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  • 'Godzilla Platypus' Fossil Discovered in Australia

    11/06/2013 5:47:04 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 10 replies
    CBS News ^ | November 5, 2013 | DANIELLE ELLIOT
    Paleontologists have long believed that the platypus is one of the few species that can trace a direct line back to the beginning of time. Now, a new study is changing that image. Researchers say a tooth discovered in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area in Queensland, Australia, belongs to a different, extinct platypus species. "Discovery of this new species was a shock to us because prior to this, the fossil record suggested that the evolutionary tree of platypuses was relatively linear one," Dr. Michael Archer of the University of New South Wales, a co-author of the study, said in a...
  • Scans give 3D look at Coughton Court’s priest hole

    12/01/2016 2:00:42 PM PST · by fishtank · 22 replies
    Stratford-upon-Avon Herald ^ | 30th November 2016 | Chris Smith
    Scans give 3D look at Coughton Court’s priest hole By Chris Smith - 30th November 2016 1 1694 One of the 3D images of the priest hole at Coughton Court which have been produced by researchers at the University of Nottingham. THE first 3D images of a hiding-hole at Coughton Court that was used by 17th-century Catholic priests escaping religious persecution have been created by university researchers. The priest hole was first discovered in the 1850s in Coughton – a key building in the Gunpowder Plot of 1605 – hidden in a turret of the main gatehouse, concealed between the...
  • Archaeological excavation unearths evidence of turkey domestication 1,500 years ago

    11/23/2016 10:15:55 AM PST · by Red Badger · 9 replies
    phys.org ^ | November 21, 2016 | Provided by: Field Museum
    Turkey eggshells and bones from an offering 1,500 years ago in Oaxaca, Mexico. Credit: © Linda Nicholas, The Field Museum. ================================================================================================================================ The turkeys we'll be sitting down to eat on Thursday have a history that goes way back. Archaeologists have unearthed a clutch of domesticated turkey eggs used as a ritual offering 1,500 years ago in Oaxaca, Mexico—some of the earliest evidence of turkey domestication. "Our research tells us that turkeys had been domesticated by 400-500 AD," explains Field Museum archaeologist Gary Feinman, one of the paper's authors. "People have made guesses about turkey domestication based on the presence or...
  • Extremely rare and ancient 'thinking man' jug discovered in Israel

    11/23/2016 7:00:16 AM PST · by Red Badger · 25 replies
    www.ibtimes.co.uk ^ | November 23, 2016 13:54 GMT | By Hannah Osborne
    Excavators unearth the ancient 'thinking man' jug at at an archaeological site in Yehud, Israel (Israel Antiquities Authority) ================================================================================================================================== An ancient jug bearing the image of a "reflective" person has been discovered in Israel. The vessel dates back to the Middle Bronze Age and is believed to be approximately 3,800 years old. Archaeologists at the site in Yehud said similar pottery jugs have never before been found in the country. The jug is believed to have been a funeral offering to a "respected member of the ancient settlement," a statement from Israel Antiquities Authority said. It was found alongside daggers,...
  • SunkenCiv ?

    08/04/2016 5:08:02 AM PDT · by nuconvert · 64 replies
    ā€ˇSunkenCiv hasn't posted anything since 7ā€ˇ/ā€ˇ11ā€ˇ/ā€ˇ2016ā€ˇ ā€ˇ9ā€ˇ:ā€ˇ37ā€ˇ:ā€ˇ18ā€ˇ ā€ˇAM. Anyone know anything?
  • Earliest known stone version of Ten Commandments up for auction

    11/16/2016 10:34:17 AM PST · by Red Badger · 17 replies
    CNN ^ | Updated 9:36 PM ET, Tue November 15, 2016 | By Georgia McCafferty
    The earliest known stone inscription of the Ten Commandments is being auctioned in Beverly Hills on November 16, with an opening bid of $250,000 -- and a stipulation that any owner must put the tablet on public display. Described as a "national treasure" of Israel, the stone was first uncovered in 1913 during excavations for a railroad station near Yavneh in Israel and is the only intact tablet version of the Commandments thought to exist.
  • NEW BLOG: Top ten Battles in history (EVENTS IN HUMAN HISTORY)

    11/01/2016 7:22:18 AM PDT · by mainestategop · 34 replies
    mainestategop ^ | Kyle Weissman
    MAINESTATEGOP AND THE NEW ENGLAND ALLIANCE FOR LIBERTY AND FREE MARKETS PRESENTS A NEW BLOG Ā EVENTS IN HUMAN HISTORY BY KYLE WEISSMAN Ā We've had many history articles on our blog, The story of The Battle Of Lepanto being our best one, we've had many requests for more history related articles. So, we're presenting a new blog, EVENTS IN HUMAN HISTORY by our very own Kyle Weissman.Ā  Kyle Weissman is one of our original founders of the New England Alliance For Liberty and Free Markets, He has been very very active in the free state movement in New Hampshire and...
  • Don't Diss the Dark Ages

