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Keyword: genetics

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  • Cancer-causing mutations yield their secrets

    02/17/2012 11:05:15 AM PST · by neverdem · 4 replies
    Nature News ^ | 15 February 2012 | Heidi Ledford
    Changes to metabolism disrupt cells' ability to differentiate. The mystery of how mutations in a gene called isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) cause brain cancer and leukaemia is beginning to be unravelled. Researchers have discovered that the mutations cause the production of an enzyme that can reconfigure on–off switches across the genome and stop cells from differentiating. The findings, published in three papers today in Nature1–3, could be used in the development of drugs for cancers with these mutations — a search that is already under way in many pharmaceutical companies. Some cancer patients could benefit from new treatments that target...
  • The Case of the Missing Genes

    02/16/2012 7:37:24 PM PST · by neverdem · 11 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 16 February 2012 | Jocelyn Kaiser
    Enlarge Image Imperfect. The average person may be walking around with about 20 inactive genes. Credit: Jan Kranendonk/iStockphoto You might assume that if you're healthy, you have a normal, healthy genome. But there is no such thing as a normal genome—all of us carry a number of mutated and nonfunctioning genes. Now researchers have estimated exactly how many such genes there are in the average person: about 100, including 20 mutated and completely inactive genes. We probably don't need some of this DNA and in some cases could even be better off without it. Soon after researchers began to...
  • Did Easter Islanders Mix It Up With South Americans?

    02/08/2012 7:20:56 AM PST · by Theoria · 16 replies · 1+ views
    Science ^ | 06 Feb 2012 | Andrew Lawler
    The scattered islands of the vast Pacific Ocean were settled by seafarers who set out from the eastern coasts and islands of Asia and traveled thousands of kilometers by boat. Meanwhile pre-Columbian South America was populated by people who crossed a now-vanished land bridge far to the north. Did these two groups ever meet in the New World? There's a good chance of that, according to a new study, which finds evidence that Easter Islanders may have reached South America and mixed with the Native Americans already there. University of Oslo immunologist Erik Thorsby first began analyzing the people of...
  • That myth-crap of 'Khazars,' pushed by R. Islamists and Neo-Nazis alike

    01/18/2012 2:41:19 PM PST · by PRePublic · 38 replies
    Ever heard about the 'Khazar' myth pushed by the Neo-Nazis/KKK? In fact, Jews are both a nation and a religion. the percentage of those with any roots in khazaria is so minimal, that there was only one non-historian "writer" that came up with the idea to say that the percentage is higher. As a penpal who is of Jewish background told me once: 'Before the WW2 Were were told to go BACK to Palestine where we came from... now the same haters don't even grant us that...' Hitler VS Khazar mythOddly enough, Hitler's "aryanism" and anti-Jewish sick obession was AGAINST...
  • Genes Important to Keep Brain Sharp Through Old Age

    01/19/2012 5:54:05 AM PST · by Pharmboy · 21 replies
    Live Science ^ | 18 January 2012 | Jennifer Welsh
    A person's intelligence is mostly inherited, it's in their genes, but whether a person can expect to be a clever grandma or grandpa relies on both genes and environment. "Until now, we have not had an estimate of how much genetic differences affect how people's intelligence changes across the lifetime," study researcher Ian Deary, of the University of Edinburgh in the United Kingdom, said in an email to LiveScience. "These new results mean that researchers can seek both environmental and genetic contributionsto successful cognitive aging." Previous studies of the genetics of intelligence have been performed on sets of twins or...
  • Genome Study Points to Adaptation in Early African-Americans

    01/08/2012 2:22:04 PM PST · by neverdem · 24 replies · 2+ views
    NY Times ^ | January 2, 2012 | NICHOLAS WADE
    Researchers scanning the genomes of African-Americans say they see evidence of natural selection as their ancestors adapted to the harsh conditions of their new environment in America. The scientists, led by Li Jin of the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Shanghai, report in the journal Genome Research that certain disease-causing variant genes became more common in African-Americans after their ancestors reached American shores — perhaps because they conferred greater, offsetting benefits. Other gene variants have become less common, the researchers say, like the gene for sickle cell hemoglobin, which in its more common single-dose form protects against malaria. The Shanghai...
  • Brain gene activity changes through life

