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Keyword: genes

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  • Interactive map reveals how fallen European empires have left their stamp on the world's gene-pools

    02/14/2014 6:37:49 AM PST · by Pharmboy · 16 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 2-13-14 | ELLIE ZOLFAGHARIFARD
    Full headline: From Mongol warriors to Silk Road traders: Interactive map reveals how fallen European empires have left their lasting stamp on the world's gene-pools Map shows the mixing of genes of 95 different populations across Europe, Africa, Asia and South America It reveals colonialism, the Arab slave trade and European traders on the Silk Road mixing with people in China Scientists pinpointed time when mixing took place by looking areas of DNA that exchanged genetic information To use the map, double click on the location you want to view. You can then use the scroll bar to zoom in...
  • Gene clue to Latin American risk for diabetes

    12/25/2013 6:05:05 PM PST · by Pharmboy · 20 replies
    Malay Mail Online ^ | 12-2513 | Anon.
    Paris — Scientists on Wednesday said they had found a variant of a gene to explain why Latin Americans are at higher risk of Type 2 diabetes, and pointed to a possible DNA legacy from the Neanderthals. The variant lies on a gene called SLC16A11, which plays a part in breaking down fatty molecules called lipids, they said in the journal Nature. A research consortium called SIGMA -- for the Slim Initiative in Genomic Medicine for the Americans -- sought to understand why Type 2 diabetes in Mexicans and other Latin American populations is roughly twice as great as among...
  • Study suggests inbreeding shaped course of early human evolution

    11/29/2013 7:51:37 AM PST · by Pharmboy · 64 replies
    UPI ^ | Nov. 28, 2013 | Anon.
    CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Nov. 28 (UPI) -- Humans lived for thousands of years in small, isolated populations and resulting inbreeding shaped the course of human evolution, a U.S. researcher says. Research suggests the severe inbreeding may have created many health problems and the small populations were likely a barrier to the development of complex culture and technologies, NewScientist.com reported Thursday. David Reich of Harvard Medical School in Boston -- who has sequenced the genome of Neanderthals and that of another extinct human, the Denisovans -- said both species were severely inbred due to small populations. "Archaic populations had low genetic diversity,...
  • European Roots for Native Americans?

    11/05/2013 6:05:07 PM PST · by Pharmboy · 36 replies
    The Scientist ^ | October 29, 2013 | Bob Grant
    An analysis of ancient DNA from a 24,000-year-old Siberian skeleton generates a new model for the original peopling of the Western Hemisphere. Native Americans may not have descended from East Asians who crossed the Bering Land Bridge more than 15,000 years ago, according to a new genomic analysis of a millennia-old Siberian skeleton. A portion of the nuclear DNA recovered from the upper arm bone of a 4-year-old boy that was buried near the Siberian village of Mal’ta about 24,000 years ago is shared by modern Native Americans and no other group. But the boy appears to have been descended...
  • rDNA Genes May Be Key to Human Longevity

    09/09/2013 4:47:38 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 2 replies
    An international team of researchers reporting in the journal Current Biology has found evidence that ageing works through a special set of genes that everyone has – the rDNA genes.Studies in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, shown here, over the past two decades have found a connection between rDNA genes and lifespan. “This work is exciting because it shows that rDNA instability is a new factor in ageing,” said study co-author Dr Austen Ganley from Massey University, New Zealand. Dr Ganley and his colleagues from Japan found that by improving the stability of the rDNA genes they could extend the lifespan...
  • Supreme Court Says Human Genes Aren’t Patentable

    06/13/2013 12:35:25 PM PDT · by JerseyanExile · 14 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | June 13, 2013 | Brent Kendall, Jess Bravin
    The Supreme Court unanimously ruled Thursday that human genes isolated from the body can’t be patented, a victory for doctors and patients who argued that such patents interfere with scientific research and the practice of medicine. The court was handing down one of its most significant rulings in the age of molecular medicine, deciding who may own the fundamental building blocks of life. The case involved Myriad Genetics Inc., which holds patents related to two genes, known as BRCA1 and BRCA2, that can indicate whether a woman has a heightened risk of developing breast cancer or ovarian cancer. Justice Clarence...
  • "This is the Way God Made Me"--A Scientific Examination of Homosexuality and the "Gay Gene"

