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Keyword: fossil

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  • Is Every Fossil in Its (Evolutionary) Place?

    06/24/2014 8:34:36 AM PDT · by fishtank · 23 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | June 2014 | Vernon R. Cupps, Ph.D., and Brian Thomas, M.S.*
    Is Every Fossil in Its (Evolutionary) Place? by Vernon R. Cupps, Ph.D., and Brian Thomas, M.S.* During a recent televised debate between Bill Nye and Ken Ham, Mr. Nye claimed that fossils are never found “out of place.”1 If by this he means they are never found outside of the rock strata that define the supposed age in which the fossilized creatures lived, he’s wrong. He then challenged viewers to find one single contrary instance anywhere in the world. That’s easy. The fossil record is not nearly as evolutionary as Mr. Nye would have us believe. It features fossils mixed...
  • Live Birth Fossil Exposes Evolutionary Enigma

    03/05/2014 9:19:43 AM PST · by fishtank · 5 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 2-5-2014 | Brian Thomas
    Live Birth Fossil Exposes Evolutionary Enigma by Brian Thomas, M.S. * Fossils sometimes capture brief, fleeting moments. Pterosaur footprints, raindrop craters, ripple marks, and half-swallowed fish adorn Earth's layers. And now researchers have discovered a baby ichthyosaur, an extinct fish-like reptile, halfway in and out of its mother's body. Though fossilization tragically ended the baby's transition from the womb, could this specimen support the story that a land reptile evolved into the first ichthyosaur? The rare find was one of 80 fossils of Chaohusaurus, a small variety of ichthyosaur, described in PLOS ONE.1 The fossils came from a rock formation...
  • Digging Into a Fossil Outhouse

    12/16/2013 9:48:01 AM PST · by fishtank · 29 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 12-16-13 | Timothy L. Clarey, Ph.D.
    Digging Into a Fossil Outhouse by Tim Clarey, Ph.D. * A group of paleontologists reported the discovery of concentrated fields of fossilized dung, called coprolite, in northwest Argentina.1 The closely-spaced dung piles are seen as evidence of gregarious behavior from large herbivores. However, does the great Flood provide a better explanation? Eight separate dung heaps were located within an area of about three square miles in La Rioja Province, each containing hundreds to thousands of coprolites with an average density of about 80 coprolites per square yard.1 The dung concentrations were spaced about a mile apart, and each covered an...
  • New 'Human' Fossil Borders on Fraud (article)

    11/14/2013 8:15:39 AM PST · by fishtank · 23 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | Nov. 13, 2013 | Brian Thomas
    New 'Human' Fossil Borders on Fraud by Brian Thomas, M.S. * An international team of paleoanthropologists reported discovering the earliest human fossils found outside Africa at a dig in the country of Georgia.1 The team told Science that one specimen, "skull 5," is so different from other humans that it significantly widens the range of variation within ancient mankind. The Guardian wrote that among the human remains in Dmanisi researchers found a "spectacular fossilised skull of an ancient human ancestor," but there is actually more proof against this claim.2 The team found clearly human skeleton parts, along with five skulls...
  • Scientists Have Found An Ancient Fossilized Mosquito Full Of Blood (46 Million Years OLD)

    10/14/2013 8:54:39 PM PDT · by blam · 22 replies
    BI ^ | 10-14-2013 | Jennifer Welsh
    Scientists Have Found An Ancient Fossilized Mosquito Full Of Blood Jennifer Welsh Oct. 14, 2013, 5:37 PMBlood engorged mosquito Researchers have just published an exciting find: a 46-million-year-old mosquito full of blood. Next stop "Jurassic Park"? Not so fast. The find is really interesting because it's the first example of blood-feeding in these ancient insects. We hadn't had clear evidence of when this began until now. They found the mosquito in shale sediments in Montana. They first found the presence of iron in the female mosquito's belly, then used a non-destructive technique to study the molecules inside the find. They...
  • 4-Billion-Year-Old Fossil Proteins Resurrected

    08/16/2013 11:21:41 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 10 replies
    Live Science ^ | 08/16/2013 | Tia Ghose
    Researchers have reconstructed the structure of 4-billion-year-old proteins. The primeval proteins, described today (Aug. 8) in the journal Structure, could reveal new insights about the origin of life, said study co-author José Manuel Sanchez Ruíz, a physical chemist at the University of Granada in Spain. Exactly how life emerged on Earth more than 3 billion years ago is a mystery. Some scientists believe that lightning struck the primordial soup in ammonia-rich oceans, producing the complex molecules that formed the precursors to life. Others believe that chemical reactions at deep-sea hydrothermal vents gave rise to cell membranes and simple cellular pumps....
  • Oldest primate fossil rewrites evolutionary break in human lineage

