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Keyword: genes

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  • Ancient humans had sex with a mysterious species, scientists discover

    07/25/2017 4:08:29 PM PDT · by Candor7 · 98 replies
    News.com.au ^ | July 25, 2017 | Jasper Hamill
    HUMANITY has a filthy secret: our ancestors used to have sex with members of other species. That’s the finding in a new piece of research which suggests ancient people used to romp with a “ghost” species of proto human. We are just one of a number of species known as hominins. Members of this family include Neanderthals and Denisovans, which are no longer found on Earth. “It seems that interbreeding between different early hominin species is not the exception — it’s the norm,” said Omer Gokcumen, assistant professor of biological sciences at the University of Buffalo. Gokcumen tested the DNA...
  • Why I Write about Race and IQ

    07/05/2017 7:46:49 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 79 replies
    The National Review ^ | July 5, 2017 | Robert VerBruggen
    There are good reasons not to confine the discussion to academic journals. In the latest issue of National Review, John McWhorter has a challenging and thought-provoking essay about the topic of race and IQ — specifically, about whether that topic should even be up for discussion in liberal-arts classrooms and in the media, as opposed to in scientific journals. He suggests not, as there is nothing to gain from discussing it. I read McWhorter’s essay with special interest because I have violated the norm he proposes. I have written about race and IQ on numerous occasions — and for a...
  • In ‘Enormous Success,’ Scientists Tie 52 Genes to Human Intelligence

    05/22/2017 9:35:15 PM PDT · by Innovative · 11 replies
    NY Times ^ | May 22, 2017 | Carl Zimmer
    In a significant advance in the study of mental ability, a team of European and American scientists announced on Monday that they had identified 52 genes linked to intelligence in nearly 80,000 people. These genes do not determine intelligence, however. Their combined influence is minuscule, the researchers said, suggesting that thousands more are likely to be involved and still await discovery. Just as important, intelligence is profoundly shaped by the environment. Still, the findings could make it possible to begin new experiments into the biological basis of reasoning and problem-solving, experts said. They could even help researchers determine which interventions...
  • Hundreds of genes seen sparking to life two days after death

    06/22/2016 10:46:20 AM PDT · by Theoria · 24 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 21 June 2016 | Anna Williams
    The discovery that many genes are still working up to 48 hours after death has implications for organ transplants, forensics and our very definition of death When a doctor declares a person dead, some of their body may still be alive and kicking – at least for a day or two. New evidence in animals suggests that many genes go on working for up to 48 hours after the lights have gone out. This hustle and bustle has been seen in mice and zebrafish, but there are hints that genes are also active for some time in deceased humans. This...
  • Can Your Genes Make You Kill?

    06/06/2016 10:33:31 AM PDT · by imardmd1 · 33 replies
    Popular Science ^ | April 28, 2016 | Lois Parshley
    Killer gene The killer read his Bible. He drank. Heavily. It was a fall night in 2006, when Bradley Waldroup walked out of his rural trailer in southeastern Tennessee, carrying his .22 caliber hunting rifle. His estranged wife and her friend, Leslie Bradshaw, had just pulled up to drop off the Waldroups’ four children. Waldroup began arguing with his wife and Bradshaw, who was unloading the car. Drawing his gun, Waldroup shot Bradshaw eight times, killing her. He used a knife to cut her head open. He then chased his wife with the knife and a machete, managing to slice...
  • From indoor farms to neural nets, this tech will change the world in 2016

    01/03/2016 3:43:48 PM PST · by 2ndDivisionVet · 17 replies
    Digital Trends ^ | January 1, 2016 | Drew Prindle
    At any given moment there are approximately a zillion different crowdfunding campaigns happening on the Web. Take a stroll through Kickstarter or Indiegogo and you'll find no shortage of weird, useless, and downright stupid projects out there - alongside some real gems. We've cut through the Pebble clones and janky iPhone cases to round up the most unusual, ambitious, and exciting projects out there this week. Keep in mind that any crowdfunded project -- even the best intentioned -- can fail, so do your homework before cutting a check for the gadget of your dreams. Flashlights are a handy thing...
  • Intelligence genes discovered by scientists

    12/22/2015 4:43:59 AM PST · by SkyPilot · 93 replies
    Photo: AP The Telegraph ^ | 21 Dec 15 | Sarah Knapton
    Imperial College London has found that two networks of genes determine whether people are intelligent or not so bright. Genes which make people intelligent have been discovered and scientists believe they could be manipulated to boost brain power. Researchers have believed for some time that intellect is inherited with studies suggesting that up to 75 per cent of IQ is genetic, and the rest down to environmental factors such as schooling and friendship groups. But until now, nobody has been able to pin-point exactly which genes are responsible for better memory, attention, processing speed or reasoning skills. Now Imperial College...
  • The Liberal Gene