    06/06/2013 5:22:59 AM PDT · by kimtom · 68 replies
    www.apologeticspress.org ^ | Aug 1 2004 | Dave Miller, Ph.D., Dave Miller, Ph.D.
    The trumpets were left at home and the parades were canceled. The press releases and campaign signs were quietly forgotten. The news was big, but it did not contain what some had hoped for. On April 14, 2003, the International Human Genome Consortium announced the successful completion of the Human Genome Project—two years ahead of schedule. The press report read: “The human genome is complete and the Human Genome Project is over” (see “Human Genome Report...,” 2003, emp. added). Most of the major science journals reported on the progress in the field of genetics, but also speculated on how the...
  • Identical twin studies prove homosexuality is not genetic

    06/01/2013 5:59:38 PM PDT · by Coleus · 114 replies
    Holland Davis ^ | May-13-2013 | Mark Ellis
    Eight major studies of identical twins in Australia, the U.S., and Scandinavia during the last two decades all arrive at the same conclusion: gays were not born that way. “At best genetics is a minor factor,” says Dr. Neil Whitehead, PhD. Whitehead worked for the New Zealand government as a scientific researcher for 24 years, then spent four years working for the United Nations and International Atomic Energy Agency. Most recently, he serves as a consultant to Japanese universities about the effects of radiation exposure. His PhD is in biochemistry and statistics. Identical twins have the same genes or DNA....
  • Long Complex Gene Tails Defy Evolution (article)

    05/13/2013 12:35:55 PM PDT · by fishtank · 23 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | May 2013 | Jeffrey Tomkins, Ph.D.
    Long Complex Gene Tails Defy Evolution by Jeffrey Tomkins, Ph.D. * If the picture of complexity regarding how genes are controlled and regulated in the genome was not complicated enough, a new study has increased this paradigm to an unprecedented level.1 Recently reported research describes massively long gene tails that do not code for proteins, but instead contain hundreds to thousands of built in regulatory switches per gene RNA copy. When a protein-coding gene is turned on in the genome, copies of it are made called mRNAs. These mRNAs are then processed to remove non-protein coding intervening regions called "introns"...
  • How Similar Are Human and Ape Genes? )article)

    05/02/2013 7:45:45 AM PDT · by fishtank · 47 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | May 2013 | Jeffrey Tomkins, Ph.D.
    How Similar Are Human and Ape Genes? by Jeffrey Tomkins, Ph.D. * In the past, evolutionists have tried to prove human evolution by comparing only similar DNA segments between humans and apes—disregarding the non-similar DNA regions.1 Many evolutionary studies have involved the selective use of protein-coding segments in the genome called genes. But comparing just the genes of humans and apes produces much higher DNA similarities than many other regions of the genome would yield. Surprisingly, a recent study compared chimpanzee chromosomes to their similar human-counterpart chromosomes using highly optimized DNA matching conditions and found that the chimpanzee genome was...
  • Gay Is Not All in the Genes

    03/28/2013 8:33:24 AM PDT · by Maelstorm · 98 replies
    http://news.sciencemag.org ^ | 30 June 2008 | by Michael Balter
    Why are some people gay? Most researchers who study sexual orientation think that both genetic and environmental factors play a role, but the relative contributions of each remain unclear. A new study of Swedish twins reinforces earlier findings that environmental influences--including the environment in the womb--may play a greater role than genes. Scientists studying complex human behaviors often turn to twin studies. Researchers look at both identical and fraternal twins to see how often they share a trait--a parameter called concordance. The greater the concordance among genetically identical twins compared with fraternal twins--who share only half of their genes--the more...
  • East Asian Physical Traits Linked to 35,000-Year-Old Mutation

    02/15/2013 1:33:40 AM PST · by Pharmboy · 47 replies
    NY Times ^ | February 14, 2013 | NICHOLAS WADE
    Gaining a deep insight into human evolution, researchers have identified a mutation in a critical human gene as the source of several distinctive traits that make East Asians different from other races. Researchers have identified a mutation in a gene that confers several distinct traits to East Asians, including thicker hair. The traits — thicker hair shafts, more sweat glands, characteristically identified teeth and smaller breasts — are the result of a gene mutation that occurred about 35,000 years ago, the researchers have concluded. snip The first of those sites to be studied contains the gene known as EDAR. Africans...
  • Epigenetics: How Our Experiences Affect Our Offspring

    02/04/2013 1:10:36 PM PST · by blam · 23 replies
    The Week Magazine ^ | 1-20-2013 | The Week Staff
    Epigenetics: How Our Experiences Affect Our Offspring New research suggests that people's experiences, not just their genes, can affect the biological legacy of their offspring By The Week Staff January 20, 2013 Isn't our genetic legacy hardwired? From Mendel and Darwin in the 19th century to Watson and Crick in the 20th, scientists have shown that chromosomes passed from parent to child form a genetic blueprint for development. But in a quiet scientific revolution, researchers have in recent years come to realize that genes aren't a fixed, predetermined program simply passed from one generation to the next. Instead, genes can...
  • Vitamin D Gene Changes May Drive Disease