    06/06/2013 2:14:27 PM PDT · by EveningStar · 60 replies
    ESRF (European Synchrotron Radiation Facility) ^ | June 6, 2013 | Kirstin Colvin
    The study of the world’s oldest early primate skeleton has brought light to a pivotal event in primate and human evolution: that of the branch split that led to monkeys, apes and humans (anthropoids) on one side, and living tarsiers on the other. The fossil, that was unearthed from an ancient lake bed in central China’s Hubei Province, represents a previously unknown genus and species named Archicebus Achilles. The results of the research were published on 6 June 2013 in Nature. Oldest primate fossil rewrites evolutionary break in human lineage The fossil, which is 55 million years old and dates...
  • Scientist Stumped by Actual Dinosaur Skin (article)

    05/20/2013 7:15:16 AM PDT · by fishtank · 43 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | May 20, 2013 | Brian Thomas
    Scientist Stumped by Actual Dinosaur Skin by Brian Thomas, M.S. * Being the first ever to examine a dinosaur fossil long buried in sedimentary rock is thrilling enough for a field researcher. But a team working in Canada found an exhilarating bonus on a hadrosaur fossil fragment—it had actual skin still attached. They found the duck-bill dinosaur fossil near Grand Prairie, Alberta. University of Regina physicist Mauricio Barbi operates state-of-the art synchrotron equipment that can detect and identify chemical signatures without destroying samples. He plans to use the technology to investigate the special fossil and its skin. He told Canadian...
  • Peak Oil Flip-Flop

    04/14/2013 10:46:26 AM PDT · by nickcarraway · 51 replies
    National Geographic ^ | April 10, 2013 | Bill Chameides
    There’s a new twist in the “peak oil” debate. Is it good news for the climate? Peak Oil Question Remains, Debate Continues Ever since M. King Hubbert advanced the theory of peak oil in 1956, experts and non-experts alike have been debating about timing and relevance. (See here, here, here and here.) Hubbert’s argument seems like a no-brainer. Oil is a finite natural resource, so there must come a time when oil production peaks and begins to decline. The question is, when? And for a world economy that is largely fueled by oil, that “when” question is quite germane. If...
  • Ancient Arctic camel a curious conundrum

    03/05/2013 3:17:09 PM PST · by Beowulf9 · 28 replies
    Foxnews.com ^ | Published March 05, 2013 | Associated Press
    OTTAWA – Ancient, mummified camel bones dug from the tundra confirm that the animals now synonymous with the arid sands of Arabia actually developed in subfreezing forests in what is now Canada's High Arctic, a scientist said Tuesday. About 3.5 million years ago, Strathcona Fiord on Ellesmere Island's west-central coast would have looked more like a northern forest than an Arctic landscape, said paleobotanist Natalia Rybczynski of the Canadian Museum of Nature in Ottawa.
  • Toothy Spiral Jaw Gave Ancient Sea Predator an Edge

    02/28/2013 11:45:33 AM PST · by EveningStar · 57 replies
    LiveScience ^ | February 27, 2013 | Stephanie Pappas
    An ancient sea predator had a spiraling whorl of teeth that acted as a lethal slicing tool, according to new scans of a mysterious fossil. Helicoprion was a bizarre creature that went extinct some 225 million years ago.
  • Ancient 'Super-Croc' Fossil Discovered in Museum Drawer

    01/30/2013 4:45:18 PM PST · by EveningStar · 22 replies
    LiveScience ^ | January 30, 2013 | Charles Choi
    Long-forgotten remains of a giant dolphin-shaped crocodilian "super-predator" that could devour ancient beasts its size and larger have now been discovered in a museum drawer in Scotland, researchers say. The ancient newfound crocodilian is named Tyrannoneustes lythrodectikos, which in ancient Greek means "blood-biting tyrant swimmer."
  • A Fossilized Scene of a Spider Attacking a Wasp, Preserved for 110 Million Years

