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Keyword: geology

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  • Can slow creep along thrust faults help forecast megaquakes?

    02/06/2016 10:36:54 AM PST · by JimSEA · 9 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 2/4/2016 | University of California
    In Japan and areas like the Pacific Northwest where megathrust earthquakes are common, scientists may be able to better forecast large quakes based on periodic increases and decreases in the rate of slow, quiet slipping along the fault. This hope comes from a new study by Japanese and UC Berkeley seismologists, looking at the more than 1,000-kilimeter-long fault off northeast Japan where the devastating 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake originated, generating a tsunami that killed thousands. There, the Pacific Plate is trundling under the Japan plate, not only causing megaquakes like the magnitude 9 in 2011, but giving rise to a chain...
  • Icy ebb and flow influenced by hydrothermal activity

    02/03/2016 8:26:28 AM PST · by JimSEA · 14 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 1/29/2016 | Univ of Connecticut
    Hydrothermal activity along the mid-ocean ridge system suggests that the release of molten rock, or magma, in response to changes in sea level plays a significant role in the earth's climate. The last million years of Earth's history was dominated by the cyclic advance and retreat of ice sheets over large swaths of North America. During cold glacial intervals, ice sheets reached as far south as Long Island and Indiana, while during warm interglacial periods the ice rapidly retreated to Greenland. It has long been known that ice ages occur every 40,000 years or so, but the cause of rapid...
  • Ancient rocks of Tetons formed by continental collisions

    02/01/2016 2:13:19 PM PST · by JimSEA · 36 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 1/29/2016 | Univ. of Wyoming
    University of Wyoming scientists have found evidence of continental collisions in Wyoming's Teton Range, similar to those in the Himalayas, dating to as early as 2.68 billion years ago. The research, published Jan. 22 in the journal Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta, shows that plate tectonics were operating in what is now western Wyoming long before the collisions that created the Himalayas starting 40 million years ago. In fact, the remnants of tectonic activity in old rocks exposed in the Tetons point to the world's earliest known continent-continent collision, says Professor Carol Frost of UW's Department of Geology and Geophysics, lead...
  • New study zeros in on plate tectonics' start date

    01/25/2016 10:35:42 AM PST · by JimSEA · 28 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 1/21/2016 | University of Maryland
    Earth has some special features that set it apart from its close cousins in the solar system, including large oceans of liquid water and a rich atmosphere with just the right ingredients to support life as we know it. Earth is also the only planet that has an active outer layer made of large tectonic plates that grind together and dip beneath each other, giving rise to mountains, volcanoes, earthquakes and large continents of land. Geologists have long debated when these processes, collectively known as plate tectonics, first got underway. Some scientists propose that the process began as early as...
  • The Backwards Earthquakes

    12/19/2015 10:02:24 AM PST · by JimSEA · 29 replies
    Eos.org ^ | 12/15/2016 | Erin Ross
    Earthquakes in Idaho's panhandle are usually caused by the Earth's crust pulling apart. So why were earthquakes on 24 April pushing the crust together? Last April, a swarm of earthquakes shook the ground near Sandpoint, Idaho. Unused to shaking, Sandpoint’s residents took notice. So did local media, widely reporting on the events. But it wasn’t the size or location of the earthquakes that surprised scientists. Sandpoint lies along the Lewis and Clark Fault Zone, and previous earthquakes in the region were caused when the Earth’s crust pulled apart, which geologists call extension. But the earthquakes that struck on 24 April...
  • Plate tectonics thanks to plumes?

    11/12/2015 9:11:35 AM PST · by JimSEA · 7 replies
    Science Daily ^ | November 11, 2015 | ETH Zurich
    "Knowing what a chicken looks like and what all the chickens before it looked like doesn't help us to understand the egg," says Taras Gerya. The ETH Professor of Geophysics uses this metaphor to address plate tectonics and the early history of the Earth. The Earth's lithosphere is divided into several plates that are in constant motion, and today's geologists have a good understanding of what drives these plate movements: heavier ocean plates are submerged beneath lighter continental plates along what are known as subduction zones. Once the movement has begun, it is perpetuated due to the weight of the...
  • Could Mount St Helens be about to erupt? Massive magma chamber found below the volcano ...