    11/14/2012 10:15:09 PM PST · by neverdem · 14 replies
    MedPage Today ^ | November 13, 2012 | Cole Petrochko
    Reviewed by Robert Jasmer, MD; Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco and Dorothy Caputo, MA, BSN, RN, Nurse Planner Action Points Certain variations in the vitamin D receptor gene may influence the clinical effects of low vitamin D levels in some chronic diseases.Note that patients in the cohort without the genetic polymorphism showed no association between low 25(OH)D levels and outcomes such as hip fracture, myocardial infarction, cancer, and death. Variations in the vitamin D receptor gene may influence the clinical effects of low vitamin D levels in some chronic diseases, researchers found.Among patients with low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin...
  • Human Genome Is Much More Than Just Genes

    09/06/2012 10:04:50 PM PDT · by neverdem · 19 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 5 September 2012 | Elizabeth Pennisi
    Enlarge Image Zooming in. This diagram illustrates a chromosome in ever-greater detail, as the ENCODE project drilled down to DNA to study the functional elements of the genome. Credit: ENCODE project The human genome—the sum total of hereditary information in a person—contains a lot more than the protein-coding genes teenagers learn about in school, a massive international project has found. When researchers decided to sequence the human genome in the late 1990s, they were focused on finding those traditional genes so as to identify all the proteins necessary for life. Each gene was thought to be a discrete piece...
  • Native Americans descended from three Asian groups: study

    07/11/2012 11:22:20 AM PDT · by Theoria · 57 replies
    AFP ^ | 11 July 2012 | AFP
    Native Americans spread out today from Canada to the tip of Chile descended not from one but at least three migrant waves from Siberia between 5,000 and 15,000 years ago, a study said Wednesday. The finding is controversial among geneticists, archaeologists and linguists -- many of whom have maintained that a single Asian ancestral group populated the Americas. But the new study, claiming to be the most comprehensive analysis yet of Native American genetics, claims to have found incontrovertible proof that there were three immigration waves -- a theory first put forward in 1986. Most Native Americans, said the study,...
  • Another Genetic Quirk of the Solomon Islands: Blond Hair

    05/04/2012 7:46:30 AM PDT · by Theoria · 20 replies
    The New York Times ^ | 03 May 2012 | SINDYA N. BHANOO
    In the Solomon Islands, about 10 percent of the dark-skinned indigenous people have strikingly blond hair. Some islanders theorize that the coloring could be a result of excess sun exposure, or a diet rich in fish. Another explanation is that the blondness was inherited from distant ancestors — European traders and explorers who came to the islands. But that’s not the case, researchers now report. The gene variant responsible for blond hair in the islanders is distinctly different from the gene that causes blond hair in Europeans. “For me it breaks down any kind of simple notions you might have...
  • That myth-crap of 'Khazars,' pushed by R. Islamists and Neo-Nazis alike

    01/18/2012 2:41:19 PM PST · by PRePublic · 35 replies
    Ever heard about the 'Khazar' myth pushed by the Neo-Nazis/KKK? In fact, Jews are both a nation and a religion. the percentage of those with any roots in khazaria is so minimal, that there was only one non-historian "writer" that came up with the idea to say that the percentage is higher. As a penpal who is of Jewish background told me once: 'Before the WW2 Were were told to go BACK to Palestine where we came from... now the same haters don't even grant us that...' Hitler VS Khazar mythOddly enough, Hitler's "aryanism" and anti-Jewish sick obession was AGAINST...
  • Genes Important to Keep Brain Sharp Through Old Age

    01/19/2012 5:54:05 AM PST · by Pharmboy · 21 replies
    Live Science ^ | 18 January 2012 | Jennifer Welsh
    A person's intelligence is mostly inherited, it's in their genes, but whether a person can expect to be a clever grandma or grandpa relies on both genes and environment. "Until now, we have not had an estimate of how much genetic differences affect how people's intelligence changes across the lifetime," study researcher Ian Deary, of the University of Edinburgh in the United Kingdom, said in an email to LiveScience. "These new results mean that researchers can seek both environmental and genetic contributionsto successful cognitive aging." Previous studies of the genetics of intelligence have been performed on sets of twins or...
  • Scientists Discover Second-Oldest Gene Mutation