    10/09/2012 2:04:50 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 67 replies
    IO9 ^ | October 9, 2012 | George Dvorsky
    A Fossilized Scene of a Spider Attacking a Wasp, Preserved for 110 Million Years Paleontologists have discovered beautifully preserved species trapped in amber before — but this one is extraordinary. It features a parasitic wasp that has become ensnared in a spider's web, with the owner bearing down on it for an attack. But just before the spider was about to have its meal, a drop of resin flowed down from above, freezing the moment in time. Researchers date the scene to the Early Cretaceous between 97 to 110 million years ago in the Hukawng Valley of Myanmar — a...
  • Fossil records 'crab' death march

    09/07/2012 12:07:14 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 14 replies
    Yahoo! News ^ | 9/7/12 | Nick Crumpton - BBC News
    The behaviour of an ancient horseshoe crab in its final moments before death has been captured in the fossil record. A 9.7m-long trackway was created around 150 million years ago when a horseshoe crab fell into a lagoon. The find is of interest because the fossil of the animal itself is present at the end of the trackway, where the animal died. The research appears in the journal Ichnos. The fossil trackway of the animal's last moments - known as a mortichnia, or death march - was discovered in the lithographic limestone of Bavaria in Germany in 2002, where spectacular...
  • Fossil Discovery: More Evidence for Asia, Not Africa, as the Source of Earliest Anthropoid Primates

    06/07/2012 2:49:58 PM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 28 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 06/07/2012
    An international team of researchers has announced the discovery of Afrasia djijidae, a new fossil primate from Myanmar that illuminates a critical step in the evolution of early anthropoids -- the group that includes humans, apes, and monkeys. The 37-million-year-old Afrasia closely resembles another early anthropoid, Afrotarsius libycus, recently discovered at a site of similar age in the Sahara Desert of Libya. The close similarity between Afrasia and Afrotarsius indicates that early anthropoids colonized Africa only shortly before the time when these animals lived. The colonization of Africa by early anthropoids was a pivotal step in primate and human evolution,...
  • Ancient Penguin Weighed 130 Pounds

    02/28/2012 7:26:26 PM PST · by EveningStar · 23 replies · 1+ views
    Discovery News ^ | February 27, 2012 | Jennifer Viegas
    The tallest and heaviest ever known penguin stood nearly 5 feet tall and tipped the scales at around 130 pounds, according to a 27-million-year-old fossil found in New Zealand.
  • All fossil fuels must be cut to avoid global warming, (two) scientists say

    02/21/2012 4:38:32 PM PST · by Libloather · 39 replies · 2+ views
    Canada ^ | 2/21/12 | Mike De Souza
    All fossil fuels must be cut to avoid global warming, scientists sayBy Mike De Souza, Postmedia News February 21, 2012 6:10 PM OTTAWA — Two Canadian climate change scientists from the University of Victoria say the public reaction to their recently published commentary has missed their key message: that all forms of fossil fuels, including the oilsands and coal, must be regulated for the world to avoid dangerous global warming. "Much of the way this has been reported is (through) a type of view that oilsands are good and coal is bad," said climate scientist Neil Swart, who co-authored the...
  • 'Woolly mammoth' spotted in Siberia

    02/08/2012 2:52:34 PM PST · by Red Badger · 139 replies
    The Sun - UK ^ | Wed Feb 08, 2012 | Staff
    A BEAST lurches through icy waters in a sighting a paranormal investigator thinks could prove woolly mammoths are not extinct after all. The animal – thought to have mostly died out roughly 4,000 years ago – was apparently filmed wading through a river in the freezing wilds of Siberia. The jaw-dropping footage was caught by a government-employed engineer last summer in the Chukotka Autonomous Okrug region of Siberia, it is claimed. He filmed the elephant-sized creature as it struggled against the racing water. Its hair matches samples recovered from mammoth remains regularly dug up from the permafrost in frozen Russia....
  • Fossil Whale Brain Proves Paleontologist Wrong

    01/27/2012 5:31:10 AM PST · by fishtank · 18 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 1-27-2012 | Brian Thomas
    Fossil Whale Brain Proves Paleontologist Wrong by Brian Thomas, M.S. | Jan. 27, 2012 Howell Thomas, senior paleontological preparator for the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County, was skeptical when a woman claimed that she found a fossilized whale brain in San Luis Obispo County, California, nine years ago. "The first thing I said when I heard about this finding was that there's just no way," Thomas told the Beatrice Daily Sun. "They brought it in, and sure enough, it's the second of two fossil whale brains [ever found]."1 He explained that "it's an amazing specimen because brains don't...
  • First Long-Necked Dinosaur Fossil Found In Antarctica