    11/05/2015 10:25:45 AM PST · by Red Badger · 111 replies
    www.dailymail.co.uk ^ | 12:49 EST, 5 November 2015 | By Richard Gray
    Geologists have discovered a second magma chamber beneath volcano They believe this feeds the smaller chamber directly below the mountain Earthquakes in the area may be a sign of magma pumping between them Geologists still consider Mount St Helens to be of high risk of erupting Its scarred and jagged crater is a reminder of the terrible devastation that Mount St Helens wrought over the Washington countryside 35 years ago. Now a new study of the volcanic plumbing lurking beneath the 8,363ft (2,459 metre) summit suggests the volcano could yet again blow its top in an explosive eruption. Geologists studying...
  • Supervolcanoes likely triggered externally

    11/05/2015 9:03:26 AM PST · by JimSEA · 42 replies
    Science Daily ^ | November 4, 2015 | University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
    Supervolcanoes, massive eruptions with potential global consequences, appear not to follow the conventional volcano mechanics of internal pressure building until the volcano blows. Instead, a new study finds, such massive magma chambers might erupt when the roof above them cracks or collapses. Knowledge of triggering mechanisms is crucial for monitoring supervolcano systems, including ones that lie beneath Yellowstone National Park and Long Valley, California, according to the study led by Patricia Gregg, University of Illinois professor of geology, in collaboration with professor Eric Grosfils of Pomona College and professor Shan de Silva of Oregon State University. The study was published...
  • Large igneous provinces linked to extinction events

    10/30/2015 12:22:44 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 34 replies
    Science Daily ^ | October 30, 2015 | Geological Society of America
    Mass extinction events are sometimes portrayed in illustrations of volcanic eruptions causing widespread destruction. According to Dr. Richard E. Ernst of Carleton University, Ottawa, Canada, expert on Large Igneous Provinces (LIPs), this interpretation may have some truth behind it, but not in the instantaneous way we might think. Ernst will report on his research on 1 November at the Geological Society of America's Annual Meeting in Baltimore, Maryland, USA. The basaltic lava flowing from ancient volcanoes and the portion of magma (liquid rock) emplaced underground can create geologic conditions linked with climate change and, subsequently, extinction events. This climatic effect...
  • New 'geospeedometer' confirms super-eruptions have short fuses

    10/22/2015 11:52:24 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 32 replies
    Science Daily ^ | October 20, 2015 | Vanderbilt University
    Repeatedly throughout Earth's history, giant pools of magma greater than 100 cubic miles in volume have formed a few miles below the surface. They are the sources of super-eruptions -- gigantic volcanic outbursts that throw 100 times more superheated gas, ash and rock into the atmosphere than run-of-the-mill eruptions, enough to blanket continents and plunge the globe into decades-long volcanic winters. Now a team of geologists have developed a new "geospeedometer" that they argue can help resolve this controversy by providing direct measurements of how long the most explosive types of magma existed as melt-rich bodies of crystal-poor magma before...
  • Earth's inner core was formed 1-1.5 billion years ago

    10/11/2015 12:03:37 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 38 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 10/7/2015 | University of Liverpool
    There have been many estimates for when the earth's inner core was formed, but scientists from the University of Liverpool have used new data which indicates that the Earth's inner core was formed 1 -- 1.5 billion years ago as it "froze" from the surrounding molten iron outer core. . . . . In a new study published in Nature, researchers from the University's School of Environmental Sciences analysed magnetic records from ancient igneous rocks and found that there was a sharp increase in the strength of the Earth's magnetic field between 1 and 1.5 billion years ago. This increased...
  • Geologists Discover New Layer in Earths Mantle