    12/15/2011 10:00:15 AM PST · by Pharmboy · 27 replies
    THE Ohio State University ^ | 12/14/2011 | Stephan M. Tanner
    COLUMBUS, Ohio – A new study has identified a gene mutation that researchers estimate dates back to 11,600 B.C., making it the second oldest human disease mutation yet discovered. Researchers with the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center – Arthur G. James Cancer Hospital and Richard J. Solove Research Institute led the study and estimate that the mutation arose in the Middle East some 13,600 years ago. Only a mutation seen in cystic fibrosis that arose between 11,000 and 52,000 years ago is believed to be older. The investigators described the mutation in people of Arabic, Turkish and Jewish ancestry....
  • What question would you like to ask the Republican presidential candidates about income inequality?

    12/07/2011 10:15:23 AM PST · by Dr.Deth · 32 replies
    Yahoo ^ | 12/7/11 | Yahoo
    Here is your opportunity to ask the candidates your specific questions about income inequality. Let us know and we may include your question in the debate. Click to read Yahoo/ABC loaded question article
  • Genetic Study Confirms: First Dogs Came from East Asia

    11/23/2011 7:43:40 PM PST · by decimon · 21 replies
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology ^ | November 23, 2011 | Katarina Ahlfort
    Researchers at KTH say they have found further proof that the wolf ancestors of today’s domesticated dogs can be traced to southern East Asia — findings that run counter to theories placing the cradle of the canine line in the Middle East.Dr Peter Savolainen, KTH researcher in evolutionary genetics, says a new study released Nov. 23 confirms that an Asian region south of the Yangtze River was the principal and probably sole region where wolves were domesticated by humans. Data on genetics, morphology and behaviour show clearly that dogs are descended from wolves, but there’s never been scientific consensus on...
  • Gene Regulation And The Difference Between Human Beings And Chimpanzees

    10/27/2011 5:49:24 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 23 replies
    Scince 2.0 ^ | October 26th 2011 | Gunnar De Winter
    When the DNA sequences of Homo sapiens and Pan troglodytes were sequenced, the difference between the sequences of coding genes was smaller than expected based on the phenotypic differences between both species. If not the coding genes, then what is responsible for these dissimilarities? In the words of the authors of a new study that took a look at this question: Although humans and chimpanzees have accumulated significant differences in a number of phenotypic traits since diverging from a common ancestor about six to eight million years ago, their genomes are more than 98.5% identical at protein-coding loci. Since this...
  • Gene therapy and stem cells unite

    10/13/2011 6:30:34 PM PDT · by CutePuppy · 5 replies
    BBC ^ | October 12, 2011 | James Gallagher
    Two of the holy grails of medicine - stem cell technology and precision gene therapy - have been united for the first time in humans, say scientists.It means patients with a genetic disease could, one day, be treated with their own cells. A study in Nature corrected a mutation in stem cells made from a patient with a liver disease. Researchers said this was a "critical step" towards devising treatments, but safety tests were still needed. At the moment, stem cells created from a patient with a genetic illness cannot be used to cure the disease as those cells would...
  • Cancer’s Secrets Come Into Sharper Focus

    08/15/2011 8:35:22 PM PDT · by neverdem · 29 replies
    NY Times ^ | August 15, 2011 | GEORGE JOHNSON
    For the last decade cancer research has been guided by a common vision of how a single cell, outcompeting its neighbors, evolves into a malignant tumor. Through a series of random mutations, genes that encourage cellular division are pushed into overdrive, while genes that normally send growth-restraining signals are taken offline. With the accelerator floored and the brake lines cut, the cell and its progeny are free to rapidly multiply. More mutations accumulate, allowing the cancer cells to elude other safeguards and to invade neighboring tissue and metastasize. These basic principles — laid out 11 years ago in a landmark...
  • Decoding infidelity linked to Type 2 diabetes

    08/15/2011 2:05:53 PM PDT · by Pharmboy · 9 replies
    Journal of Clinical Investigation ^ | 8-15-11 | Karen Honey
    Type 2 diabetes is an extremely common chronic condition characterized by high levels of sugar in the blood as a result of either insufficient production of the hormone insulin or an inability of cells to respond to insulin. A combination of genetic and environmental factors causes an individual to develop type 2 diabetes. Among the most reproducible genetic variations associated with type 2 diabetes in different ethnic populations are those in the CDKAL1 gene. However, the mechanisms underlying these associations have not yet been determined. But now, a team of researchers, led by Kazuhito Tomizawa, at Kumamoto University, Japan, has...
  • State to double crime searches using family DNA[California]