    12/25/2011 11:22:02 PM PST · by neverdem · 9 replies
    Science News ^ | November 19th, 2011 | Laura Sanders
    Studies track biochemical patterns from just after conception to old age Human brains all work pretty much the same and use roughly the same genes in the same way to build and maintain the infrastructure that makes people who they are, two new studies show. And by charting the brain’s genetic activity from before birth to old age, the studies reveal that the brain continually remodels itself in predictable ways throughout life. In addition to uncovering details of how the brain grows and ages, the results may help scientists better understand what goes awry in brain disorders such as schizophrenia...
  • Genetic Study Confirms: First Dogs Came from East Asia

    11/23/2011 7:43:40 PM PST · by decimon · 21 replies
    KTH Royal Institute of Technology ^ | November 23, 2011 | Katarina Ahlfort
    Researchers at KTH say they have found further proof that the wolf ancestors of today’s domesticated dogs can be traced to southern East Asia — findings that run counter to theories placing the cradle of the canine line in the Middle East.Dr Peter Savolainen, KTH researcher in evolutionary genetics, says a new study released Nov. 23 confirms that an Asian region south of the Yangtze River was the principal and probably sole region where wolves were domesticated by humans. Data on genetics, morphology and behaviour show clearly that dogs are descended from wolves, but there’s never been scientific consensus on...
  • Our Tax Dollars At Work - Rent Fraud

    11/13/2011 10:39:24 AM PST · by BagCamAddict · 7 replies
    YouTube ^ | 08-04-11 | Judge Judy
    EVERY tax payer in this country needs to watch this video. This is why the "intentionally unemployed" vote Democrat - because our "Government" gives them free rent, free college tuition, free food, free cell phones... This is where our tax dollars go. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VuCKkOkQcHY And after watching this video, every one of us needs to send the video to our "politicians."
  • Concerns Raised about Genetically Engineered Mosquitoes

    10/31/2011 2:12:46 PM PDT · by dubyagee · 26 replies
    New York Times ^ | Oct 30, 2011 | Andrew Pollack
    Researchers on Sunday reported initial signs of success from the first release into the environment of mosquitoes engineered to pass a lethal gene to their offspring, killing them before they reach adulthood.
  • Focus Issue: Recruiting Players for a Game of ERK

    10/29/2011 10:23:33 PM PDT · by neverdem · 2 replies
    Science Signaling ^ | 25 October 2011 | Nancy R. Gough
    Sci. Signal., 25 October 2011 Vol. 4, Issue 196, p. eg9 [DOI: 10.1126/scisignal.2002601] EDITORIAL GUIDES Focus Issue: Recruiting Players for a Game of ERK Nancy R. Gough1* 1 Editor of Science Signaling, American Association for the Advancement of Science, 1200 New York Avenue, N.W., Washington, DC 20005, USA. Abstract: The extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK) pathway is one of the superfamily of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways. Signals transmitted by this kinase cascade activate a pair of related proteins, ERK1 and ERK2. Research published in Science Signaling shows that, despite the wealth of knowledge about this pathway, previously unknown functions continue to...
  • Iceman stories begin arriving!

    10/18/2011 10:34:58 AM PDT · by FritzG · 18 replies · 1+ views
    Dienekes' Anthropology Blog ^ | 17 Oct 2011 | Dienekes
    The National Geographic has info, a teaser for an October 26 Nova special: The genetic results add both information and intrigue. From his genes, we now know that the Iceman had brown hair and brown eyes and that he was probably lactose intolerant and thus could not digest milk—somewhat ironic, given theories that he was a shepherd. Not surprisingly, he is more related to people living in southern Europe today than to those in North Africa or the Middle East, with close connections to geographically isolated modern populations in Sardinia, Sicily, and the Iberian Peninsula. The DNA analysis also revealed...
  • Gene therapy and stem cells unite

    10/13/2011 6:30:34 PM PDT · by CutePuppy · 5 replies
    BBC ^ | October 12, 2011 | James Gallagher
    Two of the holy grails of medicine - stem cell technology and precision gene therapy - have been united for the first time in humans, say scientists.It means patients with a genetic disease could, one day, be treated with their own cells. A study in Nature corrected a mutation in stem cells made from a patient with a liver disease. Researchers said this was a "critical step" towards devising treatments, but safety tests were still needed. At the moment, stem cells created from a patient with a genetic illness cannot be used to cure the disease as those cells would...
  • Christian Professor Claims Genetics Disproves Historical Adam

