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Keyword: fossils

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  • Fossils Destroy Human Evolution Story Again

    02/22/2017 11:14:17 AM PST · by fishtank · 64 replies
    Creation-Evolution Headlines ^ | February 16, 2017 | Creation-Evolution Headlines staff
    Fossils Destroy Human Evolution Story Again Posted on February 16, 2017 The old picture of human evolution is in tatters again. “Your face is probably more primitive than a Neanderthal’s.” That surprising headline on the BBC News summarizes the radical change in thinking of leading evolutionary paleoanthropologists about so-called ‘modern’ humans: i.e., those members of our genus Homo that have been unblessed by the self-serving species name sapiens (“the wise”). If you read Richard Gray’s article without the assumption of evolution, you may find yourself questioning the sapience of some moderns.
  • Ancient, scary and alien-looking specimen forms a rarity in the insect world -- a new order

    01/27/2017 5:59:49 PM PST · by JimSEA · 51 replies
    Science Daily ^ | January 25, 2017 | Oregon State University
    Researchers at Oregon State University have discovered a 100-million-year-old insect preserved in amber with a triangular head, almost-alien and "E.T.-like" appearance and features so unusual that it has been placed in its own scientific "order" -- an incredibly rare event. There are about 1 million described species of insects, and millions more still to be discovered, but every species of insect on Earth has been placed in only 31 existing orders. Now there's one more. The findings have been published in the journal Cretaceous Research and describe this small, wingless female insect that probably lived in fissures in the bark...
  • Dinosaur discovery casts light on final flurry of animals' evolution

    11/10/2016 1:56:32 PM PST · by JimSEA · 9 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 11/10/2016 | University of Edinburgh
    A dinosaur fossil that almost went undiscovered is giving scientists valuable clues about a family of creatures that flourished just before the mass extinction. The bird-like species, found at a building site in southern China and nicknamed the 'Mud Dragon', was preserved almost intact, lying on its front with its wings and neck outstretched. Scientists speculate that the creature may have died in this pose after becoming mired in mud about 66-72 million years ago. Scientists have named the new species Tongtianlong limosus, meaning 'muddy dragon on the road to heaven'. The two-legged animal belongs to a family of feathered...
  • Forget what you thought dinosaurs looked like — this adorable bird–lizard just changed the game

    09/16/2016 11:45:38 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 21 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 9/15/2016 | L. Dodgson
    Paleontologists have teamed up with a paleoartist to create a model which challenges everything you thought you knew about the typical dinosaur. Dr. Jacob Vinther ofa Psittacosaurus — nicknamed a "parrot-lizard" — is about the size of a turkey, has bristles on its tail and a birdlike beak. In other words, a bit weird, but also pretty cute. It's also quite likely that the animal had feathers and a horn on each cheek, the experts say. Quite aptly, Psittacosaurus belongs to the group ceratopsians, which basically means "horned faces" in Greek. It's the same group that contains Triceratops. The scientists...
  • Life thrived on young Earth: scientists discover 3.7-billion-year-old fossils

    08/31/2016 4:24:39 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 53 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 8/31/2016 | Allen P. Nutman, et al
    In an extraordinary find, a team of Australian researchers have uncovered the world's oldest fossils in a remote area of Greenland, capturing the earliest history of the planet and demonstrating that life on Earth emerged rapidly in the planet's early years. Led by the University of Wollongong's (UOW) Professor Allen Nutman, the team discovered 3.7-billion-year-old stromatolite fossils in the world's oldest sedimentary rocks, in the Isua Greenstone Belt along the edge of Greenland's icecap. The findings are outlined in a study published in Nature, with co-authors Associate Professor Vickie Bennett from The Australian National University (ANU), the University of New...
  • 'Descendents Of Dragon' Confirmed At Laiohe River Valley

    02/26/2004 12:30:26 PM PST · by blam · 51 replies · 1,717+ views
    Peoples Daily ^ | 2-26-2004
    'Descendants of the Dragon' confirmed at the Liaohe River ValleyIn thousands of years, the Chinese people have been deeming themselves as "the descendant of the dragon" though there is no enough solid proof to support the statement. But in this year, with continually findings of dragons in archeological work at the Liaohe River Valley, the statement that the Chinese people are "the descendant of the dragon" is further confirmed. In thousands of years, the Chinese people have been deeming themselves as "the descendant of the dragon" though there is no enough solid proof to support the statement. But in this...
  • Fuel Me or Fool Me