    05/11/2011 7:27:27 PM PDT · by Palter · 10 replies
    LA Times ^ | 09 May 2011 | Maura Dolan
    California's success in using 'familial searching' spurs Atty. Gen. Kamala Harris to increase funding for the controversial genetic sleuthing technique in rape, murder and cold cases. A young man followed a woman into a coffee shop as she prepared to open for business at 6 a.m. He put a knife to her throat, sexually assaulted her, barricaded her in a walk-in refrigerator and grabbed cash from the register before vanishing. The March 2008 attack near the Santa Cruz Harbor in a low-crime neighborhood unnerved the community and spawned an intense police hunt. "It is the kind of attack that communities...
  • Oxford ethicist: use IVF to create only smart babies

    04/11/2011 8:28:42 PM PDT · by TheDingoAteMyBaby · 29 replies
    The Way ^ | Mar 27, 2011 | Amanda Hopkins
    Australian ethicist working at the Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics claims that humanity has a “moral obligation” to use in vitro fertilization (IVF) to select the most intelligent embryos for the good of society, with the obvious implication that the less intelligent “surplus” embryos should simply be destroyed. Professor Julian Savulescu of Melbourne made the statement while commenting on an economic modeling research paper by Oxford University ethicists Andres Sandberg and Nick Bostrom, who claim that a rise in humanity’s IQ would result in a reduction in poverty, welfare dependency, crowding of jails, school dropout rates, out-of-wedlock births, and...
  • Out of (southern) Africa: Modern man 'evolved from desert bushmen'

    03/08/2011 4:50:30 AM PST · by Pharmboy · 37 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | March 8, 2011 | DAVID DERBYSHIRE
    The first modern people evolved in southern Africa more than 60,000 years ago - and not in the east of the continent as most scientists believe, a study concludes. After analysing DNA samples from 27 populations in modern-day Africa, researchers say the most likely location for the 'cradle of humanity' is the Kalahari desert region of South Africa, Namibia and Botswana. The modern-day click-speaking bushman from the desert show the greatest genetic diversity of any Africans - suggesting that their home was the birthplace of the first true Homo sapiens. Originators: The home of the modern day click-speaking bushman in...
  • Reducing Crime To Genes

    02/13/2011 2:03:08 PM PST · by SeanG200 · 4 replies
    Religio-Political Talk (RPT) ^ | 2-13-2011 | Papa Giorgio
    There are multiple links in my one post, so if you wish to go directly to them here they are: ----http://www.bioedge.org/index.php/bioethics/bioethics_article/9384/ ----http://www.scribd.com/doc/39228567/Determinism-and-Morals ----http://www.philosophy.ucsb.edu/faculty/anderson/lewisanti.html ----http://www.scribd.com/doc/48738624/Reduction-ism ----http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F6fdZqzD2Qk ----http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HXaQsybMIQQ ----http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HaqmGGOZbeY I piece together these recent and past videos and stories (one is an article from National Review from 2008 scanned in -- not in the links above) that deal with evolutionary psychology and genes being the source of (fallaciously of course) all human behavior. In other words, no choice of free will. I will add an excerpt below. Enjoy the massive amounts of info!!
  • Obama Announces Support for UN Resolution Stating 'Indigenous Peoples ...

    12/21/2010 11:53:50 AM PST · by yoe · 186 replies · 2+ views
    CNSNEWS ^ | December 21, 2010 | Penny Starr
    President Barack Obama, addressing a tribal nations conference at the White House last week, announded that the U.S. government is now supporting the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous People, which includes a sweeping declaration that "indigenous peoples" have a right to lands and resources they traditionally occupied or "otherwise used." "Indigenous peoples have the right to the lands, territories and resources which they have traditionally owned, occupied or otherwise used or acquired," says the U.N. resolution. The Bush administration had declined to support the resolution. At the White House Tribal Nations Conference, Obama reminded the group that...
  • The Insanity Virus

    11/18/2010 7:12:58 PM PST · by MetaThought · 26 replies
    Discover Magazine ^ | published online November 8, 2010 | Douglas Fox
    The Insanity VirusSchizophrenia has long been blamed on bad genes or even bad parents. Wrong, says a growing group of psychiatrists. The real culprit, they claim, is a virus that lives entwined in every person's DNA. by Douglas Fox Steven and David Elmore were born identical twins, but their first days in this world could not have been more different. David came home from the hospital after a week. Steven, born four minutes later, stayed behind in the ICU. For a month he hovered near death in an incubator, wracked with fever from what doctors called a dangerous viral infection....
  • Disparities in cardiovascular risk based more on socioeconomic status than race, ethnicity