    08/27/2011 10:07:19 AM PDT · by fishtank · 142 replies · 1+ views
    Institute for Creation Research ^ | 8-26-11 | Brian Thomas
    National Public Radio recently interviewed Trinity Western University biologist Dennis Venema, who stated his belief that humans did not descend from Adam and Eve.1 Venema, an evangelical evolutionist, claimed that genetics studies show "there is no way we can be traced back to a single couple."2 Do the data really contradict the biblical account of human history? "Given the genetic variation of people today, [Venema] says scientists can't get that [starting] population size below 10,000 people at any time in our evolutionary history," NPR reported.2 But this claim fails for three reasons. First, it relies on the presumption of "evolutionary...
  • Human Excrement to Blame for Coral Decline

    08/19/2011 12:07:15 PM PDT · by neverdem · 22 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 17 August 2011 | Gisela Telis
    Enlarge Image Coral killer. Bacteria found in human excrement cause white pox disease, which bares coral skeletons and kills their tissue. Credit: James W. Porter/University of Georgia Coral reef ecologists have laid a persistent and troubling puzzle to rest. The elkhorn coral, named for its resemblance to elk antlers and known for providing valuable marine habitat, was once the Caribbean's most abundant reef builder. But the "redwood of the coral forest" has declined 90% over the past decade, in part due to highly contagious white pox disease, which causes large lesions that bare the coral's white skeleton and kill...
  • Suicide-Bombing Bacteria Could Fight Infections

    08/19/2011 11:39:20 AM PDT · by neverdem · 5 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 16 August 2011 | Sara Reardon
    Enlarge Image Guerrilla tactics. Biologists have created synthetically engineered E. coli (left) that explode and kill pathogenic P. aeruginosa (right). Credit: CDC Like any good military unit, infectious bacteria have access to numerous weapons and efficient communication systems. But like soldiers in the field, they're also susceptible to suicide bombers. Researchers have used the tools of synthetic biology to create an Escherichia coli cell that can infiltrate foreign bacteria and explode, killing off the pathogens along with itself. The project, says bioengineer Chueh Loo Poh of Nanyang Technological University in Singapore, was "inspired by nature," particularly by quorum sensing,...
  • Database Finds New Uses for Old Drugs

    08/17/2011 9:31:27 PM PDT · by neverdem · 20 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 17 August 2011 | Kai Kupferschmidt
    Enlarge Image Double whammy. Researchers have turned up a pill against heartburn that could be used to treat lung cancer and an antiepileptic pill that might treat Crohn's disease. Credit: Marina Sirota What if a cheap medicine sold over the counter turned out to be a cure against cancer or another deadly disease? Scientists have devised a new way of predicting such unexpected benefits of existing drugs, and they have confirmed two potential new therapies just to prove the point. "This promises new uses for drugs that have already been tested for their safety and offers a faster and...
  • New leukemia treament exceeds 'wildest expectations'

    08/10/2011 1:39:34 PM PDT · by Nachum · 68 replies
    NBC News ^ | 8/10/11 | Robert Bazell
    Doctors have treated only three leukemia patients, but the sensational results from a single shot could be one of the most significant advances in cancer research in decades. And it almost never happened. In the research published Wednesday, doctors at the University of Pennsylvania say the treatment made the most common type of leukemia completely disappear in two of the patients and reduced it by 70 percent in the third. In each of the patients as much as five pounds of cancerous tissue completely melted away in a few weeks, and a year later it is still gone
  • Animal's genetic code redesigned (scientists create worm with artificial genetic code)

    08/13/2011 1:24:33 PM PDT · by NYer · 15 replies
    BBC ^ | August 11, 2011 | Roland Pease
    Researchers say they have created the first ever animal with artificial information in its genetic code. The technique, they say, could give biologists "atom-by-atom control" over the molecules in living organisms. One expert the BBC spoke to agrees, saying the technique would be seized upon by "the entire biology community".The work by a Cambridge team, which used nematode worms, appears in the Journal of the American Chemical Society.The worms - from the species Caenorhabditis elegans - are 1mm long, with just a thousand cells in their transparent bodies.What makes the newly created animals different is that their genetic code has...
  • Ancient DNA reveals secrets of human history

    08/09/2011 11:36:54 AM PDT · by neverdem · 50 replies
    Nature News ^ | 9 August 2011 | Ewen Callaway
    Modern humans may have picked up key genes from extinct relatives. For a field that relies on fossils that have lain undisturbed for tens of thousands of years, ancient human genomics is moving at breakneck speed. Barely a year after the publication of the genomes of Neanderthals1 and of an extinct human population from Siberia2, scientists are racing to apply the work to answer questions about human evolution and history that would have been unfathomable just a few years ago. The past months have seen a swathe of discoveries, from details about when Neanderthals and humans interbred, to the important...