    11/07/2011 11:15:17 PM PST · by Altariel · 12 replies
    LiveScience.com ^ | November 4, 2011 | Stephanie Pappas
    It's official, long-necked sauropod dinosaurs once roamed every continent on Earth — including now-frigid Antarctica. The discovery of a single sauropod vertebra on James Ross Island in Antarctica reveals that these behemoths, which included Diplodocus, Brachiosaurus and Apatosaurus, lived on the continent in the upper Cretaceous Period about 100 million years ago.
  • Officials say beaver teeth are 7 million years old

    09/19/2011 2:00:08 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 43 replies
    http://www.physorg.com ^ | 09-19-2011 | Staff
    The Bureau of Land Management says a fossil found by employees on federal land represents the earliest record of living beavers in North America. The pair of teeth was found on BLM land in northeast Oregon. The Albany Democrat-Herald reports the teeth come from the Rattlesnake Formation and are 7 to 7.3 million years old. The BLM says the earliest beavers were found in Germany 10 to 12 million years ago and the animals spread across Asia, eventually crossing the Bering Land Bridge to North America. The previous earliest known records of living beavers in North America, from about 5...
  • Peru researchers make rare ancient insect find

    08/09/2011 7:59:49 PM PDT · by Pharmboy · 76 replies
    AFP ^ | 8-9-11 | Anon
    Detailed fossilized insect remains preserved in amber for over 23 million years (AFP/HO) Peru researchers make rare ancient insect find (AFP) – 3 hours ago LIMA — Researchers in Peru said Tuesday they have discovered the remains of ancient insects and sunflower seeds trapped inside amber dating from the Miocene epoch, some 23 million years ago. The rare find was made in the remote mountainous jungle region near Peru's northern border with Ecuador, paleontologist Klaus Honninger told AFP. "These new discoveries are very important, because the insects and sunflower seeds confirm the type of climate that existed during the Miocene...
  • How early reptiles moved

    07/27/2011 9:19:08 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 7 replies
    http://www.physorg.com ^ | 07-27-2011 | Staff + Provided by Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena
    Jena (Germany) Modern scientists would have loved the sight of early reptiles running across the Bromacker near Tambach-Dietharz (Germany) 300 million years ago. Unfortunately this journey through time is impossible. But due to Dr. Thomas Martens and his team from the Foundation Schloss Friedenstein Gotha numerous skeletons and footprints of early dinosaurs have been found and conserved there during the last forty years. "It is the most important find spot of primitive quadruped vertebrates from the Perm in Europe," says Professor Dr. Martin S. Fischer from the University Jena (Germany). The evolutionary biologist and his team together with the Gotha...
  • Image of ancient mammoth or mastodon found on bone (Florida 13,000bc)

    06/23/2011 8:06:42 PM PDT · by Islander7 · 16 replies
    AP ^ | June 23, 2011 | RANDOLPH E. SCHMID
    WASHINGTON (AP) — Some of the earliest Americans turn out to have been artists. A bone fragment at least 13,000 years old, with the carved image of a mammoth or mastodon, has been discovered in Florida, a new study reports. While prehistoric art depicting animals with trunks has been found in Europe, this may be the first in the Western Hemisphere, researchers report Wednesday in the Journal of Archaeological Science.
  • Extinct sea cow fossil found in Philippines

    06/06/2011 10:28:43 AM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 9 replies
    Yahoo ^ | 6/6/11 | AFP
    MANILA (AFP) – The bones of an extinct sea cow species that lived about 20 million years ago have been discovered in a cave in the Philippines by a team of Italian scientists, the expedition head said Monday. Several ribs and spine parts of the aquatic mammal were found in February and March in limestone rock above the waters of an underground river on the island of Palawan, said University of Florence geologist Leonardo Piccini. "The fossil is in the rock, in the cave. We cannot remove it and we don't want to extract it. We would like to wait...
  • 'Monstrously Big Ant' Fossil Found in Wyoming