    12/10/2015 8:49:14 AM PST · by Sean_Anthony · 10 replies
    Canada Free Press ^ | 12/10/15 | Dr. Brad Lyles
    Liberal friends are so infuriating, Logical discourse is almost entirely lost upon them: We can’t change their brains – we can’t change their minds I’m not making this up. Donald Trump’s Muslim Proposal inflamed so much passion among Liberals they unconsciously revealed themselves to be the wild-eyed, emotional, illogical sorts we always knew them to be. The hysteria was so widespread, however, it begged further investigation into the eons-old question: Where do Liberals come from? At last, we have an answer: The Liberal Gene. Admit it, Liberals infuriate Conservatives because Liberals think emotionally rather than logically. Consequently, when you point...
  • Disease-resistant pigs latest win for gene editing technology

    12/08/2015 5:03:24 PM PST · by o_1_2_3__ · 14 replies
    yahoo ^ | 12/08/2015 | Ben Hirschler
    LONDON (Reuters) - A British animal genetics firm, working with U.S. scientists, has bred the world's first pigs resistant to a common viral disease, using the hot new technology of gene editing. Genus, which supplies pig and bull semen to farmers worldwide, said on Tuesday it had worked with the University of Missouri to develop pigs resistant to Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSv). The condition, also known as blue-ear disease, can be fatal as it affects the animals' immune system and costs farmers hundreds of millions of dollars a year. There is no cure.
  • New kind of "designer" immune cells clear baby's leukaemia

    11/05/2015 1:13:06 PM PST · by amorphous · 44 replies
    Reuters ^ | 5 Nov 2015 | Kate Kelland
    A baby whom doctors thought almost certain to die has been cleared of a previously incurable leukemia in the first human use of an "off-the-shelf" cell therapy from Cellectis that creates designer immune cells. One-year-old Layla had run out of all other treatment options when doctors at Britain's Great Ormond Street Hospital (GOSH) gave her the highly experimental, genetically edited cells in a tiny 1-milliliter intravenous infusion. Two months later, she was cancer-free and she is now home from hospital, the doctors said at a briefing about her case in London on Wednesday. "Her leukemia was so aggressive that such...
  • Ashkenazi Jews descend from 350 people, study finds

    07/15/2015 2:42:04 PM PDT · by Pharmboy · 101 replies
    The Times of Israel ^ | Andrew Tobin
    ‘Bottleneck’ dates back 600 to 800 years, genome analysis shows; researcher says among population ‘everyone is a 30th cousin. Illustrative photo of Ashkenazi Jews, taken from Nurit Ben Sheetri's 'The Redheads' exhibit at Dizengoff Center (courtesy Nurit Ben Sheetrit) A new study concludes that all Ashkenazi Jews can trace their ancestry to a “bottleneck” of just 350 individuals, dating back to between 600 and 800 years ago. The study, published in the Nature Communications journal Tuesday, was authored by Shai Carmi, a computer science professor at Columbia University, and more than 20 medical researchers from Yale, Columbia, Yeshiva University’s Albert...
  • Did your genes really make you do it?

    06/28/2015 8:36:35 AM PDT · by Cats Pajamas · 23 replies
    My Genes made me do it! ^ | 1999 | Neil and Briar Whitehead
    BLURB: First published in the USA in 1999 this book is now freely downloadable from this site. It is under constant review to keep it up-to-date so readers can be assured of its on-going relevance. My Genes Made Me Do It is one of the most comprehensive and easily-read books in the popular market today on science and homosexuality. It is an objective review of more than 10,000 scientific research papers and publications from all sides of the debate. In simple and clear terms, by analysis of the science, it shows homosexuality cannot be biologically innate, or fixed - leaving...
  • Another Horizontal Gene Transfer Fairy Tale

    04/06/2015 9:54:36 AM PDT · by fishtank · 7 replies
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 4-6-2015 | Jeffrey P. Tomkins, Ph.D.
    Another Horizontal Gene Transfer Fairy Tale by Jeffrey P. Tomkins, Ph.D. * As the genomes of many new creatures rapidly fill the public DNA sequence databases, the problems for the grand evolutionary story are becoming overwhelming. One issue is the fact that different creatures have unique sets of genes specific to their kind with no apparent evolutionary history. To explain this glaring problem, evolutionists have resorted to the myth of pervasive horizontal gene transfer. Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is the process whereby genes are transferred from one type of creature to another without sexual reproduction. Earlier in my career, I...
  • You + Your Man Both Have Blue Eyes? You're Related, Says Science!

