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Keyword: gammarays

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  • Mysterious Energy Bursts May Be Death Knell of Gigantic Stars

    04/17/2013 2:21:13 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 2 replies
    Space.com ^ | 4/16/13 | Tanya Lewis
    An artist’s impression of the stars creating gamma-ray bursts. The background blue star is the progenitor of a standard long duration gamma-ray burst. A new type of powerful, long-lasting explosion deep in space may be the death knell of gigantic stars, scientists say. Star explosions (called supernovas) can give off high-powered flashes of radiation known as gamma-ray bursts. These bursts usually fall into two categories: ones that last less than two seconds, and ones that last for several minutes. But this new type of explosion can create a gamma-ray burst that goes on for much longer — up to several...
  • Alien Species Living In The Inner Milky Way Could Be In Danger

    06/26/2012 12:27:17 AM PDT · by Windflier · 58 replies
    Message To Eagle ^ | 23 March 2012 | Staff
    Few people doubt there is intelligent alien life in the Milky Way galaxy, but where can we expect to find it? Astronomers think that the inner sector of the Milky Way Galaxy may be the most likely to support habitable worlds. Unfortunately some of these places are also most dangerous to all life-forms. According to Michael Gowanlock of NASA's Astrobiology Institute, and his Trent University colleagues David Patton and Sabine McConnel, habitability in the Milky Way can be based on three factors: supernova rates, metallicity (the abundance of heavy elements, used as a proxy for planet formation) and the time...
  • Violent Past: Young sun withstood a supernova blast

    10/27/2013 6:03:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 61 replies
    Science News ^ | May 23, 2007 | Ron Cowen
    Martin Bizzarro of the University of Copenhagen and his colleagues set out to determine the amount of iron in the early solar system. To do so, they measured nickel-60, a decay product of iron-60, in eight meteorites known to have formed at different times during the first 3 million years of the solar system. The meteorites that formed more than about a million years after the start of the solar system contain significantly more nickel-60 than do those that formed earlier, the team found. In a neighborhood of young stars, only a supernova could have produced iron-60, the parent of...
  • Hints of a breakdown of relativity theory?

    08/28/2007 11:24:31 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies · 263+ views
    Scientific American 'blogs ^ | August 22, 2007 | George Musser
    The team studied two gamma-ray flares in mid-2005 from the black hole at the heart of the galaxy Markarian 501. They compared gammas in two energy ranges, from 1.2 to 10 tera-electron-volts (TeV) and from 0.25 to 0.6 TeV. The first group arrived on Earth four minutes later than the second. One team member, physicist John Ellis of CERN, says: "The significance of the time lag is above 95%, and the magnitude of the effect is beyond the sensitivity of previous experiments." Either the high-energy gammas were released later (because of how they were generated) or they propagated more slowly.
  • Mysterious radiation burst recorded in tree rings

    06/04/2012 10:58:45 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 46 replies
    Nature ^ | Sunday, June 3, 2012 | Richard A. Lovett
    Just over 1,200 years ago, the planet was hit by an extremely intense burst of high-energy radiation of unknown cause, scientists studying tree-ring data have found. The radiation burst, which seems to have hit between AD 774 and AD 775, was detected by looking at the amounts of the radioactive isotope carbon-14 in tree rings that formed during the AD 775 growing season in the Northern Hemisphere. The increase in 14C levels is so clear that the scientists, led by Fusa Miyake, a cosmic-ray physicist from Nagoya University in Japan, conclude that the atmospheric level of 14C must have jumped...
  • Did An 8th Century Gamma Ray Burst Irradiate Earth?

    01/21/2013 7:50:06 AM PST · by blam · 51 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 1-21-2013 | Science Daily
    Did An 8th Century Gamma Ray Burst Irradiate Earth?Science DailyJanuary 21,2013 A nearby short duration gamma-ray burst may be the cause of an intense blast of high-energy radiation that hit the Earth in the 8th century, according to new research led by astronomers Valeri Hambaryan and Ralph NeuhÓ“user. The two scientists, based at the Astrophysics Institute of the University of Jena in Germany, publish their results in the journal Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society. In 2012 scientist Fusa Miyake announced the detection of high levels of the isotope Carbon-14 and Beryllium-10 in tree rings formed in 775 CE,...
  • Researcher points to Sun as likely source of eighth-century 'Charlemagne event'

    12/12/2012 5:34:52 AM PST · by Renfield · 29 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 11-20-2012
    (Phys.org)—Until recently, the years 774 and 775 were best known for Charlemagne's victory over the Lombards. But earlier this year, a team of scientists in Japan discovered a baffling spike in carbon-14 deposits within the rings of cedar trees that matched those same years. Because cosmic rays are tied to carbon-14 concentrations, scientists around the world have wondered about the cause: a nearby supernova, a gamma ray burst in the Milky Way or an intense superflare emanating from the Sun? Now, Adrian Melott, professor of physics and astronomy at the University of Kansas and Brian Thomas, KU alumnus and professor...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- Gamma Rays from Galactic Center Dark Matter?