    10/28/2016 8:01:09 AM PDT · by Lorianne · 20 replies
    Of Two Minds ^ | 25 October 2016 | Charles Hugh Smith
    Once dissed as The Dark Ages, the Medieval Era is more properly viewed as a successful adaptation to the challenges of the post-Western Roman Empire era. The decline of the Western Roman Empire was the result of a constellation of challenges, including (but not limited to) massive new incursions of powerful Germanic tribes, a widening chasm between the Western and the Eastern Roman Empire (Byzantium), plague, an onerous tax burden on the non-elite classes, weak leadership, the dominance of a self-serving elite (sound familiar?) and last but not least, the expansion of an unproductive rabble in Rome that had to...
  • Earliest Ten Commandments Tablet On Auction in Beverly Hills

    10/25/2016 5:18:14 AM PDT · by SJackson · 72 replies
    Jewish Press ^ | October 25th, 2016
    Three views of the Ten Commandments marble slab on auction Three views of the Ten Commandments marble slab on auction Photo Credit: Heritage Auctions The earliest-known stone inscription of the Ten Commandments will be offered Nov. 16, 2016 by Heritage Auctions in the Living Torah Museum Auction in Beverly Hills, California, Art Daily reported Tuesday. The tablet is the centerpiece of an offering of Bible-related historical artifacts, researched and authenticated, property of the Living Torah Museum in Brooklyn, NY. The opening bid on the Ten Commandments is $250,000. David Michaels, Director of Antiquities for Heritage Auctions, suggested “there is nothing...
  • Roman coins ID'd in Japanese ruins, but their origin baffles

    10/18/2016 7:08:04 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 16 replies
    Associated Press ^ | Oct 18, 2016 9:18 PM EDT | Mari Yamaguchi
    The eyes of a visiting archaeologist lit up when he was shown the 10 tiny, tarnished discs that had sat unnoticed in storage for two and a half years at a dig on a southern Japan island. He had been to archaeological sites in Italy and Egypt, and recognized the “little round things” as old coins, including a few likely dating to the Roman Empire. “I was so excited I almost forgot what I was there for, and the coins were all we talked about,” said Toshio Tsukamoto of the Gangoji Institute for Research of Cultural Property in Nara, an...
  • 'It just got much more complicated': Why the discovery of HMS Terror only raises more questions

    10/11/2016 9:07:48 AM PDT · by jerod · 12 replies
    Mystery still surrounds what happened after the Franklin Expedition ships were abandoned in 1848 Even though HMS Terror has been found, the wreck's discovery in no way marks the end of the mystery surrounding how the Franklin Expedition met its grim demise in the mid-19th century in the icy waters of what is now Nunavut. As much as its location had been long sought, the wreck's revelation last month only serves up more questions about the ill-fated British polar mission led by John Franklin in search of the elusive Northwest Passage. "It's not like it's a solution," says Russell Potter,...
  • Roman bullets tell story of 1,800-year-old attack on Scottish fort

    10/07/2016 10:27:03 AM PDT · by sparklite2 · 15 replies
    Fox News ^ | October 07, 2016 | Tom Metcalfe
    Several different types of sling bullets have been found at the site, from small lead bullets drilled with holes that the researchers think were designed to make a whistling noise in flight and terrorize their targets, to the largest lemon-shaped sling bullets, which weigh up to 2 ounces. "The interesting thing is that all the whistling sling bullets are from the Roman camp on the south face of the hill fort, so clearly they are using different sling bullets for different purposes," Nicholson told Live Science.
  • Roman coins discovered in ruins of Japanese castle

    09/28/2016 11:56:53 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 21 replies
    fox news ^ | 09/28/2016
    The coins were excavated from the ruins of Katsuren Castle in Okinawa Prefecture, according to the Japan Times, noting that this is the country’s first discovery of its kind. Citing the Board of Education in the city of Uruma, the Japan Times reports that the four copper coins are believed to be from the third to fourth centuries. ... X-ray analysis of the coins has apparently revealed the image of Emperor Constantine I and a soldier carrying a spear. Each coin measures 0.6 inches to 0.8 inches in diameter, according to the report.
  • First Temple-Era Gate Shrine Unearthed in Israel [PHOTOS]

    09/28/2016 9:23:26 AM PDT · by Lera · 28 replies
    Breaking Israel News ^ | 9/28/16 | Jonathan Benedek
    Archaeologists have unearthed a city-gate and shrine dating to the First Temple Era. An Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) team headed by Sa'ar Ganor discovered the ruins in the Tel Lachish National Park. "Tel Lachish was the most important city in Judea, after Jerusalem," Ganor told Tazpit Press Service (TPS). "This is the biggest city-gate we have found in the Land of Israel." "The size of the gate is consistent our historical and archaeological data that indicates Lachish was a major city and the most important one after Jerusalem," Ganor said. The city gate is approximately 24 by 24 meters in...
  • Listen To The World's Oldest-Known Melody (1400 BC)