    03/08/2015 7:17:33 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 75 replies
    Your Tango ^ | March 8, 2015 | Nicole Weaver
    Do you have blues eyes? (Lucky you!) Are you dating someone with blue eyes? (Even luckier!) You may think the eye color similarity is no different than dating with someone with a similar hair color or skin tone, but science just revealed that BOOM: All people with blue eyes are genetically linked. Thus, you and your blue-eyed hunny are both definitely related somehow - and even weirder, your shared relative can be narrowed down to one ancestor! A study at University of Copenhagen found that because blue eyes are a genetic mutation — before said mutation, everyone in the world...
  • Matter: Gene Linked to Obesity Hasn’t Always Been a Problem, Study Finds

    01/01/2015 9:28:04 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 29 replies
    But the gene doesn’t seem to have always been a problem. If scientists had studied FTO just a few decades ago, they would have found no link to weight whatsoever. A new study shows that FTO became a risk only in people born after World War II. The research, published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, raises questions that extend far beyond obesity. Genes clearly influence our health in many ways, but so does our environment; often, it is the interplay between them that makes the difference in whether we develop obesity or cancer or...
  • More than 3,000 epigenetic switches control daily liver cycles

    12/14/2012 2:34:22 PM PST · by neverdem · 7 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | December 11, 2012 | NA
    Thousand of epigenetic switches in the liver control whether genes turn on or off in response to circadian cycles. The figure illustrates daily changes, every six hours, in five different...When it's dark, and we start to fall asleep, most of us think we're tired because our bodies need rest. Yet circadian rhythms affect our bodies not just on a global scale, but at the level of individual organs, and even genes. Now, scientists at the Salk Institute have determined the specific genetic switches that sync liver activity to the circadian cycle. Their finding gives further insight into the mechanisms behind...
  • US researchers identify gene network linked to autism

    12/30/2014 11:55:35 AM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 18 replies
    FOX News ^ | December 30, 2014 | FoxNews.com
    U.S. scientists have identified a molecular network of genes known to contribute to autism spectrum disorders, and they say their finding may help uncover new genes linked to these conditions. "The study of autism disorders is extremely challenging due to the large number of clinical mutations that occur in hundreds of different human genes associated with autism," study author Michael Snyder, genetics and personalized medicine professor at Stanford University, said in a news release. "We therefore wanted to see to what extent shared molecular pathways are perturbed by the diverse set of mutations linked to autism in the hope of...
  • Consumer Trends: Synthesizing food

    11/20/2014 8:53:32 PM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 9 replies
    Drovers Cattle Network ^ | November 19, 2014 | Suzanne B. Bopp
    In a way, genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are not really news anymore, since farmers have had access to that technology for a couple of decades already. So what is the new frontier in food production? The latest step in genetic engineering — at least as it pertains to our food system — is called synthetic biology, which applies the principles of engineering to the fundamental components of biology. Instead of mixing one engineered gene into an existing organism (which is what happens with most of today’s GMOs), these scientists are creating large clusters of genes synthetically. They can essentially design...
  • Will Ebola kill you? It depends on your genes

    10/31/2014 7:52:21 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 41 replies
    The Dailly Mail ^ | 10-30-14 | Lizzie Parry
    Genetics will determine whether a person infected with Ebola dies, scientists claimed today. A new study has found DNA could be the key to tracking the deadly effects of the virus which has ravaged West Africa. The World Health Organisation revealed nearly 5,000 people have died from the disease, which has devastated Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone. A team of scientists at Washington University believe their study has identified genetic factors behind the mild-to-deadly range of reactions to the virus.
  • The evidence of polygamy is in our genes

    09/26/2014 8:14:22 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 31 replies
    The Washington Post's Speaking of Science ^ | September 25, 2014 | Rachel Feltman
    In the genetic history of our species, the mamas outnumber the papas. A new study in Investigative Genetics reports that females have made a bigger contribution than men. By studying the DNA of 623 males from 51 populations, the researchers found more genetic diversity in the DNA inherited from mothers than they did in the DNA inherited from fathers. At first glance, these results could be taken to mean that there used to be more women than men. But if you know anything about history, it makes more sense to blame reproductive habits: In many cultures, more women reproduced than...