    03/10/2014 5:36:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    NASA ^ | March 10, 2014 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: What is creating the gamma rays at the center of our Galaxy? Excitement is building that one answer is elusive dark matter. Over the past few years the orbiting Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has been imaging our Galaxy's center in gamma-rays. Repeated detailed analyses indicate that the region surrounding the Galactic center seems too bright to be accounted by known gamma-ray sources. A raw image of the Galactic Center region in gamma-rays is shown above on the left, while the image on the right has all known sources subtracted -- leaving an unexpected excess. An exciting hypothetical model that...
  • Scientists witness massive gamma-ray burst, don't understand it

    11/22/2013 7:53:51 AM PST · by Red Badger · 35 replies
    Christian Science Monitor ^ | November 21, 2013 | By Pete Spotts, Staff writer
    An exploded star some 3.8 billion light-years away is forcing scientists to overhaul much of what they thought they knew about gamma-ray bursts – intense blasts of radiation triggered, in this case, by a star tens of times more massive than the sun that exhausted its nuclear fuel, exploded, then collapsed to form a black hole. Last April, gamma rays from the blast struck detectors in gamma-ray observatories orbiting Earth, triggering a frenzy of space- and ground-based observations. Many of them fly in the face of explanations researchers have developed during the past 30 years for the processes driving the...
  • Israeli EMP Attack Could Throw Iran 'Back to Stone Age'

    09/09/2012 3:22:11 AM PDT · by Eleutheria5 · 106 replies
    Arutz Sheva ^ | 9/9/12 | Tzvi Ben Gedalyahu
    Israel might attack Iran by using electromagnetic impulses (EMP) that could cripple the country by shutting down its electronics and sending the Islamic Republic “back to the Stone Age,” The London Sunday Times reported. EMP causes non-lethal gamma energy to react with the magnetic field and produces a powerful electromagnetic shock wave that can destroy electronic devices, especially those used in Iran’s nuclear plants. The shock wave would knock out Iran’s power grid and communications systems for transport and financial services, leading to economic collapse. The “back to the Stone Age” tactic was proposed in the right-wing publication Israel National...
  • New study shows how gamma-ray bursts could end life on Earth

    10/09/2011 8:28:11 PM PDT · by smokingfrog · 30 replies
    dailymail.co.uk ^ | 8 Oct 2011 | Daily Mail Reporter
    New research suggests the continuation of life on Earth depends on massive explosions on the other side of the galaxy. The explosions, gamma-ray bursts thought to occur when two stars collide, can release tons of high-energy gamma-ray radiation into space. Scientists believe they have already played a part in some the planet's extinctions. They say the blasts could be contributing to the depletion of the Earth's ozone layer. Brian Thomas, of Washburn University, in Topeka, Kansas, said: 'We find that a kind of gamma-ray burst — a short gamma-ray burst — is probably more significant than a longer gamma-ray burst....
  • Brightest gamma ray on Earth -- for a safer, healthier world

    09/19/2011 11:34:06 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 25 replies
    http://www.physorg.com ^ | 19 Sep 11 | Provided by University of Strathclyde
    The brightest gamma ray beam ever created- more than a thousand billion times more brilliant than the sun- has been produced in research led at the University of Strathclyde- and could open up new possibilities for medicine. Physicists have discovered that ultra-short duration laser pulses can interact with ionised gas to give off beams that are so intense they can pass through 20 cm of lead and would take 1.5 m of concrete to be completely absorbed. The ray could have several uses, such as in medical imaging, radiotherapy and radioisotope production for PET (positron emission tomography) scanning. The source...
  • T Pyxidis Soon To Be A Type Ia Supernova

    01/05/2010 4:39:06 AM PST · by PeaceBeWithYou · 30 replies · 1,472+ views
    Space Daily ^ | Jan 05, 2010 | Staff
    Astronomers have uncovered evidence that a massive, explosive white dwarf star in a binary star system with a Sun-like star in our Milky Way Galaxy is growing in mass and is much closer to our solar system than previously thought. The report is being presented by Drs. Edward M. Sion, Patrick Godon and student Timothy McClain of Villanova University at the 215th meeting of the American Astronomical Society in Washington, DC. This result is of special interest because it may shed light on the still unidentified type of stellar objects that explode as Type Ia supernovae, the kind of supernova...
  • NASA'S Fermi Telescope Unveils a Dozen New Pulsars