    09/27/2016 10:12:31 AM PDT · by blam · 50 replies
    Fox News Science - Newser ^ | 9-27-2016 | Elizabeth Armstrong Moore
    Elizabeth Armstrong Moore September 27, 2016 In 1950, a collection of 29 tablets was discovered in the ruins of Ugarit, an ancient city in the northern region of present-day Syria, but only one had survived the intervening centuries well enough to be deciphered. Known as H6, the 3,500-year-old clay tablet revealed a simple hymn specifying the use of nine lyre strings and the intervals between them, much like an "ancient guitar tab," reports ClassicFM, which has recently picked up the story. The resulting melody, it says, isn't just the oldest discovered in the world, but "utterly enchanting." Musician and composer...
  • Unearthed Where David Battled Goliath

    09/15/2016 9:16:33 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 15 replies
    Algemeiner ^ | September 11, 2016 | Maayan Jaffe-Hoffman
    Archaeologists believe they have found the location of the battle between David and Goliath, narrated in the Book of Samuel, in a mysterious two-gated city from the early 10th century. Known by its modern name, Khirbet Qeiyafa, the site is located in the the Elah Valley, 20 miles southwest of Jerusalem. The excavation project took nearly seven years, and was led by Professor Yosef Garfinkel, the Yigal Yadin Chair of Archeology at Hebrew UniversityĀ’s Institute of Archeology in Jerusalem, together with SaĀ’ar Ganor from the Israel Antiquities Authority and Professor Michal Hazel of Southern Adventist University of Tennessee. Through the...
  • Oldest textile dyed indigo blue found [6200 yrs]

    09/14/2016 8:25:25 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 22 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 09/13/2016 | Staff
    George Washington University researcher has identified a 6,200-year-old indigo-blue fabric from Huaca, Peru, making it one of the oldest-known cotton textiles in the world and the oldest known textile decorated with indigo blue. Credit: Lauren Urana The discovery marks the earliest use of indigo as a dye, a technically challenging color to produce. According to Jeffrey Splitstoser, lead author of a paper on the discovery and assistant research professor of anthropology at the George Washington University, the finding speaks to the sophisticated textile technology ancient Andean people developed 6,200 years ago. "Some of the world's most significant technological achievements were...
  • Ancient Egyptian mummy's face reconstructed with 3D printing

    08/31/2016 10:54:36 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 26 replies
    www.ibtimes.co.uk ^ | August 31, 2016 13:38 BST | By Léa Surugue
    The face of an ancient female Egyptian mummy has been reconstructed with the help of 3D printing and forensic science techniques, an important step to better understand who she was. Other crucial details about her health have also been gathered, completing the picture. This reconstruction was only made possible due to the work of a multi-disciplinary team led by scientists at Melbourne University, combining medical research, forensic science, computerised tomographic (CT) scanning, 3D printing, Egyptology and art. It all started when Dr Ryan Jefferies, curator at the University's Harry Brookes Allen Museum of Anatomy and Pathology, stumbled across the skull...
  • The Rock-Hewn Churches of Lalibela

    08/25/2016 10:50:13 AM PDT · by fishtank · 13 replies
    Biblical Archeology ^ | 8-25-16 | Megan Sauter
    The Rock-Hewn Churches of Lalibela Ethiopian rock churches Megan Sauter • 08/25/2016 While many spectacular churches have been constructed in Ethiopia, perhaps the country’s most famous churches are the ones carved out of stone. Located 150 miles south of Aksum, Lalibela is the best example of Ethiopia’s hypogean (rock-hewn) architectural tradition. With 11 rock-hewn churches, Lalibela is understandably a place of pilgrimage for those in the Ethiopian Orthodox Church. The site Lalibela was originally called Roha, but it eventually took the name of King Lalibela, who ruled around 1200 C.E. as part of the Zagwe dynasty. King Lalibela is traditionally...
  • Lost cities #8: mystery of Cahokia – why did North America's largest city vanish?

    08/19/2016 11:42:09 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 56 replies
    The Guardian ^ | 08/17/2016 | Lee Bey
    Located in southern Illinois, eight miles from present-day St Louis, it was probably the largest North American city north of Mexico at that time. It had been built by the Mississippians, a group of Native Americans who occupied much of the present-day south-eastern United States, from the Mississippi river to the shores of the Atlantic. Cahokia was a sophisticated and cosmopolitan city for its time. Yet its history is virtually unknown by most Americans and present-day Illinoisans. ... Its mix of people made Cahokia like an early-day Manhattan, drawing residents from throughout the Mississippian-controlled region: the Natchez, the Pensacola, the...