    07/09/2016 7:19:18 AM PDT · by rktman · 13 replies
    townhall.com ^ | 7/9/2016 | Paul Driessen
    Fool me once, the adage says, shame on you. Fool me twice, shame on me. The reality-based fossil fuel version states: Fuel me for 150 years, fuel me forever – or at least until creative, entrepreneurial spirits can devise reliable, affordable alternatives. The 2016 Democratic Party would change this adage to read: Fuel me for 150 years, fuel me never again. Bernie Sanders and Hillary Clinton want to regulate drilling and fracking into oblivion, or ban them outright. Clinton also says she is“going to put a lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business.” The draft Democratic Party...
  • Microbes make tubular microtunnels on Earth and perhaps on Mars

    05/04/2016 9:17:42 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 8 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 5/4/2016 | Matthew P.C. Nikitczuk
    Tubular microtunnels believed to be the trace fossils formed by microbes inhabiting volcanic rock interiors have only been reported in oceanic and subglacial settings. This is the first observation of such features in basaltic volcanic glass erupted in a continental lake environment, the Fort Rock volcanic field. As a result, the record of subsurface microbial activity in the form of endolithic microborings is prospectively expanded. Our understanding of the range of environments and conditions that microtunnels can form in is enhanced along with our knowledge of potentially habitable environments on Earth and beyond. The Fort Rock volcanic field has analogous...
  • Radiometric backflip: Bird footprints overturn ‘dating certainty’

    04/18/2016 10:55:02 AM PDT · by fishtank · 26 replies
    Creation Ministries International ^ | 4-18-16 | Jonathan O'Brien
    Radiometric backflip: Bird footprints overturn ‘dating certainty’ by Jonathan O'Brien Using well-known radioisotope technology, scientists dated the Santo Domingo rock formation in Argentina at 212 million years old. This happened to agree well with a nearby geologic formation that was also radiometrically dated.1 The radiometric date of the Santo Domingo formation also agreed with the dating based on fossil wood found entombed in the rock. This wood came from an extinct species of tree conventionally believed to have existed around 200 million years ago. Well-preserved and abundant tracks were also found in the rock, similar in appearance to bird tracks....
  • Prehistoric peepers give vital clue in solving 300 million year old 'Tully Monster'

    04/13/2016 4:03:37 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 12 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 4/12/2016 | University of Leicester
    A 300 million year-old fossil mystery has been solved by a research team led by the University of Leicester, which has identified that the ancient 'Tully Monster' was a vertebrate -- due to the unique characteristics of its eyes. Tullimonstrum gregarium or as it is more commonly known the 'Tully Monster', found only in coal quarries in Illinois, Northern America, is known to many Americans because its alien-like image can be seen on the sides of large U-haul™ trailers which ply the freeways. Despite being an iconic image -- a fossil with a striped body, large tail, a pair of...
  • Evolutionary leap from fins to legs was surprisingly simple

    03/08/2016 10:19:08 AM PST · by JimSEA · 115 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 3/8/16 | Univ. of Lincoln
    New research reveals that the limbs of the earliest four-legged vertebrates, dating back more than 360 million years ago, were no more structurally diverse than the fins of their aquatic ancestors. The new finding overturns long-held views that the origin of vertebrates with legs (known as tetrapods) triggered an increase in the anatomical diversity of their skeletons. The research was carried out by Dr Marcello Ruta from the School of Life Sciences at the University of Lincoln and Professor Matthew Wills from the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath in the UK. The authors found that fish...
  • Montana Officials Want Dollar Value On Dinosaur Fossils

    01/04/2016 9:45:28 PM PST · by This_far · 19 replies
    AP / Montana Standard ^ | January 03, 2016 9:30 pm | AP
    BOZEMAN (AP) - Montana State University is trying to put a value on dinosaur bones after state auditors said they need it for insurance policies, despite opposition from Museum of the Rockies' dinosaur experts who say it's unethical and dangerous to treat scientific research like it is marketable.
  • Latest study suggests early human dispersal into Spain through Strait of Gibraltar

    01/02/2016 11:49:06 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Popular Archaeology, Journal of Human Evolution ^ | Saturday, January 2, 2016 | editors
    Most recent dating places one wave of human dispersal out of Africa into southeastern Spain at almost one million years ago. Using state-of-the-art dating methodologies, a team of scientists have obtained or confirmed a date range between .9 and .85 Mya (million years ago) as a time when a species of Old World monkey (Theropithecus) and an early species of human occupied the cave site of Cueva Victoria in southeastern Spain. It is a location not far from where many scientists have hypothesized that humans may have crossed over into Europe from North Africa through the Strait of Gibraltar at...
  • How To See A Mass Extinction If Its Right In Front Of You