    05/03/2011 9:41:13 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 156 replies
    LiveScience.com ^ | 5/3/11 | Stephanie Pappas
    Almost 50 million years ago, ants the size of hummingbirds roamed what is now Wyoming, a new fossil discovery reveals. These giant bugs may have crossed an Arctic land bridge between Europe and North America during a particularly warm period in Earth's history. At about 2 inches (5 cm) long, the specimen is a "monstrously big ant," said Bruce Archibald, a paleoentomologist at Simon Fraser University in British Columbia who reported the discovery today (May 3) in the journal Proceedings of the Royal Society B. Though fossils of loose giant ant wings have been found before in the United States,...
  • Largest Fossil Spider Found in Volcanic Ash

    04/21/2011 7:31:32 PM PDT · by greatdefender · 45 replies
    Yahoo! News ^ | Charles Q. Choi, LiveScience Contributor
    The largest fossil spider uncovered to date once ensnared prey back in the age of dinosaurs, scientists find. The spider, named Nephila jurassica, was discovered buried in ancient volcanic ash in Inner Mongolia, China. Tufts of hairlike fibers seen on its legs showed this 165-million-year-old arachnid to be the oldest known species of the largest web-weaving spiders alive today — the golden orb-weavers, or Nephila, which are big enough to catch birds and bats, and use silk that shines like gold in the sunlight. The fossil was about as large as its modern relatives, with a body one inch (2.5...
  • T. Rex More Hyena Than Lion

    03/09/2011 10:34:09 PM PST · by Immerito · 15 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | February 22, 2011 | Unknown
    T. Rex More Hyena Than Lion: Tyrannosaurus Rex Was Opportunistic Feeder, Not Top Predator, Paleontologists Say ScienceDaily (Feb. 22, 2011) — The ferocious Tyrannosaurus rex has been depicted as the top dog of the Cretaceous, ruthlessly stalking herds of duck-billed dinosaurs and claiming the role of apex predator, much as the lion reigns supreme in the African veld. But a new census of all dinosaur skeletons unearthed over a large area of eastern Montana shows that Tyrannosaurus was too numerous to have subsisted solely on the dinosaurs it tracked and killed with its scythe-like teeth. Instead, argue paleontologists John "Jack"...
  • Rare 89-Million-Year-Old Flying Reptile Fossil from Texas May Be World's Oldest Pteranodon

    03/09/2011 10:26:34 PM PST · by Immerito · 11 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | March 1, 2011 | Unknown
    ScienceDaily (Mar. 1, 2011) — Fossilized bones discovered in Texas from a flying reptile that died 89 million years ago may be the earliest occurrence of the prehistoric creature known as Pteranodon. Previously, Pteranodon bones have been found in Kansas, South Dakota and Wyoming in the Niobrara and Pierre geological formations. This likely Pteranodon specimen is the first of its kind found in Texas, according to paleontologist Timothy S. Myers at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, who identified the reptile. The specimen was discovered north of Dallas by an amateur fossil hunter who found various bones belonging to the left...
  • Thunder Thighs: New Dinosaur Had A Colossal Kick

    02/24/2011 4:05:30 AM PST · by edpc · 8 replies
    Live Science via Yahoo News ^ | 24 Feb 2011 | Charles Q. Choi
    Anyone who's ever thought they had a big butt had nothing on a dinosaur literally named "thunder thighs." Among the sauropods, the largest creatures to have ever walked the Earth, Brontomerus — "thunder thighs" in Greek — probably had the biggest thighs of them all, scientists revealed. Its unusually powerful back legs might have been used for super-kicks against rivals or would-be predators, they added. [Illustration of Brontomerus] Partial skeletons of Brontomerus mcintoshi were recovered in 1994 in a quarry in eastern Utah. (The dinosaur's species name, mcintoshi, is meant to honor of John "Jack" McIntosh, a retired physicist and...
  • Scientists say new human relative roamed widely in Asia

    12/25/2010 1:48:33 AM PST · by Islander7 · 21 replies · 2+ views
    Star Advertiser ^ | Dec 22, 2010 | MALCOLM RITTER
    NEW YORK — Scientists have recovered the DNA code of a human relative recently discovered in Siberia, and it delivered a surprise: This relative roamed far from the cave that holds its only known remains. By comparing the DNA to that of modern populations, scientists found evidence that these "Denisovans" from more than 30,000 years ago ranged all across Asia. They apparently interbred with the ancestors of people now living in Melanesia, a group of islands northeast of Australia.
  • Dozer Driver Makes Fossil Discovery of the Century