    09/25/2015 2:28:37 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 79 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | 9/24/2015 | Staff
    New research led by Dr Hauke Marquardt of the University of Bayreuth, Germany, suggests the existence of a previously unknown superviscous layer inside our planet: part of the lower mantle where the rock gets 3 times stiffer. Such a layer may explain why tectonic plate slabs seem to pool at 930 miles (1,500 km) under Indonesia and South Americas Pacific coast. The Earth has many layers, like an onion. Most layers are defined by the minerals that are present. Essentially, we have discovered a new layer in the Earth. This layer isnt defined by the minerals present, but by the...
  • Meteorite-hunting scientists stunned by crowd-funding support after government grants dry up

    09/08/2015 9:41:46 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 10 replies
    Australian Broadcasting ^ | 3/2/2015 | Loretta Florancestry
    A group of scientists who travel to the Nullarbor to collect meteorites have received thousands of dollars from the public after they were unable to secure a government grant for their research. Since 2007, when PhD student Alastair Tait and his team from Melbourne first began their 3,400-kilometre road trips to the desert, they claimed to have found more than 20 per cent of Australia's recorded meteorites. Their research findings have been published in international journals, including Geochimica et Cosmochimica Acta and Meteoritics and Planetary Science.
  • Hiker Burned, 2 Dogs Die After Leaping Into Idaho Hot Spring

    08/28/2015 5:20:37 PM PDT · by ponygirl · 31 replies
    NBC News ^ | August 25, 2015 | Reuters
    SALMON, Idaho A man hiking through a national forest in Idaho suffered severe burns and his two dogs were scalded to death when both canines plunged into a hot spring and he jumped in after them to try to save his pets, authorities said on Tuesday. The freak accident occurred last week in the Panther Creek Hot Springs, a popular spot in the sprawling Salmon-Challis National Forest, about 50 miles (80 km) northwest of the tourist town of Salmon in east-central Idaho. Temperatures at Panther Creek, usually mild enough for human bathing, had apparently grown dangerously high, possibly from...
  • Earth's mineralogy unique in the cosmos

    08/27/2015 2:38:18 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 27 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 8/26/2015 | Carnegie Institution, Robert Hazen
    New research from a team led by Carnegie's Robert Hazen predicts that Earth has more than 1,500 undiscovered minerals and that the exact mineral diversity of our planet is unique and could not be duplicated anywhere in the cosmos. Minerals form from novel combinations of elements. These combinations can be facilitated by both geological activity, including volcanoes, plate tectonics, and water-rock interactions, and biological activity, such as chemical reactions with oxygen and organic material.
  • Pilanesberg Ring Dike Complex

    08/06/2015 7:38:26 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 2 replies
    NASA Earth Observatory ^ | 7/22/2015 | NASA
    While big game animals such as lions, leopards, elephants, rhinos, and water buffaloes draw most visitors to Pilanesberg National Park, the land these animals live on is just as compelling. Pilanesberg is located in one of the worlds largest and best preserved alkaline ring dike complexesa rare circular feature that emerged from the subterranean plumbing of an ancient volcano. The Operational Land Imager (OLI) on Landsat 8 acquired this image of the park in South Africa on June 19, 2015. Seen from above, the concentric rings of hills and valleys make a near perfect circle, with different rings composed of...
  • Florida's African Connection

    08/04/2015 8:00:31 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 22 replies
    Florida Geological Survey ^ | Summer, 2015 | Jonathan D. AArthur
    Would it surprise you to learn that some of the deep basement rocks underlying Florida were once part of Africa? Floridas geologic history has been traced back to the early Paleozoic Era, 540 251 million years ago (mya), largely through the study of rock samples obtained from oil test wells drilled in northern Florida and nearby Georgia and Alabama. In Florida, the top of the Paleozoic strata ranges from approximately 3,000 to 8,000 feet below land surface and they consist of igneous and metamorphic rocks overlain by sandstones and shales. The sedimentary basement strata were found to contain macrofossils...
  • Earth's Magnetic Shield Is Much Older Than Thought