    08/02/2010 1:36:10 PM PDT · by Pharmboy · 16 replies · 5+ views
    University of California - Los Angeles ^ | 8-2-2010 | Dr. Arun Karlamangla
    A new UCLA study suggests that disparities in cardiovascular disease risk in the United States are due less to race or ethnicity than to socioeconomic status. In the study, published in the August issue of the journal Annals of Epidemiology, researchers from the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and colleagues found that there are large differences in risk by socioeconomic status within racial and ethnic groups — with the poorest individuals having the highest risk — but that there are few differences in risk between racial and ethnic groups. "Most ethnic differences in cardiovascular risk are really due...
  • Genes set Jews apart, study finds (European Jews Descended from Ancient Roman Converts?)

    06/10/2010 9:08:00 AM PDT · by GOPGuide · 105 replies · 646+ views
    LA Times ^ | June 3, 2010 | Thomas H. Maugh II
    The Jewish people, according to archaeologists, originated in Babylon and Persia between the 4th and 6th centuries BC. The modern-day Jews most closely related to that original population are those in Iran, Iraq and Syria, whose closest non-Jewish relatives are the Druze, Bedouins and Palestinians, the study found. Sometime in that period, the Middle Eastern and European Jews diverged and the European branch began actively proselytizing for converts. At the height of the Roman Empire, about 10% of the empire's population was Jewish, although the bulk of them were converts. Some Khazars were also incorporated during this period. "That explains...
  • New autism susceptibility genes identified

    06/09/2010 3:37:01 PM PDT · by Pharmboy · 16 replies · 67+ views
    Mount Sinai Med ^ | June 9, 2010 | Joseph Buxbaum, PhD
    Autism Genome Project Phase 2 results published in Nature Mount Sinai researchers and the Autism Genome Project Consortium (AGP) announced today that they have identified new autism susceptibility genes that may lead to the development of new treatment approaches. These genes, which include SHANK2, SYNGAP1, DLGAP2 and the X-linked DDX53–PTCHD1 locus, primarily belong to synapse-related pathways, while others are involved in cellular proliferation, projection and motility, and intracellular signaling. The findings were published today in Nature by researchers at the Seaver Autism Center for Research and Treatment at Mount Sinai School of Medicine, together with an international consortium of researchers...
  • Breakthrough in fight against fatal Ebola as new drug saves 100% of monkeys tested! (Praise God!)

    05/29/2010 4:21:54 PM PDT · by Niuhuru · 29 replies · 708+ views
    Daily Mail ^ | 10:57 PM on 29th May 2010 | Daily Mail Reporter
    A gene silencing approach can save monkeys from high doses of the most lethal strain of Ebola virus in what researchers call the most viable route yet to treating the deadly and frightening infection. They used small interfering RNAs or siRNAs, a new technology being developed by a number of companies, to hold the virus at bay for a week until the immune system could take over. Tests in four rhesus monkeys showed that seven daily injections cured 100 per cent of them. U.S. government researchers and a small Canadian biotech company, Tekmira Pharmaceuticals, worked together to develop the new...
  • Tibetans Evolved to Survive High Life, Study Says

    05/16/2010 8:07:24 AM PDT · by JoeProBono · 27 replies · 1,215+ views
    nationalgeographic ^ | May 13, 2010 | John Roach
    Most Tibetans are genetically adapted to life on the "roof of the world," according to a new study. The Tibetan Plateau (map) rises more than 13,000 feet (4,000 meters) above sea level. At such heights, most people are susceptible to hypoxia, in which too little oxygen reaches body tissues, potentially leading to fatal lung or brain inflammation. To survive the high life, many Tibetans carry unique versions of two genes associated with low blood hemoglobin levels, the researchers found. Since hemoglobin is the oxygen-carrying component of red blood cells, the find might seem "really counterintuitive," said study leader Tatum Simonson...
  • Neanderthals, Humans Interbred—First Solid DNA Evidence -Most of us have some Neanderthal genes

    05/07/2010 12:04:44 PM PDT · by JoeProBono · 87 replies · 2,814+ views
    nationalgeographic ^ | May 6, 2010 | Ker Than
    The next time you're tempted to call some oaf a Neanderthal, you might want to take a look in the mirror. According to a new DNA study, most humans have a little Neanderthal in them—at least 1 to 4 percent of a person's genetic makeup. The study uncovered the first solid genetic evidence that "modern" humans—or Homo sapiens—interbred with their Neanderthal neighbors, who mysteriously died out about 30,000 years ago. What's more, the Neanderthal-modern human mating apparently took place in the Middle East, shortly after modern humans had left Africa, not in Europe—as has long been suspected. "We can now...
  • Scientists find new genes for cancer, other diseases in plants, yeast and worms

