborhood themselves. They are looking for unmarked graves. And it doesn't take long before fears are realized. The wave of violence that at one time made Juarez the most dangerous city in the world is washing away. But, there are painful reminders: unidentified bodies, unsolved murders and reports of people who have simply disappeared. Marta Rincon’s daughter disappeared five years ago....
  • All in the eyes: corneal reflections in photos can help solve crimes

    01/01/2014 7:20:31 AM PST · by KeyLargo · 27 replies
    Medical News Today ^ | Dec 31, 2013
    All in the eyes: corneal reflections in photos can help solve crimes Tuesday 31 December 2013 - 8am PST The eyes are not just the mirror of the soul, they also mirror the world around us. Now, a UK team has found that today's high-resolution digital images are now so detailed, they can enlarge the eyes in people's photos and retrieve images of out-of-shot bystanders reflected on their corneas. Combine this with the fact human beings are very efficient at recognizing faces, even from poor quality images, and you have the makings of a rich forensic resource for solving crimes....
  • Fingerprints Help Convict Lightning Cable Thieves

    10/27/2013 3:54:11 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 1 replies
    Emirates 24/7 ^ | Sunday, October 27, 2013 | Eman Al Baik
    Dubai court sentences three copper cable thieves to one year in jailThree Bangladeshi labourers were sentenced to one year in jail for stealing lightning protection cables made of copper from the roof a building. Police found fingerprints of the culprits in a building in the Russian cluster of International City in Dubai where the theft had taken place. “We rushed to the location and could lift some finger prints and so we could reach MA, 25,” testified a police officer. After his arrest, MA admitted to the theft and lead police to his accomplices NM, 26, and FH, 22. Police...
  • Could Detectives Use Microbes To Solve Murders?

    09/23/2013 5:08:42 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 2 replies
    NPR ^ | September 23, 2013 | Rob Stein
    In the woods outside Huntsville, Texas, scientists are trying to determine whether they can use the microbes that live on the human body as microscopic witnesses that could help catch criminals. It's a strange scene at the Southeast Texas Applied Forensic Science Facility. At first, it's easy to miss the human bodies scattered among the tall pines, wild grass and weeds. "We hope microbes can tell crime scene investigators how long a person has been dead," Sibyl Bucheli of Sam Houston State University explains, as she leads a group of researchers and visitors from NPR through a tall, chain-link fence...
  • George Zimmerman's Account Supported By Forensics, Expert Testifies

    07/09/2013 1:29:09 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 27 replies
    ABC News ^ | 07/09/2013 | SENI TIENABESO and MATT GUTMAN
    The markings the fatal bullet left on Trayvon Martin's sweatshirt and body supports George Zimmerman's account that Martin was on top and leaning over him when Zimmerman shot and killed Martin, a leading forensics expert testified today. "The medical evidence is consistent with his statement," Dr. Vincent Di Maio told the Florida court. Di Maio said that the pattern of powder burns on Martin's sweatshirt and skin indicated that the shirt was two to four inches away from Martin's chest when he was shot by Zimmerman. "Mr. Martin was over him, leaning forward," he said. "If you are lying on...
  • (Civil War Forensics) Surgeon: Pneumonia Likely Killed 'Stonewall' Jackson

    05/10/2013 8:08:54 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 37 replies
    The Charleston Gazette ^ | May 10, 2013 | The Charleston Gazette
    Surgeon: Pneumonia likely killed 'Stonewall' Jackson Legendary Confederate general died 150 years ago Friday Historians and doctors have debated for decades what medical complications caused the death of legendary Confederate fighter Thomas J. "Stonewall" Jackson, felled by friendly fire from his troops during the Civil War. Shot three times while returning from scouting enemy lines in the Virginia wilderness, Jackson was badly wounded in the left arm by one of the large bullets the night of May 2, 1863. Blood gushed from a severed artery. It took at least two hours to get him to a field hospital, and Jackson...
  • Massachusetts crime lab scandal explodes

    04/04/2013 4:42:15 PM PDT · by neverdem · 23 replies
    Chemistry World ^ | 4 April 2013 | Rebecca Trager
    More than 300 convicted inmates have been released from Massachusetts state prisons in the US as a result of the September 2012 arrest and subsequent indictment of Annie Dookhan, who worked in a Department of Public Health state laboratory and allegedly falsified evidence used in criminal cases. Now the scandal has grown with the prosecution of another Massachusetts state lab chemist for tampering with evidence and stealing drugs seized as evidence. Sonja Farak, who worked at the Massachusetts State Crime Laboratory in Amherst, was charged with tampering with four drug samples stored at the lab on 1 April. In two...
  • Review of FBI forensics does not extend to federally trained state, local examiners

    12/26/2012 8:14:12 PM PST · by Altariel · 1 replies
    Washington Post ^ | December 22, 2012 | Spencer Hsu
    Thousands of criminal cases at the state and local level may have relied on exaggerated testimony or false forensic evidence to convict defendants of murder, rape and other felonies. The forensic experts in these cases were trained by the same elite FBI team whose members gave misleading court testimony about hair matches and later taught the local examiners to follow the same suspect practices, according to interviews and documents. In July, the Justice Department announced a nationwide review of all cases handled by the FBI Laboratory’s hair and fibers unit before 2000 — at least 21,000 cases — to determine...
  • Israeli Archaeologist Excavates Sobibor Death Camp To Reveal The Nazis' Buried Secrets

    08/28/2012 7:11:00 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 46 replies
    Haretz ^ | August 21, 2012 | The Associated Press
    Israeli archaeologist digs into Sobibor death camp in search of Nazi killing machines Yoram Haimi's biggest breakthrough yet: mapping of what the Germans called the Himmelfahrsstrasse, or the 'Road to Heaven,' a path upon which the inmates were marched naked into the gas chambers. When Israeli archaeologist Yoram Haimi decided to investigate his family's unknown Holocaust history, he turned to the skill he knew best: He began to dig. After learning that two of his uncles were murdered in the infamous Sobibor death camp, he embarked on a landmark excavation project that is shining new light on the workings of...
  • Worsley Man: Hospital scanner probes Iron Age bog death

    03/11/2012 5:10:02 PM PDT · by Renfield · 30 replies · 3+ views
    BBC News ^ | 3-8-2012
    Bryan Sitch, curator of archaeology at the museum, said it now appeared the man had been beaten about the head, garrotted and then beheaded The head of an Iron Age man who died almost 2,000 years ago has been scanned in a Manchester hospital to shed light on how he died. Worsley Man is thought to have lived around 100 AD when Romans occupied much of Britain. Since its discovery in a Salford peat bog in 1958, the head has been kept at Manchester Museum on Oxford Road. The scans at the Manchester Children's Hospital have now revealed more details...