    12/18/2015 5:00:30 AM PST · by arthurus · 12 replies
    Writing in the journal Nature the week of Dec. 16, Yale's Pincelli Hull and colleagues from the Smithsonian Institution argue that modern extinction rates may be a poor measure of whether we're in the midst of a mass extinction event today -- something many scientists suspect may be happening. Instead, Hull and her co-authors contend, the best way to see a mass extinction in real time is by studying changes in species and ecosystems.
  • Influence of Earth's history on the dawn of modern birds

    12/13/2015 11:06:28 AM PST · by JimSEA · 25 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 12/11/2015 | American Museum of Natural History
    New research led by the American Museum of Natural History reveals that the evolution of modern birds was greatly shaped by the history of our planet's geography and climate. The DNA-based work, published today in the journal Science Advances, finds that birds arose in what is now South America around 90 million years ago, and radiated extensively around the time of the Cretaceous-Paleogene extinction event that killed off the non-avian dinosaurs. The new research suggests that birds in South America survived this event and then started moving to other parts of the world via multiple land bridges while diversifying during...
  • Extinct 3-horned palaeomerycid ruminant found in Spain (Fossil)

    12/07/2015 10:56:30 AM PST · by JimSEA · 11 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 12/02/2015 | PLOS
    The extinct three-horned palaeomerycid ruminant, Xenokeryx amidalae, found in Spain, may be from the same clade as giraffes, according to a study published December 2, 2015 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Israel M. Sánchez from the Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales-CSIC, Madrid, Spain, and colleagues. Palaeomerycids, now extinct, were strange three-horned Eurasian Miocene ruminants known through fossils from Spain to China. In this article, the authors classify the palaeomerycid to their clade based on shared characteristics with the best-known species of the group and reassess their phylogenetic position among ruminants, which is currently disputed. The authors use well-preserved...
  • Pre-Flood Human Fossils Revisited

    11/02/2015 10:46:56 AM PST · by fishtank · 19 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | Nov. 2015 | Brian Thomas
    Pre-Flood Human Fossils Revisited by Brian Thomas, M.S. * Evidence for Creation Where are the fossils from the people who lived before the Flood? A 1992 ICR article supplied seven responses to this question.1 Land animals and humans have a low fossilization potential. We would expect few fossils from them. If the Flood buried a multitude of people and distributed their bodies among the world’s sedimentary rocks, finding even one human fossil in such a vast area would be unlikely. Underwater mudflows during the Flood would have ground human bones to powder. Floodwaters receding off continents might have likewise pulverized...
  • Why are there whale fossils in California mountains?

    09/22/2015 11:17:09 AM PDT · by george76 · 168 replies
    The Christian Science Monitor. ^ | September 21, 2015 | Story Hinckley,
    Construction workers in California's Santa Cruz mountains were subject to a surprise delay last week when a team of archaeologists took over the site to remove an ancient whale fossil. The project site was expected to have a high potential for archaeological finds, so a monitor was assigned to the Scotts Valley development and found the fossil amid construction vehicles on Sept. 4. This project site is not the only one in California with fossils ... Since the 19th century, paleontologists have been studying the “Sharktooth Hill Bone Bed” near Bakersfield, California, where fossils and bones of ancient whales, seals,...
  • Five amazing extinct creatures that aren't dinosaurs

    06/19/2015 7:19:56 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 28 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | 06-18-2015 | Staff Source: The Conversation
    The release of Jurassic World has reignited our love for palaeontology. Many of us share a longing to understand the dinosaurs that roamed the Earth long before we arrived. But palaeontology is a discipline much broader than this. Dinosaurs dominated the land for 135 million years, but what happened during the rest of the Earth's 4.6 billion-year history? The role of palaeontologists past and present has been to unravel the mysteries of life on Earth, and in doing so they've found a lot more than just dinosaur bones. -------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- 1. The spiky-backed ocean dweller: Right side up? Credit: Natural Math/flickr,...
  • Video: Research team discovers plant fossils previously unknown to Antarctica

    05/13/2015 11:13:48 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 8 replies
    National Science Foundation ^ | 4/28/2015 | Eric Gulbranson
    Erik Gulbranson, a visiting professor at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, trudges up a steep ridge overlooking his field camp of mountain tents and pyramid-shaped Scott tents in Antarctica's McMurdo Dry Valleys. A brief hike nearly to the top of a shorter ridge ends at the quarry, where picks and hammers have chopped out a ledge of sorts in the slate-grey hillside. Sometime about 220 million years ago, a meandering stream flowed here and plants grew along its banks. Something, as yet unknown, caused sediment to flood the area rapidly, which helped preserve the plants. Gulbranson splits open a grey slab...