    04/13/2010 11:30:52 AM PDT · by decimon · 7 replies · 282+ views
    University of Texas at Austin ^ | Apr 13, 2010 | Unknown
    AUSTIN, Texas—From deep within the genomes of organisms as diverse as plants, worms and yeast, scientists have uncovered new genes responsible for causing human diseases such as cancer and deafness. The University of Texas at Austin scientists exploited the fact that all life on Earth shares common ancestry, and therefore shares sets of genes. They found genes in yeast, for example, that humans use to make veins and arteries, even though yeasts have no blood vessels at all. Yeasts use those same genes to fix their cell walls in response to stress. "Basically, we figured out a way to discover...
  • Lose Genes, Gain Weight

    01/04/2010 11:24:33 PM PST · by neverdem · 8 replies · 583+ views
    ScienceNOW Daily News ^ | 7 December 2009 | Mitch Leslie
    Obesity is a disease of excess, but a new study suggests that a few obese patients are actually lacking something--a piece of one of their chromosomes. The loss might remove a gene that helps the body manage blood sugar and appetite. Obesity runs in families, and researchers have identified several genetic variants that seem to boost the odds of becoming obese. However, these variants only explain a minority of cases. In the last decade, researchers have discovered that genetic differences among people can stem from lost or duplicated sections of chromosomes, called copy number variants (CNVs). Because of CNVs, for...
  • Blonde women born to be warrior princesses (My Genes Made Me Spoiled)

    01/16/2010 5:59:49 PM PST · by GOPGuide · 108 replies · 4,718+ views
    Times of London ^ | January 17, 2010 | John Harlow
    IT really is a case of blonde ambition. Women with fair hair are more aggressive and determined to get their own way than brunettes or redheads, according to a study by the University of California. Researchers claim that blondes are more likely to display a “warlike” streak because they attract more attention than other women and are used to getting their own way — the so-called “princess effect”. Even those who dye their hair blonde quickly take on these attributes, experts found. The study could cast fresh light on the ability of Joanna Lumley, the actress and former model, to...
  • Donald Prothero’s Imaginary Evidence for Evolution (yet another evo hoax!)

    12/01/2009 6:39:06 PM PST · by GodGunsGuts · 152 replies · 3,224+ views
    Evolution News & Views ^ | December 1, 2009 | Jonathan Wells, Ph.D.
    Need evidence for Darwinian evolution? Just make it up. That’s the lesson of Donald Prothero’s book, Evolution: What the Fossils Say and Why It Matters (New York: Columbia University Press, 2007). Prothero is a professor of geology at Occidental College in Los Angeles. On November 30, he teamed up with atheist Michael Shermer (founding publisher of Skeptic Magazine) to debate Stephen Meyer and Richard Sternberg of the Discovery Institute. Shermer wrote the foreword to Prothero’s book, calling it “the best book ever written on the subject.” In fact, “Don’s visual presentation of the fossil and genetic evidence for evolution is...
  • Early life stress 'changes' genes

    11/09/2009 11:55:52 AM PST · by JoeProBono · 21 replies · 801+ views
    bbc ^ | 8 November 2009 | Victoria Gill
    A study in mice has hinted at the impact that early life trauma and stress can have on genes, and how they can result in behavioural problems. Scientists described the long-term effects of stress on baby mice in the journal Nature Neuroscience. Stressed mice produced hormones that "changed" their genes, affecting their behaviour throughout their lives. This work could provide clues to how stress and trauma in early life can lead to later problems...... The team found that mice that had been "abandoned" during their early lives were then less able to cope with stressful situations throughout their lives. The...
  • Bad driving may have genetic basis, UCI study finds

    10/29/2009 6:14:35 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 23 replies · 670+ views
    UC Irvine ^ | October 28, 2009 | Stephanie McHughen
    People with gene variant perform more than 20 percent worse on driving test Bad drivers may in part have their genes to blame, suggests a new study by UC Irvine neuroscientists. People with a particular gene variant performed more than 20 percent worse on a driving test than people without it - and a follow-up test a few days later yielded similar results. About 30 percent of Americans have the variant. "These people make more errors from the get-go, and they forget more of what they learned after time away," said Dr. Steven Cramer, neurology associate professor and senior author...
  • Saami not descended from Swedish Hunter-Gathers