    07/31/2015 9:55:30 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 21 replies
    Science Daily ^ | 07/30/2015 | J. A. Tarduno, R. D. Cottrell, W. J. Davis, F. Nimmo, R. K. Bono.
    Since 2010, the best estimate of the age of Earth's magnetic field has been 3.45 billion years. But now a researcher responsible for that finding has new data showing the magnetic field is far older. John Tarduno, a geophysicist at the University of Rochester and a leading expert on Earth's magnetic field, and his team of researchers say they believe the Earth's magnetic field is at least four billion years old.
  • Earthquake Fact & Earthquake Fiction

    06/02/2015 3:27:40 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 34 replies
    USGS ^ | May/2015 | USGS
    Fact or Fiction? broken earth cartoon FACT: Earthquakes are sudden rolling or shaking events caused by movement under the Earths surface. An earthquake is the ground shaking caused by a sudden slip on a fault. Stresses in the earth's outer layer push the sides of the fault together. Stress builds up and the rocks slip suddenly, releasing energy in waves that travel through the earth's crust and cause the shaking that we feel during an earthquake. Faults are caused by the tectonic plates grinding and scraping against each other as they continuously and slowly move. In California, for example, there...
  • Traces of Ancient Earthquakes

    05/14/2015 12:45:29 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 16 replies
    Live Science ^ | 4/22/2016 | Becky Oskin
    PASADENA, Calif. Shattered cave formations in the central United States may preserve one of the longest records of powerful earthquakes in this region. Historical records from European settlers provide vivid accounts of deadly earthquakes in states such as Missouri, Tennessee and Illinois. For instance, in 1811 and 1812, people saw the ground ripple like ocean waves when the New Madrid Fault Zone unleashed earthquakes thought to be greater than magnitude 8. However, no written accounts exist from before Europeans arrived. And most earthquake faults in the Midwest are hidden deep beneath the surface, so scientists can't dig into the...
  • Scientists monitor undersea volcanic eruption off Oregon coast

    05/01/2015 5:31:59 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 15 replies
    dailymail.co.uk ^ | Courtney Sherwood
    An undersea volcano about 300 miles (480 km) off Oregon's coast has been spewing lava for the past seven days, confirming forecasts made last fall and giving researchers unique insight into a hidden ocean hot spot, a scientist said on Friday. Researchers know of two previous eruptions by the volcano, dubbed "Axial Seamount" for its location along the axis of an underwater mountain ridge, Oregon State University geologist Bill Chadwick said on Friday. But those 1998 and 2011 eruptions were detected months or years afterward, Chadwick added. Last year, researchers connected monitoring gear to an undersea cable that, for the...
  • The Story of Earth: How Life and Rocks Co-Evolved

    03/31/2015 8:58:02 PM PDT · by onedoug · 27 replies
    Carnegie Institution for Science ^ | 29 JUL 2014 | Robert Hazen, Lecturer
    Incredible (IMHO) exposition of the co-dependence of "evolutionary" minerology and biology.
  • Why Is Denver a Mile High

    03/25/2015 7:05:19 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 82 replies
    University of Colorado Boulder researchers propose a novel mechanism to explain the regions high elevation No one really knows how the High Plains got so high. About 70 million years ago, eastern Colorado, southeastern Wyoming, western Kansas, and western Nebraska were near sea level. Since then, the region rose about 2 kilometers, leading to some head scratching at geology conferences. Now researchers at the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences (CIRES) and the Department of Geological Sciences at the University of Colorado Boulder have proposed a new way to explain the uplift: water trapped deep below Earths crust may...
  • Volcano Monitors Proposed For Mount Hood, A "Very High Threat" Volcano

    03/19/2015 12:20:01 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 33 replies
    The Oregonian ^ | 3/17/2015 | Staff
    PORTLAND -- The U.S. Geological Survey and the Cascades Volcano Observatory hope to install four volcano monitoring stations on the upper flanks of Mount Hood.
  • Amazingly, the earths water is really a miniscule amount

    05/15/2012 10:58:01 AM PDT · by central_va · 43 replies
    nasa.gov ^ | 5/15/12 | mother earth
    The blue ball represents all of the earths water. Not that much...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- All the Water on Planet Earth