    11/23/2010 9:21:20 AM PST · by Squidpup · 63 replies · 2+ views
    FoxNews ^ | November 20, 2010 | Loren Grush
    An accidental discovery by a bulldozer driver has led to what may be the find of the century: an ice-age burial ground that could rival the famed La Brea tar pits. After two weeks of excavating ancient fossils at the Ziegler Reservoir near Snowmass Village, Colorado, scientists from the Denver Museum of Natural Science returned home Wednesday with their unearthed treasures in tow -- a wide array of fossils, insects and plant life that they say give a stunningly realistic view of what life was like when ancient, giant beasts lumbered across the Earth. Since the team’s arrival in mid-October,...
  • Obama could kill fossil fuels overnight with a nuclear dash for thorium

    08/29/2010 12:01:55 PM PDT · by Nachum · 55 replies
    Telegraph [UK] ^ | 8/29/10 | Ambrose Evans-Pritchard
    If Barack Obama were to marshal America’s vast scientific and strategic resources behind a new Manhattan Project, he might reasonably hope to reinvent the global energy landscape and sketch an end to our dependence on fossil fuels within three to five years. We could then stop arguing about wind mills, deepwater drilling, IPCC hockey sticks, or strategic reliance on the Kremlin. History will move on fast.
  • APNewsBreak: Hagel backing Pa.'s Sestak for Senate

    08/23/2010 2:15:27 PM PDT · by Justaham · 66 replies
    Former Nebraska Sen. Chuck Hagel, a Republican who has broken ranks in the past with the GOP, gave Democrat Joe Sestak his second major endorsement from moderates in a week in his bid for a hotly contested Senate seat in Pennsylvania. Hagel told The Associated Press on Monday that Sestak has demonstrated during his two terms in Congress that he puts the interests of the nation and his constituents ahead of his party. "I think he's exactly what our country needs more of. I think he's what the Senate needs more of _ courageous, independent thinking," Hagel said. "That's what...
  • Geology Picture of the Week, July 25-31, 2010: Petrified Wood

    07/31/2010 9:41:09 PM PDT · by cogitator · 9 replies · 2+ views
    Various
    I just decided to go in a different direction for a change this week. I hope the commercial entities don't mind a bit of low-cost advertising. Thin section Arizona Skies Meteoritesclick pic for 2x Sticks In Stones Lapidaryclick pic for 2x Ginkgo Gem Shop The Lone Star Mine Shaft
  • Ancient treasure comes home: 200-million-year-old fossil back in N.J.

    04/18/2010 2:47:00 PM PDT · by Coleus · 10 replies · 490+ views
    star ledger ^ | 04.11.10 | Brent Johnson
    For millions of years, Tany laid buried under layers of rock in what is now Hudson County. She was unearthed in 1979 by a trio of amateur fossil hunters in an abandoned quarry: a rare, complete skeleton of a primitive reptile — one that swam through waterways in the northeast as dinosaurs began to roam the planet. But in the decades since her discovery, Tany has been stored out of state, modestly displayed in the lobby of a New York research laboratory. Now, she’s back home. The fossil’s founders, Steven and Trini Stelz and James Leonard, recently donated the 200-million-year-old...
  • 'Sea monster' whale fossil unearthed

    06/30/2010 9:36:54 PM PDT · by shibumi · 18 replies
    BBC News ^ | June 30, 2010 | Pallab Ghosh
    Researchers have discovered the fossilised remains of an ancient whale with huge, fearsome teeth. Writing in the journal Nature, the scientists have dubbed the 12 million-year-old creature "Leviathan". It is thought to have been more than 17m long, and might have engaged in fierce battles with other giant sea creatures from the time. Leviathan was much like the modern sperm whale in terms of size and appearance. Continue reading the main story At the same time in the same waters was another monster... they might have fought each other Dr Christian de Muizon Natural History Museum, Paris But that is...
  • NASA team cites new evidence that meteorites from Mars contain ancient fossils

    05/04/2010 12:55:53 AM PDT · by Palter · 41 replies · 796+ views
    The Washington Post ^ | 04 May 2010 | Marc Kaufman
    NASA's Mars Meteorite Research Team reopened a 14-year-old controversy on extraterrestrial life last week, reaffirming and offering support for its widely challenged assertion that a 4-billion-year-old meteorite that landed thousands of years ago on Antarctica shows evidence of microscopic life on Mars. In addition to presenting research that they said disproved some of their critics, the scientists reported that additional Martian meteorites appear to house distinct and identifiable microbial fossils that point even more strongly to the existence of life. "We feel more confident than ever that Mars probably once was, and maybe still is, home to life," team leader...
  • Pictures: New Human Ancestor Fossils Found

