Free Republic 3rd Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $47,064
53%  
Woo hoo!! And we're now over 53%!! Thank you all very much!!

Gardening (Bloggers & Personal)

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • VANITY--Revamping the Wood Shed--What floor would you choose?

    08/05/2018 11:51:31 AM PDT · by AbolishCSEU · 40 replies
    We have a 12 x 24 foot lean to with a metal roof that is open on the North and South side. West wall is our garage and East wall is partially walled in. @e used to store our already seasoned/almost seasoned wood. We were using pallets before but as you know one wrong step and you do your ankle in. We are thinking of crusher run. Any advice?
  • 15 Light Veggie Korean Recipes Great For Summer!

    08/02/2018 3:22:50 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 18 replies
    One Green Planet ^ | August 2, 2018 | Staff
    These Korean dishes are vegan and so healthy! Try one of these dishes to share Korean cuisine with your family and friends. All of these delicious plant-based recipes are from the Food Monster App so make sure to check it out! 1. Fresh Korean Bean Sprout Salad This Fresh Korean Bean Sprout Salad is so crisp and delicious! This would be the perfect side for your next Korean feast!(continued)
  • Why Go "Off Grid" ...or "Off Slave Camp"

    07/19/2018 9:58:20 AM PDT · by amorphous · 4 replies
    "Ok, this isn't perfect. I just did one take, and could explain a few things better, clarify some stuff, but the overall idea comes through pretty well, I think. ...the important part." - J Mantzel Maybe he's eccentric, but an inspiration to me, especially concerning the amount of physical work he is willing to devote to his ideas and "out-of-the-box" thinking. Jamie and family currently live in a concrete dome structure, he built himself, among the mangrove islands of eastern Panama.
  • Is Vertical Farming Really the Future of Agriculture?

    07/05/2018 3:29:12 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 29 replies
    Eater ^ | July 3, 2018 | Steve Holt
    By now, the images of shelves full of perfect greens in hulking warehouses, stacked floor to ceiling in sterile environs and illuminated by high-powered LED lights, have become familiar. Food futurists and industry leaders say these high-tech vertical farming operations are the future of agriculture — able to operate anywhere, virtually invincible against pests, pathogens, and poor weather, and producing local, fresh, high-quality, lower-carbon food year-round. That future seemed one step closer to reality last year when San Francisco-based indoor farming startup Plenty, which grows a variety of salad and leafy greens hydroponically (without soil) and uses artificial lighting in...
  • MasterChef man John Torode on new Asian street food inspired cookbook

    06/08/2018 6:05:11 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 3 replies
    The Irish News ^ | June 9, 2018 | Lauren Taylor
    IT MIGHT not feel like it, but MasterChef veteran John Torode has been putting amateur cooks, and some famous faces, through their paces for 13 years on the popular BBC show. And while you might know him best for his TV partnership with co-host Gregg Wallace, he's also just published his 11th cookbook. The chef, 52, hails from Melbourne, Australia, but has been living in England for 27 years. His first culinary love, however, comes from much further afield – the street food of the Far East, which, Torode says, "the world is slowly falling in love with". His new...
  • Urban Agriculture Could Potentially Produce a Tenth of the World's Food.

    05/13/2018 1:19:31 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 30 replies
    Indy Week ^ | April 25, 2018 | Amanda Abrams
    This weekend, the Carolina Farm Stewardship Association is holding its popular Piedmont Farm Tour, which opens forty-five Triangle-area farms to the public. General interest in traditional farming is well-established here; this is the twenty-third year of the tour. But meanwhile, there's a rising fascination, in the region and around the nation, with another kind of farming: urban agriculture. There seems to be momentum behind the conviction that the collective cultivation of underutilized public spaces such as empty lots and rooftops just might save the world. Growing food in a city is hands-on and hyper-local, it requires few chemicals and gives...
  • The Cajun Democrat who could shake up the 2020 field

    03/21/2018 9:05:51 AM PDT · by rktman · 33 replies
    poltico.com ^ | 3/21/2018 | EDWARD-ISAAC DOVERE
    ‘I think he’s a remarkable talent … on the Bill Clinton, Barack Obama scale,’ says one admirer of New Orleans Mayor Mitch Landrieu.
  • The Davis-Bacon Act of 1931 and the Breakdown of the Black Family