    02/03/2009 9:07:48 AM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 11 replies · 385+ views
    NASA ^ | 01.06.09 | Francis Reddy NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center
    GREENBELT, Md. -- NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has discovered 12 new gamma-ray-only pulsars and has detected gamma-ray pulses from 18 others. The finds are transforming our understanding of how these stellar cinders work. "We know of 1,800 pulsars, but until Fermi we saw only little wisps of energy from all but a handful of them," says Roger Romani of Stanford University, Calif. "Now, for dozens of pulsars, we're seeing the actual power of these machines."
  • Space telescope recycled for bomb detection

    05/10/2008 12:12:36 AM PDT · by neverdem · 5 replies · 209+ views
    Nature News ^ | 9 May 2008 | Eric Hand
    Compton Gamma Ray Observatory equipment helps to sniff out radioactive sources. Remnants of the Compton Gamma Ray Observatory (pictured), are being used in other fields.NASA The 9-year mission of NASA’s Compton Gamma Ray Observatory ended in 2000 with a plunge into the Pacific Ocean. But its spare parts are living on — as a detector of dirty bombs. James Ryan, an astrophysicist at the University of New Hampshire in Durham, has recycled parts from one of the space telescope’s old instruments, realizing that they can work just as well pointing horizontally as they did vertically up into the heavens. The...
  • High Energy Gamma Rays Go Slower Than the Speed of Light?

    10/04/2007 9:33:31 PM PDT · by annie laurie · 12 replies · 1,172+ views
    Universe Today ^ | October 3rd, 2007 | Fraser Cain
    The speed of light is the speed of light, and that's that. Right? Well, maybe not. Try and figure this out. Astronomers studying radiation coming from a distant galaxy found that the high energy gamma rays arrived a few minutes after the lower-energy photons, even though they were emitted at the same time. If true, this result would overturn Einstein's theory of relativity, which says that all photons should move at the speed of light. Uh oh Einstein. The discovery was made using the new MAGIC (Major Atmospheric Gamma-ray Imaging Cherenkov) telescope, located on a mountain top on the Canary...
  • The Milky Way’s Pinball Wizard

    03/06/2007 10:21:46 AM PST · by NormsRevenge · 5 replies · 316+ views
    Space.com ^ | 3/6/07 | Jeanna Bryner
    In a cosmic game of pinball, black holes fling high-energy protons into space, where they zigzag around at near light-speeds before smashing into low-energy protons, finds a new study. Then the collisions send bursts of gamma rays flying out from the center of our galaxy, which explains for the first time the mechanism for the high-energy jets first spotted in 2004. This proton-slinging could explain more than this cataclysmic light show deep in our galaxy. The scientists suggest other black holes in the universe could rely on the pinball mechanism to produce enormous jets of light. “Our galaxy's central supermassive...
  • Mini Black Holes Might Reveal 5th Dimension

    06/26/2006 8:22:41 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 26 replies · 962+ views
    Space.com ^ | 6/25/06 | Ker Than
    A space telescope scheduled for launch in 2007 will be sensitive enough to detect theoretical miniature black holes lurking within our solar system, scientists say. By doing so, it could test an exotic five-dimensional theory of gravity that competes with Albert Einstein's General Theory of Relativity. That is, of course, if the tiny black holes actually exist. The idea, recently detailed online in the journal Physical Review D, is being proposed by Charles Keeton, a physicist at Rutgers University in New Jersey, and Arlie Petters of Duke University in North Carolina. Branes The Randall-Sundrum braneworld model, named after the scientists...
  • Trucker charged in drug arrest (load of tomatoes should not contain white powder)

    09/21/2005 4:13:30 AM PDT · by Cowman · 27 replies · 639+ views
    Gainesville Sun ^ | September 20, 2005 | Deborah Ball
    Trucker charged in drug arrest By DEBORAH BALL Sun staff writer Something about a California's man cargo of tomatoes made agriculture officers leery during their inspection of his tractor-trailer at an interdiction station on Interstate 10 in Suwannee County Friday. But it wasn't the tomatoes that raised the officers' suspicions. Faulty paperwork led to a search of the cargo and the discovery of 243 pounds of cocaine inside the trailer, Florida Agriculture and Consumer Services Commissioner Charles H. Bronson announced Monday. Gabriel Hernandez Ramos, 36, of Oceanside, Calif., was arrested on charges of cocaine trafficking after officers with the department's...
  • Did a gamma-ray burst devastate life on Earth?