    04/09/2010 2:38:53 PM PDT · by JoeProBono · 39 replies · 1,827+ views
    nationalgeographic ^ | April 8, 2010
    Remarkably well preserved for a two-million-year-old fossil, this child's skull belongs to Australopithecus sediba, a previously unknown species of ape-like creature that may have been a direct ancestor of modern humans, according to a new study in Science. Scientists think this particular Australopithecus sediba fossil is from a male between 8 and 13 years old. The child's fossils were found in the remnants of a subterranean South African cave system alongside the fossil remains of an adult female in her 30s. "It's the opinion of my colleagues and I that [A. sediba] may very well be the Rosetta stone that...
  • Fresh Tissues from Solid Rock

    04/09/2010 11:35:22 AM PDT · by lasereye · 51 replies · 731+ views
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 02/01/2010 | Brian Thomas, M.S.
    Fresh tissues continue to be found in supposedly millions-of-years-old fossils. These un-replaced, un-mineralized, still-soft tissues come from animals or plants that were preserved by some catastrophic event.1 Each specimen looks young, and a direct inference is that its host rock must also be dated as thousands, not millions, of years old. And the fresher the meat, the more ridiculous are the evolution-inspired claims of great antiquity for the rock in which it was discovered. These tissue finds are typically accompanied, in either the technical literature or science news, by the phrase "remarkable preservation." If one is to believe in the...
  • Fossil Find May Be 'Missing Link' in Human Evolution (Again? Yawn)

    04/07/2010 11:31:16 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 21 replies · 694+ views
    Fox News ^ | 04/05/2010
    A fossil skeleton of a child discovered in a cave system known as the Cradle of Humankind may represent a previously unknown stage in the evolution of man, The (London) Sunday Times reported. The skeleton, which is almost complete despite being two million years old, is believed to belong to one of the hominid groups that includes humans. Hominid fossil finds are usually little more than small bone fragments. Scientists hope such a complete find will help them to work out what our ancestors looked like and to determine key dates in their evolution from ape-man to man-ape. Experts who...
  • 'Rare' fossil of new dinosaur species found in US

    03/23/2010 7:43:10 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 23 replies · 790+ views
    AFP on Yahoo ^ | 3/23/10 | AFP
    WASHINGTON (AFP) – It had a body the size of a sheep, a long neck and tail, and lived some 185 million years ago. Scientists call this dinosaur find "a rare skeleton of a new species." Paleontologists unearthed the partial remains of the plant-eating creature, named Seitaad ruessi, in the red rocks of the Navajo Sandstone region of the western US state of Utah. The bones were found just below stone and adobe dwellings of the ancient Anasazi people in a site known as the Eagles Nest. Seitaad is an ancestor of the giant long-necked, long-tailed dinosaurs such as Diplodocus,...
  • In Fossil Find, 'Anaconda' Meets 'Jurassic Park'(Snake Devouring Baby Dinosaur Eggs)

    03/02/2010 9:37:54 AM PST · by Dallas59 · 43 replies · 1,584+ views
    NPR ^ | 2/02/2010 | NPR
    Scientists have discovered a macabre death scene that took place 67 million years ago. The setting was a nest, in which a baby dinosaur had just hatched from an egg, only to face an 11-foot-long snake waiting to devour it. The moment was frozen forever when, apparently, the nest was buried in a sudden avalanche of mud or sand and everything was fossilized. Scientists have discovered a macabre death scene that took place 67 million years ago. The setting was a nest, in which a baby dinosaur had just hatched from an egg, only to face an 11-foot-long snake waiting...
  • Giant predatory shark fossil unearthed in Kansas

    02/24/2010 9:51:06 AM PST · by JoeProBono · 60 replies · 2,143+ views
    bbc ^ | 24 February 2010 | Matt Walker
    The fossilised remains of a gigantic 10m-long predatory shark have been unearthed in Kansas, US. Scientists dug up a gigantic jawbone, teeth and scales belonging to the shark which lived 89 million years ago. The bottom-dwelling predator had huge tooth plates, which it likely used to crush large shelled animals such as giant clams. Palaeontologists already knew about the shark, but the new specimen suggests it was far bigger than previously thought. The scientists who made the discovery, published in the journal Cretaceous Research, last week also released details of other newly discovered giant plankton-eating fish that swam in prehistoric...
  • Fossil tracks record 'oldest land-walkers'