    05/15/2012 4:39:34 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies
    NASA ^ | May 15, 2012 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: How much of planet Earth is made of water? Very little, actually. Although oceans of water cover about 70 percent of Earth's surface, these oceans are shallow compared to the Earth's radius. The above illustration shows what would happen is all of the water on or near the surface of the Earth were bunched up into a ball. The radius of this ball would be only about 700 kilometers, less than half the radius of the Earth's Moon, but slightly larger than Saturn's moon Rhea which, like many moons in our outer Solar System, is mostly water ice. How...
  • Volume of world's oldest water estimated

    12/18/2014 1:33:29 AM PST · by WhiskeyX · 51 replies
    BBC ^ | 17 December 2014 Last updated at 20:25 ET | Rebecca, BBC
    The world's oldest water, which is locked deep within the Earth's crust, is present at a far greater volume than was thought, scientists report. The liquid, some of which is billions of years old, is found many kilometres beneath the ground. Researchers estimate there is about 11m cubic kilometres (2.5m cu miles) of it - more water than all the world's rivers, swamps and lakes put together. The study was presented at the American Geophysical Union Fall Meeting. It has also been published in the journal Nature. The team found that the water was reacting with the rock to release...
  • UW team explores large, restless volcanic field in Chile

    12/05/2014 9:57:57 AM PST · by JimSEA · 3 replies
    University of Wisconsin ^ | 11/28/2014 | David Tenenbaum
    If Brad Singer knew for sure what was happening three miles under an odd-shaped lake in the Andes, he might be less eager to spend a good part of his career investigating a volcanic field that has erupted 36 times during the last 25,000 years. As he leads a large scientific team exploring a region in the Andes called Laguna del Maule, Singer hopes the area remains quiet. But the primary reason to expend so much effort on this area boils down to one fact: The rate of uplift is among the highest ever observed by satellite measurement for a...
  • Scientists may be cracking mystery of big 1872 earthquake

    12/01/2014 9:36:18 AM PST · by JimSEA · 30 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 11/27/2014 | Sandi Doughton
    Geologists may be close to cracking one of the biggest seismological mysteries in the Pacific Northwest: the origin of a powerful earthquake that rattled seven states and provinces when Ulysses S. Grant was president. Preliminary evidence points to a newly discovered fault near the town of Entiat in Chelan County, Wash. The find adds to a growing body of evidence that Central and Eastern Washington are more quake-prone than previously thought, and will help refine seismic risks in an area that's home to 1.5 million people, more than a dozen hydropower dams and the Hanford nuclear reservation, said Craig Weaver,...
  • Theres no getting around Jesus teaching on the age of the earth

    11/25/2014 7:41:28 AM PST · by fishtank · 102 replies
    Creation Ministries International ^ | 11-25-2014 | Keaton Halley
    From the beginning of creationwhat did Jesus mean? Theres no getting around Jesus teaching on the age of the earth by Keaton Halley Published: 25 November 2014 (GMT+10) Not everyone welcomes this news, but some of Jesus statements imply, of necessity, that the world is young. This is something I regularly point out when I speak in churches about creation, and it is a theme on which we have written previously, in articles such as Jesus on the age of the earth and in chapter 9 of Refuting Compromise. To reiterate the argument briefly, Jesus claimed that human history began...
  • Newly discovered fossil could prove a problem for creationists

    11/07/2014 2:43:53 PM PST · by Alter Kaker · 250 replies
    Washington Post ^ | November 5, 2014 | Rachel Feltman
    Researchers report that they've found the missing link between an ancient aquatic predator and its ancestors on land. Ichthyosaurs, the dolphin-like reptiles that lived in the sea during the time of the dinosaurs, evolved from terrestrial creatures that made their way back into the water over time. But the fossil record for the lineage has been spotty, without a clear link between land-based reptiles and the aquatic ichthyosaurs scientists know came after. Now, researchers report in Nature that they've found that link an amphibious ancestor of the swimming ichthyosaurs named Cartorhynchus lenticarpus. "Many creationists have tried to portray ichthyosaurs...
  • Snail Shells Show High-Rise Plateau Is Much Lower