    09/24/2003 2:05:01 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 27 replies · 301+ views
    Eurekalert ^ | 9/24/03 | Jeff Hecht
    A DEVASTATING burst of gamma-rays may have caused one of Earth's worst mass extinctions, 443 million years ago. A team of astrophysicists and palaeontologists says the pattern of trilobite extinctions at that time resembles the expected effects of a nearby gamma-ray burst (GRB). Although other experts have greeted the idea with some scepticism, most agree that it deserves further investigation. GRBs are the most powerful explosions known. As giant stars collapse into black holes at the end of their lives, they fire incredibly intense pulses of gamma rays from their poles that can be detected even from across the universe...
  • Scientists Study Ancient Gamma Rays

    09/23/2003 12:01:51 PM PDT · by bedolido · 15 replies · 362+ views
    Charlotte Observer ^ | 09/23/03 | Staff Writer
    LOS ALAMOS, N.M. - A new satellite could offer more information into the gamma ray bursts that occurred billions of years ago. Scientists at Los Alamos National Laboratory discovered the strange phenomenon 30 years ago, but much about it - such as why they happen - remains mysterious. In May 2004, when a new satellite called SWIFT launches, they might finally be able to unravel some of the mysteries about gamma ray bursts. "We've had to create an explanation to fit what we're seeing, rather than understanding what gamma ray bursts are by predicting them," said Ed Fenimore, a Los...
  • US military pioneers death ray bomb

    08/14/2003 9:53:52 AM PDT · by bedolido · 88 replies · 392+ views
    Guardian ^ | 08/14/03 | David Adam and Suzanne Goldenberg
    American military scientists are developing a weapon which kills by delivering an enormous burst of high-energy gamma rays, it is claimed today. The bomb, which produces little fallout, blurs the distinction between conventional and nuclear weapons, and experts have already warned it could spark a new arms race. The science behind the gamma ray bomb is still in its infancy, and technical problems mean it could be decades before the devices are developed. But the Pentagon is taking the project seriously. The plans are getting under way at a time when the Bush administration is seeking ways to expand its...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day 5-17-02

    05/16/2002 9:45:27 PM PDT · by petuniasevan · 11 replies · 270+ views
    NASA ^ | 5-17-02 | Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell
    Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2002 May 17 Gamma-Ray Burst, Supernova Bump Image Credit: S. Kulkarni, J. Bloom, P. Price, Caltech - NRAO GRB Collaboration Explanation: On the 21st of November 2001, satellites detected yet another burst of gamma-rays from the cosmos. While this flash of high-energy photons lasted for less than a minute, eager astronomers have been following the fading optical light from the location of the burst source ever since. Seen...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day 4-6-02

    04/05/2002 9:42:01 PM PST · by petuniasevan · 3 replies · 328+ views
    NASA ^ | 4-6-02 | Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell
    Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2002 April 6 Vintage Gamma Rays Credit: ESA / IAS / CEA-SACLAY Explanation: Gamma-rays are the most energetic form of electromagnetic radiation. But these high energy photons penetrate and interact in normal materials and cannot be focused by lenses and mirrors like those in optical telescopes. So how do you make an image in gamma-ray light? One way is to use a patterned mask of material which can...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day 4-5-02

    04/04/2002 8:32:47 PM PST · by petuniasevan · 10 replies · 318+ views
    NASA ^ | 4-5-02 | Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell
    Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2002 April 5 Gamma-Ray Burst Afterglow: Supernova Connection Credit: HST Image: D.W. Fox, J.S. Bloom, S.R. Kulkarni (Caltech), et al. XMM Result: J.N. Reeves, D. Watson, J.P. Osborne (University of Leicester), et al. Explanation: What causes the mysterious gamma-ray bursts? Indicated in this Hubble Space Telescope exposure of an otherwise unremarkable field in the constellation Crater, is the dwindling optical afterglow of a gamma-ray burst first detected by...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day 3-09-02

    03/11/2002 12:14:08 AM PST · by petuniasevan · 318+ views
    NASA ^ | 3-09-02 | Robert Nemiroff and Jerry Bonnell
    Astronomy Picture of the Day Discover the cosmos! Each day a different image or photograph of our fascinating universe is featured, along with a brief explanation written by a professional astronomer. 2002 March 9 A Quasar Portrait Gallery Credit J. Bahcall (IAS, Princeton), M. Disney (Univ. Wales), NASA Explanation: Quasars (QUASi-stellAR objects) lie near the edge of the observable Universe. Discovered in 1963, astronomers were astounded that such objects could be visible across billions of light-years, as this implies they must emit prodigious amounts of energy. Where does the energy come from? Many believe the quasar's central engine is...