    09/28/2009 8:11:25 PM PDT · by BGHater · 23 replies · 1,322+ views
    Science blogs ^ | 24 Sep 2009 | Razib Khan
    A few weeks ago I posted on a paper, Genetic Discontinuity Between Local Hunter-Gatherers and Central Europe's First Farmers.Another one is out in the same vein, Ancient DNA Reveals Lack of Continuity between Neolithic Hunter-Gatherers and Contemporary Scandinavians: The driving force behind the transition from a foraging to a farming lifestyle in prehistoric Europe (Neolithization) has been debated for more than a century...Of particular interest is whether population replacement or cultural exchange was responsible...Scandinavia holds a unique place in this debate, for it maintained one of the last major hunter-gatherer complexes in Neolithic Europe, the Pitted Ware culture...Intriguingly, these late...
  • Barack Obama's Dog Bo is a Mutant

    08/27/2009 3:08:32 PM PDT · by JoeProBono · 15 replies · 1,202+ views
    abcnews ^ | Aug. 27, 2009 | JOSEPH BROWNSTEIN
    Study Shows Portuguese Water Dog Breed, Gift from Ted Kennedy, Has Mutant Genes - Based on new research from the National Institutes of Health, first dog Bo is once, twice, but not quite three times a mutant.Researchers from the NIH and several universities have shown that variation among the coats of different dog breeds can be traced back to three genes.
  • Genes of 'Bearded Lady' Revealed

    05/21/2009 2:59:34 PM PDT · by JoeProBono · 19 replies · 1,957+ views
    news.yahoo ^ | Thu May 21
    Julia Pastrana became famous as the "bearded lady" in the mid-1800s. Now, more than 150 years later, scientists have discovered the genetic mutations responsible for her rare condition. The disorder, known as congenital generalized hypertrichosis terminalis (CGHT) with gingival hypertrophy, is characterized by excessive growth of dark hairs all over the body, distorted facial features, and enlarged gums. In some cases, people can have CGHT with normal gums. All of these diseases fall into a group of conditions called congenital generalized hypertrichosis (CGH). The disease is difficult to study because it is so rare. After analyzing the genomes of members...
  • Britain: Middle-class children have better genes, says former schools chief

    05/12/2009 4:04:03 PM PDT · by GOPGuide · 62 replies · 1,209+ views
    The UK Daily Mail ^ | 05/12/09 | Daily Mail
    Middle-class children are more likely to be clever than those from poorer families because they have 'better genes', former Ofsted chief Chris Woodhead said yesterday. The comments caused an immediate storm, with critics calling them insulting and 'crazy'. However, Mr Woodhead won support in some quarters - including the backing of an evolutionary psychologist, who said research had shown there was a link between class and average IQ. Mr Woodhead called for a return to selection by ability at 11. He suggested that grammar school pupils were more likely to be middle-class because 'the genes are likely to be better...
  • A Drug To Re-Awaken Ancient Human Genes And Fight HIV

    04/29/2009 1:48:12 PM PDT · by LibWhacker · 23 replies · 1,305+ views
    io9 ^ | 4/27/09 | Annalee Newitz
    "Junk DNA" are inactive parts of your genome, switched off long ago in evolutionary history. Now scientists say there's a junk gene that fights HIV. And they've discovered how to turn it back on. What these scientists have done could give us the first foolproof HIV vaccine. They have re-awakened the human genome's latent potential to make us all into HIV-resistant creatures. This evening in PLoS Biology, they've published their ground-breaking research. A group of scientists led by Nitya Venkataraman and Alexander Colewhether wanted to try a new approach to fighting HIV - one that worked with the body's own...
  • Why no Mexican Genes in Mexican Swine Flu?

    04/28/2009 7:41:03 AM PDT · by FreedomFighter1013 · 38 replies · 1,430+ views
    Greg's Blog ^ | April 28, 2007 | Greg C.
    An analysis of the the phylogenic tree (the component strains) present in the current swine flu cases in Texas and California show no identifiable components of Mexican origin.The H1 protein (hemagglutinin) shows evidence from past cases from Korea, China and Turkey as well as Indiana, Minnesota, Ohio and Kansas. The N1 protein (neuraminidase) shows evidence of having come from China, Hong Kong, Mongolia, Hokkaido, Japan, Chonburi and Chachoengsao (Thailand) and Italy. Figure 1 shows the phylogenic tree of the H1 protein (hemagglutinin) of the U.S. strain of the current influenza virus. Figure 2 shows the phylogenic tree of the N1...