    11/07/2014 10:11:50 AM PST · by JimSEA · 1 replies
    UAW Today (University of Washington) ^ | 9/22/2014 | Vince Stricherz
    The Tibetan Plateau in south-central Asia, because of its size, elevation and impact on climate, is one of the worlds greatest geological oddities. The Zhada Basin on the southwest Tibetan Plateau, with the Himalayas to the south.Joel Saylor At about 960,000 square miles it covers slightly more land area than Alaska, Texas and California combined, and its elevation is on the same scale as Mount Rainier in the Cascade Range of Washington state. Because it rises so high into the atmosphere, it helps bring monsoons over India and other nations to the south while the plateau itself remains generally arid.
  • Low Oxygen on Earth May Have Held Up Animal Evolution

    11/07/2014 9:54:01 AM PST · by JimSEA · 19 replies
    Washington Post ^ | Rachel Feltman
    Why did complex life evolve precisely when it did? According to a new study, simpler life forms may have been waiting on a proper oxygen supply -- for as long as a billion years.
  • Chicxulub Didnt Do It All By Itself

    10/17/2014 11:40:09 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 24 replies
    Geology Times ^ | 10/10/2014 | Staff
    Geoscientists now overwhelmingly agree that a single large asteroid or comet impact, such as Chicxulub in the Yucatan peninsula of Mexico, could not have been the sole cause of the end-Cretaceous mass extinction. Instead, new research in both planetary/space science and multiple earth-science specialties reveals that concomitant volcanic activity and the associated climate and environmental changes were significant contributing factors in four of the five major mass extinctions in Earth history.
  • Radiometric Dating, A Christian Perspective

    10/06/2014 1:10:19 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 65 replies
    Radiometric dating--the process of determining the age of rocks from the decay of their radioactive elements--has been in widespread use for over half a century. There are over forty such techniques, each using a different radioactive element or a different way of measuring them. It has become increasingly clear that these radiometric dating techniques agree with each other and as a whole, present a coherent picture in which the Earth was created a very long time ago. Further evidence comes from the complete agreement between radiometric dates and other dating methods such as counting tree rings or glacier ice core...
  • Diamond Mines in Canada

    09/18/2014 6:37:42 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 21 replies
    Geology.com ^ | 09/18/2014 | Hobart King
    Throughout the 20th century most people would never have thought about Canada being an important producer of diamonds. [1] Their knowledge of diamonds was fixed on mining operations in Africa and diamond trading centers in Europe. All of this started to change in 1991 when two geologists, Chuck Fipke and Stewart Blusson, found evidence of diamond-bearing Kimberlite pipes about 200 miles north of Yellowknife, Northwest Territories. One of these pipes would soon be developed by BHP Billiton into the EKATI Diamond Mine, which produced Canada's first commercial diamonds in 1998.
  • $1tn in rare minerals found under Afghanistan

    09/06/2014 7:27:20 AM PDT · by GonzoII · 36 replies
    The Daily Star ^ | September 06, 2014 | Charles Choi
    Despite being one of the poorest nations in the world, Afghanistan may be sitting on one of the richest troves of minerals in the world, valued at nearly $1 trillion, top science news website Live Science reports quoting US scientists. Afghanistan, a country nearly the size of Texas, is loaded with minerals deposited by the violent collision of the Indian subcontinent with Asia. The US Geological Survey (USGS) began inspecting what mineral resources Afghanistan had after US-led forces drove the Taliban from power in the country in 2004. As it turns out, the Afghanistan Geological Survey staff had kept Soviet...
  • Are Ants the Answer to CO2 Sequestration?