    12/22/2017 6:54:39 AM PST · by x1stcav · 14 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 12/22/17 | Antonio R. Chaves
    Conservatives tend to regard the growing trend of single-parent families as an issue of personal responsibility, but what if the liberals who blame society are partly right? What if they can point their finger to a bill sponsored by two Republicans and signed into law by a Republican president? Prior to the 1930s, the labor force participation rate for black Americans was roughly equal to that of whites. Following passage of the first federal minimum wage in 1931, these rates started to diverge, and from the 1950s to the present, national black unemployment has remained at double the rate for...
  • Blessing or Curse? The Curious Case of Carbon Dioxide

    12/22/2017 5:52:40 AM PST · by x1stcav · 8 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 12/22/17 | Vijay Jayaraj
    How did CO2 -- the elixir of life -- turn out to be the evil gas of 21st century? The special interest in CO2 began when a handful of scientists, backed by political elements, proposed their hypothesis -- one which suggested that CO2 emission from anthropogenic sources, such as coal-fired plants, is the primary reason for what they allege is a dangerous increase in earth’s temperature. Despite the lack of observational evidence, political institutions popularized this hypothesis through state-sponsored research programs. In order to sustain their claims, these climate alarmists designed climate computer models to manufacture friendly results that supported...
  • Clinton Appointee Tosses Lawsuit Claiming Trump Violated Constitution’s Anti-Corruption Provisions

    12/22/2017 5:24:03 AM PST · by x1stcav · 17 replies
    The Stream ^ | 12/22/17 | Kevin Daley
    A federal court in New York City has dismissed a lawsuit against President Donald Trump that alleged his failure to divest from the Trump business empire violated anti-corruption provisions of the Constitution. U.S. District Judge George Daniels, a Clinton administration appointee, ruled Thursday that the case could not proceed because the plaintiffs could not prove that Trump’s actions tangibly harmed their businesses. The lawsuit was brought by Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW), an anti-Trump watchdog group formerly led by Clinton ally David Brock. A number of accomplished lawyers and legal scholars participated in the effort, including Professor...
  • Marco Rubio slams ‘anti-Americanism’ of UN; says it’s time to ‘reevaluate’ US funding

    12/22/2017 12:31:23 AM PST · by x1stcav · 16 replies
    Conservative Review ^ | 12/21/17 | Chris Pandolfo
    On Twitter, Sen. Rubio said it was time for a “reevaluation” of U.S. funding for the U.N. Senator Rubio’s suggestion follows comments by President Donald Trump threatening to cut off financial aid to countries that vote in favor of the U.N. resolution condemning American recognition of Jerusalem as Israel’s capital. “They take hundreds of millions of dollars and even billions of dollars, and then they vote against us. Well, we’re watching those votes. Let them vote against us. We’ll save a lot. We don’t care,” Trump told reporters at the White House Wednesday.
  • After student hangs Kate Steinle posters, university’s bias response office launches probe

    12/21/2017 7:24:01 AM PST · by x1stcav · 26 replies
    The College Fix ^ | 12/20/17 | Jennifer Kabbany
    A student at the University of California San Diego has been contacted to report to its Office for the Prevention of Harassment & Discrimination after hanging pro-Kate Steinle posters across the campus. On the evening of Dec. 7, Gregory Lu hung 150 posters of Steinle’s smiling face with the words “She had dreams too” in highly traversed areas across campus that other students typically hang items on, such as bulletin boards and the free speech area. Four days later, an investigator with the Office for the Prevention of Harassment & Discrimination emailed Lu asking to meet with him. “Our office...
  • Arizona seeks to impose Medicaid work requirements

    12/20/2017 4:43:11 PM PST · by x1stcav · 6 replies
    The Hill ^ | 12/20/17 | Nathaniel Weixel
    Arizona is seeking to impose work requirements on many of its Medicaid beneficiaries under a new waiver submitted to the Trump administration this week. The waiver would require able-bodied adults between the ages of 19 and 55 — with certain exemptions — to work, attend school or go to employment support and development programs for at least 20 hours a week. Those who fall under the requirements would have six months to meet them before losing coverage, though they could re-enroll after complying. The state is also proposing to impose a five-year lifetime limit on Medicaid for “able-bodied” people. Arizona...
  • Inside Eataly World, Italy’s Massive Food Theme Park

    11/15/2017 5:51:47 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 23 replies
    Eater ^ | November 15, 2017 | Coral Sisk
    It’s easy to get lost in the idea of FICO Eataly World, dubbed by many in the media as the “Disney World of food.” The park, located 30 minutes east of Bologna, Italy and open to the public today, is less of a Disney World and more of a industrial showroom and souped-up mall food court with contrasting surprises. There’s a dairy plant and outdoor livestock stalls housing more than 200 cows, goats, and chickens. There’s a mini-plot of forest land that’s home to truffle dogs (aka some of the sweetest Labradors around) who show guests how they can sniff...
  • Agri. Robots Market: Future Forecast Assessed on the Basis of How the Market Is Predicted to Grow