    01/07/2010 8:51:50 AM PST · by JoeProBono · 17 replies · 732+ views
    bbc ^ | 6 January 2010 | Jonathan Amos
    The oldest evidence of four-legged animals walking on land has been discovered in southeast Poland. Rocks from a disused quarry record the "footprints" of unknown creatures that lived about 397 million years ago. Scientists tell the journal Nature that the fossil trackways even retain the impressions left by the "toes" on the animals' feet. The team says the find means that land vertebrates appeared millions of years earlier than previously supposed. "This place has yielded what I consider to be some of the most exciting fossils I've ever encountered in my career as a palaeontologist," said team member Per Ahlberg...
  • Colossal 'sea monster' unearthed

    10/26/2009 11:28:31 PM PDT · by JoeProBono · 22 replies · 1,615+ views
    bbc ^ | 27 October 2009 | Rebecca Morelle
    The fossilised skull of a colossal "sea monster" has been unearthed along the UK's Jurassic Coast. The ferocious predator, which is called a pliosaur, terrorised the oceans 150 million years ago. The skull is 2.4m long, and experts say it could belong to one of the largest pliosaurs ever found: measuring up 16m in length. The fossil, which was found by a local collector, has been purchased by Dorset County Council. It was bought with money from the Heritage Lottery Fund, and it will now be scientifically analysed, prepared and then put on public display at Dorset County Museum. Palaeontologist...
  • Hyped fossil 'link' just a big boner (another disappointing missing link)

    10/23/2009 10:55:52 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 33 replies · 1,048+ views
    New York Post ^ | 10/23/2009 | Malcolm Ritter
    Remember Ida, the fossil discovery announced last May with its own book and TV documentary? A publicity blitz called it "the link" that would reveal the earliest evolutionary roots of monkeys, apes and humans. Experts protested that Ida wasn't even a close relative. And now a new analysis supports their reaction. In fact, Ida is as far removed from the monkey-ape-human ancestry as a primate could be, says an expert at Stony Brook University on Long Island. Professor Erik Seiffert and his colleagues compared 360 specific anatomical features of 117 living and extinct primate species to draw up a family...
  • 'Missing Link' Primate Fossil Debunked

    10/21/2009 9:36:09 PM PDT · by bogusname · 39 replies · 1,762+ views
    Discovery News ^ | Oct. 21, 2009 | Malcolm Ritter
    Remember Ida, the fossil discovery announced last May with its own book and TV documentary? A publicity blitz called it "the link" that would reveal the earliest evolutionary roots of monkeys, apes and humans. Experts protested that Ida wasn't even a close relative. And now a new analysis supports their reaction...
  • Prehistoric titanic-snake jungles laughed at global warming

    10/20/2009 7:12:58 AM PDT · by snarkpup · 12 replies · 828+ views
    The Register ^ | 13th October 2009 12:35 GMT | Lewis Page
    Rainforest similar to ours flourished at 3-5° hotterFossil boffins say that dense triple-canopy rainforests, home among other things to gigantic one-tonne boa constrictors, flourished millions of years ago in temperatures 3-5°C warmer than those seen today - as hot as some of the more dire global-warming projections.The new fossil evidence comes from the Cerrejón coal mine in Colombia, previously the location where the remains of the gigantic 40-foot Titanoboa cerrejonensis were discovered. The snake's discoverers attracted flak from global-warming worriers at the time for saying that the cold-blooded creature would only have been able to survive in jungles a good...
  • Pterodactyl fossil fills gaps in evolutionary tale

    10/14/2009 5:06:10 AM PDT · by JoeProBono · 15 replies · 1,339+ views
    Scientists say a very rare find of some 20 fossilized pterodactyls has produced the first clear evidence of a controversial theory of evolution.The fossils were found in north-east China earlier this year, embedded in rock dating back 160 million years, and have been called "Darwinopterus" after the renowned naturalist Charles Darwin. The creature's discovery has astounded scientists because their age puts them within two recognized groups of pterodactyls -- primitive long-tailed forms and advanced short-tail forms -- and they display characteristics of both. The combination of features indicates that the primitive pterodactyls evolved relatively quickly, and that certain groups of...