    07/30/2014 9:39:08 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 26 replies
    GSA press release ^ | 7/29/2014 | Staff
    Boulder, Colo., USA A 25-year-long study published in GEOLOGY on 14 July provides the first quantitative measurement of in situ calcium-magnesium silicate mineral dissolution by ants, termites, tree roots, and bare ground. This study reveals that ants are one of the most powerful biological agents of mineral decay yet observed. It may be that an understanding of the geobiology of ant-mineral interactions might offer a line of research on how to "geoengineer" accelerated CO2 consumption by Ca-Mg silicates. Researcher Ronald Dorn of Arizona State University writes that over geological timescales, the dissolution of calcium (Ca) and magnesium (Mg) bearing...
  • Super Volcano is Bigger [YELLOWSTONE]

    07/09/2014 1:13:21 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 29 replies
    www.kulr8.com ^ | Updated: Jul 09, 2014 3:04 PM CST | By Penny Preston
    YELLOWSTONE NATIONAL PARK - The worlds authority on Yellowstones Super Volcano says its more than twice as big as scientists once thought. Does that mean its more likely to blow up soon? Penny Preston found Dr. Robert Smith at his home near Grand Teton, and found the answer. Millions of people visit Yellowstone each year to see its geysers, fumeroles, hot springs, and mud pots. Its the largest concentration of thermal features in the world. The park sits on top of the worlds largest active volcano. The Super Volcano. Its most recent eruption was more than 600,000 years ago. All...
  • How Did Earth Avoid Runaway Global Warming In The Past?

    06/24/2014 8:50:00 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 18 replies
    Science 2.0 ^ | 6/11/2014 | News Staff
    There have been times in our geological history when CO2 levels were 10X what they are today, yet warming was only slightly higher. Unlike what you often read in simplistic media accounts, there are a lot of variables in climate and weather and temperature. It takes a lot of things going wrong to turn Earth into Venus and we have never come close. At the Goldschmidt geochemistry conference in Sacramento, geochemists discussed one such period, but they say we just got lucky - a vast mountain range formed in the middle of the ancient supercontinent, Pangea.
  • Recent Advances in Understanding the Geology of Diamonds

    06/22/2014 1:45:14 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 5 replies
    GIA: Gems and Gemology ^ | Winter, 2013 | Steven B. Shirey and James E. Shigley
    ABSTRACT It has been more than two decades since diamond ages have proven to be up to billions of years older than their host magmas of kimberlite or lamproite. Since then, there have been significant advances in the analysis of diamonds and their mineral inclusions, in the understanding of diamond-forming fluids in the mantle, and in the relationship of diamonds to the deep geology of the continents and the convecting mantle. The occurrence of natural diamonds is remarkable and important to earth studies. This article reviews current thinking of where, how, when, and why natural diamonds form.
  • Mars' minerals could be microbe made

    06/19/2014 4:35:53 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 14 replies
    ABC Science ^ | 5/23/2014 | Stuart Gary
    Friday, 23 May 2014 Stuart Gary ABC New Australian research suggests Martian minerals may have formed from biological rather than geological origins. The findings, reported in the journal Geology, indicate the mineral stevensite, which is found on both Earth and Mars, can be created either in hot, highly alkaline volcanic lakes, or by mineralisation in living microbes. Stevensite is a magnesium-silicate mineral, used a Nubian beauty treatment for several centuries.
  • Which Volcano is the World's Largest?

    06/15/2014 9:44:33 AM PDT · by JimSEA · 9 replies
    Geology News ^ | 6/15/2014 | Hobart King
    Tamu Massif: The Most Massive Volcano Most of the world's largest features are so clearly visible that they have been known and recognized for hundreds of years. One exception is Tamu Massif. It is now recognized to be a single volcano - instead of a volcano complex with multiple vents. Tamu Massif has a footprint that covers more area than any other volcano - about 120,000 square miles (310,800 square kilometers) - an area about the size of New Mexico. It also has a larger mass than any other known single volcano on Earth. How could this enormous volcano have...
  • Why did evolution stall during the 'boring billion'?