    10/08/2017 9:03:13 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 11 replies
    Digital Journal ^ | October 6, 2017
    Albany, NY -- (SBWIRE) -- 10/06/2017 -- The global agriculture robots market features a widely diverse competitive landscape characterized by region-wise dominance of prominent players, notes Transparency Market Research (TMR). For instance, the agriculture robots market in North America was dominated Harvest Automation, Inc., Clearpath Robotics, and PrecisionHawk, Inc., in 2015, while in the same year, Naio Technologies and SenseFly SA led the Europe market. In addition, Shibuya Seiki was one of the leading players in the Asia Pacific market for agriculture robots in 2015. Furthermore, driven by abundant lucrative avenues, the market is witnessing a constant influx of emerging...
  • Colorado Dominates Top 150 Ancillary Cannabis Companies

    09/22/2017 11:44:13 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 8 replies
    Denver's Westword ^ | September 22, 2017 | Thomas Mitchell
    Legalizing cannabis doesn't just create jobs involving cultivation of the plant; it also creates businesses that aid those cultivations, infused-product manufacturers and dispensaries. Ancillary businesses to the cannabis industry can be in anything from extraction technology to industry consulting, with many, many things in between. Ancillary businesses represent the largest and broadest sector of the cannabis industry, according to multiple industry reports, and many of the top companies are based in Colorado. Of the top 150 ancillary cannabis businesses on a recent list from Cannabis Business Executive, 41 are headquartered in Colorado. By comparison, California had 35 on the list,...
  • West Virginia University researchers create new tomatoes

    09/10/2017 6:08:27 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 16 replies
    The Parkersburg News and Sentinel ^ | September 10, 2017 | Staff
    MORGANTOWN — West Virginia University has named two new varieties of tomatoes created by school researchers to commemorate the sesquicentennial of the Davis College of Agriculture, Natural Resources and Design. West Virginia ’17A and West Virginia ’17B were developed by Mahfuz Rahman and Mannon Gallegly, a professor who in 1963 created a new tomato for the centennial. From ore than 100 submissions, West Virginia 17A was called Mountaineer Pride and 17B was called Mountaineer Delight. “Though we initially considered the idea of releasing only one variety, it became apparent to me that both varieties were very good — each in...
  • Big Tex-Urban Farms Farm on grounds of State Fair of Texas helps feed homeless

    08/11/2017 12:56:50 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 2 replies
    KRIS-TV ^ | August 11, 2017 | The Associated Press
    DALLAS (AP) - Drew Demler is digging in a box of dirt in the middle of Fair Park. The Dallas Morning News reports he is harvesting potatoes - big, small, misshapen, one that even looks like a snowman - in a hotter-than-deep-fried parking lot just outside the Cotton Bowl. "I think potatoes and onions are two of the most important crops that we grow," Demler, farm manager at Big Tex Urban Farms , says as he uses his bare hands to search for the tubers. "They're hearty and prolific, and their storage life is long."(continued)
  • How much does it cost to stock the typical family refrigerator?

    08/06/2017 1:02:55 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 59 replies
    The Philadelphia Inquirer ^ | August 6, 2017 | Jodi O'Connell, GoBankingRates.com
    Refrigerators were originally used to store just a few perishable essentials such as meat and milk. In fact, the first electric units of the 1920s were only slightly bigger than modern mini-fridges. Nearly 100 years later, refrigerators are bigger than ever and used to store the bulk of the food consumed by a household. Americans spend anywhere from $130 to just under $300 a week stocking up on food for a family of four, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. But those numbers include dry goods that wouldn't be kept in the refrigerator and leave out fridge such staples...
  • Throwback Tulsa: Controversial Creek Turnpike opened 25 years ago

    06/12/2017 7:13:10 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 9 replies
    The Tulsa World ^ | March 5, 2017 | Debbie Jackson
    Least terns. A federal lawsuit. Greenpeace. Vandals. Industrious beavers. Angry homeowners. Bureaucratic delays. These were among the obstacles and setbacks that had to be overcome before the Creek Turnpike was built. At one point, the chairman of the Oklahoma Turnpike Authority declared it a “total disaster” and exclaimed: “The Creek Turnpike in Tulsa, God only knows when that’ll be completed,” John Kilpatrick said, as reported by the Tulsa World’s Wayne Greene on Oct. 19, 1990. “If we had it to do all over again, we wouldn’t do that project,” the exasperated Kilpatrick said after federal bureaucrats held up construction of...