    06/12/2014 7:44:28 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 83 replies
    New Scientist ^ | Jeff Hecht
    LONG before evolution on Earth kicked in with a vengeance, it seemed to stall completely. From 1.7 billion years ago, for a billion boring years, Earth remained a slimy, near-static world of algae and microbes. The pace picked up 750 million years ago: glaciers spread, complex animals appeared, and by 520 million years ago the Cambrian revolution an explosion of varied life was under way. The reason for that long stasis has been a mystery. We may now have the answer: the gradual cooling of the planet's interior. Just as turning down a stove burner slows the boiling...
  • A Geologist in Grand Canyon

    06/09/2014 7:37:28 PM PDT · by JimSEA · 6 replies
    UAGIS ^ | 1996 | Steve Rauzi
    Join Arizona Geological Survey geologist Steve Rauzi and a team of Conoco geoscientists as they raft through Grand Canyon examining the Precambrian Chuar Group. The trip, which occurred in 1996, begins at Lees Ferry and ends at river-mile 225. The expedition resulted in two publications by the Arizona Geological Survey: OFR-98-17
  • NASA: Humans on Mars by 2035 is 'primary focus'

    06/01/2014 1:02:02 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 23 replies
    chron.com ^ | May 29, 2014 | Carol Christian |
    NASA has been talking about sending people to Mars by 2035. That goal is still on the books, despite recent upheaval in the space program, according to two of the agency's top scientists. "In the near term, Mars remains our primary focus," Ellen Stofan, NASA's chief scientist said May 15 in a talk at the Royal Institution in London ... ....scientists [also] decided to "redirect" an asteroid into an orbit of the moon and are searching for an asteroid that's an appropriate candidate. "Once we find the right one, we'll use all the technology we've got," he said. "We'll snag...
  • Creeping landslide devouring part of Wyoming town

    04/20/2014 1:11:00 AM PDT · by blueplum · 16 replies
    Sacramento Bee ^ | April 20, 2014 | Matthew Brown
    JACKSON, Wyo. -- What's happening in this Wyoming resort town might be better described as a land creep than a landslide, but the lack of speed has not hindered the sheer power of the moving earth. Over the past two weeks, a piece of East Gros Ventre Butte has slowly collapsed toward the west side of Jackson shearing one hillside home in half, threatening to devour several others and looming ever more ominously over a cluster of businesses below. :snip: By Saturday morning, the shifting earth had caused bulges in a road and a parking lot at the foot...
  • 'Paleo Ale' Brewed From Yeast Found On A 40-Million-Year-Old Whale Fossil

    04/19/2014 2:41:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Popular Science ^ | April Fools' Day, 2014 | Francie Diep
    The beer will be called Bone Dusters Paleo Ale (Hardy har har [Okay, actually, "paleo ale" is pretty good]). The yeast come from the surface of one of the oldest marine mammal fossils ever discovered in the western hemisphere. The idea for the beer came from Jason Osborne, who co-directs a nonprofit dedicated to advancing paleontology and geology. A paleo beer, Osborne thought, would be a great hook to interest non-scientists in fossils. I think many non-scientists are quite interested in fossils already, but I cannot argue against a paleo beer. Will whale-fossil beer really taste that different from other...
  • Massive Hole Discovered Under Antarctica, Bigger Than The Grand Canyon

    01/17/2014 1:18:49 AM PST · by Flotsam_Jetsome · 56 replies
    Forbes ^ | 1/15/2014 | William Pentland
    A giant valley deeper than the Grand Canyon is buried beneath several miles of glacial ice in West Antarctica, according to a new study by British scientists. The sub-glacial canyon is nearly two miles deep, 200 miles long and 15 miles wide.
  • Is the geological column a global sequence? (1-10-2014 article)

    01/10/2014 7:46:50 AM PST · by fishtank · 4 replies
    creation.com ^ | 1-10-2014 | Michael J. Oard
    Is the geological column a global sequence? by Michael J. Oard Creationist geologists are not yet agreed over whether the geological column represents an exact sequence of Flood events or not. Local stratigraphic sections seem to line up with the general order of the geological column at hundreds of locations around the world. But there are many problems with the details. For example, 1) the geological column is a vertical or stratigraphic representation abstracted from rock units that are mainly found laterally adjacent to each other in the field, 2) new fossil discoveries continue to expand fossil stratigraphic ranges, 3)...